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Thread: Good brand for haircutting scissors?

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    Member AlleyKitten's Avatar
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    Default Good brand for haircutting scissors?

    After my last disastrous "trim" (which involved losing 2-3 inches!) I've decided that I'll have my boyfriend trim my hair, or do it myself, from now on. My parents have agreed to get me a nice pair of scissors for my upcoming birthday, as long as I send them a link to a kind to get. I've googled for hairdresser's scissors, but I realized that I didn't know anything about what brand might be better than any other.

    So, what brands of good scissors have y'all liked? Preferably ones I can find online. Thanks!

    1c/2a/F/ii/iii -- trimmed the scraggly ends from knee back to classic.

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    Member dor3girl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good brand for haircutting scissors?

    I am not sure if you can order from Sally's beauty supply online--but they have a few that they sell at reasonable prices. On another note--I have Kuniko shears that I LOVE. They make replaceable blades for the shears & are reasonably priced. I wouldn't spend more than $50 on shears, especially if you will only be cutting your own hair.

    Here is a site to check out: http://www.sallybeauty.com/on/demand...start=10&sz=10 or http://www.morrisflamingo.com/menus/section/h.htm

    Just make sure your shears are only used for cutting HAIR--you don't want nicks in the blade from people using them to cut paper or wire or plastic *yikes*!
    Last edited by dor3girl; August 8th, 2008 at 02:50 PM. Reason: more info
    You grow girl!

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    Henna Seeress Nightshade's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good brand for haircutting scissors?

    The shears I use are ice-tempered and are from a friend who went out of her dog-grooming business and I can't remember what brand they are. Same as people-shears, just a lot cheaper because of the marketing angle.

    I found this really helpful when researching:

    Q: What are the different handle types?
    A: There are three general types of handle designs:
    Opposing grip handles are both the same length and are symmetrically positioned from the center screw. This is good for stylists who cut with the thumb and middle finger.
    Offset grip handles have a shorter thumb handle but both are still symmetrically positioned from the center screw. The shorter thumb handle reduces over-extension of the thumb and allows you to cut with a more open hand but you must still elevate your elbow.
    Crane grip handles
    also have a shorter thumb handle but the angles of the handles are not symmetrical. The longer handle is perpendicular to the blades while the thumb handle is angled. This design allows the elbow to be dropped while cutting and helps to relieve stress on both the shoulder and wrist.
    [2] Q: What is the difference between a convex edge blade and bevel edge blade?
    A: The Convex Edge blade was made popular by the Japanese. On a convex edge blade, the edges are ground to a razor sharp 45-50 degree angle. The blades are usually triple honed to make the scissor run very smoothly and quietly. Because of its sharp edges, a convex blade cuts through hair with less force. A must for slide cutting.
    The Bevel Edge blade was made popular by the Germans. The edge on a Bevel Edge blade is ground at a 30-40 degree angle. Because these blades are not as sharply angled as convex blades, one edge is usually serrated to keep hair from sliding forward. These edges are also very nick resistant. These are best for layer and taper cutting.
    [3] Q:What is the difference between stamped and forged shears?
    A: A stamped shear is produced similar to the process of cutting out cookies. Strips of steel are stamped out into the shape of a shear. They can then be either ground into the final shape or put into a press and squeezed into shape. With the press method the steel near the edge is compress and the cutting edge will generally last longer.
    A forged shear is produced by pouring hot steel into a die that is in the shape of a shear. Half of the form is fastened to an anvil while the other half is attached to a large ram. The ram pounds down onto the anvil and "forges" the hot steel into the shape of the shear. The hot steel forges are then cooled off under controlled conditions and then are tempered and trimmed to their final state.
    [4] Q: What does Ice Tempered mean?
    A: Ice tempering is a termed used to describe the cooling process used on stainless steel shears. To make steel hard it has to be heat treated. With stainless steel that means heating it to above 2000 degrees F. At this temperature, the structure of the steel is at is optimum. To maintain this structure the steel is cooled rapidly and tempered at about 450 degrees F. To make the cutting edge last longer, the steel is then subjected to temperatures about 120 degrees below 0. Thus the term Ice-tempered. The shear is not much harder but the steel is still at its optimum.
    [5] Q: How do I care for my shears?
    A: Never use the shears for any purpose other than cutting hair. Clean your shears every day by wiping away any excess moisture and hair fragments. Lubricate the set screw joint on a weekly basis. Work the oil into the joint by opening and closing the shears several times. Wipe away any excess oil. Avoid dropping the shears. Store in a protected, dry place.

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    Laissez-haire VanillaTresses's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good brand for haircutting scissors?

    I use a pair of jilbere de Paris scissors from Sally Beauty Supply. I think they were around $14.95 or so and they are supposedly an "intermediate" pair. I figured that since I was only going to be cutting my hair and that of my immediate family, they wouldn't need to be a super high end pair that would last through thousands of clients like a hairdresser's would. They are "Japanese Stainless Steel, Ice Tempered Surgical Stainless Steel" with black plastic ergonomic handles with a little brass finger rest. I have been very happy with them. An interesting note is that the "correct" way to hold them is with the thumb and the ring-finger. Hope this helps-- it is my own limited experience/knowledge.
    The Uncut Story <><><> Fragrance Free Options <><><>Aspiring Fairytale Ender

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    Member dor3girl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good brand for haircutting scissors?

    You grow girl!

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    a bit of a fox Angellen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good brand for haircutting scissors?

    I just recently acquired Sephora's stainless steel ice-tempered shears. They seem to work very well, but I haven't used them for any full trims as of yet.
    Lady Angellen, Bound Raven in the Order of the Long Haired Knights

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    Hairtoy Hoarder AmandaPanda's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good brand for haircutting scissors?

    I have a pair of Arius-Eickert 6.25" Luxor convex shears. They originally came from Sally Beauty Supply. Price reads $79.99, but I think I paid about $25 on ebay. They are super sharp and cut really really well. I sliced my skin (not deep enough to bleed though) when I ran my finger lightly over the bottom of one of the blades.

    I highly recommend them

    At waist!
    Amanda

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    Member wendyg's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good brand for haircutting scissors?

    Mine are Henckels that I bought probably ten years ago in of all places an airport. Brussels, I think.

    wg

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    Member NurseMama's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good brand for haircutting scissors?

    Henckels are the best scissors that I know of in general (sewing and such). If they make scissors for hair than those would be the top of the line. I know that my local fabric store will sharpen Henckels a couple times a year for free which could be a savings over the life of the scissors.

    That said, although I have a few lovely pairs of Henckels for sewing, I have a Walgreens brand pair for hair! Maybe I should upgrade? I do get them sharpened once a year or so and I only use them on the kids and my hair (Dh won't let me near him with a pair of scissors!).
    Just keep growing....

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    Member wendyg's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good brand for haircutting scissors?

    NurseMama: the packaging said they were specifically hair scissors. They weren't particularly expensive, and I knew (because my mother trained as a hairdresser and is the only person who's ever cut my hair, although that was a mixed blessing since she hated long hair) that you needed scissors intended for hair, so I snapped them up. It could have been Amsterdam. Or Frankfurt. Wish I could remember!

    wg

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