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Thread: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

  1. #161
    Member CavyQueen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

    Hello again everyone! Here is another expert's answer. It is everything we already know.

    Based on the reference you provided and in the light of other information, following factors affect the hair oil to penetrate the hair shaft.
    (1)
    The oil molecules must have smaller chain of carbons/smaller molecular chain such as that of lauric acid and other medium chain fatty acids which contains 8, 10, or 12 carbons atoms unlike the other vegetable oils such as corn oil, safflower oil, peanut oil, cottonseed oil, etc., which contains up to 20 atoms.
    (2)
    The molecular chains of the molecules must be straight for the molecules to be penetrated to the hair shafts easily. Cyclic and non-straight molecular structures often findings difficulties in penetrating the hair shaft such as
    (3)
    The molecules must have affinity for proteins and must not be unsaturated (having double and triple bonds).As low affinity to proteins and unsaturated (having double and triple bonds) makes the molecules difficult to penetrate the hair shaft.
    The oils that you are using lack in one or more of these factors and so are unable to penetrate the hair shaft.
    Peace, love, and guinea pigs!

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    Default Re: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

    Quote Originally Posted by CavyQueen View Post
    Hello again everyone! Here is another expert's answer. It is everything we already know.

    Based on the reference you provided and in the light of other information, following factors affect the hair oil to penetrate the hair shaft.
    (1)
    The oil molecules must have smaller chain of carbons/smaller molecular chain such as that of lauric acid and other medium chain fatty acids which contains 8, 10, or 12 carbons atoms unlike the other vegetable oils such as corn oil, safflower oil, peanut oil, cottonseed oil, etc., which contains up to 20 atoms.
    (2)
    The molecular chains of the molecules must be straight for the molecules to be penetrated to the hair shafts easily. Cyclic and non-straight molecular structures often findings difficulties in penetrating the hair shaft such as
    (3)
    The molecules must have affinity for proteins and must not be unsaturated (having double and triple bonds).As low affinity to proteins and unsaturated (having double and triple bonds) makes the molecules difficult to penetrate the hair shaft.
    The oils that you are using lack in one or more of these factors and so are unable to penetrate the hair shaft.
    Very cool!

  3. #163
    Member CavyQueen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

    Here is expert 3's explaination:

    It has been scientifically proven that some oils can penetrate example:


    Coconut oil, being a triglyceride of lauric acid (principal fatty acid), has a high affinity for hair proteins and, because of its low molecular weight and straight linear chain, is able to penetrate inside the hair shaft.


    Mineral oil, being a hydrocarbon, has no affinity for proteins and therefore is not able to penetrate and yield better results. In the case of sunflower oil, although it is a triglyceride of linoleic acid, because of its bulky structure due to the presence of double bonds, it does not penetrate the fiber, consequently resulting in no favorable impact on protein loss.


    The main purpose of oiling the hair is to help it retain moisture,

    Studies have proven that ...

    Coconut Oil, Avocado Oil, Olive oil penetrate the hair shaft to make it stronger (J. Cosmet.Sci 52, 169-184, 2001)The study showed straight chain glyceride's like coconut oil , avocado oil, olive oil easily penetrate into the hair.

    Polyunsaturated oils , like Jojoba oil, are more open in their structure so they don’t pass through the layers of cuticles very well.

    Meadow foam seed oil partially penetrates, and jojoba and sunflower oils don’t penetrate at all.Most other oils, including safflower oil and sunflower oil, do not penetrate hair very well.

    The following information will also be useful for ur queries :-

    The Carrier Oils

    Carrier oils are just as important as the essential oils for getting the best results for stimulating hair growth. The carriers provide important essential fatty acids to the scalp and follicles. They offer necessary nutrients, and have therapeutic actions themselves. All these oils may be used for 100% of the base, though it may be most beneficial to blend two or more that suit your specific needs.

    Coconut - A carrier oil used in Ayurvedic medicine for enhancing hair growth all by itself. Fractionated coconut (as we carry here at Ananda) is simply Coconut oil that has had the largest-chain molecules 'fractionated' from the smaller ones—this allows the oil to stay liquid at room temperature. Fractionated coconut has a nice light texture, appreciated in the warmer months. Virgin whole coconut can also be used in your formulas, and will remain liquid if blended with other carriers for your base. Highly nutritive, excellent for all types of scalp & hair.

    Evening Primrose - Many conditions of the skin are positively affected by essential fats, of which Evening Primrose is a wonderful source. Application and ingestion of this oil has been the subject of many scientific inquiries, with exceptional results for all kinds of dermatitis. Evening Primrose is noted to specifically address hair growth (or hair loss) where poor circulation might be an issue. Evening Primrose also may have a significant effect in reducing inflammation, which may in-turn be beneficial for reversing hair loss.

    Grapeseed - In the last few years, this oil became very prominent for healthy cuisine. Sometimes found dark green in color, the darker Grapeseed oils have more significant amounts of antioxidant polyphenols. Grapeseed has a particularly light feel, and may be the best choice if one has an oily scalp, though is wanting the many benefits of essential oil application. Grapeseed and Jojoba were used as the base for a study which treated alopecia areata with essential oils. These oils may be used 50/50 for this purpose.

    Hemp - Like Evening Primrose, Hemp offers significant quantities of essential fats, may improve circulation and reduce inflammation. Hemp is a highly regarded oil for its many nutritive constituents, and is considered the most palatable of the high Omega-3 plant oils. Some experts note that ingestion of essential fats can be very significant for hair growth, and Hemp is the most easily ingested of the plant sources (generally Evening Primrose and Borage oils are found too bitter, and are taken in capsules, rather than 'straight' or in a salad dressing, etc.)

    Jojoba - Found in many natural hair care products, Jojoba is used for softening and moisturizing dry hair. It is thought to cleanse the follicles of sebum, and promote vibrant, shiny and soft hair.

    Rosehip Seed - Considered one of the most therapeutic carrier oils for skin and hair. Rosehip has been the subject of many studies involving the reduction of sun damage and wrinkles for the skin. While not yet proven in the laboratory, Rosehip seed oil's therapeutic effects should benefit those needing its regenerative properties for their scalp and hair. While it can be used at 100% strength, Rosehip is most often blended with other carriers at 10-30% of the base formula.

    Sesame - Also highly regarded in Ayurveda, Sesame contains lignans that greatly enhance the efficacy of Vitamin E. Sesame is thought to encourage the growth of dark lustrous hair.
    Peace, love, and guinea pigs!

  4. #164
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    Default Re: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

    Going online right now to buy some broccoli seed and kukui nut oil...

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    Default Re: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

    I knew I had this somewhere but I could not find it until just now lol.
    http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/...&postcount=904

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    Default Re: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

    Haven't read all the thread, but I will try to follow from here.

    How about palm kernel oil: Palmitic acid oleic acid and some linolic acid? But is this the oil which people take down forrests for in favour for palm trees? Or is it another oil than "palm oil"?

    Camellia is absorbed very well into hair, but is mainly oleic acid, 80 %. I am checkin almond oil and sesame oil, and them too has lot of oleic acid and linolic acids (and som palmitic), but is not at all absorbed as well. I don't understand what makes the big difference in these oils.

    Is the linolic acid badly absorbed, while oleic acid is better absorbed? Linolic is polysaturated, oleic is monosaturated.

    EVOO should contain much oleic acid, but is terrible and sticky on my hair...

    How much difference does the fatty acids in small amounts do? Like 1-5 %. Some oils differs more in those small amounts acids.

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    Default Re: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

    Quote Originally Posted by ktani View Post
    It would appear so. But the argan oil results indicate that it is not as simple as it appears, just by reading the numbers. There is more to it than that.
    I use Camellia oil, and it is absorbed well.

    If I put an oil on, and it "disappear", absorb, it should be a proof that the oil is penetrating, or?

    Can it "dry" in some way? Camellia oil seams to absorb better than coconut oil, maybe because it remains liquid on my hair which coconut oil doesn't.

    Camellia oil is high in oleic acid, 80 %, which is more than sesame and almond that has about 40 % oleic and 40 % linolic (very approximately numbers).

    Is the oleic a fatty acid that penetrates hair shaft?

    I am so interested in this, since camellia oil is too expensive (I use a lot) and coconut it almost never liquid here and therefore makes my hair a bit stiff and crunchy.

    Argan
    is high in oleic and linolic, but has also 12 % palmitic acid. Maybe that does the trick?

    What is your experience from argan oil?

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    Default Re: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

    Quote Originally Posted by HotRag View Post
    I use Camellia oil, and it is absorbed well.

    If I put an oil on, and it "disappear", absorb, it should be a proof that the oil is penetrating, or?

    Can it "dry" in some way? Camellia oil seams to absorb better than coconut oil, maybe because it remains liquid on my hair which coconut oil doesn't.

    Camellia oil is high in oleic acid, 80 %, which is more than sesame and almond that has about 40 % oleic and 40 % linolic (very approximately numbers).

    Is the oleic a fatty acid that penetrates hair shaft?

    I am so interested in this, since camellia oil is too expensive (I use a lot) and coconut it almost never liquid here and therefore makes my hair a bit stiff and crunchy.

    Argan is high in oleic and linolic, but has also 12 % palmitic acid. Maybe that does the trick?

    What is your experience from argan oil?
    I have only used argan oil on my skin and it absorbs very well. My skin was not greasy at all afterward.

    The iodine value of camellia oil varies. It can be 80, which makes it non drying, http://www.aseanbiodiversity.info/Abstract/51009607.pdf, or up to 89, whick still makes it a non drying oil. That has to do with coatings. Drying oils leave a film on the hair and skin.
    Last edited by ktani; June 15th, 2010 at 09:51 AM.

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    Default Re: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

    I bought argan oil some years ago. But it went rancid too soon and I threw it. Never tested on my hair. I checked it now, and it is lot more expensive than camellia, so better stick to camellia anyway (which already is almost too expensive for me).

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    Default Re: Certain Oils Don't Penetrate???

    Quote Originally Posted by HotRag View Post
    I bought argan oil some years ago. But it went rancid too soon and I threw it. Never tested on my hair. I checked it now, and it is lot more expensive than camellia, so better stick to camellia anyway (which already is almost too expensive for me).
    I got pure, organic, deoderized, cosmetic argan oil from here, http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/...&postcount=407 and need very little to work well on my skin when I use it.

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