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Thread: historical hair care

  1. #11
    Member BVU's Avatar
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    Default Re: historical hair care

    Quote Originally Posted by TatsuOni View Post
    Alright. I'm going to write down more thoughts as I watch the video.

    * It's great that it works for her.

    * As mentioned earlier. Not every woman had that long hair. Those were chosen to model for pictures and paintings. It isn't just hair care. But it's also about genetics.

    * She sais that a text section is from 1910 and that people didn't often use shampoo. Shampoo wasn't actually invented until 1920... So I doubt her source.

    * Heat styling isn't good for hair. Absolutely not. But it's not a new invention. It's been around for thousands of years. Even some of the "long haired" victorians used it. So yes it's damaging, but it's not impossible to reach certain lenghts even with heatstyling. Just want to mention it.

    * Historical people? If she's talking about people during the Victorian era in Great Brittain, she should say so. Because what she's describing is not at all accurate for every era or country. So I find it a bit missleading. For example, the vikings and medieaval people didn't use bristle brushes. They used combs for the same thing.

    * Once again. "They all had very, very long hair." No! You can't base this information just on some pictures.

    * Yes fingers are great for detangling. But to say that one can't feel tangles with a comb or brush? Of course you feel it of you're careful. This is when I put the comb down, detangle it with my fingers and then keep on combing.

    * Yes methods such as eggs were used. But there are also recipes that used really harsh and drying ingredients...

    * It's great that rhassoul clay works for her! It didn't for me when I tried it. It just dried my hair out badly.

    * Oils on the scalp works great for some people. For others it can cause both irritation and hair loss.

    * Heavy hair oiling works for some people. For others it just leaves the hair tangled and more dry.

    * You can easily make a bun without putting any strain on the front sections of your hair. You don't have to add that hair later.

    * "This is a common feature you see in most historical womens updos". Not really... The part of something happening in the front has been in fashion in some places during some periods.

    * Bobby pins was a hair killer for me personally and could not really hold up a bun. I prefer U-pins.

    Summary. It's great that she's found something that works for her! But it's absolutely not for everyone. She generalises a bit too much with her "historical women". I get that she isn't a professional hair historian and neither am I, but she could have checked some facts a bit more, before trying to "sell them". My problem with videos like this is mainly that there's a bit of a "this is the way" attitude.
    Exactly this! Its becoming more common on YT to see "historical haircare" people bashing eachother over methods, over-generalising, doing things wrong, and pulling info from god knows where. It's going to give a false impression to new people with different hairtypes that theres only 1 or 2 ways of historical haircare being from Europe or Asia, when in reality there's thousands of historical routines. I personally don't know much about curly haircare routines but that doesnt mean they magically didn't exist lmfao. While yes, some women had long hair (mostly in eastern europe), they often didn't take good care of it, in most lower classes trimming wasnt even a thing. Wealthy women in France around the 1600s would often hide sharp objects in their hair incase men got personal, which would often break many hairstrands, along with messing up their mullets. Even women in the victorian era often had shorter hair (about hip length) so when floor lengthers like the Seven Sutherland Sisters popped up, people were amazed, and even only 3 of the 7 sisters had floor length hair, while the others were hip, calf, and knee length.

    PS: I believe the shampoo she's talking about is Kasey Heber's Canthrox, which was a powder inside a can or box, it was released in 1909 and later mass released in 1914, credited to be the first "shampoo". Aline Vallandri speaks briefly about it in her interview with "Every Woman's Enclopaedia" that was released in 1912.
    Material Girling my way to longer hair.

  2. #12

    Default Re: historical hair care

    I agree about the generalisations.

    One thing I did take away from the video was the idea of washing in plaits/braids. I’d never thought of doing that on my own hair because my hair is only a bit wavy and not very thick, so I’ve never felt the need to section it during a wash. However I have been wondering recently why my hair tangles so much when I wash I it - I’m careful to only manipulate the scalp, I don’t pile my hair up when I wash it, but it can still get very tangled during the wash.

    On a whim, I decided to plait my hair before I washed it today, and it worked really well. I didn’t tie off the plait, and it mostly undid itself during the wash. My hair is MBL-ish. But, it hardly tangled at all so the washing process was much quicker than usual, with far less manipulation.

    My hair is at the lower end of ii so I just did one loose plait. I had pre-oiled with babassu oil and the plait was still in place when I added conditioner. The plait had pretty much undone itself by the time I rinsed the conditioner out and applied leave in.

    I’m quite enamoured with this method of washing (plaited) however I did worry part way through if I was going to create one huge plaited tangle. The opposite happened though, and the reduced manipulation has got to be good for my hair.

    For anyone who hasn’t watched the video, the idea for plaiting came from LHC in the first place
    Last edited by Lady Stardust; December 6th, 2022 at 07:13 AM.

  3. #13

    Default Re: historical hair care

    I watched this video the other week, I was fascinated by it. Bought some of that clay, ACV and jojoba oil to try it.

    The clay wash was actually really good. Can't say my hair enjoyed the jojoba oil and I have no idea what the ACV did if anything.

    My hair became static as anything, couldn't brush through with my wooden comb without static. Missed my conditioner. Went back to it.

    All in all I liked the clay wash but I'd only use it with leave in conditioner afterwards personally.

  4. #14

    Default Re: historical hair care

    I mean, it's something I would maybe consider trying... but, with having to buy stuff (probably online), if I didn't like it I'd then be stuck with the stuff... and since I don't have any problems with my current routine (with those evil, evil sulfates and washing-- gasp-- every week), there's probably no reason for me to trade a sure thing for spending money and time on something that might not even work. (I'm learning to not fall prey to "this looks interesting" when I don't actually need a change...)

    Quote Originally Posted by TatsuOni View Post
    My problem with videos like this is mainly that there's a bit of a "this is the way" attitude.
    Yes! Exactly what I was trying to say, but better. I think people sometimes get excited about a method or product, and want to share it... and when you stack that on top of "they maybe don't consider that not everyone has the same hair/hair genes that they do," then things start to sound a bit absolute.
    Putting it in my signature because I have to say it so often:
    Do what works for your hair, not what other people say is "right" or "wrong." If it works for you, it's not wrong. If it doesn't work for you, it's not right.

  5. #15

    Arrow Re: historical hair care

    Quote Originally Posted by Arcticfoxes View Post
    I watched this video the other week, I was fascinated by it. Bought some of that clay, ACV and jojoba oil to try it.

    The clay wash was actually really good. Can't say my hair enjoyed the jojoba oil and I have no idea what the ACV did if anything.

    My hair became static as anything, couldn't brush through with my wooden comb without static. Missed my conditioner. Went back to it.

    All in all I liked the clay wash but I'd only use it with leave in conditioner afterwards personally.
    It whizzes past really quickly in the video but she does mention that she uses a conditioner as part of the wash, but I suspect that it isnít shown because it doesnít fit with the idea of historical hair care.

    I canít remember if she mentions how often she washes her hair, was it once a week? Itís just that she uses clay rather than shampoo. She adds in oil to the lengths every day and the oil provides lubrication during the detangling process. I think the main point she is making is that dry detangling works better for her than detangling with conditioner in the shower. Maybe it was easier to categorise the video as ďhistoricalĒ haircare, but really her main point seems to be that some of the methods advocated for curly hair havenít worked for her.

  6. #16
    Member Happymaman's Avatar
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    Default Re: historical hair care

    Slightly off topic to the original question but I just can't figure out how she does her silk wrap. I've slowed this down and rewatched it a bunch and tried to do the same movements and I cannot for the life of me get it to look the same. Anyone who knows that style of wrapping care to point me to a tutorial?

  7. #17
    Member Happymaman's Avatar
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    Default Re: historical hair care

    Timestamp 41:58 for reference.

  8. #18

    Default Re: historical hair care

    Quote Originally Posted by Happymaman View Post
    Slightly off topic to the original question but I just can't figure out how she does her silk wrap. I've slowed this down and rewatched it a bunch and tried to do the same movements and I cannot for the life of me get it to look the same. Anyone who knows that style of wrapping care to point me to a tutorial?
    I think she’s tying it in a knot at the top of her head, and then bringing the ends to the nape and tying in a double knot and leaving the ends to hang down, but I could be wrong! At the end she just seems to be fiddling about to make it lie nicely.

    I think it would look different depending on the length, shape and thickness of the scarf you are using. I tie a square scarf every day (1940s/Rosie the Riveter style) but it looks quite different with even a minimal change in thickness or size or the square I use.

  9. #19
    Member Happymaman's Avatar
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    Default Re: historical hair care

    Thanks, Lady Stardust, that was the closest approximation I could get to by watching it over and over as well. I suppose it's the size of my scarf. Mine is a long rectangular edge wrap but it clearly isn't as wide across as hers. I just love the way the top looks on her. I'm sure her hair volume gives her some extra floomph as well.

    Also care for household: DH: 1c/C/iii, CBL; S: long-haired XL dog (6in winter coat!);
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  10. #20
    Evil Duck Queen TatsuOni's Avatar
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    Default Re: historical hair care

    Quote Originally Posted by Happymaman View Post
    Thanks, Lady Stardust, that was the closest approximation I could get to by watching it over and over as well. I suppose it's the size of my scarf. Mine is a long rectangular edge wrap but it clearly isn't as wide across as hers. I just love the way the top looks on her. I'm sure her hair volume gives her some extra floomph as well.
    If you want to find more wrappings similar and totally different. Wrapunzel has a lot of tutorials. https://www.youtube.com/@WrapunzelLadies


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