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Thread: Possible way to protect hair from conventional peroxide damage

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    Default Re: Possible way to protect hair from conventional peroxide damage

    I just updated and added this to the first post too.

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    Default Re: Possible way to protect hair from conventional peroxide damage

    I added a link and clarified this post.

    Interpreting the reports

    While damage to hair from bleaching (peroxide and/or bleach) can be minimized, the hair you start with has to be considered and some hair can withstand conventional lightening chemicals more than others.

    From 21 reports so far, no apparent damage has been reported with the use of coconut and argan oils, used on hair on heads, and the hair has been reported to be in better condition, than it was when the oils were not used on prior occasions, for conventional colouring or lightening. These reports are aside from shed hairball (test strand) reports, in which hair was pushed with conventional chemicals to the limit and beyond. Any abuse of conventional lightening chemicals can result in hair disasters and is not advised.

    No hair damage (again, hair on heads) has been reported elsewhere here on the boards, without the use of any pretreatment, when some people have hi-lighted, used 10 volume peroxide, coloured with conventional products, and used products like Sun-In, on their hair. It comes down to degrees and interpretation of damage and what is visible or felt by people (felt as in literally felt their hair, not as in feelings or emotions). If someone reports no damage as in no; breakage, split ends, gummy hair, brittleness, weak hair, loss of shine etc., I consider that to be no damage too.

    Hair can feel better following conventional lightening, with the use of conditioning but no conditioning can repair hair damage. To me, it makes more sense to help prevent hair damage, than to have to just help the hair feel better, once damage has occurred.



    What is significant to me, with regard to conventional hair lightening, is this research, and the potential protective effects of flavonoids and phenolic acids on levels that cannot be seen or felt.
    “Protection by the Flavonoids Myricetin, Quercetin, and Rutin Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced DNA Damage ….
    Exposure to 50 μM H2O2 for 30 minutes .... 37°C resulted in significant DNA damage .... preincubation with the flavonoids before H2O2 exposure significantly .... protected .... cells against H2O2-induced DNA damage"


    "In the Ames test, gallic acid esters showed protective effects against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity ….
    …. similarity of the protective effects of gallic acid esters on the H2O2-induced damages to both bacterial and mammalian cells.”


    Gallic acid, a phenolic acid, is found in coconut oil.



    And this research, by P&G, on the chelation of copper and the fact that constituents in both coconut and especially argan oil, chelate copper. Coconut oil constituents also chelate free iron, which generates oxygen free radicals, during a hydrogen peroxide reaction with cells.
    ".... hair color scientists discovered a way to reduce damage from the HO* radical, blocking its formation with the use of chelants—molecules that can coordinate metals through multiple binding sites. They added EDDS (ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid), a chelant which is highly selective to copper, to home hair coloring kits. During the coloring process, EDDS binds to the copper, preventing access to the copper by hydrogen peroxide .... results in better color formation and less damage. .... preference of the EDDS for copper over calcium makes it superior to traditional chelants, such as EDTA or DTPA, and more efficient at preventing fiber damage. 5-cycle repeat test showed that EDDS prevents more than 95 percent of radical damage. .... By minimizing free radical damage, advances such as EDDS help hair remain resilient and retain a healthy, lustrous look. ...."
    Last edited by ktani; April 7th, 2009 at 10:31 AM. Reason: spelling

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    Last edited by ktani; August 30th, 2009 at 05:59 AM. Reason: fixed link

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    Default Re: Possible way to protect hair from conventional peroxide damage

    New reports of the use of coconut or coconut and argan oils as a pretreatment or with conventional hair colour or lightening chemicals, are always welcome.

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    Exclamation Re: Possible way to protect hair from conventional peroxide damage

    Other oils and coatings

    To elaborate further on what I mean about coatings interfering with dye uptake and lightening, shea butter mixed with coconut oil was not reported to work well, and either was jojoba oil alone.

    Jojoba oil is a liquid wax and there is nothing I have read, to indicate that it is absobed well into hair. Shea butter contains latex and stearic acid. Stearic acid is waxy, "A white, waxy, natural fatty acid".

    Cocoa butter, an ingredient in some shampoos and conditioners, contains a good deal of stearic acid, "Of the saturated fat content in cocoa butter, over half comes from stearic acid". It is better to dilute a shampoo with cocoa butter in it, if one washes one's hair and then pretreats the hair with coconut and argan oils, before conventional colouring and lightening, IMO.

    It is not recommended to heavily condition hair with conventional conditioners before conventional hair colouring and lightening is done. Stearic acid is a constituent in conventional conditioner ingredients, appearing on labels, in cetearyl alcohol and stearyl alcohol, as well as other ingredients.

    Drying or semi drying oils like linseed oil (flax) and safflower oil leave a coating upon drying. They are not recommended either, in spite of their conditioning properties. "Under practical conditions, the drying power of safflower oil equals that of linseed oil". Sunflower oil is a drying oil, "sunflower oil is a drying oil, which means that it is subject to severe drying on contact with atmospheric oxygen", that can leave a coating on the hair and is also not recommeded; "sunflower oil, because of its bulky structure due to the presence of double bonds .... does not penetrate the fiber", "provide a protective barrier".

    Coconut and argan oils chelate free iron and copper and do not coat the hair enough or at all, to interfere with conventional hair colour dye uptake, or lightening, even when heavier oiling is done with them prior to these processes, based on all reports, so far. These 2 oils have the most chelating abilities of all the products I have researched to date, for this purpose.
    Last edited by ktani; April 13th, 2009 at 08:38 AM. Reason: fixd link

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    Default Re: Possible way to protect hair from conventional peroxide damage

    Other oils and butters/products researched for a pre-treatment

    So far, I have researched; Abyssinian Oil (Mustard Seed oil), Almond oil, Apricot kernel oil, Avocado oil, Broccoli seed oil, Camellia oil, Canola oil, Castor oil, Cocoa butter, EVOO, Flax seed oil, Grape seed oil, Green tea, Hemp seed oil, Jojoba oil, Kukui Oil, Macadamia nut oil, Olive oil, Palm oil, Pumpkin seed oil, Red palm oil, Rice Bran oil, Rosehip seed oil, Safflower oil, Sea Buckthorn oil, Sesame oil, Shea butter, Soy oil, Sunflower oil, as alternatives or additions to Coconut and Argan oils for pre-treatment, before conventional hair lightening or hair colouring.

    None of them have the equivalent chelating abilities of Coconut or Argan oils. In addition, some of the products coat hair or would add a colour of their own to hair, undesirable, for a pre-treatment in this case.

    The main purpose of the pre-treatment is to chelate metal salts, and the 2 identified as causing free radical damage, when peroxide/bleach is used (free iron and copper).

    Both Coconut and Argan oils are also conditioning oils. For the purposes here though, that is secondary. However, from all reports so far, the condition of the hair, following the use of these 2 oils as a pre-treatment, has been excellent, even when either oil, is not a regular conditioning oil preference.

    Adding another oil may be a problem, in terms of optimal results, if the quantity of either Coconut or Argan oil is reduced, to accomodate the alternate.
    Last edited by ktani; September 9th, 2010 at 08:27 PM. Reason: spelling

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    Default Re: Possible way to protect hair from conventional peroxide damage

    Heidi 34

    How is the club soda working out after swimming?

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    Default Re: Possible way to protect hair from conventional peroxide damage

    Quote Originally Posted by ktani View Post
    Heidi 34

    How is the club soda working out after swimming?
    I only managed to use it once or twice (I don't swim that much lol), but I think it made my hair feel better than when I didn't use it. My hair didn't smell much of chlorine, but I can't vouch whether it helped cancel the chlorine or not (you know me, I'm never sure in anything).

    Soft hair that is nice to sit on - now I'm bragging!

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    Default Re: Possible way to protect hair from conventional peroxide damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Heidi_234 View Post
    I only managed to use it once or twice (I don't swim that much lol), but I think it made my hair feel better than when I didn't use it. My hair didn't smell much of chlorine, but I can't vouch whether it helped cancel the chlorine or not (you know me, I'm never sure in anything).
    Thanks for the reply and update!

    I do not think that club soda can necessarily remove all of the chlorine, depending on how wet the hair got, but probably most of it. That is why I suggested using the coconut and argan oils afterward, as a conditioning/chelating extra treatment.

    Did the club soda work to remove the chlorine smell from your skin and was it drying used on it?

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