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Dreamkitty
July 28th, 2012, 10:51 AM
I just read this recent article on chinese village women and how their hair is so long. What beautiful and long thick silky hair these ladies have, even at this length their ends look very healthy:)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2179380/Chinese-women-worlds-longest-locks-ancient-tradition.html

Vivalagina
July 28th, 2012, 11:59 AM
Wow, what gorgeous hair!

ratgirldjh
July 28th, 2012, 12:02 PM
Wonder if they are WO? Kind of looks like WO hair to me.

WaitingSoLong
July 28th, 2012, 12:04 PM
Why do they all have their hair combed forward like that?

millyaulait
July 28th, 2012, 12:07 PM
It looks soooo strong, too!

DarleneH
July 28th, 2012, 12:08 PM
"The Red Yao people believe that the women’s long hair brings longevity, wealth and good fortune.

The longer the hair, the more fortunate one would be."

Don't we wish that were true for us!!!

heidi w.
July 28th, 2012, 12:15 PM
Why do they all have their hair combed forward like that?

Likely it's a cultural norm for them. You got to put all that hair somewhere. LOL (I know.)

heidi w.

heidi w.
July 28th, 2012, 12:17 PM
"The Red Yao people believe that the women’s long hair brings longevity, wealth and good fortune.

The longer the hair, the more fortunate one would be."

Don't we wish that were true for us!!!

We get ignored or sliced at and an occasional compliment. Where I live, it's backhanded compliments which kind of takes away from the whole idea of a compliment. My best compliments were decades ago, sadly.

heidi w.

Lostsoule77
July 28th, 2012, 12:19 PM
It looks like that is how they style their hair. No pins or anything and their hair is always up. Seems pretty healthy to me. Gorgeous!

cwarren
July 28th, 2012, 12:20 PM
Beautiful hair!

It looks like they only let their hair down to wash it. Otherwise it is kept in an updo.

curlyhair
July 28th, 2012, 01:42 PM
WOW beautiful hair ,I wonder what do they eat and their hair care routine.
I Found this link about Red Yao Women but i never thought rice water could do that.
http://www.chinaodysseytours.com/guilin/longji-huangluo-yao-village.html

Amber_Maiden
July 28th, 2012, 01:57 PM
So lovely!!!

secondrain
July 28th, 2012, 02:03 PM
I love how their hair is wrapped around the head to look like a silk turban. So gorgeous.

ratgirldjh
July 28th, 2012, 02:11 PM
Wow rice water!

I've actually tried this! It does take oil out of hair so I can see how it would work. I think on me I got protein build up after a couple of times though.

spidermom
July 28th, 2012, 03:30 PM
Interesting cultural tradition.

TheWebsIWeave
July 28th, 2012, 04:01 PM
Mmmh...Of corse their hair is beautiful and very long indeed but...Doesn't all this mass weight a great amount? I admire their patience as much as i admire the hair itself!

Othala
July 28th, 2012, 04:33 PM
.... i never thought rice water could do that....

Guess I'll be using rice water for my next herbal hair wash mix :D

Fantastic insight into a long hair culture. Thanks OP for posting this.

jacqueline101
July 28th, 2012, 04:43 PM
I love their hair.

shutterpillar
July 28th, 2012, 04:58 PM
I cant get over how thick it looks as well.

Blackout
July 28th, 2012, 06:14 PM
Amazing hair, it looks so healthy and thick!

MrsGuther
July 28th, 2012, 06:24 PM
Why do they all have their hair combed forward like that?
I was wondering the same thing!!:confused:

floralgem
July 28th, 2012, 10:30 PM
There hair is:thud:Imagine if they were on LHC too.....

Kyla
July 28th, 2012, 10:58 PM
Gorgeous, it looks so thick and shiny. I'm betting there are probably some splits, but it appears really healthy! And I love the way they twist it.

adiapalic
July 28th, 2012, 11:47 PM
Fascinating village! And all of them have such beautiful hair. I especially love the photo of them washing it in the river.

Also, I have to add... this stood out to me quite a bit: "Their hair, an ancient tradition, could only be let down in the presence of close family but the women abandoned tradition in 1987."

That the women just simply decided to do away with it one day is peculiar and really interesting. I wonder what the details on that story is?

californiagirl
July 29th, 2012, 12:39 AM
Also, I have to add... this stood out to me quite a bit: "Their hair, an ancient tradition, could only be let down in the presence of close family but the women abandoned tradition in 1987."

That the women just simply decided to do away with it one day is peculiar and really interesting. I wonder what the details on that story is?

I was wondering this as well. It seems that the women were extremely happy to show off their hair, and it would be interesting to find out why they let it down now. They probably get a little extra tourism to their village now. :shrug:

Neneka
July 29th, 2012, 12:47 AM
I wish I had hair like that. Gorgeous! Maybe I should try some rice water on my hair too...

I would also like to know what happened in 1987 and if older women too let people see their hair.

Kyla
July 29th, 2012, 01:01 AM
I couldn't find what happened in 1987, but apparently their hairstyles symbolize their relationships and statuses.

lmfbs
July 29th, 2012, 01:05 AM
Mmmh...Of corse their hair is beautiful and very long indeed but...Doesn't all this mass weight a great amount? I admire their patience as much as i admire the hair itself!

I read somewhere that knee length hair weighs around 300g.

Shepherdess
July 29th, 2012, 01:20 AM
Oh wow! ! Their hair is lovely, healthy and so inspirational!

Thank you very much for posting this. I should try rice water, lol. But how would you make that? Just boiling rice in water or something?

Leah Polamalu
July 29th, 2012, 01:22 AM
That's so cool. Their hair looks soft, almost like a scarf in some pictures. Real inspiration.

Elanadi
July 29th, 2012, 01:38 AM
Oh wow! ! Their hair is lovely, healthy and so inspirational!

Thank you very much for posting this. I should try rice water, lol. But how would you make that? Just boiling rice in water or something?

It's the water from rinsing rice... when making rice for sushi or the type of rice that sticks together, you rinse the rice three times, massaging the grains, to get the starchy coating removed from the grains. The water the first two rinses is cloudy white from the starch. They are likely saving that, and using it on their hair. That's so odd, who would think to do that? :)

Kyla
July 29th, 2012, 01:45 AM
It's the water from rinsing rice... when making rice for sushi or the type of rice that sticks together, you rinse the rice three times, massaging the grains, to get the starchy coating removed from the grains. The water the first two rinses is cloudy white from the starch. They are likely saving that, and using it on their hair. That's so odd, who would think to do that? :)

I recall reading before that they washed hair that way in Ancient Japan as well, although who knows who first had the idea? :p

Shepherdess
July 29th, 2012, 01:47 AM
It's the water from rinsing rice... when making rice for sushi or the type of rice that sticks together, you rinse the rice three times, massaging the grains, to get the starchy coating removed from the grains. The water the first two rinses is cloudy white from the starch. They are likely saving that, and using it on their hair. That's so odd, who would think to do that? :)

Oh really? Cool! I don't usually rinse rice before I use it. I'll have to try that! Yeah, it is odd, it never would have crossed my mind to try something like that! Such a strange, odd, and yet interesting way of taking care of hair! Now I'm thinking of trying it! lol :p :D

minxe
July 29th, 2012, 01:59 AM
Absolutely gorgeous.

Panth
July 29th, 2012, 05:02 AM
Why do they all have their hair combed forward like that?

I would imagine two things:

1) It is the cultural hairstyle (and necessary to create that turban-like twist)

2) They have been photographed washing their hair - to wash one's own hair (e.g. in a sink) it is easiest to brush the hair forwards over one's face. I'd imagine similar is true in a river where you would want to stand or sit and bend forwards to dip your hair in, rather than lie out as in a bath which would likely churn up sediment and make the water dirty (if, indeed, the water is of the right depth and flow to immerse yourself as in a bath).

Lostsoule77
July 29th, 2012, 11:59 AM
It's the water from rinsing rice... when making rice for sushi or the type of rice that sticks together, you rinse the rice three times, massaging the grains, to get the starchy coating removed from the grains. The water the first two rinses is cloudy white from the starch. They are likely saving that, and using it on their hair. That's so odd, who would think to do that? :)


I recall reading before that they washed hair that way in Ancient Japan as well, although who knows who first had the idea? :p
Water used to be a very scarse thing and it was often used over & over again. The cleanest thing got it first, like cooking, then down the line. Often for food, then body, then toilet type use.

MoonLover
July 29th, 2012, 01:19 PM
Oh really? Cool! I don't usually rinse rice before I use it. I'll have to try that! Yeah, it is odd, it never would have crossed my mind to try something like that! Such a strange, odd, and yet interesting way of taking care of hair! Now I'm thinking of trying it! lol :p :D

My bf's mom (also Chinese) makes me water all the house plants with rice rinsing water. She says it helps them grow fast and strong. I wonder if this works for hair too?!

Kat
July 29th, 2012, 01:45 PM
Wouldn't your hair get stiff and starchy? I know how my hands are sometimes if I've been handling cooked rice. Or do you just pour it through and then rinse it out?

ravenheather
July 29th, 2012, 02:03 PM
Wouldn't your hair get stiff and starchy? I know how my hands are sometimes if I've been handling cooked rice. Or do you just pour it through and then rinse it out?

If they are washing in the river, I would assume they are rinsing.

Shepherdess
July 29th, 2012, 02:08 PM
My bf's mom (also Chinese) makes me water all the house plants with rice rinsing water. She says it helps them grow fast and strong. I wonder if this works for hair too?!

Oh that is interesting! I bet it does have nutrients in it! Perhaps it does, next time I make rice I'll have to try it! :p

AutumnLocks
July 31st, 2012, 09:21 AM
Wow! I'm not sure if I could let mine go that long. My goal is to just see how long it will get. So, we shall see.

pepperminttea
July 31st, 2012, 09:31 AM
I'm not sure about its uses for hair, but I've heard about rice water for skin before, from this vid (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ByP2YvqfnnI). :) I've never tried it myself though, I worried it'd be too starchy and drying?

moxamoll
July 31st, 2012, 09:43 AM
It's interesting to me that having cut their hair only once in their whole lives, the average length is only 5 ft. I know that's more hair than most, don't get me wrong! But given that it's an average, it seems that genetically, they must have a relatively short terminal length?

Or maybe my idea of how long hair can grow is optimistic! I can't find any info on the great interwebs about average terminal lengths for different ethnic groups. :p

jextxadore
August 2nd, 2012, 09:43 AM
Oh wow! ! Their hair is lovely, healthy and so inspirational!

Thank you very much for posting this. I should try rice water, lol. But how would you make that? Just boiling rice in water or something?

2 ways…
1. Mix raw rice and water in a bowl. Scrub your palms with the rice with everything in the water…it's hard to describe. Like you're trying to make a lather with the rice. The water will turn cloudy — that's rice water.
2. Boil rice until it turns soft and mushy. That's congee. The water is rice water (so just strain out the mushy rice). If you're just using it for your hair, don't wash the rice beforehand (so you get a more concentrated rice-water); if you plan on using the rice mush for cooking, definitely wash beforehand (especially if it's not organically grown).

Actually, would rice mush make a good hair mask, which would then be rinsed out with rice water? :D

MoonLover
August 2nd, 2012, 09:54 AM
2 ways…
1. Mix raw rice and water in a bowl. Scrub your palms with the rice with everything in the water…it's hard to describe. Like you're trying to make a lather with the rice. The water will turn cloudy — that's rice water.
2. Boil rice until it turns soft and mushy. That's congee. The water is rice water (so just strain out the mushy rice). If you're just using it for your hair, don't wash the rice beforehand (so you get a more concentrated rice-water); if you plan on using the rice mush for cooking, definitely wash beforehand (especially if it's not organically grown).

Actually, would rice mush make a good hair mask, which would then be rinsed out with rice water? :D

OMGosh congee in hair? I don't think it would ever come out!

auburntressed
August 2nd, 2012, 10:04 AM
It's interesting to me that having cut their hair only once in their whole lives, the average length is only 5 ft. I know that's more hair than most, don't get me wrong! But given that it's an average, it seems that genetically, they must have a relatively short terminal length?

Or maybe my idea of how long hair can grow is optimistic! I can't find any info on the great interwebs about average terminal lengths for different ethnic groups. :p
Yeah, that is a good point. But the thing is, I'm not sure we have enough scientific data to really understand averages as it relates to terminal length. The only way we can test is by taking samples from populations like these women or other groups who are genetically isolated - such as the Amish or the Mormon Fundamentalists. So it is easy to figure out what is average terminal length for isolated genetic populations, but those figures do us no good in figuring out the broader spectrum of hair growth throughout the human race and various ethnicities.

I think the last time it was common or average for women to just let their hair grow and never cut it, it was also common for adult women to keep their hair pinned up all the time. So probably not a ton of photos from the olden days to get data that way.

Babyfine
August 2nd, 2012, 10:15 AM
It's interesting to me that having cut their hair only once in their whole lives, the average length is only 5 ft. I know that's more hair than most, don't get me wrong! But given that it's an average, it seems that genetically, they must have a relatively short terminal length?

Or maybe my idea of how long hair can grow is optimistic! I can't find any info on the great interwebs about average terminal lengths for different ethnic groups. :p

yeah it would be interesting to know. 5ft of hair on me would be nearly to my ankles(as I'm not quite 5'6" maybe 5'5"1/2 so that seems like a good terminal length to me.

alwayssmiling
August 2nd, 2012, 10:56 AM
I know that all hair differs, but to my eye (and I hope this doesn't sound too ignorant) oriental hair usually looks thick, strong and super shiny. I know there are always exceptions but I do wonder if these ladies just have great hair genetics - not necessarily the rice water. (But I can't wait to experiment all the same! :) )

ratgirldjh
August 2nd, 2012, 11:04 AM
Has anyone tried the rice water washing yet?

henné
August 2nd, 2012, 11:21 AM
Oh wow! Haha ... DH just told me that he read about the rice water being good for hair in some Korean cook book :)

This is, ladies, a must try :)

sakuraemily
August 2nd, 2012, 12:59 PM
You guys seem to have quite a few questions. Here's what I'm sure of:
1) They rinse out rice water after working it through the hair. There is not much build-up
2) they use rice-washed water
3) It makes your hair smooth but does not get all the oil out. But they don't particularly care about getting it all out anyway.
4) It is not too drying on its own because it is not a strong cleanser.
There is someone here on LHC who incorporates cooked rice water into their herbal hairwash mix and she likes it. Can't remember who.
my source: south-east asian general knowledge. I'm not chinese but I know that s the way most south-east asian village people think.

sunnydee92
August 2nd, 2012, 01:11 PM
Amazing hair! I bet it is WO! It's so interesting seeing hair trends from around the world ^.^

jextxadore
August 3rd, 2012, 12:15 AM
OMGosh congee in hair? I don't think it would ever come out!

I'm pretty sure it would! I'd try it myself, but that'd mean skipping breakfast.

Venefica
August 3rd, 2012, 05:34 AM
That is gorgeous hair and so thick and healthy to, those womens hair just look amazing.

lmfbs
August 3rd, 2012, 05:47 AM
It's interesting to me that having cut their hair only once in their whole lives, the average length is only 5 ft. I know that's more hair than most, don't get me wrong! But given that it's an average, it seems that genetically, they must have a relatively short terminal length?

Or maybe my idea of how long hair can grow is optimistic! I can't find any info on the great interwebs about average terminal lengths for different ethnic groups. :p

I don't think you're factoring in breakage and general wear and tear. It's entirely possible their terminal length isn't reached because they're not trimming and therefore suffering some breakage.

MissCoco
August 3rd, 2012, 05:48 AM
:thud: Gorgeous hair! Glad these women have more freedom to show their beautiful gift to the world now!

About the rice water washing, I've read that a lot of traditional Indian hair washing incorporates rice water in the recipes, but I've never heard of it alone. Would be curious to know more about it though...but thanks to sakuraemily for the info already :flower:

Othala
August 3rd, 2012, 06:08 AM
About the rice water washing, I've read that a lot of traditional Indian hair washing incorporates rice water in the recipes, but I've never heard of it alone.

I have heard of it but never known anyone in my circle of Indian friends and family who actually did this. I think it might either be a village practice or particular to certain regions or only practised in "olden times".

Hoping someone will enlighten us.

Boucles d'or
August 3rd, 2012, 06:25 AM
Wow! Lovely article, thanks for sharing! :)

LHktress
August 3rd, 2012, 02:17 PM
I was in that village last year. The women put on a hair show for tourists, it's quite cool.

A few things I remember:

* some of them had hair longer than 5 ft

* the guide said that because of the washing with rice water, their hair never gets white - but some of the old ladies had tufts of white peeking at the back, so IMO they use some form of dye

* the hair strands are really REALLY thick, the thickest I've ever seen. I remember thinking they must be using something that deposits on hair and stays there.

* the hair looks kind of gross/unwashed up close and it's not shiny

* haven't seen any split ends

* they walk around with the hair up (in that turban shape) all the time, they're not having any fun with it (other than showing it off to tourists)

* their men are lazy bums, the women do all the work in the household!!!

xnibn
August 3rd, 2012, 06:11 PM
found this intresting video about how they wash their hair

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y45KMpCcBYU&feature=related

greywolf
August 3rd, 2012, 11:36 PM
found this intresting video about how they wash their hair

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y45KMpCcBYU&feature=related

So it's more than just ricewater. They said something about fermenting it, and they boil the ricewater and add tea leaf oil and pomelo peels.

MissCoco
August 6th, 2012, 07:55 AM
I have heard of it but never known anyone in my circle of Indian friends and family who actually did this. I think it might either be a village practice or particular to certain regions or only practised in "olden times".

Hoping someone will enlighten us.

Ah okay, thanks Othala for saying so. It's something I had read from on an online research, but I'd rather gain info from someone who's directly connected to the culture :flower:


I was in that village last year. The women put on a hair show for tourists, it's quite cool.

A few things I remember:

* some of them had hair longer than 5 ft

* the guide said that because of the washing with rice water, their hair never gets white - but some of the old ladies had tufts of white peeking at the back, so IMO they use some form of dye

* the hair strands are really REALLY thick, the thickest I've ever seen. I remember thinking they must be using something that deposits on hair and stays there.

* the hair looks kind of gross/unwashed up close and it's not shiny

* haven't seen any split ends

* they walk around with the hair up (in that turban shape) all the time, they're not having any fun with it (other than showing it off to tourists)

* their men are lazy bums, the women do all the work in the household!!!

Wow, it's cool that you've actually been there! Thanks for sharing! Maybe the rice water sort of coats the hair after a while? And lol at the men being lazy bums (although I'm not entirely surprised to hear that and hope it will change soon)!


found this intresting video about how they wash their hair

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y45KMpCcBYU&feature=related

Hmm, they use more than just rice water...interesting...thanks for the link, xnibn!

jextxadore
August 7th, 2012, 10:27 AM
Wow, it's cool that you've actually been there! Thanks for sharing! Maybe the rice water sort of coats the hair after a while? And lol at the men being lazy bums (although I'm not entirely surprised to hear that and hope it will change soon)!



Hmm, they use more than just rice water...interesting...thanks for the link, xnibn!

I imagine the coating on their hair is due to the mixture they use and how the river/spring water flow isn't strong enough to wash it all off. They probably sweat a lot more than we do too, which might add to the coating — I don't think they'd have the time some of us do to take care of their hair (which probably explains why they wear it up like that). And given that all the women have the same hair, they probably don't care about it too much, and their standards of hair cleanliness are a bit lower as they're probably very rarely exposed to things like shampoo.

MissCoco
August 10th, 2012, 09:29 AM
Well, you certainly have it all figured out, jextxadore! Glad you know all about it!

Oh, and welcome to the LHC, by the way! :)