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IvanaGil
July 6th, 2012, 05:57 PM
My mom just returned from a trip in Central America, and even though we had lived there for 4 years before, it wasn't until this trip that she asked her friend how the indigenous Mayan women make their hair so shiny. This is the part where it gets gross. Apparently the majority of them use pig fat soap! If you've ever used or seen African black soap, it has a similar texture except this soap is much darker. Needless to say, it smells absolutely repulsive, but my mom brought 4 balls of pig fat soap anyway. And, lucky me, I got one :confused: I'm going to try it, even though I am on the brink of vomiting in the shower.
Has anyone else heard of pig fat soap?

Dovetail
July 6th, 2012, 06:00 PM
Ew. I wonder if you can melt it, mix in some E.O and then remold it?

I hope it works! Do let us see after pictures!

prettykitty
July 6th, 2012, 06:05 PM
Ick but awesome! There's really no end to what we'll try for a lush head of hair, is there?

IvanaGil
July 6th, 2012, 06:06 PM
Ew. I wonder if you can melt it, mix in some E.O and then remold it?

I hope it works! Do let us see after pictures!

That's a good idea!


Ick but awesome! There's really no end to what we'll try for a lush head of hair, is there?

That's just what I was thinking lol. Where are our boundaries?

Sassy9226
July 6th, 2012, 06:11 PM
I really hope that works out for you. It'd be a shame to go through that for nothing. I'm interested to see how this turns out.

Nae
July 6th, 2012, 06:15 PM
Oh boy, oh boy!!

:popcorn:

RitaCeleste
July 6th, 2012, 06:15 PM
Nothing greases a frying pan like bacon grease!!! Sounds like a simple soap made with pork lard. My grandparents would probably laugh and tell you its far easier to render pork fat than squeeze oil out of corn and ask what they hell you thought they made their soap out of? Lye and lard, that's what great grandpa had??? You think coconut oil was imported to the backwoods of America during the depression? I don't see it. Pig fat soap= lye and lard. So old and so darn common its exotic now. LMAO!!!!

HappyHair87
July 6th, 2012, 06:21 PM
Nothing greases a frying pan like bacon grease!!! Sounds like a simple soap made with pork lard. My grandparents would probably laugh and tell you its far easier to render pork fat than squeeze oil out of corn and ask what they hell you thought they made their soap out of? Lye and lard, that's what great grandpa had??? You think coconut oil was imported to the backwoods of America during the depression? I don't see it. Pig fat soap= lye and lard. So old and so darn common its exotic now. LMAO!!!!

:laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:!!!!!!

Carolyn
July 6th, 2012, 06:28 PM
A lot of us eat bacon and love it. Cooking with lard is still common. How is using pig fat soap any different? I'm not grossed out in the least. I wouldn't hesitate to try it. My hair loves oils and butters. There is an old slogan or saying about using the whole pig, everything but the squeal.

FrozenBritannia
July 6th, 2012, 06:28 PM
I want to see pics!!

My dog eats bacon grease (not a slab of it, but residue, you know) and his coat has always been really shiney. I think I would rather eat the bacon than rub it on my hair, but hey, maybe one day I will try it!

LaFlor
July 6th, 2012, 06:30 PM
Nothing greases a frying pan like bacon grease!!! Sounds like a simple soap made with pork lard. My grandparents would probably laugh and tell you its far easier to render pork fat than squeeze oil out of corn and ask what they hell you thought they made their soap out of? Lye and lard, that's what great grandpa had??? You think coconut oil was imported to the backwoods of America during the depression? I don't see it. Pig fat soap= lye and lard. So old and so darn common its exotic now. LMAO!!!!


This! My mother (80 years old) has mentioned that she never had hair or skin as pretty as when they used... pig fat soap. She's always saying she would love to get ahold of some again :D

IvanaGil
July 6th, 2012, 06:31 PM
A lot of us eat bacon and love it. Cooking with lard is still common. How is using pig fat soap any different? I'm not grossed out in the least. I wouldn't hesitate to try it. My hair loves oils and butters. There is an old slogan or saying about using the whole pig, everything but the squeal.

I don't personally eat pork, so it's pretty gross to me, but the worst part about it is that the smells stays in your hair for a couple of days. Who wants to walk around smelling like a pig? :disgust: not me...

FrozenBritannia
July 6th, 2012, 06:35 PM
I don't personally eat pork, so it's pretty gross to me, but the worst part about it is that the smells stays in your hair for a couple of days. Who wants to walk around smelling like a pig? :disgust: not me...

Maybe you can sent it with lavender oil or something? Personally, my hubby would probably love it if I smelled like bacon! LOL.

IvanaGil
July 6th, 2012, 06:38 PM
Maybe you can sent it with lavender oil or something? Personally, my hubby would probably love it if I smelled like bacon! LOL.

Oh my goodness! hahaha my DH would kick me out if he smelled it. He's muslim and anything pig-related goes right out the door. I guess some of him rubbed off on me, but I never was a fan of pork to begin with. In the words of my DH "You are what you eat and I'd rather be a lamb than a pig." LOL!
I LOVE lavender so that's a great idea! Thanks :D

firegypsy
July 6th, 2012, 06:50 PM
Nothing greases a frying pan like bacon grease!!! Sounds like a simple soap made with pork lard. My grandparents would probably laugh and tell you its far easier to render pork fat than squeeze oil out of corn and ask what they hell you thought they made their soap out of? Lye and lard, that's what great grandpa had??? You think coconut oil was imported to the backwoods of America during the depression? I don't see it. Pig fat soap= lye and lard. So old and so darn common its exotic now. LMAO!!!!


YUP! Exactly what I was thinking. ;)

GlennaGirl
July 6th, 2012, 06:51 PM
I'm not grossed out, I mean I eat pork.

dollyfish
July 6th, 2012, 07:03 PM
Reminds me of fight club! lol :laugh: Pigs are so similar, anatomically and diet-wise, to humans that I'm sure pig fat soap would probably be nearly identical to human soap :p

Either way, I wouldn't want to use it, but then again I'm a vegetarian. It makes sense why plain ol' fat would be great for hair. I definitely second the suggestion to mix it with EOs or something. Sounds like smell is really the only problem.

Alvrodul
July 6th, 2012, 07:03 PM
You could try melting it and adding EOs to it to cut the smell - instructions for this are here (http://www.soap-body-and-spa.com/Hand-milled-soap-instructions.html).

IvanaGil
July 6th, 2012, 07:04 PM
You could try melting it and adding EOs to it to cut the smell - instructions for this are here (http://www.soap-body-and-spa.com/Hand-milled-soap-instructions.html).

Awesome. thank you :)

Nae
July 6th, 2012, 07:05 PM
Reminds me of fight club! lol :laugh: Pigs are so similar, anatomically and diet-wise, to humans that I'm sure pig fat soap would probably be nearly identical to human soap :p


Lol, I didn't know there would be spoilers in this thread. I really should watch that movie one of these days, but now I am not sure I want to. ;)

Natalia
July 6th, 2012, 07:18 PM
interesting i bet it would smell better if they smoked the fat first lol

RitaCeleste
July 6th, 2012, 07:33 PM
Still, you could try soap making with other oils besides lard. There are probably some good recipes floating around that would put lard soap to shame. My grandma liked Pantene and shampoos and conditioners with Jojoba oil. Her mom use to lay her hair over the ironing board and iron it with an iron that looked like a little cast iron pot. She never said she loved how her hair did with lard soap better than modern shampoos. Then again, my grandma is where a lot of my hair "texture" came from. She was picky and touchy about her own hair "texture". Even if you went with lard, I'm sure you could fix the smell. I've always wanted to make soap but I'm a little afraid of the lye part of it. I kinda need to find out what is different about shampoo bars and homemade soap anyway as I still didn't look that up.

EyeFuzz
July 6th, 2012, 07:42 PM
My family is from Guatemala, my grandma makes frequent trips there. About a year or so ago she came back with some of that stuff, I eat pork and don't really mind the smell. My experience with it was that it didn't smell very strong but the texture when it gets wet can be slightly off putting. (Squishy and greasy...) It cleaned my hair though and it ended up making it shiny. It also doesn't lather well, the only other experience I have that are similar are with shampoo bars.

I discontinued the use because I ended up moving out and didn't have access to it. I've wanted to try it again though since I started my hair growing journey after that experience and didn't know too much about hair care.

Nae
July 6th, 2012, 07:44 PM
It might be slightly different than our regular cold processed lard and lye versions of soap. I have used that before when I was a kid and it wasn't greasy or squishy at all. I will be curious to see how your hair likes it.

IvanaGil
July 6th, 2012, 07:44 PM
My family is from Guatemala, my grandma makes frequent trips there. About a year or so ago she came back with some of that stuff, I eat pork and don't really mind the smell. My experience with it was that it didn't smell very strong but the texture when it gets wet can be slightly off putting. (Squishy and greasy...) It cleaned my hair though and it ended up making it shiny. It also doesn't lather well, the only other experience I have that are similar are with shampoo bars.

I discontinued the use because I ended up moving out and didn't have access to it. I've wanted to try it again though since I started my hair growing journey after that experience and didn't know too much about hair care.

I'm from Guatemala too! That's where my mom brought it from :D

EyeFuzz
July 6th, 2012, 07:54 PM
I'm from Guatemala too! That's where my mom brought it from :D

Yeah I've had a feeling about you, sorry if that sounds creepy but I've read some of your other posts and I figured you were Guatemalan. Probably mentioned it somewhere else too.

I hope it works out for you, and definitely let us know how it turns out. :D

ratgirldjh
July 12th, 2012, 04:11 PM
Lard soap is my all time favorite soap. It is the first soap I learned how to make!

I've made it several ways. The first time was outdoors at an SCA event and we made the lye with wood ashes and water and then purified the fat by boiling it and then made hot process soap in a big pot.

This soap turned out softer and more 'pig' smelling than the soaps I've made since.

The soaps I make now (or buy when I am lazy) are very white and hard. They have almost no smell and don't smell like 'pig fat' but have if anything a 'clean soapy' smell.

All of them when they age turn yellow, brown or even reddish brown.

If I don't feel like making my own I buy this brand from my local hardware store (Ace Hardware) and it is much cheaper there.

http://www.amazon.com/Remwood-Products-Grandmas-Lye-Soap/dp/B001B4SEY8

Of all the soaps I have made (and I've made a lot over the last 25 years) the best 2 were lard and crisco!!! lol :D

Who would have thought it? The absolute worst and most drying soap I've ever made was 100% cocoa butter!!! I couldn't give it away!

Everyone always loves my lard soap. It doesn't suds a lot but it cleans well and leaves my hair very shiny.

swearnsue
July 12th, 2012, 05:06 PM
Keep it away from dogs if you own any! My dogs got into my tub of lard one day and I came home to a real mess. The carpet has never been the same.

heidi w.
July 12th, 2012, 05:23 PM
This is intriguing. I am going to remain tuned in on this thread. Let us know how it goes....

heidi w.

lmfbs
July 12th, 2012, 05:41 PM
The other night I cooked bacon for dinner and filled the grill with water so the fat didn't soak. Later, I was in the kitchen getting dessert and accidentally flipped the last inch or so of my hair into the bacon water.

My ends have been SO soft since. And they smell vaguely bacon-y.

ratgirldjh
July 12th, 2012, 06:03 PM
Years ago I tried lard on my skin. Sadly it didn't work well and made my skin kind of dry.

This was lard I had purified several times by boiling the fat in water and then letting it cool and putting it in the fridge and letting the cleaner whiter fat solidify. After you do this enough times you get very white sweet smelling lard!!!

I had even added some EO's to it. I never tried it on my hair because I find lard very difficult to wash off my skin!!!

Weird how oils that can be drying to my skin make the most moisturizing soaps for me and the ones that are the most moisturizing to my skin to start with like cocoa butter, or olive actually made my skin very dry even when superfatted 3 - 5%.

I used to lard with coconut oil to get the soap to make more lather but after several times of doing that and finding myself using the 100% lard soaps instead I now just use lard. The lard/coconut scented with EO's sell really well for me though when I make them but most of my customers want my 100% lard soap with or without EO's added.

There are a LOT of lard soap junkies out there :D

CajunBaby
July 12th, 2012, 06:29 PM
Did the OP try the soap?:)

misspriss
July 12th, 2012, 07:05 PM
Now I want to buy some pig lard soap, but I can't seem to find it for sale, just instructions to make, and I don' t have the time to take up soap-making. I'll keep an eye peeled though.

IvanaGil
July 12th, 2012, 10:21 PM
Yes I used it for about 5 days (I wash everyday) and other than the fact that it leaves my hair squeaky clean, I haven't noticed any improvements or shine. The soap does lather up quite a bit and boy does it leave it's smell on your hair. I only used it on my scalp and I can smell it constantly throughout the day. I don't think I would use it again just because the smell is not worth the squeaky clean feeling in my opinion. But it might work better for those with coarser hair. I'd say give it a try if you can get your hands on some.

ratgirldjh
August 9th, 2012, 05:03 PM
Now I want to buy some pig lard soap, but I can't seem to find it for sale, just instructions to make, and I don' t have the time to take up soap-making. I'll keep an eye peeled though.

http://www.amazon.com/Remwood-Products-Grandmas-Lye-Soap/dp/B001B4SEY8

misspriss
August 9th, 2012, 07:52 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Remwood-Products-Grandmas-Lye-Soap/dp/B001B4SEY8

Does lye mean it is made with pig lard? I don't see that anywhere in the description! I know soaps are made with lye and fat, but how do I know the fat is pig lard?

CurlyCap
August 9th, 2012, 07:59 PM
Yep. Lye and lard make soap. What changes is the skill of the soap maker and how they purify/clean the fat.

My grandmother used to take the pig fat drippings and save it for soap, but then she pulled some village voodoo where she got clean white fat and the "cooked smell" to separate. Then she mixed the pig fat with coconut oil and fire ash and got soap. Never smelled bad, but since neither my hair or skin is ever oily, it was too harsh for me. However, for my mom's family, where things tend to run to oil, it's perfect.

It amazes me how much so many people are separated from basic household goods used to be made before supermarkets. I sometimes make fun of my immigrant family, but they introduced me to a lot of things that a lot of my friends have never even had a chance to see.

riceball
August 9th, 2012, 09:59 PM
I thought they just had naturally shiny hair, helped by the fact that they don't bleach/color/perm. Wow I don't know anything.

Actually I just thought that black hair looks shiniest because it reflects the most light. Little did I know that some people use pig fat on their hair! I can't say I'm that grossed out even though I have been veg all my life.. other people eat bacon, why not put the grease on their head?

I'll stick with coconut oil, but thanks for sharing this interesting piece of hair advice!

domisimone
August 9th, 2012, 10:35 PM
Well tallow is cow fat, and people use tallow soap with good results, so I guess pig fat isn't very far off . . . Subbing!

Arden
August 9th, 2012, 11:03 PM
Years ago I tried lard on my skin. Sadly it didn't work well and made my skin kind of dry.

This was lard I had purified several times by boiling the fat in water and then letting it cool and putting it in the fridge and letting the cleaner whiter fat solidify. After you do this enough times you get very white sweet smelling lard!!!

I had even added some EO's to it. I never tried it on my hair because I find lard very difficult to wash off my skin!!!

Weird how oils that can be drying to my skin make the most moisturizing soaps for me and the ones that are the most moisturizing to my skin to start with like cocoa butter, or olive actually made my skin very dry even when superfatted 3 - 5%.

I used to lard with coconut oil to get the soap to make more lather but after several times of doing that and finding myself using the 100% lard soaps instead I now just use lard. The lard/coconut scented with EO's sell really well for me though when I make them but most of my customers want my 100% lard soap with or without EO's added.

There are a LOT of lard soap junkies out there :D

Cornstarch. Add cornstach to the lard. It will make the consistancy nicer for your skin.

I make skin butters and lip balms. Although the lard is not my favorite I experimented alot with it to see how I could make it more "plaitable" for working on the skin and cornstarch acctually seemed to help the texture alot...

Rufflebutt
August 9th, 2012, 11:12 PM
I can understand why it would work. The oils and such from the fat must be incredibly moisturizing. However, is there any way you can fragrance your hair to keep the smell at bay?

kitschy
August 9th, 2012, 11:13 PM
Well tallow is cow fat, and people use tallow soap with good results, so I guess pig fat isn't very far off . . . Subbing!

Actually tallow comes from cows OR sheep. Lanolin comes from sheep.

freznow
August 9th, 2012, 11:54 PM
This thread is fascinating! I love supporting local soap makers, and I love a soap that I can use from head to toe. I wonder if there are any farmers markets in the Chicagoland area who sell lard or tallow soap.

Or, batgirldjh, do you sell online? Anyone other LHCers make lard soap?

dandylioness
August 10th, 2012, 02:25 AM
I, too, am fascinated by this thread. My admiration for the "old ways" of beauty care is increasing daily. Foolish to buy chemical commercial products when there are so many natural items to use.
FYI, I am thrilled by my 3 day deep oiling results. Just some canola with a bit of yummy ginger peach fragrance added.

JLa23
August 10th, 2012, 05:55 AM
This thread is funny and fascinating. It seems a little strange, but at the same time I know that is what they used back then, so I would try it if the smell didn't linger and rinsed out easy. Ivanagil, what is the brand that you used? I hope more people who have used the pig fat soap find this thread and can comment.

marta
August 10th, 2012, 06:03 AM
I use dog fat lard soap from china, since living here, it's even better. I also eat dog yum! dog bacon so good. on seriously note i dont need to take any animals life to serve my taste or oil my hair how pathetic..

Arden
August 10th, 2012, 12:18 PM
I use dog fat lard soap from china, since living here, it's even better. I also eat dog yum! dog bacon so good. on seriously note i dont need to take any animals life to serve my taste or oil my hair how pathetic..


Back before everything was commercially processed eating animals was a way of life. I am a gardener and I make home made balms and butters and I will tell you from this knowledge that without commercial hot houses to provide year round produce someone in "days of old" would have likely starved if they refused to eat / use meat.

Also, when people killed there own meat and grew there own food people had a deeper respect for animals and a love of the earth. Animal fat soap may seem barbaric to you now but when people raised there own animals or hunted for food consumption, using all of the body was considered a way to be respectful of the animal and not wasteful of it's sacrifice.

Now I understand it seems my argument might be mute considering the modern world but the modern world is not so lovely as you might think. Commercial farmers in this country, thanks to companies like Monsanto, are not much better than slaves. And if they try to grow without these business giants they are financially raped over GMO seed patients or other imaginary infringements upon the rights of the “commercial giant”

I respect your choice not to eat / use animal products

But coming on here calling people who do use animals products "pathetic" is just well... pathetic....

You say sarcastically (and obviously for shock appeal) "I eat dog, from China"? There are people in this world who do eat dog, yes. I think if a person was starving they'd eat just about anything. Because American's keep dogs as pets we consider them better than the "lesser" animals and find this notion disturbing. If you can grown up in a culture or country where food was hard pressed to find you would most certainly have a different frame of mind.

I have a friend from Poland who eats pigeon. Do I think that's nasty? Yes. Because I was raised to believe pigeons are dirty. But if I was a potato farmer in an agrarian society where food sources where limited? Well that pigeon might start to look real tasty.

It's easy for you to set there and be critical of peoples choices because you have the option to go run down to your local Whole Foods and feel mightier than thou because your eating 'organic veggies' ....but your existence in the world is small compared to the universal truth that there is still poor people in this world who have to eat and use what they can get.

I grew up “poor“ by modern standards because I didn’t have the nicer clothes of all the modern gadgets when I was a kid. There are children right now in this very country who have nice clothes, TV’s and video games but nothing to eat in there refrigerator.

My family lived to a large degree off the land. I got made fun of for having cheap clothes and living in a run down shack but I never went hungry a day in my life. We grew a garden, we fished and hunted. If we had nothing else we where fed and happy.

Before you go running around placing your judgment on people because you have some high and might idea than animals are “too good” to eat or use you might want to consider how you would feel if you didn’t have these modern things beating down your doorstep.

If the modern world collapsed tomorrow would you starve to death because of your notions that “meat is wrong”.

I would be more apt to think you would more likely starve because you don’t know how to care for yourself in the non modern world.

I own guns
I eat meat
I grow herbs and veggies
I know how to can
I know how to make soap, butters and balms
I know how to use plants medicinally

….and the city bus is a block from my home

Bring on the collapse of modern society. I’ll do just fine :)

kitschy
August 10th, 2012, 12:32 PM
Back before everything was commercially processed eating animals was a way of life. I am a gardener and I make home made balms and butters and I will tell you from this knowledge that without commercial hot houses to provide year round produce someone in "days of old" would have likely starved if they refused to eat / use meat.

Also, when people killed there own meat and grew there own food people had a deeper respect for animals and a love of the earth. Animal fat soap may seem barbaric to you now but when people raised there own animals or hunted for food consumption, using all of the body was considered a way to be respectful of the animal and not wasteful of it's sacrifice.

Now I understand it seems my argument might be mute considering the modern world but the modern world is not so lovely as you might think. Commercial farmers in this country, thanks to companies like Monsanto, are not much better than slaves. And if they try to grow without these business giants they are financially raped over GMO seed patients or other imaginary infringements upon the rights of the “commercial giant”

I respect your choice not to eat / use animal products

But coming on here calling people who do use animals products "pathetic" is just well... pathetic....

You say sarcastically (and obviously for shock appeal) "I eat dog, from China"? There are people in this world who do eat dog, yes. I think if a person was starving they'd eat just about anything. Because American's keep dogs as pets we consider them better than the "lesser" animals and find this notion disturbing. If you can grown up in a culture or country where food was hard pressed to find you would most certainly have a different frame of mind.

I have a friend from Poland who eats pigeon. Do I think that's nasty? Yes. Because I was raised to believe pigeons are dirty. But if I was a potato farmer in an agrarian society where food sources where limited? Well that pigeon might start to look real tasty.

It's easy for you to set there and be critical of peoples choices because you have the option to go run down to your local Whole Foods and feel mightier than thou because your eating 'organic veggies' ....but your existence in the world is small compared to the universal truth that there is still poor people in this world who have to eat and use what they can get.

I grew up “poor“ by modern standards because I didn’t have the nicer clothes of all the modern gadgets when I was a kid. There are children right now in this very country who have nice clothes, TV’s and video games but nothing to eat in there refrigerator.

My family lived to a large degree off the land. I got made fun of for having cheap clothes and living in a run down shack but I never went hungry a day in my life. We grew a garden, we fished and hunted. If we had nothing else we where fed and happy.

Before you go running around placing your judgment on people because you have some high and might idea than animals are “too good” to eat or use you might want to consider how you would feel if you didn’t have these modern things beating down your doorstep.

If the modern world collapsed tomorrow would you starve to death because of your notions that “meat is wrong”.

I would be more apt to think you would more likely starve because you don’t know how to care for yourself in the non modern world.

I own guns
I eat meat
I grow herbs and veggies
I know how to can
I know how to make soap, butters and balms
I know how to use plants medicinally

….and the city bus is a block from my home

Bring on the collapse of modern society. I’ll do just fine :)
I loved your post and agree with all of it. I too was raised in an area where we raised our own food, hunted and fished, made our own clothes, and invented our own entertainment.

I suspect the poster was a troll, but still, there is a person out there who thinks utilizing animals is the biggest horror of society. The poster needs to realize that if a society ever gets hungry - you'll see unimaginable horror!

joyfulchiara
August 10th, 2012, 12:48 PM
Back before everything was commercially processed eating animals was a way of life. I am a gardener and I make home made balms and butters and I will tell you from this knowledge that without commercial hot houses to provide year round produce someone in "days of old" would have likely starved if they refused to eat / use meat.

Also, when people killed there own meat and grew there own food people had a deeper respect for animals and a love of the earth. Animal fat soap may seem barbaric to you now but when people raised there own animals or hunted for food consumption, using all of the body was considered a way to be respectful of the animal and not wasteful of it's sacrifice.

Now I understand it seems my argument might be mute considering the modern world but the modern world is not so lovely as you might think. Commercial farmers in this country, thanks to companies like Monsanto, are not much better than slaves. And if they try to grow without these business giants they are financially raped over GMO seed patients or other imaginary infringements upon the rights of the “commercial giant”

I respect your choice not to eat / use animal products

But coming on here calling people who do use animals products "pathetic" is just well... pathetic....

You say sarcastically (and obviously for shock appeal) "I eat dog, from China"? There are people in this world who do eat dog, yes. I think if a person was starving they'd eat just about anything. Because American's keep dogs as pets we consider them better than the "lesser" animals and find this notion disturbing. If you can grown up in a culture or country where food was hard pressed to find you would most certainly have a different frame of mind.

I have a friend from Poland who eats pigeon. Do I think that's nasty? Yes. Because I was raised to believe pigeons are dirty. But if I was a potato farmer in an agrarian society where food sources where limited? Well that pigeon might start to look real tasty.

It's easy for you to set there and be critical of peoples choices because you have the option to go run down to your local Whole Foods and feel mightier than thou because your eating 'organic veggies' ....but your existence in the world is small compared to the universal truth that there is still poor people in this world who have to eat and use what they can get.

I grew up “poor“ by modern standards because I didn’t have the nicer clothes of all the modern gadgets when I was a kid. There are children right now in this very country who have nice clothes, TV’s and video games but nothing to eat in there refrigerator.

My family lived to a large degree off the land. I got made fun of for having cheap clothes and living in a run down shack but I never went hungry a day in my life. We grew a garden, we fished and hunted. If we had nothing else we where fed and happy.

Before you go running around placing your judgment on people because you have some high and might idea than animals are “too good” to eat or use you might want to consider how you would feel if you didn’t have these modern things beating down your doorstep.

If the modern world collapsed tomorrow would you starve to death because of your notions that “meat is wrong”.

I would be more apt to think you would more likely starve because you don’t know how to care for yourself in the non modern world.

I own guns
I eat meat
I grow herbs and veggies
I know how to can
I know how to make soap, butters and balms
I know how to use plants medicinally

….and the city bus is a block from my home

Bring on the collapse of modern society. I’ll do just fine :)

If you were here I'd give you a big 'ol smooch! :D I love this response and feel exactly the same.

Arden
August 10th, 2012, 01:07 PM
I loved your post and agree with all of it. I too was raised in an area where we raised our own food, hunted and fished, made our own clothes, and invented our own entertainment.

I suspect the poster was a troll, but still, there is a person out there who thinks utilizing animals is the biggest horror of society. The poster needs to realize that if a society ever gets hungry - you'll see unimaginable horror!

Yea.. the Donner party comes to mind... LOL
....if people get hungery ENOUGH... they'll even eat other people

Arden
August 10th, 2012, 01:09 PM
If you were here I'd give you a big 'ol smooch! :D I love this response and feel exactly the same.

Aww, thank you!

Hounestly I was a little afraid I'd get alot of hate responces for that. I felt so passionatly about it though I just couldn't help myself.... :)

piffyanne
August 10th, 2012, 01:16 PM
First of all, I agree the dog-eating for shock value and name calling was uncalled for. I value that poster's decisions as they impact her life, and I hope she can come to value the decisions of others as they impact their OWN lives.:cheese:

Marta, no one is going to force anyone else to use fats or other animal products in their hair. Be sure whatever chemicals you use aren't tested on animals, though, if you feel that way. I'm against animal testing myself, so don't flame me for mentioning that. Have a :flower:

:gobblecheese:TRANSITION!:gobblecheese:

Now that we've gotten the :steam and :flamed: out of our systems, does anyone have a recommended recipe for making soap like this? The idea of boiling multiple times to purify it and make it smell sweet is attractive to me, and it would be a good gift for DBF, who would live his life completely 1940's-or-earlier-period-correctly if he could get away with it in modern society.:rolleyes:

I'd also like to know if my own hair likes it!

Does your house start to stink when you commence the boiling, and is there any way to keep it from grossing out fellow house-inhabitants? Not everyone in my family (shockingly, I know!) is as obsessed with hair as I am, and they might not take kindly to me making our house's air grease- or bacon- flavored.
With all that said, Bring On The Instructions! :cheese:

antikythera
August 10th, 2012, 01:45 PM
Back before everything was commercially processed eating animals was a way of life. I am a gardener and I make home made balms and butters and I will tell you from this knowledge that without commercial hot houses to provide year round produce someone in "days of old" would have likely starved if they refused to eat / use meat.

Also, when people killed there own meat and grew there own food people had a deeper respect for animals and a love of the earth. Animal fat soap may seem barbaric to you now but when people raised there own animals or hunted for food consumption, using all of the body was considered a way to be respectful of the animal and not wasteful of it's sacrifice.

Now I understand it seems my argument might be mute considering the modern world but the modern world is not so lovely as you might think. Commercial farmers in this country, thanks to companies like Monsanto, are not much better than slaves. And if they try to grow without these business giants they are financially raped over GMO seed patients or other imaginary infringements upon the rights of the “commercial giant”

I respect your choice not to eat / use animal products

But coming on here calling people who do use animals products "pathetic" is just well... pathetic....

You say sarcastically (and obviously for shock appeal) "I eat dog, from China"? There are people in this world who do eat dog, yes. I think if a person was starving they'd eat just about anything. Because American's keep dogs as pets we consider them better than the "lesser" animals and find this notion disturbing. If you can grown up in a culture or country where food was hard pressed to find you would most certainly have a different frame of mind.

I have a friend from Poland who eats pigeon. Do I think that's nasty? Yes. Because I was raised to believe pigeons are dirty. But if I was a potato farmer in an agrarian society where food sources where limited? Well that pigeon might start to look real tasty.

It's easy for you to set there and be critical of peoples choices because you have the option to go run down to your local Whole Foods and feel mightier than thou because your eating 'organic veggies' ....but your existence in the world is small compared to the universal truth that there is still poor people in this world who have to eat and use what they can get.

I grew up “poor“ by modern standards because I didn’t have the nicer clothes of all the modern gadgets when I was a kid. There are children right now in this very country who have nice clothes, TV’s and video games but nothing to eat in there refrigerator.

My family lived to a large degree off the land. I got made fun of for having cheap clothes and living in a run down shack but I never went hungry a day in my life. We grew a garden, we fished and hunted. If we had nothing else we where fed and happy.

Before you go running around placing your judgment on people because you have some high and might idea than animals are “too good” to eat or use you might want to consider how you would feel if you didn’t have these modern things beating down your doorstep.

If the modern world collapsed tomorrow would you starve to death because of your notions that “meat is wrong”.

I would be more apt to think you would more likely starve because you don’t know how to care for yourself in the non modern world.

I own guns
I eat meat
I grow herbs and veggies
I know how to can
I know how to make soap, butters and balms
I know how to use plants medicinally

….and the city bus is a block from my home

Bring on the collapse of modern society. I’ll do just fine :)


First of all, I agree the dog-eating for shock value and name calling was uncalled for. I value that poster's decisions as they impact her life, and I hope she can come to value the decisions of others as they impact their OWN lives.:cheese:

Marta, no one is going to force anyone else to use fats or other animal products in their hair. Be sure whatever chemicals you use aren't tested on animals, though, if you feel that way. I'm against animal testing myself, so don't flame me for mentioning that. Have a :flower:

:gobblecheese:TRANSITION!:gobblecheese:

Now that we've gotten the :steam and :flamed: out of our systems, does anyone have a recommended recipe for making soap like this? The idea of boiling multiple times to purify it and make it smell sweet is attractive to me, and it would be a good gift for DBF, who would live his life completely 1940's-or-earlier-period-correctly if he could get away with it in modern society.:rolleyes:

I'd also like to know if my own hair likes it!

Does your house start to stink when you commence the boiling, and is there any way to keep it from grossing out fellow house-inhabitants? Not everyone in my family (shockingly, I know!) is as obsessed with hair as I am, and they might not take kindly to me making our house's air grease- or bacon- flavored.
With all that said, Bring On The Instructions! :cheese:
While I have never made soap, I personally would avoid bacon drippings as the starting source of fat. Try and get your hands on some pure lard. I think most grocery stores carry it. Lard, if eaten straight has a slight taste to it, the way butter has has a slight flavor. It does not have an overriding "bacon" sent or flavor. In cooking lard is what makes a pastry, like a pie crust, super flaky, fluffy and yummy.

piffyanne
August 10th, 2012, 02:22 PM
While I have never made soap, I personally would avoid bacon drippings as the starting source of fat. Try and get your hands on some pure lard. I think most grocery stores carry it. Lard, if eaten straight has a slight taste to it, the way butter has has a slight flavor. It does not have an overriding "bacon" sent or flavor. In cooking lard is what makes a pastry, like a pie crust, super flaky, fluffy and yummy.
And I was looking forward to having a reason to eat bacon, too!;)

I'm following along with the lard idea, though. I remember smelling lard when I was little, it didn't have much of a scent. I was wondering whether the smell changes when you heat it up, as I was smelling it cold. It would make sense that it doesn't smell bad when being used for cooking pastries, or people would NEVER use it to cook pastries! :rolleyes: My mind's still turning on. Excuse my brain's screensaver mode, please.