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MintChocChip
May 23rd, 2012, 05:08 PM
Hi. So I'm new to this website and I was wondering if some people could give me some advice on the correct way to wash your hair. What I used to do was pile my hair on my head while I shampooed it but I haven't been doing that for a while and am only shampooing my scalp. I then condition my ends as normal. I've also started to oil my ends every night before bed with sweet almond oil which my ends are loving. My question though is, what is the correct way of shampooing your hair when you don't pile your hair on top of your head? I've found that as thorough as I am when shampooing my scalp, there tends to be a small amount of build up/residue on the underneath section of my hair. So, am I just not being as thorough as I think I'm being? Or perhaps I'm using too much oil or conditioner?

Has anyone else had any similar problems? I'd be really grateful to hear what people think :)

Madora
May 23rd, 2012, 05:23 PM
I found that to minimize tangling, I part my hair in two sections (it is thoroughly detangled and brushed before getting wet).

I use my finger pads and gently massage in diluted shampoo, working from the nape to the ends (I shampoo in the bent at the waist position as it affords easier access to the hair nearest the nape.

I start at the crown and work down one side, then the other, then from front to back. I don't skip around, willy nilly.

The rinse is done with a hand held device, with medium warm water.

Then the conditioner (diluted is applied) and rinsed out with warm water, followed by a final cold rinse.

MintChocChip
May 24th, 2012, 12:41 AM
Thank you Madora!

Your answer's a big help! :)

Billycourty
May 24th, 2012, 02:39 AM
Thanks for posting this question Mintchopchip, I have been struggling to get my scalp super clean since i gave up piling my hair on my head to wash it.

I don't mean to hi-jack the tread but, reading Madora's reply, i would like to ask her (or anyone that knows) what finishing with a cold wash for the hair does for it?

regards
Jay

Amanah
May 24th, 2012, 03:38 AM
I think her reply will be that it makes sure the hair cuticles on the hair shaft are closed.

Littlewing13
May 24th, 2012, 04:44 AM
Tips on applying shampoo: most people slap a big squirt of shampoo on the top of their head, so underneath doesnt get any, and the top gets overly stripped & often tends to go flakey (which in turn often makes the person think they have dandruff so they buy dandruff shampoo which makes this worse).

Try to spread your shampoo out evenly over your palms. You know how with moisturiser you put a few dabs on your nose, cheeks, chin & forehead first, & then rub it in? Well if you do this with shampoo too your hair gets more all over, top doesnt get as dry, & you dont waste so much shampoo. So make sure you put a bit on the sides, underneath, on the crown etc. Then massage it in. (As Madora says, part if you need).

Make your hand into a claw (think "liar liar" or "Austin Powers"), so your finger pads touch your scalp, but not your palm. from here you can move your fingers to massage, or move "the claw" at the wrist.

When massaging always start at the front, wiggling side to side towards the back of your head. You don't want to go back to front as it can tangle & pull hairs. Move methodically, making sure you cover all of your scalp. Take your time theres no rush. Do it again if you need. Concentrate on feeling the difference between oily hair/scalp & clean hair/scalp while wet. Back of neck & behind ears usually gets missed, & just below the crown so double check in these areas.

If you find you need more shampoo, use more water first. Often its more of a 'spread' issue than not enough. Duck your head under the water for a second. Not even. In & out. Then try spreading it with your hands again.

Madora
May 24th, 2012, 07:57 AM
Thanks for posting this question Mintchopchip, I have been struggling to get my scalp super clean since i gave up piling my hair on my head to wash it.

I don't mean to hi-jack the tread but, reading Madora's reply, i would like to ask her (or anyone that knows) what finishing with a cold wash for the hair does for it?

regards
Jay

Hi, Billycourty! Here is a link that explains about using cold water as a final rinse:

http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/vbjournal.php?do=article&articleid=77

And, as Amanah said, a final cold water rinse does close the cuticles. Also leaves the hair shiny.

lapushka
May 24th, 2012, 02:16 PM
Here's a video on it, on how to wash hair properly:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzEjdmXaUUU&feature=plcp

spidermom
May 24th, 2012, 03:05 PM
I usually stand up in the shower area and let my hair hang down over my body, but about once every couple of weeks, I will bend forward so that my hair falls forward in front of me. Either way, I use diluted shampoo at the scalp. Every couple of months or so, I massage diluted shampoo all the way through my hair.

torrilin
May 25th, 2012, 08:41 AM
Try to spread your shampoo out evenly over your palms. You know how with moisturiser you put a few dabs on your nose, cheeks, chin & forehead first, & then rub it in? Well if you do this with shampoo too your hair gets more all over, top doesnt get as dry, & you dont waste so much shampoo. So make sure you put a bit on the sides, underneath, on the crown etc. Then massage it in. (As Madora says, part if you need).

I even go a bit further than this. I'll take a tiny dab of shampoo, and lather it on my wet palms to dilute it. Then I "press" the lather into the oiliest parts of my head.

I've seen a number of the ladies who CO suggest using a routine of doing a carefully organized and sectioned scalp massage for a set count at each spot on their head to ensure that their CO conditioner can properly lift and penetrate so dead scalp skin doesn't form scales or flakes. I've borrowed that idea for my diluted shampoo routine because I'm not very tidyminded and I'm prone to skipping bits. So I think of my scalp as having "claw" sized sections, and each section gets a 10 count of massage.

When I'm consistent about using my dilute shampoo in this way, I can go days without needing a wash. Not as many as Madora can :) but lots more than I could with the pile hair on top and use tons of shampoo method.

The nice thing is working this way also feels really good, and with products that suit my hair I have a lot less tangles. It's also more obvious if a shampoo doesn't suit my hair, since I'll feel the tangles forming on my scalp as I massage.

spidermom
May 25th, 2012, 09:35 AM
I have a squirt bottle and apply the diluted shampoo in stripes all over my scalp before massaging.

MintChocChip
May 25th, 2012, 09:46 AM
That's quite ok Billycourty! Thanks everyone for the helpful tips! I'm washing my hair tomorrow so hopefully will be free of a bit up build up from here on in!

akilina
May 25th, 2012, 10:38 AM
I like to put some shampoo in my hands and really only wash my scalp. I am a mostly daily washer I just can't help it. I never wash the length though i just let the suds rinse down it. I like to do a really good scalp massage as I wash. Then I leave the conditioner on the rest of the shower.

heidi w.
May 25th, 2012, 10:50 AM
Dr. G.M. advocates rinsing hair in cool water after hair washing. He does not advocate using very hot water for hair washing, but in my case, I go (in winter, that is) a bit against his counsel because I have a scalp skin condition, and if I use too cool of water to wash my hair, I end up with all the gunk remaining on my head.

So I would advocate finding a suitable temperature of water. I would also advocate softening the water if it's overly hard, or installing a purifier or filter at the shower head. (You can get these in the US from hardware stores. They're not overly costly and they install with basic tools most people have at home, a wrench or something like that.)

I begin by detangling ALL of my hair very thoroughly allowing for no tangles and that all shed hair is completely removed. Then I comb it all back because I stand in the shower to wash my hair and I wash from the back, as most people do.

I thoroughly wet all of my hair which can take a few moments because the sebum resists somewhat the ability of water to actually wet my hair. I lift the back of my hair to wet the underside of my hair, especially the back of the neck/head hair.

Then I apply my first shampoo which is merely to break the surface tension of my hair. I apply by first soaping my shampoo in my hands in a lather and applying that to my hair around the hairline, and behind the ears, and under the hair at the hairline on the back of my head. Then a second application of shampoo similarly lathered in my hands and applied to the crown of my head. I then rub this all about my head, likely wetting the hair a bit more, then I rinse out. THEN I repeat all this and have a LOT more lather than second shampoo application. I actually do a total of 4 applications because I have a fairly oily scalp from a LOT of sebum production. I allow the shampoo to dribble down my hair length, but I often make one direct application of lathered shampoo on to the length and work it "in" so to speak. THEN I rinse this all out, often using my handheld shower and increasing the pressure amount on my handheld to get a thorough rinse.

As for the scalp, this is how I scrub my hair, just about precisely. I work a fair amount on the top of the head, with my fingers really kind of lightly scratching the scalp. I loosen the sides, but work from the temples upward toward the back of the head. And I work the backside of my head by going from the center (imaginary) hairline and out to the sides, at a downward angle. THEN I lift my hair at the back and scrub around the hairline.

THEN when all this is satisfactorily rinsed out, I condition. I do not apply any conditioner to my head because my scalp produces enough sebum. I don't need to gunk that up more. I just let nature do its job there. I apply conditioner to just the length, but I go pretty high up the hair to about the earlobes. I just make sure that no conditioner touches my scalp, and for that, I lean to one side or the other so I can go high up the front hair strands without touching conditioner to the scalp skin. I apply a fairly heavy dose of conditioner to all of my entire length. I wait a little bit for it to soak in. In fact, I often gently fan or spread the length out to flatten it so that some conditioner will get on the inner hair strands. (Hair when wet tends to clump and the exterior strands get all the conditioner, and inner strands, if you fan the hair out gently, you may well note some fairly dry strands that have no conditioner on them.) Then I rinse that out, then I'm done.

When I get out of the shower, I squeeze my hair in the towel. Prior to squeezing my hair in a towel, I literally wring my hair out in the tub. I do not wrap my hair in a towel and allow that to all be plopped on top of my head. I do not rub my hair with the towel. I simply squeeze the hair in the towel, and that's it. I hang the towel back up, and apply leave-in, and then I'm done with hair business. The leave-in I use also assists with detangling, and I can slightly/somewhat detangle the end of my hair. I often put my hair up until I get to the coffee shop or school, and once settled, then take my hair down to air dry. There are some days that I can't do this, and then it can take almost two days for my hair length to dry. My hair doesn't really dry when all wrapped up or braided (not that I can braid wet hair anyway.)

I detangle my hair in steps. As it dries I detangle a bit more and more. I used to wait to detangle until ALL my hair was dry, but I have learned that if I can separate the hair strands, even if it's still somewhat tangled but slightly aligned hair, hair will dry faster.

One can even hang out near fans to increase the process of drying hair, by speed. I had a friend teach me how she does this, and at the time, she had over 8 feet of hair. I still use he fan process in the summertime, although I must confess that being out in sweltering heat with damp hair feels kind of nice. It feels refreshing.

Anyway, that's how I do it. It takes a total of about 30-45 minutes. I use up all the hot water available in my house's hot water heater. (I hope someday to have hot water on demand, but that's well outside my range of affordability, so I live with a hot water tank.)

I would say the two biggest things about hair when washing hair is using decent water. And one's conditioner choice. Local water supply can in so many places, even private well water, turn out to be fairly hard, and softening the water can make a huge difference.

I am a bad girl and don't wash my hair often enough because I'm just trying to make my shampoo last. I am in a financial crunch of sorts and am trying to delay when I need to order more shampoo. I buy my shampoo from a private business.

If interested, I have a youtube video I made concerning how I oil my hair. In it I cover Boar Bristle Brushing, oiling my hair when dry, and how to do an easy updo for mid-back length and beyond. Here's a link, if you're interested: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjVwPKMQDYk

I hope this helps you out,
heidi w.

PS A lot of people have to detangle in smaller strips or sections of hair, depending on hair thickness. While I don't do that specifically, I do find that I have to detangle in layers if you will. Even though it appears I let the comb go through the depth of my hair, I usually do not until just about the very end or around the ends of my hair which is somewhat thinner anyway. I often detangle against my leg because the hair spreads out and then I will use a side edge of the comb, not the entire comb.

heidi w.
May 25th, 2012, 10:54 AM
If you have a feeling of gunk on the back of your head, one idea is to scritch the scalp prior to a given hair wash, which I have done. It helps to loosen scalp debris and increases the effectiveness of hair washing. A hair wash is really a hygienic practice to keep the health of the scalp skin in good stead; not quite so much to wash the hair per se.

If you're noticing not good effects at the back of the head, or whatever area, just pay more attention to that area in a hair wash session. I have to pay special attention to my crown because that's where most of my scalp skin aggravation comes from, the crown.

On the top of my head I find I have to basically scratch my head when I hair wash, or I'll get out with a gunky scalp that I will have to wash again in so many days, or the day after. That's just the way it is with my scalp skin condition.

heidi w.

heidi w.
May 25th, 2012, 10:57 AM
Thanks for posting this question Mintchopchip, I have been struggling to get my scalp super clean since i gave up piling my hair on my head to wash it.

I don't mean to hi-jack the tread but, reading Madora's reply, i would like to ask her (or anyone that knows) what finishing with a cold wash for the hair does for it?

regards
Jay

I just read Mr. G.M.'s book on this very point the other day. It effectively allows the cuticle to close a bit more tightly and helps close the scalp skin pores. It's said that this results in a bit of a boost to hair shine. Also, in my experience, you do not need super cold water. Just so long as the temperature is cooler than what you wash your hair in, you should be fine. It's not an ice dip.

heidi w.

heidi w.
May 25th, 2012, 11:00 AM
Tips on applying shampoo: most people slap a big squirt of shampoo on the top of their head, so underneath doesnt get any, and the top gets overly stripped & often tends to go flakey (which in turn often makes the person think they have dandruff so they buy dandruff shampoo which makes this worse).


One should NEVER apply shampoo directly from the bottle to one's head of hair. Squirt it first in the palm, at most about the size of a quarter, and less hair than mine, you will need less than that amount of shampoo. Lather the shampoo in one's hands and then apply to thoroughly wet hair. Littlewing is correct that too much shampoo can be difficult to get out and result in little flake bits that can lead one to assume that they have dandruff. Note: not all white things in the hair are dandruff; but dandruff is always white flakes.

heidi w.

heidi w.
May 25th, 2012, 11:23 AM
Here's a video on it, on how to wash hair properly:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzEjdmXaUUU&feature=plcp

That's not a bad video regarding the HOW TO of proper hair washing. I think she could have added, although it was implied, to not wrap hair in a towel and walk around with your hair this way. She specifically covers not wringing the hair. The reason it's generally not a good idea is that most people end up pulling on the hair, and the strands are already stretched as far as they can go and all swelled up with water. However, I do wring the ends of my hair. I have used her squeegee method of getting rid of excess water when done washing hair while in the tub. But I found I still had too much water in my hair, so I first squeegee and then take up the length and fold length over length then wring. That way I have a fair amount of hair in my hands that is wringable. I take care to not streth or pull the hair further.

It's very important to know the difference between wet and damp hair when it comes to detangling. I can't detangle a whole lot when the hair is wet.

The method of detangling in the shower that she mentioned, that is not a bad idea for those with curly hair. They generally have to detangle their hair while at least damp, and if they wait til hair is drier or all dry, they have a much harder time. Curly headed folks can coat their hair in conditioner, and bring an extra-wide tooth comb, or an average wide-toothed comb into the shower and dip and re-dip the comb in conditioner and then apply to hair that is coated with conditioner and detangle this way, rinsing it all out at the end.

I like that she mentioned using far more conditioner than shampoo. That is the same for me. Conditioner matters, and for me, I use/prefer Biolage's Conditioning Balm. Currently I'm working with the Hydrating Conditioning Balm. I kind of don't like the Hydrating Balm. For one it just feels different: it's a whole lot thinner than the Conditioning Balm. But this is all they had at the store early in May, so that's what I had to get because I was completely out of conditioner. I usually get the 38 fl. oz. bucket of Conditioning Balm. I like this product line a lot. For one, the product is biodegradable, and secondly it does a great job. And yep, I use a lot. Easily twice what I use of shampoo. She's with me: conditioner matters. And like her, I make sure to apply conditioner to the ends. I absolutely make sure the ends are conditioned, well conditioned.

I mentioned in my above post that I shampoo as much as 4 times. 4 applications. But keep in mind, each application amount becomes smaller and smaller. The first and perhaps second application might be around the size of a quarter, and then half that amount and then again half that amount. (As the hair becomes cleaner, each application needs less shampoo, and you'll have plenty of lather.) I leave the final shampoo wash on a little bit before rinsing it out in order to help lift out the remaining tidbits of gunk. I have to do a little more shampooing than most because of my scalp skin condition, but most can get away with 2 applications. For everyone, the first shampoo application is to break the surface tension, and the second application is the real cleansing action of shampooing.

Thank you for sharing. I have thought of showing how I wash my hair in a video, but not until she mentioned getting in with a swimsuit on did it occur to me how I could do it without being naked. So, I may have to find a friend and give it a go. I have a little extra info I might be able to give from the perspective of someone with a scalp skin condition.

heidi w.

MintChocChip
May 25th, 2012, 11:50 AM
Heidi w. - wow, thanks so much for answering my queries in so much depth! It's really helpful! I will definately be making sure to do that scritching method on the back of my head tomorrow!

Also, I had a look at your youtube video about how to oil your hair which I found to be also really helpful. You have beautiful hair by the way!

MintChocChip
May 27th, 2012, 08:48 AM
A quick thank you to everyone who replied to this, I washed my hair yesterday after reading all your comments and my hair is now build-up/residue free! :D

heidi w.
May 27th, 2012, 02:41 PM
Thank you for your compliment, and I am glad the video was helpful to you. I'm happy to hear that everything is sorted out with your hair now. Keep up the good work. Beware of nutty ideas. Sometimes they work, but often enough they do not.

heidi w.

jacqueline101
June 3rd, 2012, 08:44 PM
I wet my hair med temp water apply shampoo to head massage scalp and rinse condition the same way and rinse with vinegar.

dollyfish
June 4th, 2012, 08:20 PM
This thread is really making me wish I had a hose attachment for my shower head. My shampooing is simply sub par.

sun-kissed
June 4th, 2012, 09:51 PM
Forgive me, I have not read the entire thread, but I realize the original problem has been cured.

I'm going to post anyways, for diversity's sake.

Traditionally I've diluted my shampoo by one drop to three cups of water, and the poured it over my wet hair in the shower. I was having the trouble of an overly stripped top layer and a greasy bottom and dirty scalp with this method, and I couldn't figure out how to get my fingers into my hair in the shower - I tried every way I could think of! - they just wouldn't merge.

Then last week I tried CO, and covered my entire head in conditioner. It was pleasantly easy to work my fingers over my scalp and through my hair, and afterwards my hair was cleaner and softer than it's ever been. I mean seriously, it's CLEAN. I can't scrape anything off of my scalp, and my hair is soft and silky even at the back of my scalp where my trouble zone used to be. The conditioner is slightly too heavy for my straight, ii, fine hair so it needs to be washed more often than I would like with this method, but if I can I'm going to stick with it. I've never gotten these results from any shampoo.