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firegypsy
May 21st, 2012, 05:59 PM
I'm sure it's been asked before, but I'm asking again. If there is a thread that thoroughly discusses this feel free to point me there instead of responding!

I have 2 MP brushes that are the boars bristle and nylon hybrid. I'm very happy with them, but am considering investing in a pure BBB from them.

So two questions, I guess. First, I've used only MP for 20 years now. I've never even tried any other brands so if you have and feel there's another, comparable brand let me know!

Secondly, opinions seem to be divided on the BBB in general. For those with thin, fine hair....what say ye? Love it or hate it?

I like it personally to distribute sebum on non wash days. BUT I've frankly not given a lot of thought to potential damage. Don't hurt me. It's a big investment, so I'd like to hear thoughts before pulling the trigger. It would be my birthday present next month!

PrairieRose
May 21st, 2012, 06:17 PM
I have a blond BBB. It is very gentle, and I have not seen any damage from it.

firegypsy
May 21st, 2012, 06:22 PM
OH! I used to have one of those and got rid of it years ago. I could kick myself...it was a silver brush with the blond boar's bristles.

Natalia
May 21st, 2012, 08:20 PM
i am a fine/thin hair who bbb's. i have a conair 100% boar that i like just fine though i dont have anything to compare it too. MP's are WAY out of my price range but more power to ya if you can. im primarily wo but not strictly and the conair does its job of spreading the sebum away from my scalp.

GrowingGlory
May 21st, 2012, 08:41 PM
I've used a Fuller Brush gentle BBB (recommended for men with thinning hair) and it worked well for me. I have thick, coarse hair, though, and love my MP Large Extra BBB. It was a worthy investment.

Tawnylioness
May 22nd, 2012, 01:05 AM
i have very thin fine hair and i realized my hair prefers combing and the occasional tangle teezer...when i brush it it tend to go all "poofy" in a bad way :)

Juanita
May 22nd, 2012, 02:46 AM
I have fine thin hair. I use a wooden comb first then a BBB to spread the oil down my length. My hair doesn't tangle very much though

Neneka
May 22nd, 2012, 03:11 AM
I have used BBB for some time now. I bought it during the winter, can't remember exactly when but I have been using it ever since. I was very worried that it would break my F hair (my thickness is average). I went to many stores because I wanted the softest pure BBB available. Majority of them felt too hard but finally I found one I liked. It has a lot of blond bristles. Are they softer? There is something like 70% blond and 30% dark bristles. :hmm:

I haven't noticed any damage yet. I like the brush. It can detangle my hair without any nasty snapping sounds and it distributes oils nicely. I don't use it every day though because I am still afraid of damage. Maybe I should just use it more and stop if any damage actually occurs...

Madora
May 22nd, 2012, 07:25 AM
Yes, I think a pure bbb (no nylon mixed in) would be a useful addition to your hair arsenal.

Just remember to always detangle your hair first with a wide tooth comb (a brush is NOT a detangler).

There are different types of boar bristle brushes, with different lengths and flexibility. Be sure to test the bristles with your fingers to get a "feel" for the bristle flexability. If the bristles are too soft and flexible, then they won't do much in the way of brushing.

Always remove the shed hairs from your brush so you get the maximum "oomph" when brushing. Keep the brush squeaky clean and it will serve you for many years.

Neneka
May 22nd, 2012, 08:19 AM
Sorry if this seems hijacking (or stupid)...

Madora, you are right about detangling. I said that I sometimes detangle my hair with BBB but I shouldn't call it detangling because my hair really doesn't tangle. It's very slippery and straight so my "tangles" propably not "real" tangles. (English is not my first language, I am sorry if I confused somebody. :o)

firegypsy
May 22nd, 2012, 08:24 AM
I have used BBB for some time now. I bought it during the winter, can't remember exactly when but I have been using it ever since. I was very worried that it would break my F hair (my thickness is average). I went to many stores because I wanted the softest pure BBB available. Majority of them felt too hard but finally I found one I liked. It has a lot of blond bristles. Are they softer? There is something like 70% blond and 30% dark bristles. :hmm:

I haven't noticed any damage yet. I like the brush. It can detangle my hair without any nasty snapping sounds and it distributes oils nicely. I don't use it every day though because I am still afraid of damage. Maybe I should just use it more and stop if any damage actually occurs...

I don't know if they are as a rule, but my blond brush was super, super soft. Not over effective for distributing sebum.

Neneka
May 22nd, 2012, 09:04 AM
I don't know if they are as a rule, but my blond brush was super, super soft. Not over effective for distributing sebum.

Maybe boars are like humans. :D Like usually blond ones have finer/softer hair than dark ones. ;)

(Okay this was stupid if my last post wasn't...)

islandboo
May 22nd, 2012, 09:20 AM
I have thin, fine hair and love BBBs. I recently upgraded to a MP sensitive from a brush that I had had for a couple decades which was staring to show wear. I detangle first with a TT. Also have a Conair BBB that I use to distribute a coney serum (it has a plastic handle so I can submerge it to wash it really well) but I don't like it at all - the bristles are packed very tight and don't penetrate my hair very well.

heidi w.
May 22nd, 2012, 09:54 AM
There is no need to spend a bazillion bucks acquiring the best BBB on the market to get the benefits of BBBing. I think I've generally spent around $10 bucks for a BBB, usually from some kind of grocery store. (The only thing is to make sure the label says 100% Boar Bristle Brush or at least 100% Boar.) I have fine, super straight hair, just a lot of it. I have always BBB'd my hair, especially as part of oiling the length after a full hair wash. My hair is so fine that seeing a single strand is not the easiest. I have always used full-on BBB's never these hybrid things, which I think is kind of against the idea of BBBing, then. In my opinion, one either detangles their hair, OR BBB's their hair, or combs their hair OR fingercombs their hair. Not this thing where one can two things in one motion such as detangle and BBB. Kind of silly, if you ask me and if you understand how to BBB, and the why behind it. IF you detangle the hair first which one should perform prior to BBBing, then why the nylon bristles? What's their use then? Oh well, to each their own, but it makes no sense to me. That's all I'll say.

I think the base of the brush matters, and the shape of the brush can matter. I used to use an oval brush with a rubber back; now I use a square BBB with a wood backing. The latter brush is one of the best BBB's I've ever come across. It works well. I even created a little youtube video on how I oil (and BBB) my hair. It shows me detangling, and it shows also an easy, quick updo that anyone should be able to do that has mid-back to tailbone length hair or longer. Here's a link if that might be of interest. I just figured it was easier for folks if I just show them rather than explain it in narrative to them. It's too easy to get lost in words. So I gave a picture:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjVwPKMQDYk


Some things to know about BBB. Basic info. (Not organized in hierarchical order....)

1. A BBB does not detangle hair. It is to be used as a hair polishing tool.
2. Never BBB wet or damp hair. Just doesn't work.
3. Curly haired folks can BBB, but they may have to practice to get the hang of it. It may create a lot of poof, so maybe BBB before bed, not before going out somewhere.
4. This kind of brush attracts dust easily so store in a drawer or in a cloth bag.
5. BBB's can cause tangles, so BBB slowly and gently. If you encounter a tangle, stop BBBing, work it out with fingers or a comb, then return to BBBing.
6. Each downstroke must be thorough. Go all the way down the length and beyond into the air so you won't accidentally take up some hair and cause a tangle.
7. BBB's generally do not penetrate the thickness (or depth) of one's hair, so one must detangle top and underside separately.
8. BBB's will flatten the top of head hair, usually.
9. BBBing is a good way to work in one's oiling choice.
10. One BBB's the opposite of detangling. Detangle we begin from the bottom of the length and work our way up; BBB, one begins at the top and goes down the length.
11. If you don't have time, don't BBB. BBB only when you have plenty of time to proceed slowly and carefully. This is not a task for those in a hurry. That's when you're most likely to have a massive tangle. Downstrokes will be incomplete, and the whole experience will be a bust.

I hope this is of help.
heidi w.

heidi w.
May 22nd, 2012, 10:00 AM
... the bristles are packed very tight and don't penetrate my hair very well.

This is normal. This is partly why a BBB doesn't generally penetrate the thickness (or depth) of one's hair, usually. Reference my list above. The way the bristles are so thick over the brush is the primary reason it's not a detangling tool.

heidi w.

heidi w.
May 22nd, 2012, 10:03 AM
Yes, I think a pure bbb (no nylon mixed in) would be a useful addition to your hair arsenal.

Just remember to always detangle your hair first with a wide tooth comb (a brush is NOT a detangler).

There are different types of boar bristle brushes, with different lengths and flexibility. Be sure to test the bristles with your fingers to get a "feel" for the bristle flexability. If the bristles are too soft and flexible, then they won't do much in the way of brushing.

Always remove the shed hairs from your brush so you get the maximum "oomph" when brushing. Keep the brush squeaky clean and it will serve you for many years.

What she said!! Um, there are different stiffness of bristles available, but you likely have to hunt it down. I once found a dog's BBB in the petco pet store, and it was a lot softer bristle. One can try one of these if that is more to your liking....

Believe it or not though, the bristle stiffness isn't that big of a worry, really, if you're using the BBB properly otherwise. Please, people don't detangle with this tool. It doesn't work well as a detangling tool.

heidi w.

Madora
May 22nd, 2012, 10:33 AM
By way of explanation of why I recommend detangling with a wide tooth comb BEFORE using your bbb:

Compare the brush vs the comb. The comb has a row of tines..the brush has closely compacted bristles..several rows of them.

Detangling with a brush (w/o detangling with a wide tooth comb first) is asking for breakage and a very unpleasant experience.

Detangling with a wide tooth comb helps get rid of any tangles, so that when you do use the brush, it glides through the hair. The effectiveness of the brush depends on the bristles (I like a moderately stiff bristle), plus the way you brush your hair.

heidi w.
May 22nd, 2012, 11:16 AM
By way of explanation of why I recommend detangling with a wide tooth comb BEFORE using your bbb:

Compare the brush vs the comb. The comb has a row of tines..the brush has closely compacted bristles..several rows of them.

Detangling with a brush (w/o detangling with a wide tooth comb first) is asking for breakage and a very unpleasant experience.

Detangling with a wide tooth comb helps get rid of any tangles, so that when you do use the brush, it glides through the hair. The effectiveness of the brush depends on the bristles (I like a moderately stiff bristle), plus the way you brush your hair.


Thank you, Madora. Learning how to BBB is a common problem of misunderstanding. They hear it makes hair soft and shinier. But then they get puzzled when they actually try it the first time because they use it like a brush, expecting it to work like a brush. Compare the bristles of a brush with a BBB (far more bristles than a regular brush, even.) Then they get frustrated and toss the brush, and claim it doesn't work at all. I'm like you; I like a bit of a stiffer brush, and I glide the brush over the top of the hair, even when I'm working oil in, which my video clearly shows.

Curly haired folks have to do things a bit differently than I do as a straight-haired gal. But the video does show me encountering a tangle while BBBing.

heidi w.

jeanniet
May 22nd, 2012, 12:19 PM
If you've been using MP brushes all this time, then I would get an MP BBB brush. There isn't a whole lot of difference in the feel between the mixed and the BBB, and you already know and like the feel. You could get the sensitive brush, but again, if you like what you've had than I would just go for the regular brush. In my experience, there is nothing like an MP.

islandboo
May 22nd, 2012, 01:04 PM
This is normal. This is partly why a BBB doesn't generally penetrate the thickness (or depth) of one's hair, usually. Reference my list above. The way the bristles are so thick over the brush is the primary reason it's not a detangling tool.

heidi w.

No, it isn't normal. I've been using BBBs all my life and never had one do this. My hair is exceptionally fine and thin and the bristles always penetrate all the way to my scalp, it's just how my hair is. I never need to do top and bottom separately, it would be ludicrous. I will grant that it may not be how they work for most people but in my case it is. This Conair brush is just completely the wrong style for me.

GrowingGlory
May 22nd, 2012, 01:19 PM
When I used a Fuller Gentler brush I had to brush in layers and hold my hair to my brush in order for the bristles to penetrate. Now that I have a larger brush with longer, stiffer bristles I don't have to do that.

heidi w.
May 22nd, 2012, 01:22 PM
No, it isn't normal. I've been using BBBs all my life and never had one do this. My hair is exceptionally fine and thin and the bristles always penetrate all the way to my scalp, it's just how my hair is. I never need to do top and bottom separately, it would be ludicrous. I will grant that it may not be how they work for most people but in my case it is. This Conair brush is just completely the wrong style for me.

Actually, if you read LHC posts, and I've also read other posts on other long hair care boards regarding BBB's, the most common complaint is that these brushes don't go through most people's hair. So you are one of the one's that the BBB penetrates the thickness of. If you'd like, you can watch my video and see that it doesn't penetrate the thickness of my hair. It may penetrate some, but most it does not. Even George Michaels' long hair care book explains this, if I recall accurately. (I don't have the book next to me at present to reference and cite.)

I should add to not press harder to get the brush to penetrate the hair. It doesn't help to press harder, and one can incur some damage if they do this.

heidi w.

firegypsy
May 22nd, 2012, 01:31 PM
Heidi, I have no idea why the hybrid! The first one (a large Mason Pearson that is BBB and nylon) was given to me as a gift when I was accepted into a ballet company. It was the standard gift. I don't think it had much to do with "proper" brushing, rather than an exquisite tool that made you feel like a princess. And boy, did it! It's one of my most treasured possessions. I went on to get a junior years later to keep in my purse because I have never found it's equal. So I have my large beautiful brush and a travel size.

So now that I'm moving on to using it for it's actual purpose (polishing and shining the hair) I am wanting to upgrade. I may get a few so I can try them out, but there's something luxurious about the MP brushes, how they're weighted, the shape and feel etc. I can't afford to do things like that regularly, but it would make a smashing birthday gift!

I so appreciate all the feedback and so far everyone on this thread seems to be in favor of them. I do not detangle with mine, so no problem there. I have used it on wet hair though, so that has changed.

Thank you for sharing all that you have. I'm learning....baby step.

Heidi thank you also for that video! I found it the other day and watched it-your hair is just so lovely. You have a very classically beautiful face too-looks like you could have stepped out of any era. It's just timeless.

heidi w.
May 22nd, 2012, 01:35 PM
Heidi thank you also for that video! I found it the other day and watched it-your hair is just so lovely. You have a very classically beautiful face too-looks like you could have stepped out of any era. It's just timeless.

Thank you. I don't consider myself beautiful by any means or definition. I'm getting wrinklier. Yuck. Oh well. Nothing much I can do about it. But it is a nice thing to hear and rather makes my day. Thank you.

heidi w.

GrowingGlory
May 22nd, 2012, 01:41 PM
@firegypsy Have you selected a brush?

firegypsy
May 22nd, 2012, 01:45 PM
I'm thinking MP, probably medium. I have a large now and it's amazing, but bigger than I need currently. When my hair was 4 times as thick and waist length it was perfect. Now I'm not quite APL and have significantly thinner hair. So medium seems about right. :)

GrowingGlory
May 22nd, 2012, 01:56 PM
There's a link in one of my Visitor Messages to MP in Germany. They are cheaper and some still have wooden backs with bristles inserted directly into them.

firegypsy
May 22nd, 2012, 01:57 PM
There's a link in one of my Visitor Messages to MP in Germany. They are cheaper and some still have wooden backs with bristles inserted directly into them.


so no rubberized pad?

islandboo
May 22nd, 2012, 01:58 PM
Actually, if you read LHC posts, and I've also read other posts on other long hair care boards regarding BBB's, the most common complaint is that these brushes don't go through most people's hair. So you are one of the one's that the BBB penetrates the thickness of. If you'd like, you can watch my video and see that it doesn't penetrate the thickness of my hair. It may penetrate some, but most it does not. Even George Michaels' long hair care book explains this, if I recall accurately. (I don't have the book next to me at present to reference and cite.)

I should add to not press harder to get the brush to penetrate the hair. It doesn't help to press harder, and one can incur some damage if they do this.

heidi w.

Heidi, I apologize. I reread what I wrote and I sound much snottier than I meant to*. You are absolutely correct, and I do realize that I am something of an outlier as far as hair goes, especially on this forum. What you state is correct for the vast majority of people and I shouldn't have came across like I was challenging it.

*err - not that I meant to sound snotty at all...I think I should just give up on trying to communicate today!

GrowingGlory
May 22nd, 2012, 02:05 PM
@firegypsy Exactly.

firegypsy
May 22nd, 2012, 02:08 PM
interesting. is there a benefit to that? I quite like the rubberized pad, but if it will do a better job without it then I'll go for that.

I have a friend in Germany. I can always have her buy and ship to me!

jeanniet
May 22nd, 2012, 02:59 PM
Actually, if you read LHC posts, and I've also read other posts on other long hair care boards regarding BBB's, the most common complaint is that these brushes don't go through most people's hair. So you are one of the one's that the BBB penetrates the thickness of. If you'd like, you can watch my video and see that it doesn't penetrate the thickness of my hair. It may penetrate some, but most it does not. Even George Michaels' long hair care book explains this, if I recall accurately. (I don't have the book next to me at present to reference and cite.)

I should add to not press harder to get the brush to penetrate the hair. It doesn't help to press harder, and one can incur some damage if they do this.

heidi w.
A lot of this has to do with the brush. I have thick hair, and my MP BBB penetrates all the way to the scalp easily. Any other BBB I've used didn't. It's one reason why I recommend MP so wholeheartedly. If you can afford it, they're as good as it gets.

GrowingGlory
May 22nd, 2012, 03:18 PM
You could ask them to be certain but I am under the impression that the bristles are sewn, not glued together. This makes it possible to spread oil with the brush. My brochure says that it is not recommended with the plastic backed brush.

firegypsy
May 22nd, 2012, 03:26 PM
Oh that is AWESOME! Thank you!

heidi w.
May 22nd, 2012, 04:31 PM
Heidi, I apologize. I reread what I wrote and I sound much snottier than I meant to*. You are absolutely correct, and I do realize that I am something of an outlier as far as hair goes, especially on this forum. What you state is correct for the vast majority of people and I shouldn't have came across like I was challenging it.

*err - not that I meant to sound snotty at all...I think I should just give up on trying to communicate today!

No problem. We're fine. Have a nice evening.
heidi w.

Miss Catrina
May 22nd, 2012, 05:50 PM
I used a cheap Conair BBB when my hair was long and I thought it was just brilliant for smoothing the surface of my hair down (great for ponytail days). Never did understand how it could be damaging.