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View Full Version : is wool parandi bad for hair?



onlyforhim
May 12th, 2012, 10:39 AM
I have been braiding my hair with parandis but recently i started using wool. In LHC i hear that wool is bad for hair.
My question is what other threads can be used that are as thick as wool but are not bad for hair?
and why is wool bad for hair?
is it bad for hair even if it is natural wool?
How do you make your parandis? and how many threads do you usually use :)

Thank you :)

Ishje
May 12th, 2012, 10:41 AM
I can't really imagen it is bad for your hair...especially if it is real wool, from sheep or alpaca.
maybe acryl could be bad because it does not feel as soft, but I don't even think that would damage hair.

I would be careful with wet hair though.

onlyforhim
May 12th, 2012, 10:49 AM
I can't really imagen it is bad for your hair...especially if it is real wool, from sheep or alpaca.
maybe acryl could be bad because it does not feel as soft, but I don't even think that would damage hair.

I would be careful with wet hair though.


thank you ishje ..I really hope so

Ishje
May 12th, 2012, 01:07 PM
you are welcome ^^

Honeyfall
May 12th, 2012, 01:36 PM
That's a good question actually, I suppose if it is very rough then perhaps there is a chance of it rubbing the cuticle the wrong way? I wouldn't worry about it too much because Parandi hairstyles tend to be pretty secure, but perhaps it would be best to use the softest wool you can find? Or else some other material?

DreadfulWoman
May 12th, 2012, 02:00 PM
Well, I don't have any definite answers for you, but here are my thoughts:

Wool is itself made of hair which is laid in both directions, with raised and interlocking cuticles. That's what holds it together. So theoretically if you are rubbing wool against your hair you would be encouraging your hair to undergo the same subtle felting process. In fact, I've heard that sleeping in a wool cap is a great way to give yourself dreadlocks, although I never tried it myself. I wouldn't worry about a wool parandi so much though, because the wool is just laying against your hair, and not really rubbing against it.

The other thing that might be an issue is that depending on how the wool has been washed and processed, it may be made of very dry hair, and so might possibly rob your hair of moisture while you wear it. A simple solution to that though, would be to treat your wool parandi with whatever moisture treatments you would give your hair. Do this right, and your parandi could even be adding moisture to your hair while you wear it, rather than robbing your hair of moisture.

Just my :twocents:.

sarelis
May 12th, 2012, 02:09 PM
I was considering making a paranda out of some embroidery silks I have, maybe something like that would be more hair friendly?

vrle
May 12th, 2012, 02:33 PM
Unfortunately, I have had some bad experiences with wool in my hair :-( One lazy weekend, I decided to do a crown braid and sew it against my head. I didn't have a satin ribon, so I used some soft feeling wool instead. When I wanted to take it out again, using wool turned out to have been a very bad idea. Strands of my hair had become tangled into the wool fibres and it was an awful job to get the wool out again. I even had to cut out some wool/hair tangles. The wool was like velcro to my hair, even though the hair was already braided before I put the wool in. Never again for me!

ladyofrohan
May 12th, 2012, 02:49 PM
I hadn't thought about the hair-on-hair aspect. I suspect if you used a very tightly twisted, smooth wool yarn you would be ok, and braiding rather than sewing might also be ok, but I would go with something a little less controversial if possible. Perhaps a bamboo yarn?

earthnut
May 12th, 2012, 03:25 PM
Wool might take some of the moisture from your hair, but if you soak the wool in conditioner, rinse it lightly, and dry it before using, this won't be a problem.

There are many types of wool. If you use cheap feltable wool, it will be more likely to cause friction. If you use soft merino, BFL, or superwash wool, it won't cause so much friction. Also the conditioner treatment will make the wool softer and reduce friction.

Basically if you're concerned, treat the paranda with conditioner like you would to your own hair. :bluesmile I think a soft, conditioned wool is an excellent choice for parandi.

As for other yarn, I wouldn't use a really slippery yarn like some bamboos, rayons, and silks just because it would be harder to use. I used cotton with great success.