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Micayla47
April 25th, 2012, 10:05 AM
Here is a list of things I always suspected but now am sure of – because of LHC. All of these ideas are in direct opposition to what everyone has ever told me:

• hair is not just superficial; it has cultural and emotional significance
• cutting hair doesn’t make it “grow faster”
• layers don’t make fine hair thicker
• blowdrying is damaging even with products that “protect” from heat
• washing everyday is too harsh
• brushing wet hair is a bad idea
• there’s no such thing as “gentle” bleach
• gray/silver hair can be beautiful and sexy
• WOMEN OVER 40 ROCK LONG HAIR!

ETA: i just remembered one more: "you don't have to spend a lot of money to get good hair products"

Dragon Faery
April 25th, 2012, 10:19 AM
LOVE this!

Also add: curly hair shouldn't be brushed, and rarely combed. :)

WaitingSoLong
April 25th, 2012, 10:30 AM
I disagree with the blow drying thing...as long as it is done carefully and the hair never gets hot...it has never damaged my hair. :)

Before TLHC I cannot say I suspected any of this. I simply did not care. LOL I had never even heard that cutting hair makes it grow faster. I heard that first here from bewlidered people wanting to know if it is true and I don't understand why anyone thinks it would.

I do know that my life's experience with my hair ran contrary to what stylists were always telling me. I was starting to think I had hair that just didn't follow hair rules but now I know that stylists don't necessarily know what they are talking about. I suppose some do. I haven't met one IRL yet.

spidermom
April 25th, 2012, 10:41 AM
The hair grows faster if you trim it thing? I think it's plus/minus. I could never get my hair long when I tried growing without trimming. It broke off more than it would grow, and getting it trimmed every 6-8 weeks made all the difference. It finally started gaining length (about 5.5 inches per year). However, at the time, I was using curling irons, etc. Now that I don't, I don't need trims that often. (but I do, in fact, still need them or my ends get ragged and break off like crazy)

Micayla47
April 25th, 2012, 10:44 AM
LOVE this!

Also add: curly hair shouldn't be brushed, and rarely combed. :)
yes, i forgot to add "benign neglect" is a good thing :)

Micayla47
April 25th, 2012, 10:47 AM
I disagree with the blow drying thing...as long as it is done carefully and the hair never gets hot...it has never damaged my hair. :)

Before TLHC I cannot say I suspected any of this. I simply did not care. LOL I had never even heard that cutting hair makes it grow faster. I heard that first here from bewlidered people wanting to know if it is true and I don't understand why anyone thinks it would.

I do know that my life's experience with my hair ran contrary to what stylists were always telling me. I was starting to think I had hair that just didn't follow hair rules but now I know that stylists don't necessarily know what they are talking about. I suppose some do. I haven't met one IRL yet.
i was thinking about how hairdressers have always blow dried my hair. they take my soaking wet, newly bleached, long, fine hair and dry it piece by piece with high heat until it's bone dry. i've even seen steam coming off my hair when they do it and they always say, "oh that's not your hair. it's the product burning off."

if i'm in a hurry i will blow dry my scalp on low heat and using my fingers instead of pulling it tight with a styling brush.

sun-kissed
April 25th, 2012, 10:49 AM
Also, brushing fine hair 100 times a day with a plastic, ball-tipped, round hairbrush just doesn't work. No matter *what* your grandmothers say. :p

Micayla47
April 25th, 2012, 10:56 AM
Also, brushing fine hair 100 times a day with a plastic, ball-tipped, round hairbrush just doesn't work. No matter *what* your grandmothers say. :p
oh i forgot that one. that was one i actually believed!

Tota
April 25th, 2012, 11:02 AM
• hair is not just superficial; it has cultural and emotional significance
• cutting hair doesn’t make it “grow faster”
• layers don’t make fine hair thicker

These three pretty much sum up my sad hairstory. All my life I had to listen to this:
- it's just hair, it grows back and you're being weird and stupid for caring so much about it
- you should cut it more regularly if you want it long
- your poor fine hair will look more full with layers

Haha no more stupid hair advice because I know better now:D

proo
April 25th, 2012, 11:21 AM
I second Spidermom -
trimming my hair accelerates my growth rate bigtime.
Don't know the science
but it's true for me.

shutterpillar
April 25th, 2012, 12:12 PM
Same here with the trimming. It needs to be microtrimmed every 3 months or else it just looks horrible and the ends end up breaking and splitting.

another rule: no hair is created equal. What works for some, may not work for you.

Nedertane
April 25th, 2012, 01:43 PM
Erm, personally, I've thought my fine hair looked better/had more body with layers, but maybe I just see what I want to see in the mirror. Also, I second WaitingSoLong when it comes to blowdrying. While I've gotten to preferring air drying for the most part, since I've kept the dryer on cool whenever I use it, I've been seeing less hair problems.

Heh, I guess then, that's another hair fact: many assume that the same things can/will help everybody. Not true!

WaterMusic
April 25th, 2012, 01:50 PM
Trimming your hair does not make it come out of your head faster. For people who experience a lot of breakage (for reasons like damage, or very fine or brittle hair) trimming makes the growth rate appear faster, because you aren't losing as much from the bottom. But it does NOT increase your growth rate.

proo
April 25th, 2012, 01:54 PM
Trimming your hair does not make it come out of your head faster. For people who experience a lot of breakage (for reasons like damage, or very fine or brittle hair) trimming makes the growth rate appear faster, because you aren't losing as much from the bottom. But it does NOT increase your growth rate.
How do you know?
Things far more esoteric, like stress, have a huge effect on the entire system.

jacqueline101
April 25th, 2012, 02:03 PM
I think trimming helps my hair but I don't know about growth wise.

whitedove
April 25th, 2012, 02:13 PM
Short hair is easier to look after. I used to spent 20 minutes trying to get my short hair styled, now I spend 1 minute.

henné
April 25th, 2012, 02:14 PM
I also don't believe trimming one's hair makes it grow faster, but it sure does feel very nice to have it trimmed from time to time - giving it some sort of shape at the ends and then the whole thicker healthy feeling ... mmmm. I love me some trimmin'! :D

I blow dry once in a blue moon and I do it in a very gentle way - hold the blow dryer far from my hair (that's why it take somewhere between long and forever) ...

But thanks for the list!!!

Also ... not brushing or combing properly even your absolutely average (in every possible way) hair produces natural dreads :rollin: (I actually had to cut one out of my hair some 3 years ago, lol, I still wonder how I could let that happen).

spidermom
April 25th, 2012, 02:31 PM
How do you know?
Things far more esoteric, like stress, have a huge effect on the entire system.

I second this. I've experienced some awesome growth spurts immediately following a trim. Plus an LHCer and her husband did a study of her hair. He measured her hair every single week for a year, and she always - without exception - got faster growth the week following a trim.

Just because our limited human brains can't figure out why something might be true doesn't mean that it's false.

ladylowtide
April 25th, 2012, 02:42 PM
LAYERS

this

a lot

why???!!!

Always had a ton of layers. I have a lot of hair, but it is very straight and medium with big sections of it being close to fine. Always hated how thin my hair looked. The solution: more layers. Why did I believe every stylist, who had ever touched my hair.

Now that I have gone 3/4 of a year without so much as a trim, my hair has never in my life looked thicker!! :cheese:

kidari
April 25th, 2012, 02:54 PM
Also, brushing fine hair 100 times a day with a plastic, ball-tipped, round hairbrush just doesn't work. No matter *what* your grandmothers say. :p

They probably mean with a BBB?

Amarante
April 25th, 2012, 02:58 PM
LAYERS

this

a lot

why???!!!

Always had a ton of layers. I have a lot of hair, but it is very straight and medium with big sections of it being close to fine. Always hated how thin my hair looked. The solution: more layers. Why did I believe every stylist, who had ever touched my hair.

Now that I have gone 3/4 of a year without so much as a trim, my hair has never in my life looked thicker!! :cheese:

I have to agree with you! I never knew how thick my hair was until I started growing out my layers. It's almost like having a different person's hair suddenly, haha.

WaitingSoLong
April 25th, 2012, 03:02 PM
I second this. I've experienced some awesome growth spurts immediately following a trim. Plus an LHCer and her husband did a study of her hair. He measured her hair every single week for a year, and she always - without exception - got faster growth the week following a trim.

Just because our limited human brains can't figure out why something might be true doesn't mean that it's false.

I find this intriguing.

I would love to see people do this as an experiment but there would be no control. Although I have measured my hair monthly for 2 years and def. know my growth rate. It never improved after a trim, BUT, I only trim once a year. However, it coudl vary as much as 1/4" any given month. For example, I would get 1/2" for several months, then only 1/4", and maybe a 3/4" once. It always averaged out to 6" a year, no matter which 12 consecutive months you looked at. I was going to trim back to Classic at the end of this year (I should be about 2" past it by then). My goal for 2013 is to reach FTL, which is only 3.5" past Classic on me. If I trimmed an inch every 3 months, I would not make it (6-4=2"). I would be willing to try, just to see! Maybe I would make it anyway? However there is no predicting health or stress issues. But if a a trim = fresher hemline = more growth, what is there to lose?

kidari
April 25th, 2012, 03:05 PM
I second this. I've experienced some awesome growth spurts immediately following a trim. Plus an LHCer and her husband did a study of her hair. He measured her hair every single week for a year, and she always - without exception - got faster growth the week following a trim.

Just because our limited human brains can't figure out why something might be true doesn't mean that it's false.

That's incredible! Maybe it's similar to cutting according to the lunar cycle? Trimming has always helped my hair. I still feel that babying your hair and being gentle with it to avoid trims allow growth but for some reason big chops (2 inches or more) seem to transform my hair and make it grow back faster and thicker and fuller. I thought it was an illusion. I used to microtrim every month but now I think I will do two inch trims twice a year.

Henrietta
April 25th, 2012, 03:10 PM
I second Spidermom -
trimming my hair accelerates my growth rate bigtime.
Don't know the science
but it's true for me.


The hair grows faster if you trim it thing? I think it's plus/minus. I could never get my hair long when I tried growing without trimming. It broke off more than it would grow, and getting it trimmed every 6-8 weeks made all the difference. It finally started gaining length (about 5.5 inches per year). However, at the time, I was using curling irons, etc. Now that I don't, I don't need trims that often. (but I do, in fact, still need them or my ends get ragged and break off like crazy)

Again, I agree. Well, it's not like your scalp knows what's going on at the ends. No nerves in hairs :) But the point is that if you trim, you stop losing length because of crunching at the ends ;)

Othala
April 25th, 2012, 03:18 PM
You never know how long and thick you can grow your hair until you have solidly reached terminal length.

WaterMusic
April 25th, 2012, 03:42 PM
For starters, none of the examples you guys have given actually contradict what I was saying.

If you see an increase in growth rate, it can be due to one of two processes: 1) an increase in the rate at which hair is emerging from the scalp, OR 2) a decrease in the rate at which hair is breaking off at the ends. Which is it, and how can we determine this?

First, we have to make predictions about what we would expect if either of these things was happening.

1) If it is true that trimming increases the apparent growth rate by altering the first process, then you would expect to see an increase in apparent growth rate right after a trim.

2) If it is true that trimming increases the apparent growth rate by altering the second process, then you would expect to see an increase in apparent growth rate right after a trim.

Wait a second! These two predictions are the exact same! In order to determine which of these processes are altered, or if both are altered, we need predictions that are different. So if we see one result, we know it was Process 1, and if we see the other result, we know it was Process 2. Also note that both of these processes could be occurring at the same time.

The problem with just measuring a change in the length of your hair, is that the length of your hair is affected by both Process 1 and Process 2. The reason being is that if you are loosing length at one end and gaining it at the other, you can't tell at what rate either process is happening. We need an objective point on the hair that we can keep track of, that isn't measured from either the ends or the scalp. The only way I can think of to do that is to have dyed hair, and have a line demarcating dyed/non-dyed hair. Then you could measure from the scalp to the line, and from the line to the ends. So here are some new predictions:

1) If it is true that trimming increases the apparent growth rate by altering the first process (growth from the scalp), then you would expect to see an increase in the rate at which the demarcation line is moving away from the scalp after a trim.

2) If it is true that trimming increases the apparent growth rate by altering the second process (erosion from the ends), then you would expect to see an increase in the rate at which the demarcation line is approaching the ends (taking trims into account).

This is how I would design a study of this phenomenon. I would also include people with a variety of hair types, and try to control fior things like: diet, washing techniques, products used, water softness, climate (humidity, temperature, etc), and any other factors that I think might affect this phenomenon.

Wow, that might be the most I have thought about a forum post in years. :P

WaterMusic
April 25th, 2012, 03:47 PM
A follow up:

My personal belief is that Process 1 is not affected by a trim. Obviously, I have not scientifically tested this, nor am I aware of any appropriate studies on the topic.

However, I have seen no evidence to suggest that Process 1 is affected by trims, and more tellingly, I have neither heard of, nor can I come up with, a reasonable explanation for how Process 1 would be altered.

On the other hand, I see some evidence for Process 2 being affected by trims, AND there exists a logical and simple explanation for the mechanism.

In the absence of a scientific study, this is how I make a decision.

Mrsbaybeegurl
April 25th, 2012, 03:55 PM
I agree with so much of this!!

How about shampooing hair twice (as the bottles often suggest in the directions) is not only not necessary but can lead to a rebellious oily scalp since all the oil is stripped from the hair and the scalp works overtime to replace the oils.

MonicaJean
April 25th, 2012, 04:13 PM
I've had to learn the hard way that layers in fine (and wavy!) hair only makes it look like you've got hundreds of broken damaged hairs sticking out everywhere unless you heat style. >:[ The worst part is even though I know this, I still want it layered sometimes because I am not against occasional heat styling and I do love the movement and volume on top that it gives.

HumanBean
April 25th, 2012, 11:49 PM
:cheer:Can I just applaud Watermusic's post!?

Arya
April 26th, 2012, 02:00 AM
1) If it is true that trimming increases the apparent growth rate by altering the first process (growth from the scalp), then you would expect to see an increase in the rate at which the demarcation line is moving away from the scalp after a trim.

My thoughts exactly. Easy to do with someone who's growing out dye.

2) If it is true that trimming increases the apparent growth rate by altering the second process (erosion from the ends), then you would expect to see an increase in the rate at which the demarcation line is approaching the ends (taking trims into account).
Again, easy enough with dye!

This is how I would design a study of this phenomenon. I would also include people with a variety of hair types, and try to control fior things like: diet, washing techniques, products used, water softness, climate (humidity, temperature, etc), and any other factors that I think might affect this phenomenon.

Not necessarily. As long as the diet and styling habits remain relatively steady for that person, and we have data from several trims to compare, and several different people, we could get enough information to see if it's worth investigating on a larger scale. The biggest issue I should think would be shoddy/inconsistent measuring techniques, IMO.

Wow, that might be the most I have thought about a forum post in years. :P

sfgirl
April 26th, 2012, 04:10 AM
I've had to learn the hard way that layers in fine (and wavy!) hair only makes it look like you've got hundreds of broken damaged hairs sticking out everywhere unless you heat style. >:[ The worst part is even though I know this, I still want it layered sometimes because I am not against occasional heat styling and I do love the movement and volume on top that it gives.

My hair isn't too wavy, but it has a lot of weird little layers from growing out bangs, some weird damage areas, and the fact some areas on the top of my head either have a shorter terminal length or a very slow growth rate (I suspect the latter). I have thin-ish hair though (3"), an dthe hair that won't fit in a ponytail is about 1" put in a mini ponytail. I can't wait to be able to do this! I'm tired of weird faux damage layers!

hellucy
April 26th, 2012, 04:30 AM
Short hair is easier to look after. I used to spent 20 minutes trying to get my short hair styled, now I spend 1 minute.

I agree entirely with this one - My short hair had to be washed & styled everyday or it looked flat in parts & stuck up in others - it took an extra 5-10mins in the shower then 10mins drying & styling to look good, now it's shoulder length I can just brush it & it looks good down or put it up which takes 2 minutes & job done.

longhairedwolf
April 26th, 2012, 07:14 AM
A follow up:

My personal belief is that Process 1 is not affected by a trim. Obviously, I have not scientifically tested this, nor am I aware of any appropriate studies on the topic.

However, I have seen no evidence to suggest that Process 1 is affected by trims, and more tellingly, I have neither heard of, nor can I come up with, a reasonable explanation for how Process 1 would be altered.

On the other hand, I see some evidence for Process 2 being affected by trims, AND there exists a logical and simple explanation for the mechanism.

In the absence of a scientific study, this is how I make a decision.

Completely agree! As someone else pointed out, there's no way for the scalp to know what's happening at the ends of the hair. There's no way that it can sense that a tiny bit has been trimmed off the ends and adjust its growth rate accordingly.

Lissandria
April 26th, 2012, 07:22 AM
Here is a list of things I always suspected but now am sure of – because of LHC. All of these ideas are in direct opposition to what everyone has ever told me:

• hair is not just superficial; it has cultural and emotional significance
• cutting hair doesn’t make it “grow faster”
• layers don’t make fine hair thicker
• blowdrying is damaging even with products that “protect” from heat
• washing everyday is too harsh
• brushing wet hair is a bad idea
• there’s no such thing as “gentle” bleach
• gray/silver hair can be beautiful and sexy
• WOMEN OVER 40 ROCK LONG HAIR!

ETA: i just remembered one more: "you don't have to spend a lot of money to get good hair products"

I agree wholeheartedly with all of these. Great thread :)

Lissandria
April 26th, 2012, 07:26 AM
I second this. I've experienced some awesome growth spurts immediately following a trim. Plus an LHCer and her husband did a study of her hair. He measured her hair every single week for a year, and she always - without exception - got faster growth the week following a trim.

Just because our limited human brains can't figure out why something might be true doesn't mean that it's false.

I think you may be onto something. There could be alot more to the universe than we think, and the way you cut your hair may influence it's growth for all we know. Anything is possible.

Dr. Girlfriend
April 26th, 2012, 07:30 AM
Short hair is easier to look after. I used to spent 20 minutes trying to get my short hair styled, now I spend 1 minute.

This, totally! I find the longer mine gets the less I have to do to style it. Wash, Scrunch and go! When it was short I had to use a lot of product and actually ::style:: it.

florenonite
April 26th, 2012, 07:31 AM
Erm, personally, I've thought my fine hair looked better/had more body with layers, but maybe I just see what I want to see in the mirror. Also, I second WaitingSoLong when it comes to blowdrying. While I've gotten to preferring air drying for the most part, since I've kept the dryer on cool whenever I use it, I've been seeing less hair problems.

Heh, I guess then, that's another hair fact: many assume that the same things can/will help everybody. Not true!

I have fine and thick hair and layers give it more body. I think it has to do with the fact the shorter my hair is, the more body it has, so layers give more body than it would have at that length if it was all one length.

I wonder if maybe the idea that thin hair gets more body with long hair has to do with the conflation of fine with thin. Because my hair is thick, it has plenty of body when it's short. However, because it's also fine, it can tend to clump together when it's long, thus giving it less body. Someone with coarse and thin hair would, I expect, have rather different experiences with layers.


I agree with so much of this!!

How about shampooing hair twice (as the bottles often suggest in the directions) is not only not necessary but can lead to a rebellious oily scalp since all the oil is stripped from the hair and the scalp works overtime to replace the oils.

I shampoo my hair twice. This is actually quite recent for me, as for most of my life with conventional shampoos I've shampooed once. Then I switched to shampoo bars for about a year. After a while, perhaps because of water changes, my hair stopped responding so well to them, and now the only way I can get my hair properly clean is to shampoo twice with sulfate shampoo, possibly including conditioner or oil in the first shampoo. In my case, I doubt it's due to overshampooing, as that's something I've tried to avoid as much as possible (hence the bars and habitual single lather), and while with one shampoo I have to wash my hair every 1-2 days, with two I can last 3 and sometimes 4 days. Far more dangerous for me than double lathering is washing daily; when I was doing that as a swimming instructor my hair started getting greasy by bedtime.

For some people it's a myth that they need to shampoo daily, or lather twice, or use sulfate shampoos. For others it's a myth that if they persevere they can train their scalp to produce less oil.

Trish in SC
April 26th, 2012, 11:48 AM
Great thread. I'm still trying to wrap my mind around this one, though:

• gray/silver hair can be beautiful and sexy

I've got a silvery streak growing down the left side of my head, and it just makes me feel older! :( Looks like I need to go visit the Renegray thread, for some emotional support. LOL

einna
April 26th, 2012, 01:30 PM
I second this. I've experienced some awesome growth spurts immediately following a trim. Plus an LHCer and her husband did a study of her hair. He measured her hair every single week for a year, and she always - without exception - got faster growth the week following a trim.

Just because our limited human brains can't figure out why something might be true doesn't mean that it's false.

This made me think! It could be one of those mind over matter things? Like the placebo effect, where you know you have lost lenght and belive or want your hair to grow faster?


A follow up:

My personal belief is that Process 1 is not affected by a trim. Obviously, I have not scientifically tested this, nor am I aware of any appropriate studies on the topic.

However, I have seen no evidence to suggest that Process 1 is affected by trims, and more tellingly, I have neither heard of, nor can I come up with, a reasonable explanation for how Process 1 would be altered.

On the other hand, I see some evidence for Process 2 being affected by trims, AND there exists a logical and simple explanation for the mechanism.

In the absence of a scientific study, this is how I make a decision.

I do agree with this, but Spidermom's post makes me consider if Process 1 can happen to some people.

WaterMusic
April 26th, 2012, 04:15 PM
Not necessarily. As long as the diet and styling habits remain relatively steady for that person, and we have data from several trims to compare, and several different people, we could get enough information to see if it's worth investigating on a larger scale. The biggest issue I should think would be shoddy/inconsistent measuring techniques, IMO.

My apologies, I meant control for in the statistical sense. I wouldn't actually change people's habits, I would collect data on them and account for those habits in my statistical analysis afterwards.


There could be alot more to the universe than we think, and the way you cut your hair may influence it's growth for all we know. Anything is possible.

I completely agree with you that there are many things that we do not yet understand. Just because I can't think of an explanation for how Process 1 could be affected does not mean that it isn't! However, until there is proof, I will be making decisions based on the evidence for the alternate explanation.



I do agree with this, but Spidermom's post makes me consider if Process 1 can happen to some people.

If you re-read my giant post, you will see that the result Spidermom described can be created by either Process 1 or Process 2. Therefore it is not evidence for either.


And on a final note, science is cool yo.

Dragon Faery
April 26th, 2012, 09:43 PM
Great thread. I'm still trying to wrap my mind around this one, though:

• gray/silver hair can be beautiful and sexy

I've got a silvery streak growing down the left side of my head, and it just makes me feel older! :( Looks like I need to go visit the Renegray thread, for some emotional support. LOL

I have a silver streak that's lately getting more noticeable. It started as one hair all the way back in 2003, and now it's 10 or more. I have others silvers appearing in various places, as well. I'm not even 30 yet, so I admit it makes me feel a bit old, but at the same time I love the look of a silver flowing mane. I think I'll focus on keeping my skin younger, instead. ;)
It's possibly genetic foe me to gray early. My father's mother (whose hair I have) has beautiful silver hair. She started graying at a younger age than me, and was almost completely white by the time she gave birth to her 5th child. On the other side of the family, my mom's mom was still mostly her natural color at age 60, and didn't have more than a few streaks of gray till she hit 70. So I'm curious to see what mine will do.

GenLove86
April 26th, 2012, 10:19 PM
Yes! Very much agreed! Recently I just had a good trim and added in some long layers and a face frame. I did this because I've had a few comments that I looked "washed out" with my long hair and that I would look much better with a shorter haircut. I stuck with my length and only took off one inch at the ends and my hair looks very pretty with the new frame. I do think my hair does not tangle as much with the new layers and frame though.
Last year I started dying my hair with henna and let me tell you, I've had sooo many compliments on my hair color, more so than when I used to box dye or even when I've had it salon dyed. I dye my hair because I am prematurely grey and at age 26 I'm just not ready to go grey. I did let it go for a full year but it wasnt for me. I do think that using coconut oil gives hair better shine than any salon creams. I just discovered not brushing wet hair. It gives my hair more body and nice waves and less breakage.

justgreen
April 26th, 2012, 10:44 PM
• hair is not just superficial; it has cultural and emotional significance
• cutting hair doesn’t make it “grow faster” I went two years without a trim or cut and although my hair got super long, the last two inches were pretty gnarly. I trimmed them off and now get a dusting twice a year.
• layers don’t make fine hair thicker I have three layers, it helps me care for my long hair easier. I have lousy health problems and having the layers makes it easier on me.
• blowdrying is damaging even with products that “protect” from heat I wash my hair 1-2 times a week and generally use the blow dryer most of the time on a low setting. But I wait until my hair has almost air dried before I use the blow dryer.
• washing everyday is too harsh I've been diluting my shampoo for almost five years
• brushing wet hair is a bad idea
• there’s no such thing as “gentle” bleach I'm one of those that can get bleached (40vol) roots done every 4-6 weeks and get no damage.
• gray/silver hair can be beautiful and sexy
• WOMEN OVER 40 ROCK LONG HAIR!

ETA: i just remembered one more: "you don't have to spend a lot of money to get good hair products"

I am also a benign neglector.

Carissamarie08
April 26th, 2012, 11:22 PM
Agree with all of it. Although hair growth for me personally is superficial and a vanity thing lol.

earthnut
April 26th, 2012, 11:26 PM
• washing everyday is too harsh
• brushing wet hair is a bad idea

I would add:
• hair needs conditioner or some kind of moisturizer, not just shampoo
• shampoo, and even conditioner, are not necessary

I just wish someone had told these things to my 14-year-old self! My poor hair as a teen... shampoo and no conditioner every day, sometimes double shampooing...:no:

BBdck1
April 27th, 2012, 04:14 AM
I have thick hair so a lot of stylists like to layered my hair to make it "thinner." This only result is the ends of my hair being extremely but it puff up big time near the root which makes my head look like a ball. So:
-layers DOES NOT thin out thick hair, just make them more concentrated on top (at least for me)

florenonite
April 27th, 2012, 04:46 AM
I would add:
• hair needs conditioner or some kind of moisturizer, not just shampoo


Again, not necessarily. While my hair is better now that I'm regularly oiling it with coconut oil, I went several months just shampooing it and it was fine. The coconut oil makes it go from 'nice enough' to 'OMGMUSTRUNMYHANDSTHROUGHMYHAIRNOW!' ;)

I think there's a list of hair 'facts' according to mainstream ideas: shampoo daily, condition, blow-dry. People come to LHC and learn they don't necessarily have to abide by these 'rules', and that these rules have been detrimental to their hair's health. They try new things instead. Thus we reach a new set of 'facts': wash infrequently, use a gentle cleanser, condition plenty. Because this is outside the mainstream, I think it gets more attention here and sometimes achieves almost a cult-like status whereby waving a closed bottle of sulfates over one's head becomes a cardinal sin.

Just like the first set of 'facts' doesn't suit all hair types, however, neither does the second. Some people's hair likes gentle care, some people (like myself) could fry chips on their heads if they're not careful. It's all about experimenting and finding what's right for you, and thus IMO the only real fact about haircare is this:

Everyone's hair and scalp are different. Experiment, find what works for you, and don't worry about what other people say.

Maelyssa
April 27th, 2012, 08:50 PM
I've learned the same facts since joining LHC and I'm soooo thankful for it. And frankly, so is my hair! Lol

Hollyfire3
April 27th, 2012, 08:59 PM
I second this. I've experienced some awesome growth spurts immediately following a trim. Plus an LHCer and her husband did a study of her hair. He measured her hair every single week for a year, and she always - without exception - got faster growth the week following a trim.

Just because our limited human brains can't figure out why something might be true doesn't mean that it's false.

This, so true, trimming does seem to help with growth for me and my hair is not fine or brittle and doesn't break off, it just grows faster with trimming.

Hollyfire3
April 27th, 2012, 09:01 PM
I would add:
• hair needs conditioner or some kind of moisturizer, not just shampoo
• shampoo, and even conditioner, are not necessary

I just wish someone had told these things to my 14-year-old self! My poor hair as a teen... shampoo and no conditioner every day, sometimes double shampooing...:no:

I wash daily...my hair is perfectly alright, its not too harsh and I sometimes lather up more than once, no harm done here, I guess it just varies. I use lots of conditioner though.

Tisiloves
April 27th, 2012, 10:02 PM
I have thick hair so a lot of stylists like to layered my hair to make it "thinner." This only result is the ends of my hair being extremely but it puff up big time near the root which makes my head look like a ball. So:
-layers DOES NOT thin out thick hair, just make them more concentrated on top (at least for me)

This! Exactly this!

Especially if it's dry, I look like a porcupine.

dulce
April 28th, 2012, 11:25 AM
TRISH IN SC,check out the" Gray and Proud" facebook page,also check their Gray and Proud vol 1 and vol 2 videos on utube.Great examples of silver hair,all styles and lengths and great before[dyed] and after[silver] shots for comparison.Hope that reassures you on going silver.

dulce
April 28th, 2012, 11:50 AM
Gray and Proud[vol 2] on utube has the before and after pics.

catamonica
April 28th, 2012, 12:47 PM
I have not trimmed my hair since last summer. I started wearing a braided bun November 2011.
In march my hair grew four inches. After two years of not growing. No need to trim. I have
no split ends. I wish I would have worn it up years ago. It would probably be a lot longer.
Wearing a bun really helps. You protect the ends, & it helps your hair to grow. I think you
should trim only if you really need to.

Shermie Girl
April 28th, 2012, 01:07 PM
One of the biggest lessons I have learned since discovering LHC is that there are as many good ways to grow and care for hair as there are heads of hair. Everyone is different and products, processes and styling tricks that work for me may not work for you and vise versa.

As far as trimming is concerned, I am in infrequent trimmer and tend to take large-ish trims (a couple of inches or more) when I do. I haven't noticed an increase or decrease in my growth rate after a trim. (Easy for me to track, since I am a bottle blonde. ;)) My growth rate is a tad faster than the "norm" and my hair has a tendency to gallop, at times. It will grow very slowly for a few weeks or a month, then suddenly... Bam! Three quarters of an inch of roots are a showin'. I think that our growth rate varies and is not completely steady. I also believe that trims can coincide with a "gallop" and that gives the impression that a trim has "made the hair grow faster". I also agree that trimming damaged ends can give the appearance that the hair is growing faster because the ends are no longer breaking off as fast as the hair grows from the scalp. These are my observations, based on my experience with my own hair, of course. Your own experience may be very different. :D

I don't believe that bleaching/dyeing/high lift lightening are necessarily bad. If done carefully, if maintained with just doing roots, hair can grow long, looks and feel lovely and be shiny and "healthy" looking.

I blow dry, when I am in a hurry or want a specific look. I use low or medium heat, My fingers or a wide tooth comb. A brush doesn't touch my hair until it is nearly fully dry, then I round brush it with a huge round brush with gentle tension and liberal use of the cold shot button. Hair, much like skin can be burned. If the air coming out of my blow dryer is comfortable on the skin on my face, I don't think that it is doing that much harm to my hair. :)

I firmly believe that "heat protection products" is the biggest hair lie ever. So called heat protectors are nothing more than silicone/oil or a mix. They don't actually stop heat from getting to and damaging the hair. They do make the hair slick, preventing hot tools from sticking. These products also make the hair look and feel shiny and silky and make it look prettier. But true protection? No frakking way. Especially the way I have seen it used, a bare mist in the direction of the hair. Yeah... No.

I don't believe that hair can be "healthy". Hair is dead, kids. It can be pretty, shiny, smooth, silky and healthy looking. But healthy? Nope. Something dead can't have health. :D

Of course, all of this is just my opinion. I may be wrong. ;) :lol:

dulce
April 28th, 2012, 03:20 PM
The heat protection is a lie ,I used a flat iron with the spray religously a few years ago and after a year,stopped as my hair got so damaged.

BeckyAH
April 28th, 2012, 03:27 PM
I agree with Shermie Girl. I think there are no real universal rules for anyone. People, lifestyles, hair-goals, water quality, access to product, and most importantly hair types are all so very different, that I don't think there any absolute dos and don'ts.

ravenreed
April 28th, 2012, 03:31 PM
I have to trim often or my hair gets more tangles which leads to more damage. I don't trim much, but I do trim regularly. Trimming regularly doesn't make your hair grow faster, but it does let it get longer faster because the damage that would break off or cause problems is removed. Some people can get away without trimming, some cannot.

Additionally, I have to brush my hair when wet, or any tangles that would be allowed to dry will be there for ever. I use a tangle teazer and I am very careful. I don't have any damage from it. Finally, CO washing my hair every other day is a must. Otherwise, my ends get too dry. Some cleansing methods are more gentle than others.

Everything on LHC is YMMV. Everything.