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sazzie88
March 25th, 2012, 01:45 PM
Hi all I have two daughters one my own and one step daughter.

Step daughters hair:

She has lovely thick hair that 1.5 years ago was cut into a chin length bob.

My daughters hair:

Has thin Waist length hair, 1.5 years ago had short layers put all through length from neck down ( which thinned it out a lot).

Now my step daughters hair is 2 inches shy of my daughters waist length hair and my daughters hair isn't gaining any length at all. I have tried a few weeks of micro trimming and measuring but it isn't helping.

Could my daughter be going through a growth stall and is there anyway to increase
Growth for her?

They are both the same height and build but one seems to grow super fast with no aid.

I have been co washing my daughters hair for the past 6 months and my step d hasn't been, I wonder if this has contributed to the stall?

GRU
March 25th, 2012, 03:08 PM
I think what you're seeing is a combination of different growth rates combined with the growing out of your daughter's layers.

CO-washing isn't going to change the genetic make-up of her follicles, which is what determines their growth rate.

Valfreyja
March 25th, 2012, 03:17 PM
It can vary so much between individuals. Mine grows really slow (1 cm per month) and I've learned that there is really nothing I can do to change that. As for my cousins on my father's side, I wish I could have whatever hair genes they were born with! Their's grows at an inch or more per month.

People have tried to alter growth rates with vitamins and mineral supplements, but I doubt it would help much. (Didn't help my growth, but at least it's good for one's overall health, right?)

jojo
March 25th, 2012, 03:47 PM
It sounds like just individual hair growth patterns. I have 2 daughters, my older ones hair was cut to shoulder last year she is now just passing apl, yet my youngest had hers cut to neck length last year and she is is near BSL. Both 5 foot 5 and the youngest dyes the hell out of her hair, my older one doesnt and is much more gentle with her hair yet the eldest gets the fastest growth! its not what you put on your hair that causes faster growth, its just genes!

GuardGirl
March 25th, 2012, 03:48 PM
Is it possible that your daughter with waist-length hair is experiencing a breakage issue that you hadn't realized? Many people on this forum at one point or another have attributed layers to an overall weakening of their hair, along the lines of 'a three-strand cord is not easily broken' and blunt hair's thickness being a little more protective. You also didn't say whether or not you had been trimming out the layers in her hair, which would cause the length to remain more constant. I would possibly consider incorporating a protein deep treatment in her hair to see if it will stop any breakage issues and allow her to start gaining some length again. Good luck!

sazzie88
March 25th, 2012, 04:12 PM
Thank you for all of your comments I wish I ha better growth too!

Guardgirl thank you for your reply, it could be breakage unfortunately she doesn't keep any styles in her hair a lot and takes them out due to them itching.

She suffered craddle cap when she was a baby and it hasn't gone, ( I'm pressuming it is still cradle cap) do you think this would slow growth?

GRU
March 25th, 2012, 04:18 PM
She suffered craddle cap when she was a baby and it hasn't gone, ( I'm pressuming it is still cradle cap) do you think this would slow growth?

Your doctor hasn't told you how to get rid of it? She doesn't have to suffer with that crap.... soak the scabs off with oil (coconut or almond work for me), then scrub well when CO-washing and rinse with a diluted ACV solution. Make sure to always massage well when CO-washing.

My seborrheic dermatitis (official name for "cradle cap") has virtually disappeared as long as I follow this routine. If I stop rubbing thoroughly when washing, or if I go longer than three days between washes, it tries to come back. I've gone from regularly having multiple bleeding scabs at any one time to having one non-bleeding scabby lesion every few months.

Amber_Maiden
March 25th, 2012, 07:42 PM
Everyone has different growth patters, and it also sounds like they both have different hair types. Genetics could also be coming into play, and your stepdaughter's hair could just grow faster because of that.

ladonna
March 25th, 2012, 08:02 PM
I have 2 daughters also. My oldest had tbl hair at 4 my other daughter is almost 4 but her hair is just past bsl. Last summer my oldest wanted short hair, so hair was cut to between apl and Bel now 7 months later shes almost at waist. I guess basically my oldests hair grows 2x as fast as my second daughter. Eta bsl not Bel darn autocorrect

sazzie88
March 26th, 2012, 02:10 AM
Your doctor hasn't told you how to get rid of it? She doesn't have to suffer with that crap.... soak the scabs off with oil (coconut or almond work for me), then scrub well when CO-washing and rinse with a diluted ACV solution. Make sure to always massage well when CO-washing.

My seborrheic dermatitis (official name for "cradle cap") has virtually disappeared as long as I follow this routine. If I stop rubbing thoroughly when washing, or if I go longer than three days between washes, it tries to come back. I've gone from regularly having multiple bleeding scabs at any one time to having one non-bleeding scabby lesion every few months.

Thank you very much GRU. Does this cause your scalp to itch when your hair is tied up?

I will do this on her hair tonight. I have always gently tried to rub it out when I'm washing her hair but it always returns very thick and yellow.

GRU
March 26th, 2012, 07:57 AM
Thank you very much GRU. Does this cause your scalp to itch when your hair is tied up?

I will do this on her hair tonight. I have always gently tried to rub it out when I'm washing her hair but it always returns very thick and yellow.

The scabs make my scalp itch whether my hair is up or down. It's sooooo hard not to itch them, but if I do itch them and pull them off, then they bleed. :rolleyes: Make sure when you're removing them that you're only taking them off if they're truly loose (like flakes, not scabs). If they're still "attached" like scabs, then they'll just scab up all over again -- it's okay to let scabs stay until the skin underneath has healed.

I highly recommend doing scalp-massages with coconut oil the night before you're going to do a CO-wash in the morning. Any time my SD acts like it's coming back again, a drenching of coconut oil with a good rubbing seems to put it off.

Also, be advised that you may have to CO-wash more frequently than her hair really needs.... her hair may not be greasy, but her scalp will still need to be scrubbed to prevent more scabs from forming. Until you get the SD under control, I would plan on CO-washing at least every other day, then you can probably stretch it to every three days.

Hope that helps!