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View Full Version : Help! :( Bald spot! Has anyone else experienced this?



Raven85
February 10th, 2012, 01:26 PM
Hi guys,

I'm so distressed. I have recently discovered a bald spot on the top back of my head, thankfully it's just underneath where hair can still cover it. I was prescribed anti-fungal shampoo but it's gotten bigger. Has anyone else experienced anything like this?

It feels smooth in an area the size of my finger in the middle and the rest feels like it's been shaved :S.

I'm so upset - I've been growing out my hair for the last four years. After lots of over-processing and bleaching I just stopped and it's just this year gotten healthy and it's almost completely virgin hair just passed my bra strap!

I think if it gets any bigger it will be noticeable as I have dark hair, how do I get around it without cutting my hair off?

Madora
February 10th, 2012, 01:33 PM
Perhaps a visit to a trichologist (hair doctor) might prove helpful?

In the meantime, if you don't already, you might want to investigate using a silk pillowcase cover to protect your ends at night.

I'd also keep away from anything that constricts the hair..i.e. ponytails..or placing clips/hairsticks in the affected area.

You might want to try gentle scalp massage and stay away from anything potentially damaging..i.e. blow fryers, straighteners, curling irons, chemicals.

Good luck! I have thinning hair in two places and while I can camoflage it fairly well, it's a pain to deal with.

Narya
February 10th, 2012, 01:39 PM
Something similar happened to me, but I knew the cause (even though I was too embarrassed to tell): trichotillomania. If I am stressed, I pull my hair out from the roots. It turns out I had eczema on that spot, too, and the doctors didn't even bother to go deeper than that (so they did not know about my trich). I suppose, then that it can happen with a simple eczema / fungal infection.

My spot was on what I understand yours is too: on the far back of my part, just before the point where my bones started to slope down. To hide it, I did a french braid: it was the only updo that worked. You say yours is still hidden naturally by your hair, so maybe you can find other hairstyles that work for you (mine was very visible). When hair was growing back, I had to just give up and accept I had a very teletubby-like curly antenna. Now, 5 years later, it is barely noticeable (unless on very bad-hair days, that there's a lock about shoulder length that acts up).

About the shampoo, I'd take into consideration for how long have you been using it. If it is fungal, could it be that the shampoo hasn't had enough time to work against it and that's why it still works?

Whatever it is, I hope you find a solution soon.

Raven85
February 10th, 2012, 01:40 PM
I already use a silk pillowcase. I feel like I've been so good to my hair lately and then this happens. I oil it occasionally, only blow dry if completely necessary and don't wash it excessively. I wish it was only thinning, it's a circle of about an inch and a quarter completely bald!

Raven85
February 10th, 2012, 01:45 PM
Ahhh 5 years it is 'barely noticeable'. I'm going to cry.

That sounds horrible! I don't think it is trick, unless I'm pulling my hair out at the same spot in my sleep and hiding it somewhere I don't know. :(

Narya
February 10th, 2012, 02:01 PM
You would notice if it was trich, so I wouldn't worry about that. I certainly did know it, even if I was on denial at first ("me?? NoooOOoo! I never do thaaaat :roll:")

I think I might have expressed myself not quite well with the "barely noticeable", so I'll try again. When the regrown hair was shorter, up until 8in or so, it curled a lot, and would stand up like an antenna. When it was finally lying down, it was way curlier than the rest, too, so you could easily tell that there was something going on there (a spiral curl out of nowhere? weird!). Now I'm at a point where I normally can't notice it even if I look for the lock of hair, unless I have a lot of frizz or static, and then there are more shorter hairs in that area. My scalp hasn't shown through since before the antenna curl days, though.

ETA: If you can see my signature pic, you can see a bit of what I mean. On the top-right part of my head (top- left corner of the image) you can see a slightly lighter spot, similar in color to the greenish background a bit higher up or close to my neck. That's how my spot showed 3 years ago (2 after the completely bald point) if I did not think about it at all while combing/brushing/braiding/etc.

ktani
February 10th, 2012, 02:01 PM
Hi guys,

I'm so distressed. I have recently discovered a bald spot on the top back of my head, thankfully it's just underneath where hair can still cover it. I was prescribed anti-fungal shampoo but it's gotten bigger. Has anyone else experienced anything like this?

It feels smooth in an area the size of my finger in the middle and the rest feels like it's been shaved :S.

I'm so upset - I've been growing out my hair for the last four years. After lots of over-processing and bleaching I just stopped and it's just this year gotten healthy and it's almost completely virgin hair just passed my bra strap!

I think if it gets any bigger it will be noticeable as I have dark hair, how do I get around it without cutting my hair off?

There is no reason to cut your hair off. I suggest that you go back to the doctor that prescribed the shampoo or as Madora suggested, see a tricologist for a second opinion and better medication. In the meantiime as she also suggested do not stress your hair, especially in that area more than you can.

When I had my hair short and layered, a too layered cut allowed me to see through to my scalp. Right now you can cover this. I would not try to self-treat it. You have to find out the cause and then remedy it. A dermatologist may be helpful too. Do not delay on this if it is getting worse and do not panic. It is most likely treatable.

Raven85
February 10th, 2012, 03:10 PM
Thanks girls.

I will be going back to the docs. Might inquire about cortisone injections. I can't stand it. The worst thing about it is that I hate wearing my hair up. It's always down and it's already noticeable if there's not enough hair pulled over to cover it and I fear that it'll worsen.

Quisquis
February 10th, 2012, 07:38 PM
Hi, Raven85 --

Are you worried that your hair loss may be due to alopecia areata? I have two family members with alopecia, and they were fortunate to find a specialist for treatment.

One thing I remember the doctor saying was to look at the root ends of your shed hair under magnification. If the hair is thinner toward that end and there is not a distinct root bulb, this is a possible indication of alopecia.

I just want to add that there are lots of effective treatment options for alopecia beyond cortisone. My family members had significant-to-full regrowth by applying DNCB in either aquaphor or propylene glycol topically. This treatment was experimental at the time (fifteen years ago or so); it may not be still available. In any event, I hope you find a good dermatologist who can help you discover what is going on.

Hugs and best wishes,

Quisquis

louwulf
February 10th, 2012, 07:44 PM
I have a similar spot in the same area that's getting dangerously thin. Now that Madora mentions the hairclips etc. I'm wondering if that could be my problem as I do clip my hair up on most days since it is so fast.

Raven85
February 10th, 2012, 08:16 PM
Hi, Raven85 --

Are you worried that your hair loss may be due to alopecia areata? I have two family members with alopecia, and they were fortunate to find a specialist for treatment.

One thing I remember the doctor saying was to look at the root ends of your shed hair under magnification. If the hair is thinner toward that end and there is not a distinct root bulb, this is a possible indication of alopecia.

I just want to add that there are lots of effective treatment options for alopecia beyond cortisone. My family members had significant-to-full regrowth by applying DNCB in either aquaphor or propylene glycol topically. This treatment was experimental at the time (fifteen years ago or so); it may not be still available. In any event, I hope you find a good dermatologist who can help you discover what is going on.

Hugs and best wishes,

Quisquis


Quisquis - I don't have the means to look under a microscope but have definitely noticed that the hairs that seem to shed from there during washing have no distinct root bulb. It's a scary thought. I have no idea what has caused it. I had a blood test for thyroid/sugar/iron/etc and it all came back negative so I think it probably is this. It's bizarre and scary though. I don't want to lose any more :(

Quisquis
February 10th, 2012, 08:32 PM
Raven --

I know, it's scary to be experiencing this. If you do have alopecia (and I certainly don't know that you do, nor am I in anyway qualified to suggest it is a possibility), please understand that progress is highly variable. Many people have one spot and all the hair regrows; other people lose more.

One thing to encourage you -- both members of my family had massive hair loss in a short period of time, and it doesn't seem like you are experiencing this. My daughter was seven at the time of onset, and I thought she was playing with scissors and cutting her hair. I'd find clumps of her APL hair on her pillow and around her room.

I hope you can find a good dermatologist locally for a consult. One factor of treatment (again, based on years' ago experience, and medical science does advance rapidly) is that early intervention is helpful.

Hugs,

QQ

Quisquis
February 10th, 2012, 08:34 PM
Sorry, forgot to add, that looking at your root ends of shed hair under a magnifying glass is all that is needed.

QQ

DoubleCrowned
February 10th, 2012, 09:27 PM
A friend had a well-defined bald spot about the size of a quarter which we are pretty sure was ringworm. His spots cleared up rapidly with homeopathic treatment, but there are essential oils and dietary changes that would also bring about a cure. Although it is not a fool-proof test, you can shine a black light on the spot in a dark room to see if the hair in there fluoresces. A doctor would take a scraping of the scalp to tell you for certain. I don't want to scare you into thinking it is ringworm, just want to mention that it is a possibility, and that it is quite treatable.

misspixie
February 10th, 2012, 09:39 PM
Awe, I am very sorry to hear that you are going through this. Back in October, I had a similar experience. Long story short, I lost a large portion of hair above my right ear that was EXTREMELY noticeable. I had to get extensions, just to mask the spot. Anyways, if you want to hide the bald spot, you can actually get makeup for that! You can hardly tell you have one, unless someone purposely examines your head. My hair has grown to be about 3 inches in length now and I can tuck it behind my ear!

You're probably freaking out now (trust me, I definitely was!!), but it will work out!

Maktub
February 10th, 2012, 10:04 PM
I have had one for years, it doesn't show though... a little smaller than a quarter on one side close to my right temple / ear.

When I noticed, I was scared it would get bigger ! But years go by and it's stable ... nude, but stable.

I've linked it to a very stressful period of my life. I don't think it will grow back... it really seems dead.


There a "traditional trick" someone gave me, but I'm sceptic and never tried.

The trick was to take a sharp razor blade, sterilise it, and then gently make very small inscisions on the skin like this --> //////// on the bald spot. To make a little blood come up, just sratching the skin NOT DEEP CUTS !

On there, apply garlic juice, freshly pressed. Each day. Let it heal, and re-do until hair starts to grow.


I guess it does make some sense, brigging more blood to the area, and garlic is known to increase hair growth... haven't tried though, it might not work... I just can't seem to belive those follicles are still "active"... but who knows ! The person who said this to me was really convinced, and had seen it work on someone else before.

Littlewing13
February 10th, 2012, 10:42 PM
I used to be a hairdresser & trust me this is more common than you think! Women actually experience more baldness than men, just it is not usually as noticeable or as talked about. Also it usually isnt permanent. The leading cause is stress, but it can also be hormonal (lots of pregnant women experience bald patches), diet related, also ringworm if it is a small round patch.

I would see a doctor about it to be sure, but it can never hurt to reduce stress & eat a healthy diet.

Quisquis
February 10th, 2012, 10:55 PM
Wow, Maktub, that is an interesting folk remedy, although pretty intense. It does have some roots in mainstream medical science, though.

If the hair loss is from alopecia, it is essentially the result of an autoimmune reaction gone haywire; the immune system, instead of attacking real threats to the body, turns on natural functions of the body itself. If you have allergies that result in histamine reactions like sneezing or a stuffy nose that is a common example. Less common reactions are when the immune system attacks skin, connective tissues, joints, etc. In alopecia, the immune system attacks hair follicles and destroys them.

Most of the treatments for the various types of alopecia involve a counter-irritation of some sort so that the immune system is stimulated to the point that healing overrides the dysfunctional attack. UV light to cause a sunburn reaction, irritants to the skin to bring on a rash, cortisone injections, etc., are intended to accomplish this.

Again, I am not a doctor, but I recommend anyone with this issue should consult one.

QQ

akilina
February 10th, 2012, 11:19 PM
Same thing happened to me!! I try not to stress over it and I pretend it isnt even there. I think mine is from bumping my head really hard a few months ago. What is weird is if I press on mine the wrong way it sends a shooting sharp pain around on my scalp and it really doesn't feel good. I have no idea if its growing at all or not. Mine is about the size of the very tip of my pinkie.

Raven85
February 11th, 2012, 06:28 AM
I think I'm going to try everything listed (although trying to avoid the 'cutting'/garlic technique as I'm a big scaredy!).

Started back on Biotin (1000mcg) which I used to take a couple years ago but stopped because I kept forgetting to take them and I also just bought some Vitamin D3 Capsules too. So hopefully these help with regrowth.

I doubt it's my diet in general as I'm a fairly healthy eater to begin with (love fruit and veg and anything 'fresh'). I find the stress thing to be a weird one too, I've been reading this a lot as far as it being linked to alopeica - I have probably been more stressed than usual the past month but on the same token, it's certainly not been the most stressful time of my life. I really hope it's not stress related as I kind of pride myself on being able to deal with it and at the stage of my career I'm at - it's definitely going to get a lot more stressful in years to come! :shrug: AHHHH.

Raven85
February 11th, 2012, 06:31 AM
Also, those that have mentioned ringworm - I think that's what the anti-fungal was prescribed for, which doesn't seem to have done anything (as it's 'grown'). To be honest, I'd have much preferred it to have been that as then it'd have been a one time freak thing that I could then forget about, whereas the alopecia thing scares the crap out of me (and I hope it grows back never to return!)

ktani
February 11th, 2012, 09:51 AM
Thanks girls.

I will be going back to the docs. Might inquire about cortisone injections. I can't stand it. The worst thing about it is that I hate wearing my hair up. It's always down and it's already noticeable if there's not enough hair pulled over to cover it and I fear that it'll worsen.

For my part you are very welcome.

Stay on the docs until you get answers and fast (as possible). You have to keep them informed so that they can help you find a solution. Do not try to figure it out on your own unless it is something you have been doing and you have ruled that out.

In university first year, we were taught about "medical students' disease".

Medical students studying diseases with overlapping or similar symptoms began to think that when ill they had just about everything that was in their books, lol.

Do not scare yourself needlessly. This needs to be properly diagnosed and treated and possibly by more than one licensed doctor.

ETA: And do not get discouraged. At a routine physical, years ago, my GP noticed something in one of my eyes he thought unusual. I was sent to a specialist. He had no clue although I had told both that as a child, I had an accident that may have left scar tissue in that eye. A second specialist who knew what he was doing (and still does) and is an eye surgeon agreed that it is scar tissue and nothing to be concerned about - on top of the fact that my vision is fine.

Moral? If one doctor or specialist cannot help you - another can. There are good and bad doctors and getting a good one is not all that difficult, in my experience.