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View Full Version : Why do many hair care sites emphasizs no conditioner on scalp?



shikara
January 8th, 2012, 12:59 PM
This puzzles me because I know many here CO and conditioner on scalp is also oftentimes recommended in dry cold weather conditions. So why do you think so many articles emphasize to NOT put conditiiner on scalp??!

http://i1200.photobucket.com/albums/bb328/lmarie29/th_44053aa6.jpg (http://s1200.photobucket.com/albums/bb328/lmarie29/?action=view&current=44053aa6.jpg)

Madora
January 8th, 2012, 01:06 PM
I don't know but two things come to mind:

1) The natural sebum in your hair is supposed to protect your hair (assuming you brush or comb every day and have short hair, which many people have)

2) The acid mantle of the scalp should be maintained at a certain level. Perhaps these sites think conditioning the scalp would upset the acid balance.

Personally, I've been using diluted conditioner all over my hair, including the scalp, for years, with no harm.

spidermom
January 8th, 2012, 01:19 PM
I think there's a possibility that conditioner can clog your pores.

Charybdis
January 8th, 2012, 01:27 PM
I think it may be that conditioner upsets the scalp of some people with seborrheic dermititis (SD) and/or dandruff. I've had SD issues and my scalp isn't bothered by conditioner, but I think it bothers some SD sufferers. That's my best guess, anyway.

Freckled.Thing
January 8th, 2012, 01:27 PM
I always just thought it made your scalp get oily faster so you wouldn't be able to stretch washes. :shrug:

Amber_Maiden
January 8th, 2012, 01:34 PM
It might be because some people have fairly oily scalps.

slz
January 8th, 2012, 01:35 PM
I think there's a possibility that conditioner can clog your pores.
I tthtink this, too. Allthemore as most conditioners these days contain cones.

nellreno
January 8th, 2012, 01:40 PM
Often it's said that conditioner will weigh your hair down if you use it all over, so as a tip for more volume you're not supposed to use conditioner on your scalp. I don't think this is accurate for everyone though, I do just fine with CO washing.

jacqueline101
January 8th, 2012, 02:09 PM
I don't know why someone would give such advice. I guess they think it will upset your scalp.

Sushi144
January 8th, 2012, 02:41 PM
I always just thought it made your scalp get oily faster so you wouldn't be able to stretch washes. :shrug:

Exactly what I thought. If I put conditionner on my scalp, I'll have to wash it two or three days later.
But I use products with cones, so... :D Maybe people here don't have the same problem.

blondie9912
January 8th, 2012, 02:43 PM
I think there's a possibility that conditioner can clog your pores.

I would agree with this. It seems too heavy to go on some scalps, IMO

vatikagirl
January 8th, 2012, 02:54 PM
Pore clog comes to mind.

ktani
January 8th, 2012, 02:56 PM
I think there's a possibility that conditioner can clog your pores.

This. In many cases that can happen, especially if the conditioner is "rich". Also, some people react to ingredients either through sensitivity or allergies.

sun-kissed
January 8th, 2012, 03:34 PM
I honestly have no idea, I've always had a very oily scalp and conditioner cleans the oil right out, leaving my scalp and hair even somewhat drier than I would prefer. It's not a strong as shampoo, but if used right it cleans and strips almost as well. Of course, if I let it set on my hair then it weighs it down, but running it through under the water? My thin, fine, greasy hair gets as clean as can be.

Lady Neeva
January 8th, 2012, 03:39 PM
Most of my friends only use shampoo and my only intuition is perhaps since you clean your body with body wash, then you should clean your head with shampoo. Even in winter.

Delila
January 8th, 2012, 05:01 PM
Putting most conditioners on my scalp tends to make it itch like crazy for days. Also, my hair is weighted down, oily and lank a lot faster than if I limit the conditioner to the length only.

I can get away with it if I if I do a heavy oiling, and use a light, CO-type conditioner to remove it, but my scalp still tends not to be thrilled about it, so I don't do that kind of thing very often.

Long_hair_bear
January 8th, 2012, 05:59 PM
I tend not to oil or condition my scalp because it's alittle oily, so it takes care of itself. If it try to oil or condition it, I can't stretch my washes. Other people though, I don't know. I'm sure not everyone needs that advice. :)

Riselda
January 9th, 2012, 07:35 PM
I just know that CO makes my scalp greasy, so it's ends-only for me.

Carolyn
January 9th, 2012, 07:44 PM
I've always thought it was clogged pores or lank, greasy hair. I've found that my hair is much better with conditioner on the scalp. I'm not trying to stretch washes past every other day washing, nor do I use a lot of coney conditioners. My scalp itches a lot more if I don't wash my hair every other day. Those of you who read my blog know my thoughts on stretching washes :D

Mommyof4
January 9th, 2012, 08:03 PM
I always thought it was because of hair looking "greasy".... although my hair needs condish all over.. who knows.. the same people that make these recommendations also claim certain hair dyes can be "healthy" for hair.. who knows why they do what they do? :)

holothuroidea
January 9th, 2012, 08:20 PM
I try not to rub conditioner into my scalp because I get scalp acne. I don't know why that would be blanket advice for everyone, though.

RachelRose
January 28th, 2015, 05:37 PM
I've recently come to the conclusion that a light conditoner on the scalp to comb through tangles really helps my hair not snag after the shower . This is how I used to comditon in high school and I don't remember any tangles ; so I'm going to give it a go .

meteor
January 28th, 2015, 06:17 PM
I think what makes this question tricky is the fact that today hair-care market is dominated by products that don't simply cleanse and others that don't simply condition, but are in some in-between, gray-zone products, like "cleansing conditioners", "conditioning/moisturizing shampoos", which are essentially "2-in-1" formulas, etc. So unless you carefully read the ingredients and you know how your scalp responds to these ingredients, it's hard to be sure if a particular conditioner will be OK on your scalp. Add to that the multitude of problems that a scalp can have and the "fragrance/perfume" that is in most products and can have hundreds of components (which one could be sensitive to), and it can get pretty tricky without some trial and error.

So to be on the safe side, many people would give advice to at least keep conditioner off the scalp and stick to manufacturers' claims: if it's shampoo, it's *supposed* to be safe on scalp, whereas a conditioner may not be able to claim that (even though it should, since it's hard to keep conditioner from touching skin/scalp). Of course, your scalp can react to both conditioner and shampoo, but at least the idea is that manufacturers are more careful to formulate shampoo with scalp's health in mind.