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View Full Version : Too impatient about hair drying....tips?



shikara
December 29th, 2011, 08:51 AM
I love having freshly washed hair but I am very impatient and tend to comb it out before its ready. Need to focus on something else during that time I guess! What do you do? (maybe I should chant 'it wont do you any good, it wont do you any good...)

http://i1200.photobucket.com/albums/bb328/lmarie29/th_a5642814.jpg (http://s1200.photobucket.com/albums/bb328/lmarie29/?action=view&current=a5642814.jpg)

girlcat36
December 29th, 2011, 09:31 AM
Have you tried plopping? That can reduce drying time and enhance waves/curls. a lot of people have good luck with it. For me, it just messes up my curls.
I must confess--- after 30 straight years of drip drying, I now have a hooded hair dryer. I just couldn't take drippy wet hair in the winter anymore! I'm sitting under my dryer now with a hot oil treatment in.

morrigan*
December 29th, 2011, 11:11 AM
I allways wrap it in towel for few minutes and gently squezze excess water out with towel. If i leave it driping wet i could wait for at least 6 hours to dry if not more.

Amber_Maiden
December 29th, 2011, 11:44 AM
I wear my hair up in a t-shirt, but you could use a towel. I also squeeze extra water out. My hair takes 8 hours to dry, minimum, so I wash my hair on a day when I know I'll be inside. I also wash it at night.

heidihug
December 29th, 2011, 11:54 AM
I recently got a set of microfiber towels and they make a HUGE difference. Soak up twice the moisture that even a T-shirt does. Cut my air-drying time in half - it's dry in about 2 hours vs. 4-ish.

bunzfan
December 29th, 2011, 11:54 AM
Mine hair takes over 4 hours to dry! so i know where your coming from but i tried this recently and it only took about 2 hours.... wrap hair in towel for a few mins to get most of the water out and than wrap in a micro fibre towel for roughly 10-15 minutes.

In the winter i try to stretch washes as i hate sitting with wet hair.

xoxophelia
December 29th, 2011, 12:04 PM
Depends for me. One way I solved the problem is by washing my hair less often. For my hair to be 95% dry it takes 5 hours. In bad conditions it can take longer so I understand your frustration.

If I have to go somewhere I just gently towel dry my hair, comb it and try to get good air circulation, try to let it dry for an hour, and then bun it. Usually the canopy is dry enough after an hour that it isn't so bad.

More often now I am washing my hair in the evenings and then I will do some other grooming things after like take care of my nails, apply lotion, and then hang out in pajamas and a bathrobe (helps keep my shirt from getting wet) and read/watch some netflix/clean/do laundry. Basically just take care of things. The next day if I want to wear it down I will spray some water in it, damp bun it, get ready, and by the time I am to wear I am going I take it out and my hair looks OK. Updos work also or braid waves.

jacqueline101
December 29th, 2011, 12:59 PM
I wash mine at night. I let it air dry I and it seems to turn out alright. I wear my hair in a pony tail as my sleep do.

Madora
December 29th, 2011, 01:22 PM
This might help:

http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/vbjournal.php?do=article&articleid=223

Any questions, please drop me a line.

wicked kisses
December 29th, 2011, 02:01 PM
I love my Turbie Twist!!
of course, for some reason my hair doesn't hang onto water very much. Did the 'porosity' test, and talk about slick!!
So my hair is 'compact'?? All I know is, I shave the sides, so there's less hair, but the hair right under my bump of knowledge stays damp for another hour.
Three hours or so to completely dry. I may try plopping...

ladyshep
December 29th, 2011, 02:26 PM
You could try Super skinny hair serum by Paul Mitchel. It speed up drying time by constricting hair strands.

Delila
December 29th, 2011, 03:41 PM
I wrap my hair in a microfiber Turbie Twist for a little while, then let it air dry.

Before I had the turban, I'd wrap my hair in a big microfiber towel, flipping it over and re-wrapping with the dry side after about 5 minutes. Really sped up drying time, but my memories are vague on the results otherwise.

WaitingSoLong
December 29th, 2011, 03:55 PM
I dry my hair in winter.

No big deal to me. I just hold the dryer FAR AWAY (arms length) from my hair. There is no way it gets hot enough to damage it.

My hair takes DAYS to dry in winter by itself.

Oh, and I always comb when wet. Other wise it is hopelessly un-comb-able. I detangle thoroughly before I wash it, don't tangle it while its being washed, very easy to wide-tooth-comb out after shower.

Sometimes, after detangling, I just braid or bun it wet. I don't dry every time I wash (which is 2x a week). Only when I have to wash and leave. Which I rarely do. I always dry it when I wear it down. Even in summer. It is what makes my hair straight and look like my sig pic. Otherwise I have wonky nape waves and funky ends. I HATE NAPE WAVES. Grr.

My towel: I use a T-shirt towel I made from a T-shirt bedsheet (aka jersey knit). Squeeze squeeze. Don't twist. It never drips after this. I also wrap it turban style without twisting. Twisting is bad. I am sure you know that.

Some of the sleeking serums out there, when applied to wet hair, do seem to speed drying time. Not sure which ingredient is the magic one. It is not the cones because my coney leave-ins do not have the same effect. It is probably not a hair-friendly ingredient (drying...seems like it would be bad).

white.chocolate
December 29th, 2011, 04:54 PM
I have never exactly tried making my hair dry faster (certainly not thinking of a hair dryer), so I hope that I can be at least of little help. First, my hair takes about 4 hours to air-dry. I also never try to comb/untangle my hair when it's very wet. So what I do to reduce the impatience I can have are:

- wrap hair in towel for sometime. Sometimes I do other things in the meantime, forget it, and my hair stays in that state for 1-2 hours. (It's not something I'm proud of.)
- wear a (clean) t-shirt and keep hair down until it dries, and detangle when almost dry.
- with my hair down, drying, I start doing what I need/plan to do indoors. It simply keeps me busy.
- I always wash my hair at night. I'm sure that this is a given, but I wanted to mention it nevertheless.

I understand how hours of air-drying can be boring and frustrating, but for me I just keep myself busy while I wait.
-

julliams
December 29th, 2011, 05:46 PM
I live in Australia so whilst it's never super cold here, we don't have central heating so this makes it a little more difficult to airdry in winter. I still airdry my hair whatever the season. I also use a microfibre towel and leave it in for about 5 minutes. Any longer and some of it comes down already dry which I don't want. I find that within half an hour it's dry enough to look somewhat respectable enough to go out into public. Once I'm out and about it dries pretty quick (3-4 hours). If I damp bun it's still wet when I take it down much later. I think the key is not to think about it too much and just get on with your day. If I washed before going to work it would definitely go up in a bun but the nature of my job is that I have most of my days free (work early morning and evenings) so I just wash during the day.

Chuckleberry
December 29th, 2011, 06:01 PM
Ok, now I'm curious! What makes some hair dry so much quicker than others? Is it the thickness? I've just washed my BSL hair, have had it up in a towel for 20 mins and I know it will be 90% dry in another half an hour. I never knew it took so long for other people's hair to dry - I suppose I should be grateful!

WaitingSoLong
December 29th, 2011, 06:08 PM
I expect the length. I didn't have hair drying issues until waist+.

Anje
December 29th, 2011, 06:23 PM
Double towels help.

Squeeze the excess water out of your hair (just running your fingers down it, no wringing!), and wrap it in a towel. After maybe 5 minutes, most of the towel in contact with your hair and the back of your head will be soaked and it won't help you dry anymore. If you have a big towel, you can turn it around so that a dry portion will be against your head and re-turban it. If you have smaller ones, you might just want a fresh towel. That'll get more water out of your hair, so hopefully it'll dry sooner.

Once you take it out of the second towel (only leave it on until the towel is as damp as your hair inside), make sure you run your fingers through it. Break up the clumps so the air can come in, and fluff the roots a bit.

sisi33
December 29th, 2011, 07:06 PM
For me, the only way that I can even have my hair dry within a reasonable amount of time in the winter is sectioning my hair in levels (horizontally), so when the bottom is dry, I let down some more hair, and repeat. I keep the hair that is damp/wet on top of my head via hair stick or clamp. It actually works pretty well on keeping my hairs' curlies in! If I wasn't clear enough just let me know, and hope this helps some! :D

darklyndsea
December 29th, 2011, 09:03 PM
For me, the only way that I can even have my hair dry within a reasonable amount of time in the winter is sectioning my hair in levels (horizontally), so when the bottom is dry, I let down some more hair, and repeat. I keep the hair that is damp/wet on top of my head via hair stick or clamp. It actually works pretty well on keeping my hairs' curlies in! If I wasn't clear enough just let me know, and hope this helps some! :D
Ooh, I've never thought about doing that! I think I'll try it next time I wash my hair...if I can actually get it to separate enough to do it.

KwaveT
December 29th, 2011, 09:15 PM
Using the microfiber towel sounds like a great idea to me to speed up drying. I have trouble getting my bangs laying the way I want to since they aren't long enough yet. I just take a regular towel and pat dry and set bangs in position I want them to dry in. Let is air dry after that. It gives me much less trouble the next morning when I do. Once they are long enough to expand the length of my face, they will have enough length and weight to totally blend into my length then. I will entertain some of these suggestions then.

Hollyfire3
December 29th, 2011, 09:37 PM
Ooh, I've never thought about doing that! I think I'll try it next time I wash my hair...if I can actually get it to separate enough to do it.

Lol! I do the same thing darklyndsea, my hair is similar in wave and thickness to yours, it isnt as hard to seperate it out as it seems. Just work in small clumps, run your fingers in the roots like your applying product and fluff. Do this for a few seconds on each clump then fluff the sides and back, leave alone for anout 30 mins then repeat, continue until hair is mostly dry. I do this and it helps take the tangles out before they form from the clumps. It also makes the wurls look extra nice, try it, what have you got to loose?:D

darklyndsea
December 29th, 2011, 09:45 PM
Lol! I do the same thing darklyndsea, my hair is similar in wave and thickness to yours, it isnt as hard to seperate it out as it seems. Just work in small clumps, run your fingers in the roots like your applying product and fluff. Do this for a few seconds on each clump then fluff the sides and back, leave alone for anout 30 mins then repeat, continue until hair is mostly dry. I do this and it helps take the tangles out before they form from the clumps. It also makes the wurls look extra nice, try it, what have you got to loose?:D
My hair tangles pretty badly most of the time, and it's even worse when it's the slightest bit wet. Mostly, it just turns into one solid mass that I can't divide without either breaking hairs or taking hours on. So, literally, I'm not sure that it's physically possible to do anything that involves me separating my hair while it's wet.

Lilli
December 30th, 2011, 07:15 AM
I wash in the morning, detangle with a comb while very wet, and then use a microfiber twist for 20 minutes. Then it dries in 30 minutes.

Sahar24
December 30th, 2011, 07:57 AM
Since I started adding coconut oil to my hair pre-wash I've found it's cut the drying time a lot! It used to take hours and hours but now in two to three hours it's pretty much there!

EdG
December 30th, 2011, 08:10 AM
In the winter, my hair would stay damp for half a day if I didn't use heat. So, I use the electric fan heater below both as a hair dryer and as a room heater.

http://www.edgrochowski.com/articles/heater1.jpg

Stay at least five feet away. The air is barely warm at that distance. I use the heater until my hair stops dripping, and then I go read LHC until my hair completely dries. :cheese:
Ed

morrigan*
December 30th, 2011, 08:33 AM
In the winter, my hair would stay damp for half a day if I didn't use heat. So, I use the electric fan heater below both as a hair dryer and as a room heater.

http://www.edgrochowski.com/articles/heater1.jpg

Stay at least five feet away. The air is barely warm at that distance. I use the heater until my hair stops dripping, and then I go read LHC until my hair completely dries. :cheese:
Ed

That's a great idea :)

Chromis
December 30th, 2011, 08:39 AM
I put mine in a microfibre turbie for a while, than I let it down and hand it over a chair while I knit or browse the internet. If it bugs me or I want to go somewhere while it is damp I put it up for a while and let it down again later. It dries fine.

I do make sure to wear something that won't feel icky if it gets damp. I get cold easily, so I just wear something extra warm in the winter and avoid cotton on wash days. Cotton isn't that great in winter anyhow. Wool stays warm when damp. In summer this is not as much an issue, but I still try not to wear cotton on wash days unless it is very hot because I don't like how clammy it feels when damp and it takes ages to dry.

celebriangel
December 30th, 2011, 08:55 AM
I have 2 microfibre "turbie" towels. I normally only use 1 of these, after gently squeezing the excess water out of my hair, I wrap it up in a turbie towel for 10 minutes or so while I dry myself and get dressed.

When I let my hair down again it is damp, not wet. If I'm in a tearing hurry I do this twice. I wash these turbie towels without fabric softener so they are really absorbent.

I too hate the "dripping wet" phase but I never suffer through it anymore.

Dorothy
December 30th, 2011, 09:15 AM
I use two towels - not microfiber, but I think I should get one. Then I detangle (I have straight hair) and comb it straight. Then I turn on the ceiling fan in the dining room and get on LHC. Periodically I fluff - which means I slid my hands up the sides of my head, fingers open, and finger comb/lift the strands straight out. This has a similar effect to the "fanning the strands" link above. My hair dries straighter this way, which is usually what I want - since curly is out of the question, if it's not straight, it's just rumpley in a rather uneven, unattractive way. If I'm watching TV, I can sit over the heating vent - which is under the couch - and do the same thing.

ktani
December 30th, 2011, 09:23 AM
I allways wrap it in towel for few minutes and gently squezze excess water out with towel. If i leave it driping wet i could wait for at least 6 hours to dry if not more.

This. By sqeezing gently and pressing the towel into my scalp it does not mess up my hair or waves. I use the shorter fleece side of the towel, not the "rougher" side.

My hair at waist now or longer (I really need to trim back) dries in 1.5 hours.

morrigan*
January 1st, 2012, 10:55 AM
This. By sqeezing gently and pressing the towel into my scalp it does not mess up my hair or waves. I use the shorter fleece side of the towel, not the "rougher" side.

My hair at waist now or longer (I really need to trim back) dries in 1.5 hours.

I too use the soft side, first sqeeze water out, then i take fresh towel and gently wrap it around head (looks like a nun :o) and leave it for few minutes.
Mine still needs some time, but it's better than driping wet.