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View Full Version : Why are some serums w/silicones called heat protectants and others not?



alxardnax
November 29th, 2011, 09:47 AM
Hello!

I notice that two hair products will have almost the same ingredients list in the same order, yet one is called a heat protectant and one a smoothing serum. Why is that?

Thanks!

xoxophelia
November 29th, 2011, 09:58 AM
So they can make a buck. You need a product for "this" and a product for "that".. it is simply a marketing scheme.

Amber_Maiden
November 29th, 2011, 10:01 AM
So they can make a buck. You need a product for "this" and a product for "that".. it is simply a marketing scheme.

I agree with this. Hit it on the head. marketing all the way.

alxardnax
November 29th, 2011, 10:14 AM
I wondered...
it figures.
I don't use silicones but I do blow dry my hair in winter or else it will take like 24 hrs to dry. I'm not even exaggerating.

If anyone knows of something that will even slightly reduce heat damage I would appreciate advice. I know a tiny serum isn't going to save hair from heat but perhaps a technique or someway of drying hair fast that is healthier for hair would be nice.

Gothchiq
November 29th, 2011, 10:30 AM
An ionic hair dryer works faster and reduces frizz. Try that. :)

xoxo
gothchiq

proo
November 29th, 2011, 10:32 AM
Madora has an air-drying method that takes about 30 minutes. WO seems to really speed the process for some. I'm with you in that I'd much rather try a method than another product.

lapushka
November 29th, 2011, 10:43 AM
If anyone knows of something that will even slightly reduce heat damage I would appreciate advice. I know a tiny serum isn't going to save hair from heat but perhaps a technique or someway of drying hair fast that is healthier for hair would be nice.

If you do blowdry, keep the blowdryer on the lowest temperature setting (and don't use a round brush to style it). My blowdryer has 3 temperature settings, the lowest is cool, the middle slightly warmish. The third setting is off limits! I've used a blowdryer since I was young, and I've never had damage from it (had classic length then). Other things like a crimper or straightening/curling iron are very damaging, though, but how many times more hot are those!

alxardnax
November 29th, 2011, 10:52 AM
Thanks! I will have to look up this Madora method!
I already use my blow-dryer on the lowest heat setting and I don't try to style it while I dry it, like with a round brush and whatnot. I try to let it air dry a bit first and pat it dry with a micro fiber towel (which btw, doesn't seem to dry hair more effectively than a regular towel for me...).
Yeah, I can only imagine what damage a curling and straightening iron wreck on your hair!
I appreciate all the advice!

ktani
November 29th, 2011, 10:58 AM
It is not just marketing in this case. It is about the silicone(s) used, http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/vbjournal.php?do=article&articleid=185.

spidermom
November 29th, 2011, 11:37 AM
Thank you for that ktani. It reinforced my own observations.

ktani
November 29th, 2011, 11:40 AM
Thank you for that ktani. It reinforced my own observations.

You are very welcome. There are differences within one silicone type like dimethicone.

alxardnax
November 29th, 2011, 12:36 PM
Huh. Interesting. How does somebody find out which silicones are useful in heat protection? I tried researching online and found a lot of info but not about which specific silicones are best on heat protectants.

spidermom
November 29th, 2011, 12:38 PM
I notice that most heat-protectant products come in a spray while the smoothing products come in a serum.

alxardnax
November 29th, 2011, 12:43 PM
Hey! That is true! I never really thought of that before. I wonder if that is because of the types of silicones used or because the serums usually have heavier oils in them as well.

jacqueline101
November 29th, 2011, 01:03 PM
Its a marketing scam. Try a turbie twister towel. Its extra absorbent and will get the water out which will help your hair dry faster.

ktani
November 29th, 2011, 02:05 PM
This may help, http://www.dowcorning.com/content/personal/personalhair/heat_protection.aspx

Not a marketing scam.

maborosi
November 29th, 2011, 02:11 PM
It is not just marketing in this case. It is about the silicone(s) used, http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/vbjournal.php?do=article&articleid=185.'

Thank you for this! A very interesting article. :)

I had no idea there was actually more than one kind of dimethicone.

~maborosi~

einna
November 29th, 2011, 02:14 PM
All I learn at this forum!! Thanks ktani :)

julliams
November 29th, 2011, 02:24 PM
I know for a fact that when I first joined LHC, my APL hair was pretty much split free. I would search for hours and come up with nothing. I went cone-free and within 6 months I had splits galore even though I was supposedly treating my hair better.

Now I use a mixture of cones and non-cones. My splits are abundant (to me) but are not visible to anyone looking at my hair. I sometimes wonder if I had continued my use of cones, if the splitting would have been a little less.

As for thermal protection, the Kerastase product I have is a cream product. I sometimes wonder in my mind how a small pea sized amount can spread to the length of every single strand hair and protect it. What it does do is cut down on drying time and makes my hair straighter and more silky to the touch which I know is all product and not my hair.

ktani
November 29th, 2011, 02:37 PM
For some reason I cannot multiple reply but to those who thanked me you are very welcome.

I have said this before. There is one silicone in the shampoo I use - dimethiconol, and the shampoo does not build-up or cause me any problems.

I see no valid reason that silicone is so vilified here.

If a product - any product - is properly formulated and a lot of thought and money goes into good formulations - and the products are not necessarily expensive - the result is the same - fewer not more - hair problems.

spidermom
November 29th, 2011, 02:51 PM
I know for a fact that when I first joined LHC, my APL hair was pretty much split free. I would search for hours and come up with nothing. I went cone-free and within 6 months I had splits galore even though I was supposedly treating my hair better.

Now I use a mixture of cones and non-cones. My splits are abundant (to me) but are not visible to anyone looking at my hair. I sometimes wonder if I had continued my use of cones, if the splitting would have been a little less.

As for thermal protection, the Kerastase product I have is a cream product. I sometimes wonder in my mind how a small pea sized amount can spread to the length of every single strand hair and protect it. What it does do is cut down on drying time and makes my hair straighter and more silky to the touch which I know is all product and not my hair.

Splits seem to show up more the longer and older the ends of your hair get.