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C.H.
July 14th, 2011, 01:41 AM
Hanging around the sandpaper section waiting for the sales person to finish helping another customer.

Him: "Can I help you?"

Me: "Yes," pulling a giant hairsense super rake out of my purse, "I need to sand this" pointing between the tines, "what should I use?"

Him: "Umm." Turning it over in his hands, squinting between the tines.

Me: "See, here between the tines...here and here, see how it's rough. I need to get rid of that. But I'm not sure which sandpaper I should use."

Him: Grazing his hand over several of the the papers and sifting through a few in box.

Me: Helpfully, "It's made out of some kind of resin."

Him: "Let me get my coworker."

Him to coworker: "She wants to sand this."

Coworker: Turning the comb this way and that in his hand as if it were some exotic artifact. "And why would she want to do that?"

Me: "Because it's better for your hair if the combs are smooth. It's a seamless comb, but..." realizing I am beginning to give TMI "I just need to smooth the remaining rough areas between the tines. See, look at this." I point emphatically.

Coworker: Squinting. Raising eyebrows.

Me: "Here! See that! That little rough protrusion. I need to sand it away."

Coworker: "Hmph." Starts striding purposely toward the files.

Coworker: "These would be good, see they should fit well between the tines."

Me: "Great, how much do they cost?"

Coworker: "$23.99"

Me: "The comb itself didn't even cost that much. Is there anything cheaper?"

Me: Striding out 10 minutes later with a $3.99 set of mini files.

------

Oh, LHC, the lengths I am now willing to go to for my hair. I'm sure this isn't the last experience I'll have like this.

trolleypup
July 14th, 2011, 04:38 AM
Which reminds me that I need to smooth a new wooden comb since I lost my last prepared one, and am using a similar one that is not mine.

cost of comb: $1.99

cost of progressive fineness of sandpaper to smooth it out: $10

cost of time to smooth it to satisfaction: 4 hours at $42/hr less any time spent unbusy at work...

Alaia
July 14th, 2011, 05:07 AM
:spitting:

I have to say, I'm due to buy a new comb. Thankfully my DH already has the necessary equipment to sand it down :lol:

Madora
July 14th, 2011, 08:09 AM
@C.H. Very interesting! Do you know what company made those mini files?

I have some Good Hair Days pins that need sanding (protrusions on both sides of them) and would rather use a file than sandpaper.

Thanks!

Carolyn
July 14th, 2011, 08:17 AM
Use a metal nail file. I got 4 for $1 at Dollar Tree. If you need more smoothing, get the soft nail files. They come in a good variety of grits. Less than a buck at Sallys.

OP did this happen at Lowes? The last few times I've shopped at Lowes I've encountered the same type of salesperson. It pained them to have to help me with what I needed. They talked down to me and asking them a question was a bother.

YesitsReal
July 14th, 2011, 08:40 AM
Yeah, I'm pretty sure that the whole contingent of salespeople at Lowe's know who I am and sincerely believe I am insane. At least, that's the look they give me when I come in looking for materials for my latest hair or small rodent (I have gerbils and have had a mouse in the past) project. What can I say? I have many endearing personality quirks. :D

monsterna
July 14th, 2011, 08:53 AM
Hmmm... so seamless combs can start to become rougher over time? Explain this, woman! :p I had no idea.

Helix
July 14th, 2011, 01:04 PM
This made me LOL. Thanks, I needed that.

faithsdaisy421
July 14th, 2011, 01:08 PM
HAHA... my DH works at a small town hardware store as a sales person. I HOPE that he has dealt with my crazy (to him) hair issues enough that he would know how to help someone with that question. I may have to test this on him...

C.H.
July 14th, 2011, 01:25 PM
Which reminds me that I need to smooth a new wooden comb since I lost my last prepared one, and am using a similar one that is not mine.

cost of comb: $1.99

cost of progressive fineness of sandpaper to smooth it out: $10

cost of time to smooth it to satisfaction: 4 hours at $42/hr less any time spent unbusy at work...

At least the original comb was inexpensive. :)

It's amazing how much time and money I am now spending on this whole hair thing--this from a person who rarely spends money on herself. But it all seems to darn necessary. I console myself with the idea that while the initial investment in tools and accessories has been a lot (I'm new to LHC), once I'm set up with everything I feel I really need the spending will slow to a trickle...just the occasional treat or splurge.


:spitting:

I have to say, I'm due to buy a new comb. Thankfully my DH already has the necessary equipment to sand it down :lol:

Good for you. I have to say, coming to LHC, I'm really grateful that I recently finished two semesters of woodworking. It's been surprisingly relevent here, who knew? I actually know something about different types of woods and finishes and feel entirely capable of sanding, reshaping, finishing an item to suit me.


@C.H. Very interesting! Do you know what company made those mini files?

I have some Good Hair Days pins that need sanding (protrusions on both sides of them) and would rather use a file than sandpaper.

Thanks!

These: http://www.drillspot.com/products/1323458/nicholson_files_02230b_chain_saw_file?s=1

Apparently, they're meant to sharpen chainsaws, hah. I think they're a good value considering that I get three long ones and I'm sure I will get use out of them in the future (I have a few forks right now with blunter tips than I prefer). I expect they will take material off faster than sandpaper, which is helpful if I want to reshape and not just smooth. They're also easy to manuever. But I haven't actually put them to work, yet. I'll report back once I have.


OP did this happen at Lowes? The last few times I've shopped at Lowes I've encountered the same type of salesperson. It pained them to have to help me with what I needed. They talked down to me and asking them a question was a bother.

Nah, it was the little Ace around the corner from my house. They weren't really rude, but come on people, what I'm actually asking for is really quite simple. And I would think in a hardware store, they'd be used to all kinds of odd requests and not bat an eyelash.


Hmmm... so seamless combs can start to become rougher over time? Explain this, woman! :p I had no idea.

No, this one is brand new. How can I explain this. Most of it is supersmooth, but you can tell between the tines was carved out by hand and it looks sort of roughly hewn. You can see the tool markings and it's a bit angular. Nothing that would snag in any way--as even the hewn part had been polished--but there just might be a little more friction than I want.

Amber_Maiden
July 14th, 2011, 01:41 PM
haha! Priceless! :D

RitaCeleste
July 14th, 2011, 02:11 PM
I'm in Lowe's too much. Once I asked how much for a tool to clamp a water line after I took a garden tub out of my trailer. The tool was $23 dollars to do it right. I used a coat hanger and ducktape. That was years ago, every so often I walk around to make sure I haven't sprung a leak. I avoid the sales people and ask rednecks whenever possible! Where we live, that's easy enough. I know someone who works there but she can be kinda catty so I try not even let her see me much less what I'm picking up. Sometimes sales people try to sell me all the proper stuff when really I just need duck tape. My last fun time was trying to get a key copied for a Kia. Who knew that would cause so much trouble?

Arianoor
July 14th, 2011, 02:24 PM
Ya know, I bet a glass nail file would work great for that! I'm completely obsessive with my nails, the smallest roughness drives me batty, and the glass files give the smoothest edge. Plus, they're pretty!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00283O7LK/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B001U3QLJ0&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1CWG0R7YTB697DGG0ZZQ

C.H.
July 14th, 2011, 02:38 PM
Ya know, I bet a glass nail file would work great for that! I'm completely obsessive with my nails, the smallest roughness drives me batty, and the glass files give the smoothest edge. Plus, they're pretty!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00283O7LK/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B001U3QLJ0&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1CWG0R7YTB697DGG0ZZQ

I have two of those, and I love them. I tried it, but they weren't going to work for this. They couldn't get in at quite the right angles.

HoneyJubilee
July 14th, 2011, 02:46 PM
It's usually amusing when I go to the hardware store

Hardware Guy: Can I help you find anything?
Me: Do you sell CA glue?
HG: *blank stare*
Me: ...model glue?
HG: *blank stare*
Me: ...super glue?
HG: Oh! Right over here...
Me: Thanks. Do you have any glue accelerator?
HG: *blank stare*
Me: Nevermind.

Another time I had to explain why it was so important that I get clear epoxy rather than white. I ended up having to pull a stick out of my hair to show the guy the inlaid part and even then he didn't really get it, but he did help me find epoxy that dried clear.

Oh, and they all think it's hilarious when I walk in chattering about power tools. And every time I ask about lathe tools they get their hands up like they're holding one, and a couple have even made "lathe" noises.
Although usually I ask about the tools and the hardware store guys tell DBF about the tools instead of talking to me, 'cause obviously girls don't use power tools :rolleyes:

heidihug
July 14th, 2011, 02:59 PM
I've had much better luck getting things to fix my hair toys at craft stores than at hardware stores. I have a lovely set of 6 tiny files (round, square, triangular, etc) that I got at a scrapbooking place for less than $10, for instance. Plus, the people there don't look at you funny when you ask for particular things like glue and epoxy!

C.H.
July 14th, 2011, 03:05 PM
I've had much better luck getting things to fix my hair toys at craft stores than at hardware stores. I have a lovely set of 6 tiny files (round, square, triangular, etc) that I got at a scrapbooking place for less than $10, for instance. Plus, the people there don't look at you funny when you ask for particular things like glue and epoxy!

That's a good idea. I was actually at an art supply store yesterday to purchase some foam board. It's got a lot of crafting stuff, but probably not the full range of specialized tools and such you could get at a place like Michael's. It didn't even occur to me I might find something like a file there. I made a beeline to what I came for, however as I was walking out I slowed and started thinking, I bet there are all kinds of goodies here that can benefit/decorate my hair. But I was like, move along self! You've got other things to do today.

Buggheart
July 14th, 2011, 04:03 PM
LOL this is just too funny. I bet they're still milling around absolutely puzzled.

PianoPlaye
July 14th, 2011, 04:16 PM
You are a shining example of the lengths we go to for the lengths we desire!
I am So Lucky that the local Big Boys Toyshop (it calls itself a hardware store, but we all know better) has really nice staff, for whom understanding what you are trying to achieve with what you already have on how little you have to spend is the problem they love to solve.
They're cool about girls & power tools, too. To me, anyway. I'm the one with the plastic - and if I say No, the male coveting some item has to either abandon that idea or get pleading. So, when the 10 year old wanted his own drill, we went, we saw, we were offered an informed choice, and we were both treated with courtesy & respect as valued & hopefully soon to return customers. (It works!)
Usually if I see a tool at the craft store, I can get the "correct name" for it & the hardware guys find me the same thing for less, either off a shelf or delivered next day.
I know TLHC can and do make amazing hairtoys - I'll ask the toyshop who to go to for a potentially suitable bit of wood. They're ambivalent about mobile phones, but do appreciate clear photos, so I'll show them the relevant thread & wait... :D

HairStickler
July 14th, 2011, 09:34 PM
C.H., my local Ace Hardware is used to me now and they even ask me what projects I'm working on when they see me. I'm sure you will find many other uses for the mini files as you build up your hairtoy collection. :eyebrows:

Madora
July 14th, 2011, 09:39 PM
@Carolyn, C.H. and heidihug! Thanks for all the info! I'm definitely going to check out Michael's for those files!

Arya
July 14th, 2011, 10:27 PM
I had a similar problem last week I needed 16 gage wire...and do you think a single hardware store in the city had it? They all looked at my like I was crazy and were keen on knowing what it was for (spin pins). I had to go out to a hardware store in the country to get the damn stuff. BAH! What kind of a hardware store doesn't sell wire??? (but has a full selection of frozen foods. I hate this all in one store trend that means specialty stores don't even have specialty items anymore!! GRR!)

trolleypup
July 15th, 2011, 02:52 AM
I had a similar problem last week I needed 16 gage wire...and do you think a single hardware store in the city had it? They all looked at my like I was crazy and were keen on knowing what it was for (spin pins). I had to go out to a hardware store in the country to get the damn stuff. BAH! What kind of a hardware store doesn't sell wire??? (but has a full selection of frozen foods. I hate this all in one store trend that means specialty stores don't even have specialty items anymore!! GRR!)
WTH?! Gauged wire in aluminum/brass/steel is generally kept on the same aisle as hinges in the various hardware stores here (except the sucky big box one...happens to be Lowe's but their selection is amazingly limited despite the breadth). So far we have managed to keep a broad selection of neighborhood hardware stores in business...and NONE of them stocks frozen food.

Also SF does tend to train the patronizing type of salesperson out of pulling that crap. The training progress can be pretty amusing to watch!

ETA: ps: Yes, I can direct you to the right aisle in most of the better hardware stores in SF, and sadly can also tell you when they don't stock a particular item and where to go to get it...

PrincessBob
July 15th, 2011, 03:03 AM
For my birthday my spouse's gift to me was a cute 15 lb anvil... but no hammer/mallet, no wire or metal of any kind. Ha! When we went to Home Depot the other day I picked up about a yard of some 16 gauge copper wire thinking I could do all sorts of things with it, but I messed up my first attempt at a hair screw, then tried to flatten it back out then tried to make it into something else, but only using a rubber mallet with my anvil, was a bit of a failure, I need some round nosed pliers, I think, and maybe a vice?
The man who helped me cut the wire wanted to know what my plan was, so I said hair accessories like this (and pulled my RedWolf bronze fork out of my hair and showed it to him). He was very easy going and readily accepted the answer.
Now I just need a lot of practice, I guess... and more wire when I'm done practicing. :P

torrilin
July 15th, 2011, 09:45 AM
It's usually amusing when I go to the hardware store

Hardware Guy: Can I help you find anything?
Me: Do you sell CA glue?
HG: *blank stare*
Me: ...model glue?
HG: *blank stare*
Me: ...super glue?
HG: Oh! Right over here...
Me: Thanks. Do you have any glue accelerator?
HG: *blank stare*
Me: Nevermind.

Most hardware stores for some godforsaken reason don't carry cyanoacrylate glues OR accelerator. Stores that sell supplies for model railroaders and people who fly model airplanes will usually have them both, and in at least a decent choice of formulations. Not all stuff sold as superglue is CA, and even the ones that are CA are not necessarily a good formulation.


Oh, and they all think it's hilarious when I walk in chattering about power tools. And every time I ask about lathe tools they get their hands up like they're holding one, and a couple have even made "lathe" noises.
Although usually I ask about the tools and the hardware store guys tell DBF about the tools instead of talking to me, 'cause obviously girls don't use power tools :rolleyes:

If I get treated like that, I'm walking RIGHT back out. I don't need to play sexism bingo to buy sandpaper when I can go to Sears or the corner hardware store and get treated like a human being.

Arya
July 15th, 2011, 03:56 PM
For my birthday my spouse's gift to me was a cute 15 lb anvil... but no hammer/mallet, no wire or metal of any kind. Ha! When we went to Home Depot the other day I picked up about a yard of some 16 gauge copper wire thinking I could do all sorts of things with it, but I messed up my first attempt at a hair screw, then tried to flatten it back out then tried to make it into something else, but only using a rubber mallet with my anvil, was a bit of a failure, I need some round nosed pliers, I think, and maybe a vice?
The man who helped me cut the wire wanted to know what my plan was, so I said hair accessories like this (and pulled my RedWolf bronze fork out of my hair and showed it to him). He was very easy going and readily accepted the answer.
Now I just need a lot of practice, I guess... and more wire when I'm done practicing. :P

If you just twist it by hand around a chopstick I find you barely need pliers, just wire cutters!

rusika1
July 15th, 2011, 08:53 PM
I had a similar problem last week I needed 16 gage wire...and do you think a single hardware store in the city had it? They all looked at my like I was crazy and were keen on knowing what it was for (spin pins). I had to go out to a hardware store in the country to get the damn stuff. BAH! What kind of a hardware store doesn't sell wire??? (but has a full selection of frozen foods. I hate this all in one store trend that means specialty stores don't even have specialty items anymore!! GRR!)

Sometimes you can get insulated wire in the gauge you want (look at the cut end to make sure it's not multistranded). Then you just have to strip the insulation. Bonus: it usually comes on a reel, so you can buy the amount you need instead of the amount the manufacturer decided to package.

And you'd be surprised at how well a plain old emery board and a sheet of 600 wet/dry sandpaper will work.Especially on horn, which is just giant fingernail anyway, right? They'll even work on metal, if you just have a tiny spot to smooth out. The little jewelers files I have work well for taking material off, but they're too thick to fit between tines.