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Stub
July 11th, 2011, 12:59 PM
I've been using ACV rinses for months now with no problem. But then I read something about leaving it on for a bit, so I started rinsing my hair with it and then clipping it up to 'soak' while I finish my shower. Then rinse it out with cool water. But since I've started doing that, I'm getting reddish streaks that I don't really want. If I switch to white vinegar will those wash out or are they permanent?
Thank you!

heidi w.
July 11th, 2011, 01:04 PM
Whoever advised to let the ACV soak in is a nutball. (ETA: For heaven's sake!)

Light haired folks should not be using ACV. They should use white vinegar.

A vinegar rinse is a rinse, precisely. There is no big benefit, except those reddish highlights to leaving it in. Even if you rinse with ACV, over time, as occurred with me, you can have that reddish tinge or hue in some ways. (I also have natural redhead running in my family, so it's a little hard to separate the two.)

Even dark haired people with Apple Cider Vinegar, can sometimes notice the reddish twinge to hair from its use.

To be safe, use white vinegar. All for the mother being gone from an ACV rinse, when working with white vinegar is the only difference. You don't get quite the same benefit as it concerns the acid mantle with white vinegar as apple cider vinegar. Otherwise it works the same, as a clarifier for that hair wash only (once dried, you have to use something else to clarify). It removes minerals from hard water.....etc.

heidi w.

Sundial
July 11th, 2011, 01:31 PM
I agree with what Heidi w. said. I developed reddish tints from ACV despite being dark haired. That was the only change to my routine during that period so I wouldn't attribute it to something else.

Both white vinegar and ACV serves their purpose as an acidic rinse so it doesn't really matter. Some people even use lemon rinses. So pick one that doesn't add color if you want to avoid reddish tints

heidi w.
July 11th, 2011, 02:01 PM
Keep in mind that hair health is a result of a lot of little things. No, more is not better. It's the combination of lots of details on a smaller scale that gets you there. It's nothing big, and fancy, and far-fetched.

Trust me. It's a game of patience and sticking to your routine.

heidi w.

heidi w.
July 11th, 2011, 02:01 PM
I agree with what Heidi w. said. I developed reddish tints from ACV despite being dark haired. That was the only change to my routine during that period so I wouldn't attribute it to something else.

Both white vinegar and ACV serves their purpose as an acidic rinse so it doesn't really matter. Some people even use lemon rinses. So pick one that doesn't add color if you want to avoid reddish tints

I like lemon rinses a lot because the hair smells so good afterwards!

heidi w.

pepperminttea
July 11th, 2011, 02:18 PM
It definitely does bring out the reddish tones - my canopy definitely has more red since I started using ACV. I quite like them though. :) Ditto heidi w. on soaking - you don't need to, literally tip over your head, make sure it reached the scalp, and rinse out. That's it.

Carolyn
July 11th, 2011, 03:22 PM
As an ashy blonde I avoid ACV like the plague. It's given my hair a reddish or strawberry blonde tinge. I only use white vinegar. I also don't use yellow colored oils or pink conditioners. I think all that added to my strawberry blonde woes. I like my hair to be as ashy as possible.

greygardens
July 11th, 2011, 04:40 PM
I don't know if it will remove the red, but white vinegar has the same effect as ACV, without the staining.

I switched to white vinegar and use it every time I wet my hair because it helps with my scalp psoriasis and my hair also loves it. Soaking for a few minutes is the only way to get it right through to my scalp, but if you're just doing it for your hair, soaking isn't necessary.

I think it's a good idea to figure out what the maximum dilution you can use and still get good results from is, though.

greygardens
July 11th, 2011, 04:42 PM
I meant to say I switched to white vinegar when I went gray, not to imply that it was somehow better for psoriasis.

gthlvrmx
July 11th, 2011, 04:57 PM
Um i have only used ACV 2 or 3 times but i left it it in with conditioner for 20 min last time. After washing, i noticed this redder curl that shined with this reddish hue in the light.

Roscata
July 11th, 2011, 09:16 PM
I like lemon rinses a lot because the hair smells so good afterwards!

heidi w.

Definitely, lemon rinses are awesome!

And to remove the red try clarifying and if that doesn't work you might want to try a chelating shampoo.

Good luck! :D

Anje
July 11th, 2011, 09:53 PM
On a related note, do the inexpensive apple cider flavor vinegars give red, or does it have to be something like Bragg's ACV with the mother still in the bottle? This cheapskate redhead-turning-brunette wants to know.

Keller1128
July 11th, 2011, 11:53 PM
My hair is already red and I've used an ACV rinse a handful of times. I haven't left it in my hair long, just rinsed with it. Does anyone know what it does to already red hair?

Roscata
July 12th, 2011, 12:49 AM
My hair is already red and I've used an ACV rinse a handful of times. I haven't left it in my hair long, just rinsed with it. Does anyone know what it does to already red hair?

I use ACV and I have red hair (hennaed) it doesn't do much for the color, not that I can notice, all I see is great conditioning and shine. :D

ETA: I would leave it on my hair for 5 minutes then rinse it out. Mixture: one tea spoon of ACV to one cup of water.

Stub
July 12th, 2011, 07:46 PM
Thank you Roscata, that's what I needed to know!

Anje: I use the cheapest Walmart brand ACV and it made my hair red! Or, red tints and streaks anyway. Especially when wet. Not as noticeable when dry.

VikingVampChick
July 12th, 2011, 07:49 PM
Has anyone used balsamic vinegar or know it's effects on hair (color and otherwise)?