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buttercupmcgee
June 6th, 2011, 10:04 PM
I just got a new job! :cheese: I couldn't be more excited.

Although it occurred to me I might need to be institutionalized when the first thing that popped into my head after "woohoo!" was "uh oh, this will mean heat styling."

I've been at my current job forever and I'm lazy, so I bun it almost every day. This new job though--it's a big step for me and it's a great career opportunity, so I want to look as polished as possible.

Unfortunately my hair looks best down (it's at collar bone now.) I have yet to find a bunning/overnight/heatless option that really makes it move well and gives it good shape. Especially at this length.

The only thing that gives me super professional, stylish hair is heat.

So, I plan on using hot rollers once/week (some weeks not at all, but a maximum of once, especially at the beginning) then trying to stretch that out for a few days, then wearing it up the rest of the week. I intend to keep up my weekly oiling/twice weekly CWC routine. I'm also going to look into steam rollers, which I've heard are less damaging, but I have no experience with them.

Getting to the point....I was hoping to go until 2012 with no trims, but I did not imagine/factor in a new job. I think I'll have to amend my trimming goals. With this schedule, how often would you say I'll need to trim it? The last trim I had was in January, and it's miraculously still supple, soft, and split free.

Kathie
June 6th, 2011, 10:06 PM
Congrats on the new job!
I'm not sure how often you'll need to trim. I would just keep an eye on the ends and trim when absolutely necessary.

Roscata
June 6th, 2011, 10:32 PM
Congrats on the new job!

I'd say just trim whenever you see damage and do S&d whenever possible.

You could consider:
How to relax curly hair My Crown Wrap method (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=17291)
deep waves/snake waves (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/vbjournal.php?do=article&articleid=82)
Creating Pin Curls - Detailed Steps (http://www.hairboutique.com/tips/tip180025.htm)
Finger Waving: Matching Waves and Finger Waving on a Live Model (http://beautyisathingofthepast.blogspot.com/2009/04/finger-waving-matching-waves-and-finger.html)
Bun waves (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=71243&highlight=waves)
Braid waves (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=68351&highlight=waves)
Sponge rollers (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=39686&highlight=sponge+rollers)
Sock bun curls (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=70310&highlight=curls)

Good luck! :D

Annibelle
June 6th, 2011, 10:37 PM
:( Maybe you can also try finding more updos you can use instead of keeping your hair down? Or use rollers that don't require heat? I don't have any trimming advice.

krissykins
June 6th, 2011, 10:38 PM
Congrats on the new job!

I'd say just trim whenever you see damage and do S&d whenever possible.

You could consider:
How to relax curly hair My Crown Wrap method (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=17291)
deep waves/snake waves (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/vbjournal.php?do=article&articleid=82)
Creating Pin Curls - Detailed Steps (http://www.hairboutique.com/tips/tip180025.htm)
Finger Waving: Matching Waves and Finger Waving on a Live Model (http://beautyisathingofthepast.blogspot.com/2009/04/finger-waving-matching-waves-and-finger.html)
Bun waves (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=71243&highlight=waves)
Braid waves (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=68351&highlight=waves)
Sponge rollers (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=39686&highlight=sponge+rollers)
Sock bun curls (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=70310&highlight=curls)

Good luck! :D


I agree with what this little smarty said. :bowtome:

Then, of course, there's also the Caruso steam rollers...

Roscata
June 6th, 2011, 10:50 PM
I agree with what this little smarty said. :bowtome:

Then, of course, there's also the Caruso steam rollers...

Aww thank you! :D :o

Dark Queen
June 6th, 2011, 11:32 PM
Congrats on the new job! Have you tried any styles that leave your hair half up, half down? Maybe that would work? I've generally been doing buns and French twists, but I guess that gets boring after a while, LOL

Kristin
June 6th, 2011, 11:39 PM
Maybe try setting your hair in pin curls or on magnetic rollers. I have some steam rollers and I love them, but they don't create the same type of curl as hot rollers because they squish.

alwayssmiling
June 7th, 2011, 01:46 AM
Another vote for steam curlers - they make my hair feel very soft and moisturised. Wrapping is good for a change too, you could do it the night before so its ready for a quick brush through in the morning. I think a neat bun can look very professional (if your hair is long enough) you could use some alcohol free gel to keep the style looking neat all day. Braid waves started to look nice for me when I got to colarbone.

torrilin
June 7th, 2011, 06:25 AM
What sort of job? What looks professional in a law office is not the same as what looks professional on a doctor or a chemistry professor. Can you show us pictures of styles you would consider polished and professional for your new job?

gretchen_hair
June 7th, 2011, 06:35 AM
I don't think anyone at work is going to be concerned with your hair. Rolled or bunned isn't going to matter to anyone but you. So long as you do a good job, I would think you can groom yourself however you wish.

Congrats on the job!

torrilin
June 7th, 2011, 08:09 AM
I don't think anyone at work is going to be concerned with your hair. Rolled or bunned isn't going to matter to anyone but you. So long as you do a good job, I would think you can groom yourself however you wish.

Depends. If she's a lawyer and just got promoted so she's regularly arguing cases in a courtroom? Her appearance matters just as much as if she's an actress. Many judges have a dress code for their courtroom, and if she doesn't dress appropriately she can be thrown out of court. A surgeon with long hair who can't keep it tidy for the operating room would rightfully get fired. A chemist or physicist who works in a lab and has a long messy ponytail can get herself killed or burned badly. It is common for jobs to have hair requirements, for safety reasons or just social ones.

However, in most jobs where you'd need to look polished and professional, a sleek updo is an ultra-conservative choice. And an ultra-conservative hairstyle won't usually get you in trouble. They also usually do a fine job of meeting safety requirements. But she could be in something like retail management, where she needs to look fashion forward, approachable *and* do heavy labor for 8 hours a day keeping the store neatly organized, fresh looking and stuffed with merchandise. Often while wearing heels and a suit...

Hair and jobs can be um... fun.

gretchen_hair
June 7th, 2011, 08:28 AM
I would say in any of these scenarios her normal bun would suffice. :shrug:


Depends. If she's a lawyer and just got promoted so she's regularly arguing cases in a courtroom? Her appearance matters just as much as if she's an actress. Many judges have a dress code for their courtroom, and if she doesn't dress appropriately she can be thrown out of court. A surgeon with long hair who can't keep it tidy for the operating room would rightfully get fired. A chemist or physicist who works in a lab and has a long messy ponytail can get herself killed or burned badly. It is common for jobs to have hair requirements, for safety reasons or just social ones.

However, in most jobs where you'd need to look polished and professional, a sleek updo is an ultra-conservative choice. And an ultra-conservative hairstyle won't usually get you in trouble. They also usually do a fine job of meeting safety requirements. But she could be in something like retail management, where she needs to look fashion forward, approachable *and* do heavy labor for 8 hours a day keeping the store neatly organized, fresh looking and stuffed with merchandise. Often while wearing heels and a suit...

Hair and jobs can be um... fun.

buttercupmcgee
June 7th, 2011, 08:31 AM
Thanks everyone, I appreciate your input. I will look into the steam rollers for sure...does anyone know if they produce the same volume?

I will be wearing my hair up plenty, but when I wear it down I'd like it to look bouncy, and have the right shape.

You're right, Torrlin--image matters quite a lot at work. I work in advertising in NYC, so image matters quite a lot actually. People do notice. Wearing the same protective updo every day isn't going to cut it in my field.

I'll keep you all posted on tips and tricks I learn to minimize heat while still attempting to look swish with my hair down. And, I'll try wrapping ASAP, how fun!

Thanks!

bcmg

GRU
June 7th, 2011, 10:29 AM
FYI, it doesn't have to be the "same protective updo every day".... there are a GAZILLION different ways to put your hair up, along with a GAZILLION different accessories you can use to accomplish that.

HairFaerie
June 7th, 2011, 10:38 AM
Another vote for Caruso steam rollers... They work really well and since it's just hot steam that creates the curls, minimum damage!

Good luck!

torrilin
June 7th, 2011, 11:02 AM
You're right, Torrlin--image matters quite a lot at work. I work in advertising in NYC, so image matters quite a lot actually. People do notice. Wearing the same protective updo every day isn't going to cut it in my field.

Ack! Worse than I feared! That's way more style conscious than retail management.

What updos can you do? Is your firm one of the ones where you should be in a suit every day, or should you have (horrors!) a "creative" look? (seriously, it's a lot worse to look suitably artsy and yet safe enough to not scare off the clients... there's no way I could put up with that. too easy to end up pigeonholed.) Are there women in upper levels of the firm who can be style role models?

Have you checked into long hair friendly salons in NYC? I seem to recall there's more than one, and while they're expensive, it might be well worth the money for learning new styles and making sure your cut grows out well. GRU's right that you don't have just one updo choice as your hair grows, but... you also can't afford to look the tiniest bit dated or out of touch with fashion either. A good stylist to help you rotate looks and accessories would be a real timesaver. It's too easy for a longhair to get into learning new buns and then find that her hairdo always looks the same from the front.

It's sometimes possible to make the same hairstyle work in a fashion forward field, but you have to be the sort of personality where people really "take" to you having a signature style. Mostly, that seems to work for folks who are editors in chief or managing partner and the like. So in the very long term, I'm sure you can make long hair work for you... the trick is surviving til then.

buttercupmcgee
June 7th, 2011, 11:41 AM
Ack! Worse than I feared! That's way more style conscious than retail management.

What updos can you do? Is your firm one of the ones where you should be in a suit every day, or should you have (horrors!) a "creative" look? (seriously, it's a lot worse to look suitably artsy and yet safe enough to not scare off the clients... there's no way I could put up with that. too easy to end up pigeonholed.) Are there women in upper levels of the firm who can be style role models?

Have you checked into long hair friendly salons in NYC? I seem to recall there's more than one, and while they're expensive, it might be well worth the money for learning new styles and making sure your cut grows out well. GRU's right that you don't have just one updo choice as your hair grows, but... you also can't afford to look the tiniest bit dated or out of touch with fashion either. A good stylist to help you rotate looks and accessories would be a real timesaver. It's too easy for a longhair to get into learning new buns and then find that her hairdo always looks the same from the front.

It's sometimes possible to make the same hairstyle work in a fashion forward field, but you have to be the sort of personality where people really "take" to you having a signature style. Mostly, that seems to work for folks who are editors in chief or managing partner and the like. So in the very long term, I'm sure you can make long hair work for you... the trick is surviving til then.

"It's too easy for a longhair to get into learning new buns and then find that her hairdo always looks the same from the front."

Oh man that is SPOT ON. Really good point. It's that, plus I look better with my hair down, I'm still in my 20s and feel it suits my overall aesthetic well, and I just plain LIKE it down.

I will look into the long hair salons, thanks for the tip. I am on the creative-ish side. There are no suits at the agency, just people with exquisite taste and style out the wazoo. No pressure! :-)

Thanks for the insights, you've given me a lot to think about!

C.H.
June 7th, 2011, 12:09 PM
As I was reading through this thread, I had a feeling it might be marketing or advertising, where it really goes beyond just being office-appropriate--they are some of the most stylish professionals out there. And sure enough...

The thing about up-dos is that while they can be totally professional, they're rarely fashion-forward and can come off as stodgy, especially for someone in their 20's.

torrilin
June 7th, 2011, 12:43 PM
I dunno. I made it work for me in my 20s in retail. But.

I was a tallish, very hourglass young woman. I have dark blonde/light brown hair that in most indoor lighting might as well be dark brown. It is straight (and with CO washing is the kind of straight that looks good left down). I have a ghost pale complexion. And I have the kind of round face that belongs on a Victorian china doll. And I was working for a company where a suit and heels were always safe.

So I always dressed as if I were Audrey Hepburn or a young prima ballerina bumming at a day job. I played up my natural strengths in terms of looks that way, and still had a look that was appropriately corporate. Lots of black clothes, fine "cashmere" (merino wool really - I can't wear cashmere) sweaters, and red red red lipstick. I swear, a Victorian china doll is NOT an ok look in a professional job. And at 23, presenting that way at work means you get treated like a helpless little girl. Not ok at all.

Buttercup's gonna have to do the same kind of dance, but writ larger because she doesn't have the handy skirt suit uniform. (also more expensively, because if you can wear a uniform of any sort, it's easier to buy off the rack)

buttercupmcgee
June 7th, 2011, 12:51 PM
I dunno. I made it work for me in my 20s in retail. But.

I was a tallish, very hourglass young woman. I have dark blonde/light brown hair that in most indoor lighting might as well be dark brown. It is straight (and with CO washing is the kind of straight that looks good left down). I have a ghost pale complexion. And I have the kind of round face that belongs on a Victorian china doll. And I was working for a company where a suit and heels were always safe.

So I always dressed as if I were Audrey Hepburn or a young prima ballerina bumming at a day job. I played up my natural strengths in terms of looks that way, and still had a look that was appropriately corporate. Lots of black clothes, fine "cashmere" (merino wool really - I can't wear cashmere) sweaters, and red red red lipstick. I swear, a Victorian china doll is NOT an ok look in a professional job. And at 23, presenting that way at work means you get treated like a helpless little girl. Not ok at all.

Buttercup's gonna have to do the same kind of dance, but writ larger because she doesn't have the handy skirt suit uniform. (also more expensively, because if you can wear a uniform of any sort, it's easier to buy off the rack)

How did you know that a black top, red lips, and a high updo is my favorite look of all time? I wish I could wear it every day. Alas I need to mix it up.

Roscata
June 7th, 2011, 01:05 PM
"It's too easy for a longhair to get into learning new buns and then find that her hairdo always looks the same from the front."

That is the perfect excuse I mean reason ;) to buy a lot of hair accessories like head bands, hair flowers, flexi8, ficcare, fun hair pins, hair combs, leaving one or two pieces of hair in the front and curling them with sponge rollers, learning rope braids, dutch braids, etc to braid the front of the hair and pin it back (I do believe the rope braid looks very nice). Honestly I'd have fun with it because straitening your hair and wearing it down every days is just as repetitive as wearing the same bun every day. At your length you can do a lot of fun stuff like Gibson tuck with a flower pinned on top of it to hid the hole, or French/peacock twist held by a cute hair comb, diagonal French braid with a cute tie at the end. There are a lot of options.

Originally I gave you ways to style your hair while down to get a polished look, because it seemed like you wanted to wear it down, but you can play with your hair styles a lot, like do rag curls then do a half up held by a pretty hair clip. I could go on and on about your options. Honestly just have fun with it. YouTube is your best friend when it comes to tutorials. :D

buttercupmcgee
June 7th, 2011, 01:27 PM
That is the perfect excuse I mean reason ;) to buy a lot of hair accessories like head bands, hair flowers, flexi8, ficcare, fun hair pins, hair combs, leaving one or two pieces of hair in the front and curling them with sponge rollers, learning rope braids, dutch braids, etc to braid the front of the hair and pin it back (I do believe the rope braid looks very nice). Honestly I'd have fun with it because straitening your hair and wearing it down every days is just as repetitive as wearing the same bun every day. At your length you can do a lot of fun stuff like Gibson tuck with a flower pinned on top of it to hid the hole, or French/peacock twist held by a cute hair comb, diagonal French braid with a cute tie at the end. There are a lot of options.

Originally I gave you ways to style your hair while down to get a polished look, because it seemed like you wanted to wear it down, but you can play with your hair styles a lot, like do rag curls then do a half up held by a pretty hair clip. I could go on and on about your options. Honestly just have fun with it. YouTube is your best friend when it comes to tutorials. :D

Oooo, thanks for the suggestions! I adore rope braids as well.

I totally agree with you that wearing hair down every day can be just as much of a snooze cruise as wearing the same bun. And, updos can be versatile, it's true. I'm actually obsessed with them and watch about 4 tutorials a day. (Love your gibson tuck with the flower idea.)

However, I find the most flattering look on me is wearing my hair around my face. So, I'd like to alternate wearing my hair down into the mix. And because I haven't mastered rag curls or overnight heatless styling--I always get weird kinks and triangle head and mid-day limpness--this means I don't know where else to turn but heat.

I'm going to try wrapping tonight--maybe that will be my magic bullet!

Alun
June 7th, 2011, 01:27 PM
Depends. If she's a lawyer and just got promoted so she's regularly arguing cases in a courtroom? Her appearance matters just as much as if she's an actress. Many judges have a dress code for their courtroom, and if she doesn't dress appropriately she can be thrown out of court. A surgeon with long hair who can't keep it tidy for the operating room would rightfully get fired. A chemist or physicist who works in a lab and has a long messy ponytail can get herself killed or burned badly. It is common for jobs to have hair requirements, for safety reasons or just social ones.

However, in most jobs where you'd need to look polished and professional, a sleek updo is an ultra-conservative choice. And an ultra-conservative hairstyle won't usually get you in trouble. They also usually do a fine job of meeting safety requirements. But she could be in something like retail management, where she needs to look fashion forward, approachable *and* do heavy labor for 8 hours a day keeping the store neatly organized, fresh looking and stuffed with merchandise. Often while wearing heels and a suit...

Hair and jobs can be um... fun.

I work in a law office, and my hair is worn loose just as shown in the sidebar. but then I'm a guy. No male lawyer is going to complain about a woman with loose hair. Same thing for judges. I don't argue in court, I can't as I'm a patent agent not a lawyer, but I've never heard of a judge complaining about some one's hair. I have heard of judges reprimanding a lawyer for not wearing a jacket, or not wearing a tie in the case of a male lawyer, but that's all, and I have actually seen long haired male lawyers argue in court with loose hair. If there is going to be a problem, and you are female, I'm pretty sure it will only involve a judge or law partner who is also female, and then I'm too far out of my depth to comment.

As for those other jobs, well you can't have strands of long hair left inside a patient or let your hair dangle over a bunsen burner, can you?

torrilin
June 7th, 2011, 01:59 PM
Ha! Ok, so we have somewhat similar aesthetics. (please tell me you're not cursed to look like a china doll?)

Since you've got a favorite look... find other looks that fit the template. Does the slumming ballerina image work for you? Or is it maybe worth hunting down images of Jean Shrimpton or other women who brought Mod into vogue? (NOT Twiggy, her hair was straight... but Kate Moss in the 1990s might be suitable) Or maybe you would suit the finger waves worn in the late 1920s and early 1930s? You want the stuff you fall back on to work as much as possible with your natural strengths.

As much as possible, try to ignore the clothes in your inspiration images. Jewelry, scarves, handbags, makeup, and hairstyle are what make a look go from ok to polished. If the clothes are vaguely the right shape and you spring for tailoring so the fit is good, the clothes will be fine. Try not to look at advertising pictures, because those often eliminate details so the customer just sees what's being sold. Look for off duty models, dancers, movie stars, socialites, princesses, queens... women who were in work that's as image conscious as yours. Try to get a visual feel for how many accessories are right, which ones, and for whom (and for when... the way a woman accessorized in 1920 is very different from how she'd accessorize in 1990, despite the fact that they might wear very similar clothing styles and hair).

Figure out what hair stuff reads as "evening" and what hair stuff is work appropriate. Spending the time to learn an incredibly cute style to show off a new hair toy and then realizing that it's only going to be ok for the Metropolitan Museum of Art's galas is gonna be demoralizing. Doing that six times in a row is gonna make you wanna chop.

spidermom
June 7th, 2011, 02:26 PM
Another thing you could try if it doesn't matter how you look in bed at night is to do a loose top-of-head ponytail, then roll the ends. I had great-looking hair every day from doing this when it was quite a bit shorter. Now it's too long for that to work.

You could roll your hair barely damp - maybe spritz it a little before you roll it (if this is an option at all).

spidermom
June 7th, 2011, 02:28 PM
FYI, it doesn't have to be the "same protective updo every day".... there are a GAZILLION different ways to put your hair up, along with a GAZILLION different accessories you can use to accomplish that.

Unless you're my husband, in which case there are only 2 styles for long hair - "pulled back" or "down". I kid you not, that's IT.

Roscata
June 7th, 2011, 06:54 PM
Unless you're my husband, in which case there are only 2 styles for long hair - "pulled back" or "down". I kid you not, that's IT.

Lol! How funny. :D

GRU
June 7th, 2011, 07:14 PM
Unless you're my husband, in which case there are only 2 styles for long hair - "pulled back" or "down". I kid you not, that's IT.

That darned Y chromosome! :lol: