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proo
May 15th, 2011, 05:28 PM
Does anyone have experience with this? How about using it as a hair rinse?
thanks, proo

DoubleCrowned
May 15th, 2011, 06:51 PM
Yes. I started using kombucha for other reasons. I had never measured or photographed my hair before joining LHC, and have only been a member for a couple of months, so can't really say for sure. However, I can't explain why my hair would have started to grow all of a sudden. I worked up to drinking one pint a day, now make my own to save money. I was amazed when I saw how much length I had gained, plus wonderfully soft and moist skin.

I think it would work about like apple cider vinegar as a rinse, but you would have to experiment on what dilution to use. I have used it as a scalp and skin wash as well. I love the stuff.

sarahbrownie
May 15th, 2011, 09:29 PM
I drink Kombucha when I feel pretty crummy or if I think a cold is coming on since it helps boost immunity. I usually drink it for about a week, so I don't know if it's done anything to my hair. I might have to start drinking it more often to see.

maborosi
May 15th, 2011, 09:48 PM
I've also heard about something called "redbush tea".
I think there was even a thread on it here...very recently, lol.

~maborosi~

ravenreed
May 16th, 2011, 02:46 AM
I have tried Kombucha a few times and had to stop. It made my heart act funny.

Qadupae
May 16th, 2011, 03:29 AM
It made my heart act funny.

I'll take you don't mean haha funny :( What was it about kombucha that caused a reaction?

As for me, DH drinks it, but I don't, although I heard its awesome stuff and might try it sometime soon when he gets it.

ravenreed
May 16th, 2011, 03:51 AM
No clue, but it was clearly the kombucha. So yeah, after trying it half a dozen times over the years, I gave up.


I'll take you don't mean haha funny :( What was it about kombucha that caused a reaction?

As for me, DH drinks it, but I don't, although I heard its awesome stuff and might try it sometime soon when he gets it.

DoubleCrowned
May 16th, 2011, 07:21 AM
I have tried Kombucha a few times and had to stop. It made my heart act funny.

I use it for detoxification. I could only tolerate about two teaspoons at a time when I started using it, so it was a few months before I was using a pint a day.

SpeakingEZ
May 16th, 2011, 08:46 AM
It wouldn't surprise me that taking kombucha internally would increase hair growth. I don't know about using it externally on the hair itself. Kombucha is just so wonderful for overall health, I can see it restoring and improving any of the body's functions necessary for healthy hair growth.

I knew a vegan who swore by kombucha to cure his hangovers. Despite the weekend drinking, he was the healthiest man I've ever known. (Then, maybe, "indirectly BECAUSE OF his weekend drinking". . . .)

proo
May 16th, 2011, 08:52 AM
That's interesting Ravenreed because I can definitely feel the kombucha doin it's thing the moment I start drinking it - sometimes it's quite intense to the point where I can't handle it. I've learned to treat it as a medicine.

annieangel149
May 16th, 2011, 08:58 AM
wow! i need to get me some of this! i hope i can find it where i live!

Misti
May 16th, 2011, 10:03 AM
Does anyone have experience with this? How about using it as a hair rinse?
thanks, proo

I found that kombucha made my scalp happy, but when I tried to use it instead of ACV, it coated my hair and made it pretty unmanageable.

Misti
May 16th, 2011, 10:07 AM
That's interesting Ravenreed because I can definitely feel the kombucha doin it's thing the moment I start drinking it - sometimes it's quite intense to the point where I can't handle it. I've learned to treat it as a medicine.

That's very interesting. We love kombucha and refer to it as "homemade soda", but I have never really noticed and direct reaction to it. Overall, I think it has helped out digestive health and out immune system health immensely, but never noticed a big change. We just gradually felt better and noticed that we got oje cold per season at most the couple of winters we've used it.

cowgirllong
May 16th, 2011, 10:08 AM
If you want to start drinking it daily do you need to start out with a small amount? Or does it just have odd effects on a few people? Curious...

cowgirllong
May 16th, 2011, 10:12 AM
I've also heard about something called "redbush tea".
I think there was even a thread on it here...very recently, lol.

~maborosi~

This is red tea, also called Rooibos. Probably available at your local grocery store.:)

DoubleCrowned
May 16th, 2011, 11:09 AM
That's interesting Ravenreed because I can definitely feel the kombucha doin it's thing the moment I start drinking it - sometimes it's quite intense to the point where I can't handle it. I've learned to treat it as a medicine.

That's what happened to me at first. I figured it was detoxifying, so kept upping it as I could handle more. By the time I got to drinking a pint a day, I knew I would not quit drinking it. Now, I only get that sensation if I have been exposed to chemicals. For me, the health benefits have been remarkable.

Healthy friends of mine never had trouble "handling" kombucha. One drank it for the first time after outpatient surgery to get rid of the taste of anesthetic in his mouth. It worked within a half hour or so, from what I remember.

mrs_coffee
May 16th, 2011, 11:31 AM
I brew my own kombucha and have for a few years now. I drink it nearly every day, but I don't know whether it makes my hair grow quickly or not.

annieangel149
May 16th, 2011, 11:52 AM
ohhh! i didnt realise that kombucha was actually redbush tea! they have that at the supermarket where i live! i will definetly be getting some of that tomorrow!!! :D

Tiina
May 16th, 2011, 12:46 PM
ohhh! i didnt realise that kombucha was actually redbush tea! they have that at the supermarket where i live! i will definetly be getting some of that tomorrow!!! :D

No, it is not the same. Rooibos is a type of leaf tea. Kombucha is fermented tea.

I would like to try kombucha but I am sure I wouldn't find it where I live. And I am waaaay too cautious to try making my own. +scaredycat...scaredycat...+

mrs_coffee
May 16th, 2011, 01:38 PM
Just in case anyone is interested in fermenting their own kombucha and doesn't have a source for starter, you can buy a starter from Cultures for Health. They have videos and how-to instructions for brewing/fermenting your own.

http://www.culturesforhealth.com/kombucha-tea-starter-culture.html

proo
May 16th, 2011, 02:28 PM
I brew my own and it has alot of kick. When I drink store-bought kombucha it doesn't affect me as profoundly.

annieangel149
May 16th, 2011, 02:33 PM
No, it is not the same. Rooibos is a type of leaf tea. Kombucha is fermented tea.

I would like to try kombucha but I am sure I wouldn't find it where I live. And I am waaaay too cautious to try making my own. +scaredycat...scaredycat...+


ohhh okay! thanx for pointing that out! i need to do a little research i think :o

pixistixx
May 16th, 2011, 02:38 PM
actually, kombucha made me lose hair... i didn't know at the time, but apparently I have a yeast allergy, and kombucha is full of yeast. I always wondered why the bridge of my nose swelled when I drank it, and I'd get all stuffy and high feeling. I have heard others say it did wonders for their hair though... not just growth, but also for reversing grey hair. I used to make it for a while, but you can buy GT daves... it gets expensive to buy it though... around 4 to 5 a bottle.

terpentyna
May 16th, 2011, 02:54 PM
SO wanting to try it.

I'm off to the internet to find out how to.

There's a more popular fermented drink where I live, it's called Kvass (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kvass) and I wonder if this has beneficial effects as well...

DoubleCrowned
May 16th, 2011, 03:35 PM
I found that kombucha made my scalp happy, but when I tried to use it instead of ACV, it coated my hair and made it pretty unmanageable.

I rinsed it out with water after using it on my hair. I have a friend who made some that turned out too sour, so she used it for house-cleaning. She ended up with a very sticky floor. So, it's official, folks: kombucha is not a leave in! (but your floor will be clean enough to eat off of by the time you get dried kombucha off of it)




I would like to try kombucha but I am sure I wouldn't find it where I live. And I am waaaay too cautious to try making my own. +scaredycat...scaredycat...+

If you can get a culture, I will walk you through the process. You can PM pictures of anything that is scary. Actually, kombucha is made in people's kitchens all around the world---maybe someone near you....


I brew my own and it has alot of kick. When I drink store-bought kombucha it doesn't affect me as profoundly.

My kombucha-maker friends and I all agree that home-made tastes better than what you can buy. Hmmmm, i think I am getting thirsty...


actually, kombucha made me lose hair... i didn't know at the time, but apparently I have a yeast allergy, and kombucha is full of yeast. I always wondered why the bridge of my nose swelled when I drank it, and I'd get all stuffy and high feeling. I have heard others say it did wonders for their hair though... not just growth, but also for reversing grey hair. I used to make it for a while, but you can buy GT daves... it gets expensive to buy it though... around 4 to 5 a bottle.

It certainly does sound like you reacted to it! I know someone who reacts to apple cider vinegar, but he has Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. His immune system is screwy from it. The reacting to kombucha has always confused me, because the kombucha culture is a symbiotic culture of beneficial bacteria and yeasts (SCOBY) living in perfect balance. Because of this, the kombucha balances a person's intestinal flora, destroying the harmful organizms and balancing the rest. So, how could it be harmful? My guesses: 1. The body became hypersensitive to certain foods for some reason 2. A problem with leaky gut, perhaps? 3. There are different strains of kombucha--could they be so different? 4. Perhaps an additive to the kombucha was at fault or perhaps the kombucha was not organic. 5. A detox reaction? At any rate, I am sorry you can't drink it.

ravenreed
May 16th, 2011, 04:34 PM
The types I tried over the years were bottled and two different strains of home grown so I am definitely sensitive to something in there. Apparently it is not uncommon for people to have allergic reactions as it is listed as a side effect on WebMD. I think there are also concerns that excessive consumption can lead to acidosis.




snipped...


It certainly does sound like you reacted to it! I know someone who reacts to apple cider vinegar, but he has Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. His immune system is screwy from it. The reacting to kombucha has always confused me, because the kombucha culture is a symbiotic culture of beneficial bacteria and yeasts (SCOBY) living in perfect balance. Because of this, the kombucha balances a person's intestinal flora, destroying the harmful organizms and balancing the rest. So, how could it be harmful? My guesses: 1. The body became hypersensitive to certain foods for some reason 2. A problem with leaky gut, perhaps? 3. There are different strains of kombucha--could they be so different? 4. Perhaps an additive to the kombucha was at fault or perhaps the kombucha was not organic. 5. A detox reaction? At any rate, I am sorry you can't drink it.

pixistixx
May 16th, 2011, 05:53 PM
I rinsed it out with water after using it on my hair. I have a friend who made some that turned out too sour, so she used it for house-cleaning. She ended up with a very sticky floor. So, it's official, folks: kombucha is not a leave in! (but your floor will be clean enough to eat off of by the time you get dried kombucha off of it)



If you can get a culture, I will walk you through the process. You can PM pictures of anything that is scary. Actually, kombucha is made in people's kitchens all around the world---maybe someone near you....



My kombucha-maker friends and I all agree that home-made tastes better than what you can buy. Hmmmm, i think I am getting thirsty...



It certainly does sound like you reacted to it! I know someone who reacts to apple cider vinegar, but he has Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. His immune system is screwy from it. The reacting to kombucha has always confused me, because the kombucha culture is a symbiotic culture of beneficial bacteria and yeasts (SCOBY) living in perfect balance. Because of this, the kombucha balances a person's intestinal flora, destroying the harmful organizms and balancing the rest. So, how could it be harmful? My guesses: 1. The body became hypersensitive to certain foods for some reason 2. A problem with leaky gut, perhaps? 3. There are different strains of kombucha--could they be so different? 4. Perhaps an additive to the kombucha was at fault or perhaps the kombucha was not organic. 5. A detox reaction? At any rate, I am sorry you can't drink it.

yeah.... i get the same issues with wine and raw ACV... it was a bummer because I just thought I was getting that buzzed feeling on it like everyone always talks about.
I'm pretty familiar with detox reactions, especially having to go through a hardcore heavy metals detox.... major achy joints and flu like symptoms... not fun! Some people break out when drinking it, i think because it tends to be dehydrating. make sure you drink additional water with it, just as you would if you drink tea or caffeinated beverages.

Brewing it is not scary at all once you get the hang of it... just make sure the jars are properly sterilized, and the ph is at a certain acidity level when you first start brewing. (by adding a bit of starter tea in with the scoby) the only issue I had was, that you will start to accrue multiple scobys and soon will have tons of jars brewing in every cabinet. I had to start giving them away to people at the local health shop because I had so many on my hands lol! you tend to become attached to the "babies" and feel guilty for throwing them out. composting might be a good option. I've also heard of them being stretched and used as drum skins, or as facial toner pads

Misti
May 17th, 2011, 10:24 AM
yeah.... Brewing it is not scary at all once you get the hang of it... just make sure the jars are properly sterilized, and the ph is at a certain acidity level when you first start brewing. (by adding a bit of starter tea in with the scoby) the only issue I had was, that you will start to accrue multiple scobys and soon will have tons of jars brewing in every cabinet. I had to start giving them away to people at the local health shop because I had so many on my hands lol! you tend to become attached to the "babies" and feel guilty for throwing them out. composting might be a good option. I've also heard of them being stretched and used as drum skins, or as facial toner pads

We have been brewing our own for years, too -- we give away the scobies we can find homes for and we compost the rest.

And to brew your own, you don't need a "special culture", if you can get a bottle of GT Dave's -- just make up the sweet tea and dump in a bottle of kombucha. It takes a little longer than starting with a scoby, but it works great. :) (We keep our house very cold in winter and usually have to start fresh in the spring.)

maborosi
May 17th, 2011, 11:04 AM
This is red tea, also called Rooibos. Probably available at your local grocery store.:)

Thanks! I like my tea straight, hehe. So I wouldn't have a problem drinking it.

By the way, everyone is mentioning using it as a rinse, but it can help with your hair (and your body?) when you drink it, too, right?

~maborosi~

DoubleCrowned
May 17th, 2011, 08:30 PM
If you want to start drinking it daily do you need to start out with a small amount? Or does it just have odd effects on a few people? Curious...

It depends on your state of health. Most people can just drink it, i think.


We have been brewing our own for years, too -- we give away the scobies we can find homes for and we compost the rest.

And to brew your own, you don't need a "special culture", if you can get a bottle of GT Dave's -- just make up the sweet tea and dump in a bottle of kombucha. It takes a little longer than starting with a scoby, but it works great. :) (We keep our house very cold in winter and usually have to start fresh in the spring.)

I have a SCOBY brought from Yugoslavia and 2 started from purchased bottles. I can't tell much difference in taste, but they behave differently and the moms seem to look different.

Like you, I give away as many moms as I can. Old moms also make chew toys for pets and I experimented with patching a pair of shoes, making facials....and compost.



Thanks! I like my tea straight, hehe. So I wouldn't have a problem drinking it.

By the way, everyone is mentioning using it as a rinse, but it can help with your hair (and your body?) when you drink it, too, right?

~maborosi~

Thanks! I like my tea straight, hehe. So I wouldn't have a problem drinking it.

By the way, everyone is mentioning using it as a rinse, but it can help with your hair (and your body?) when you drink it, too, right?

~maborosi~

Most of us are drinking it, not rinsing with it. I think it makes some people's hair start to grow because they were lacking in the nutrients or probiotics that it supplies or because the kombucha helped rid them of toxins.

If you do use it as a rinse, you have to rinse it out so that your hair won't be sticky. However, it makes a nice scalp scrub (also to rinse out).

PamelaViktoria
May 17th, 2011, 08:53 PM
I don't drink it because what ever vitamins supposed to be in it afterwards, I hate the idea of all that sugar. Sugar and salt are so aging. But I could be very wrong. Who knows?

DoubleCrowned
May 18th, 2011, 04:24 PM
I don't drink it because what ever vitamins supposed to be in it afterwards, I hate the idea of all that sugar. Sugar and salt are so aging. But I could be very wrong. Who knows?

I, too, was very concerned about the sugar content of kombucha.

The sugar used to make kombucha is devoured by bacteria and yeasts of the SCOBY. According to a Cornell study, kombucha that was started with 100 grams of sugar per liter had 4.8 grams of sugar (now as glucose) at the end of 9 days of brewing.

My kombucha usually takes more than 10 days to brew; occasionally up to 21 days, so I am guessing the Cornell study measured rather sweet kombucha. Even so, after the kombucha has brewed 9 or however many days, most of us bottle it. Once bottled, the yeasts that thrive without oxygen compete for the remaining glucose. In devouring it, fizz is formed--to the delight of the home kombucha maker. The longer it goes through this secondary fermentation in the bottle, the less sugar the finished product contains.

Those worried about sugar can measure the acidity of their kombucha to be certain that it is not too sweet. Also, I read that acidic foods and fermented foods reduce blood glucose levels, apparently by slowing the rate of sugar absorption--something to google. Kombucha is fermented and also acidic, being harvested at a pH of about 3.2.

Misti
May 20th, 2011, 02:46 PM
I read that acidic foods and fermented foods reduce blood glucose levels, apparently by slowing the rate of sugar absorption--something to google. Kombucha is fermented and also acidic, being harvested at a pH of about 3.2.

Interesting...after drinking kombucha for a couple of years my doctor reduced my 100 units per day of Lantus insulin to zero...with an hbA1C still well under 7.0.

Maybe it helped! I doubt the correlation is directly causative, though possible related through far better all-round health, but ... who knows.

Thanks for the information, DoubleCrowned!

proo
May 20th, 2011, 05:04 PM
My homebrew kombucha is definitely not sweet. The sugar is the vehicle for the fermentation process.

DoubleCrowned
May 20th, 2011, 09:34 PM
Interesting...after drinking kombucha for a couple of years my doctor reduced my 100 units per day of Lantus insulin to zero...with an hbA1C still well under 7.0.

Maybe it helped! I doubt the correlation is directly causative, though possible related through far better all-round health, but ... who knows.

Thanks for the information, DoubleCrowned!

You are welcome.

Wow, you are off insulin! Several of the articles I have mention kombucha as a cure for diabetes (and a lot of other disorders), but they do not mention how it works, how long, or how much it takes. However, one says that the studies were done in Germany early in the 20th century; they mention Gunther Frank and Dr. Rudolph Skeinar. I assumed that it worked because of the general health benefits, but maybe there is more to it than that.

Misti
May 21st, 2011, 06:13 AM
You are welcome.

Wow, you are off insulin!

I am off insulin, and my A1C is decent, but not great and I still get highs. I wouldn't say I'm *cured*, but certainly it's better. (Oh, and we're very consistent in summer, but in winter, it's hard to keep the brew going and our consumption is more sporadic.)

DoubleCrowned
May 21st, 2011, 03:41 PM
I am off insulin, and my A1C is decent, but not great and I still get highs. I wouldn't say I'm *cured*, but certainly it's better. (Oh, and we're very consistent in summer, but in winter, it's hard to keep the brew going and our consumption is more sporadic.)
I make up several gallons in the fall to use during the winter when the moms are sluggish.

A couple of my moms are in nice jars with pretty hankies as covers, so they are in the warmer living areas in the winter. Even in the cool areas, I let them brew and get some slow batches--plus vinegar if I forget them.

Misti
May 21st, 2011, 06:25 PM
I make up several gallons in the fall to use during the winter when the moms are sluggish.

A couple of my moms are in nice jars with pretty hankies as covers, so they are in the warmer living areas in the winter. Even in the cool areas, I let them brew and get some slow batches--plus vinegar if I forget them.

Yeah, ours get sleepy all winter -- largely because the warm areas of the house are at about 52 degrees Fahrenheit all winter. But we brew it in a pair of 5 gallon jars and they sit on the counter (covered with nice white towels) all the time. :)

1953Diygal
May 22nd, 2011, 02:20 PM
This is a very interesting thread. I had no idea that kombucha was such a divisive issue. Are you pro kombucha or are you anti kombucha? :D

I bought some kombucha tea at the store last week and have been adding it to my daily tea concoction. I like the taste and it seems to help with my immunity.

Oh, here's the link to the other hair tea thread where rooibus is mentioned:
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=65637&highlight=grow+hair

DoubleCrowned
May 24th, 2011, 10:26 PM
This is a very interesting thread. I had no idea that kombucha was such a divisive issue. Are you pro kombucha or are you anti kombucha? :D

I bought some kombucha tea at the store last week and have been adding it to my daily tea concoction. I like the taste and it seems to help with my immunity.

Oh, here's the link to the other hair tea thread where rooibus is mentioned:
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=65637&highlight=grow+hair

Most of us are for it--eveyone who has tried it, I think. The jury is out on whether it makes hair grow. Whether it stimulated hair growth probably depends on why the hair did not grow.

Thank you for the rooibus link. Some people make kombucha from rooibus, which I may have to try now that I have read about it.

DoubleCrowned
May 26th, 2011, 10:20 PM
Yeah, ours get sleepy all winter -- largely because the warm areas of the house are at about 52 degrees Fahrenheit all winter. But we brew it in a pair of 5 gallon jars and they sit on the counter (covered with nice white towels) all the time. :)

You have ten gallons going?! Wow. How much do you drink a day during good brewing weather? Do you boil all that water first to get the chlorine out?

Misti
May 27th, 2011, 01:27 PM
We have a family of three and we each drink at least 8 ounces or so a day and we serve some to dinner guests, too, if they want it. It sounds like we make a LOT, but it disappears pretty fast -- and except for a few weeks in August, the old batch is gone well before the new batch is ready.

We have a reverse osmosis filter that we use for all of our drinking water, but we boil the tea part. :p

Fencai
May 31st, 2011, 10:28 AM
Im soooo happy! A friend of mine gave me one of her babies! I was able to get my batch going again. When I moved the last batch died.
(and IMHO- I think my roomate was poking the scoby with her bare hands cause she thought it was gross.) it went all furry moldy on me.

So this batch is going nice and strong! I'll be getting ready to replenish it soon. Probably this weekend! YUM!
I love it! :joy:

Misti
May 31st, 2011, 12:10 PM
Congratulations -- enjoy! :)

DoubleCrowned
June 1st, 2011, 11:45 AM
Im soooo happy! A friend of mine gave me one of her babies! I was able to get my batch going again. When I moved the last batch died.
(and IMHO- I think my roomate was poking the scoby with her bare hands cause she thought it was gross.) it went all furry moldy on me.

So this batch is going nice and strong! I'll be getting ready to replenish it soon. Probably this weekend! YUM!
I love it! :joy:

What fun! Congratulations!

I have dried some of my SCOBYs as a precaution. I understand they can be hydrated and used for new batches.

Misti I have 14 jars (3 qt - 1 gal), but that is only about 8 gallons when you subtract starter and head room. Where did you get 5-gallon containers?

Misti
June 1st, 2011, 02:47 PM
Misti Where did you get 5-gallon containers?

From a local boutique hardware store. They look like the 1 quart canning jars, but BIG.

EtherealOde
June 1st, 2011, 03:06 PM
I tried the stuff but just couldn't stomach the taste, urk. There are lots of other healthful things I can do that are more pleasant, so I don't worry much about missing out on this one.

DoubleCrowned
June 1st, 2011, 03:39 PM
I tried the stuff but just couldn't stomach the taste, urk. There are lots of other healthful things I can do that are more pleasant, so I don't worry much about missing out on this one.

I hear you! I hated it at first. I mixed it with yogurt or fruit juice just to get it down, and had to start with just a teaspoon or two. However, it was the only food I could find that can actually combine with toxins to carry them out of the body. Other forms of detoxing get tricky, even dangerous, to do yourself, so I felt (and still think) a taste for kombucha is a good one to acquire.

The homemade kombucha is much nicer tasting to me and my friends. Some of us put spices in the bottle when bottling. Although that may change the health-giving benefits, some of the combinations make very nice drinks. Choosing different teas also changes the taste. We've even had tasting parties.

So far as juice goes, I think orange juice or grape juice hide the kombucha taste the best.

Misti
June 1st, 2011, 03:55 PM
I tried the stuff but just couldn't stomach the taste, urk.

Our experience in sharing with dinner guests is that people who drink softdrinks regularly find it pretty dreadful (carbonated vinegra has been mentioned) and that friends who drink mostly coffee or tea or water seem to develop a taste for it.

owlathena
June 1st, 2011, 04:39 PM
I bought a bottle of it from the grocery store a few days ago. According to the label, one bottle was four servings. It tasted kind of like really watered down vinegar. I drank half of it that afternoon and the other half the next day. :shrug: I might try it again some time since its healthy. Does it contain any probiotic buggies ("They're not bugs!" I know. But thats how I imagine them.)? Since going vegan a few weeks ago I'm worried I'm not getting enough probiotics since I'm not eating yogurt every day like I used to. I've thought of taking a supplement, but I'd like to get them from foods.

DoubleCrowned
June 1st, 2011, 10:13 PM
I bought a bottle of it from the grocery store a few days ago. According to the label, one bottle was four servings. It tasted kind of like really watered down vinegar. I drank half of it that afternoon and the other half the next day. :shrug: I might try it again some time since its healthy. Does it contain any probiotic buggies ("They're not bugs!" I know. But thats how I imagine them.)? Since going vegan a few weeks ago I'm worried I'm not getting enough probiotics since I'm not eating yogurt every day like I used to. I've thought of taking a supplement, but I'd like to get them from foods.

I drink about pint a day for the benefits I want, even though some of the bottles recommend far less.

A different brand of kombucha might taste better to you, or start making your own so that you can harvest it at the perfect degree of sourness for your taste.

Kombucha is loaded with probiotics if it is raw (not pasteurized)--I don't know of any brands that heat or pasteurize their kombucha. The probiotics in are a bigger variety than what yogurt has, and they are all living in perfect balance with each other in the SCOBY, so tend to balance the intestinal flora better than yogurt does.

Ravenwind
June 1st, 2011, 10:23 PM
This is interesting. Tea seems to work wonders ^_^ I should start drinking some.

owlathena
June 2nd, 2011, 01:10 AM
I drink about pint a day for the benefits I want, even though some of the bottles recommend far less.

A different brand of kombucha might taste better to you, or start making your own so that you can harvest it at the perfect degree of sourness for your taste.

Kombucha is loaded with probiotics if it is raw (not pasteurized)--I don't know of any brands that heat or pasteurize their kombucha. The probiotics in are a bigger variety than what yogurt has, and they are all living in perfect balance with each other in the SCOBY, so tend to balance the intestinal flora better than yogurt does.

I tried a different brand today and I liked it better. It was more sour, but the flavor was good. The one I tried before was flavored (goji or acai or something), but the one I had today was "Original."

Amber_Maiden
June 2nd, 2011, 02:07 PM
I think its the tea itself that is goof for the hair.... I don't think the alcohol content would probably not be "the best" thing for the hair... I used to drink quite a bit of it, but didn't like that it contained alcohol, from it being fermented. But thats just me.:p

DoubleCrowned
June 2nd, 2011, 09:05 PM
I think its the tea itself that is goof for the hair.... I don't think the alcohol content would probably not be "the best" thing for the hair... I used to drink quite a bit of it, but didn't like that it contained alcohol, from it being fermented. But thats just me.:p

Kombucha's alcohol content is 0.3% to 1.5%, which compares to fruit juice. The fermentation is similar to making sauerkraut or yogurt in that it is the only way to grow the desirable probiotics. Beer-and wine-making are an entirely different process, which is designed to create alcohol. If you make your own kombucha and harvest it very sour, the alcohol content will be minimal.


This is interesting. Tea seems to work wonders ^_^ I should start drinking some.

Just to clarify, there is a "kombucha tea" that comes in tea bags, but that is not what we are drinking. We are drinking the kombucha that comes in bottles.

Owlathena, I think I know the brands you describe, and agree about the taste.

crazihippichic
July 20th, 2011, 10:12 AM
I just started brewing my own kombucha. I have 3 gallons going. Can't wait to try some this weekend. I should have enough for me to drink and also use on my scalp.

princessp
July 20th, 2011, 12:26 PM
I drink Kombucha because my body loves it! I've never tested to see if it helps with hair growth. I did test using castor oil regularly in the winter and noticed that it definitely helped with growth. But with that said, good nutrition is going to help with hair growth. A lot of folks (especially those who have been on antibiotics a few times) have issues with their internal flora. Kombucha is a really good source of probiotics which keeps the rest of the body healthy. I have found it to be far superior to yogurt, kefir, and even taking probiotics straight up. Give it a shot and see if your body likes it.

But I must caution you when I first tried it I hated it! But the next time I went to the natural grocery I was craving it- so I knew my body liked it. After drinking it now for some years I actually really like the taste and fizz. Forgive me if I have already mentioned it but it is a great thing to put in your wine glass (especially the red ones) rather than alcohol since Kombucha is so much better for the body. I love wine, but it has lots of calories and then there is that pesky mind altering aspect (I'm a lightweight). So on nights when I want a glass of wine (but don't need the calories) I simply tell myself "okay self you can have a glass of wine after you have a glass of Kombucha". Most often I never end up drinking that glass of wine because it curbs my craving. And truthfully I don't think it is really about the wine for me, I think I just like the fancy smancy ritual of drinking out of a wine glass with my hair unfurled.

DoubleCrowned
July 20th, 2011, 12:34 PM
I just started brewing my own kombucha. I have 3 gallons going. Can't wait to try some this weekend. I should have enough for me to drink and also use on my scalp.

Oh, I am excited for you! Do you have a collection of bottles for storing your brew? Friends and I agree that the taste (and fizz) is the best about three weeks after harvest, the brew having been stored in air-tight bottles at room temperature. But it's hard to wait…

I just recently did a kombucha scalp scrub--very refreshing. I also used some on bug bites this morning, and the itchiness is gone.

I'm looking forward to your reports.

Cardinal
July 20th, 2011, 01:35 PM
OK, someone please post their recipe for home brewing. I want to try this! I need instructions. :)

Misti
July 20th, 2011, 04:06 PM
OK, someone please post their recipe for home brewing. I want to try this! I need instructions. :)

First, you need an innocilator. Is there a source for GT Daves Kombucha near you? Or do you have a friend who could give you a "mother"?

Brew up some good strong black tea and add lots of sugar. (You can also add up to half green tea.)

Let it cool, pour it into a wide mouth jar, then add the innoculator (the mother or a bottle of kombucha).

Rubber band a "flour sack" type towel over the mouth of the jar to keep the fruit flies out.

Let it sit in a warm place until the new mother that forms on top of the original is about a half inch thick.

How long that takes depends on the temperature of the brewing kombucha. (Ours takes about two weeks, but we brew a lot at a time.)

A more specific recipe would require knowing how big your brewing jar is.

proo
July 20th, 2011, 04:27 PM
Misti, I was under the impression the brew wouldn't "perk" if it didn't have a mother or scoby - will it ferment by simply adding a bottle of already brewed kombucha? If so, that would be sooo much easier.

DoubleCrowned
July 20th, 2011, 09:00 PM
OK, someone please post their recipe for home brewing. I want to try this! I need instructions. :)

You can figure out a recipe using my rule-of-thumb guidelines:

Guideline for container: Use a glass container for brewing. I use gallon pickle jars, but only filled so the depth of the liquid should be about equal to the diameter of the liquid's surface.

Guideline for water: The water you use should be chlorine-free. I boil tap water to achieve this. Distilled water does not have enough minerals in it for good fizz.

Guideline for tea: I use 5-6 tea bags per gallon of water (minimum 1.25 tea bags per quart), almost always part green tea (or all) green tea. The balance should be a black tea. If you use all black tea, you are making Russian Kombucha. I think GT's is made with all green tea.

Step 1 : boil water in glass or stainless steel, take it off the heat, put tea into it. Cover and let it sit awhile. I just let the tea cool with the teabags in it because the kombucha moms like the tannins.

Guideline for sugar: I use 1/3 C ordinary granulated white sugar per quart of water.

Step 2: Fish out the tea bags and dump in the sugar. Stir until sugar dissolves.

Guideline for starter: The starter (finished kobucha) must be at least 10% of the liquid. Example: if you are making 2 quarts of tea, use 3 tea bags, 2/3 cup of sugar, and at least 6.4 ounces of starter (32 oz + 32 oz + 64 oz, so figure 6.4 oz of starter plus a little more because you just added 6.4 oz to the brew, making it 70.4 oz. So use at least 7.1 oz starter...or 8 or 9 or...) If you harvested you last batch too early and it was still a bit sweet, add extra of it if you use it as starter. The starter's job is to acidify the tea enough that bacteria is kept at bay until the SCOBY forms on the liquid's surface.

Step 3: dump in enough kombucha (starter) to equal 10-20% of the total liquid.

Step 4: Be certain that the liquid is no warmer than room temperature, then put it into the glass container with the mom.

Step 5: Cover container with a napkin, hankie, or paper towel and secure with a rubber band.

Step 6: Wait at least 7 days before tasting. The new SCOBY (mom) will form on the surface--it will be 3/16" thick or more by the time the brew is ready for harvest. Brew will have some tartness to taste and will foam a little if stirred. I usually have to wait about 10- 14 days; sometimes longer.

Step 7: Save some of the brew for your next batch. Drink the rest, or bottle by filling containers very close to the lip; cap tightly. Nicest taste and fizz for me is about 3 weeks wait.

DoubleCrowned
July 20th, 2011, 09:02 PM
I drink Kombucha because my body loves it! I've never tested to see if it helps with hair growth. I did test using castor oil regularly in the winter and noticed that it definitely helped with growth. But with that said, good nutrition is going to help with hair growth. A lot of folks (especially those who have been on antibiotics a few times) have issues with their internal flora. Kombucha is a really good source of probiotics which keeps the rest of the body healthy. I have found it to be far superior to yogurt, kefir, and even taking probiotics straight up. Give it a shot and see if your body likes it.

But I must caution you when I first tried it I hated it! But the next time I went to the natural grocery I was craving it- so I knew my body liked it. After drinking it now for some years I actually really like the taste and fizz. Forgive me if I have already mentioned it but it is a great thing to put in your wine glass (especially the red ones) rather than alcohol since Kombucha is so much better for the body. I love wine, but it has lots of calories and then there is that pesky mind altering aspect (I'm a lightweight). So on nights when I want a glass of wine (but don't need the calories) I simply tell myself "okay self you can have a glass of wine after you have a glass of Kombucha". Most often I never end up drinking that glass of wine because it curbs my craving. And truthfully I don't think it is really about the wine for me, I think I just like the fancy smancy ritual of drinking out of a wine glass with my hair unfurled.

Yes, yes to everything you said. I hated the taste at first as well, but my body craved it. And it always tastes best from stemware!


Misti, I was under the impression the brew wouldn't "perk" if it didn't have a mother or scoby - will it ferment by simply adding a bottle of already brewed kombucha? If so, that would be sooo much easier.

I am curious, too, I've always made a mom first by letting the plain kombucha sit in a cloth-covered jar.

Misti
July 21st, 2011, 09:27 AM
Misti, I was under the impression the brew wouldn't "perk" if it didn't have a mother or scoby - will it ferment by simply adding a bottle of already brewed kombucha? If so, that would be sooo much easier.

It creates its own mother if you just dump a bottle of living kombusha in. We've done that when our mothers become contaminated.

It takes a lot longer (twice as long or so) so that's why people are all about getting a mother. But you may have noticed that you sometimes get a mother forming in a commercial bottle. Proof. :)

Misti
July 21st, 2011, 09:32 AM
You can figure out a recipe using my rule-of-thumb guidelines:



Very scientific and much better than my explanation, Doublecrowned. Thanks !!

The only think we do differently is to add the sugar while the tea is hot. We lose some to the tea bags of course, but we find it stays dissolved that way.

princessp
July 21st, 2011, 09:53 AM
If anyone is looking for a "mother" to start a batch you can look here: http://www.kombu.de/suche2.htm
I never ended up doing it because I travel so much, but I still poke around at this site every now and again. I love GTs brand, but I've also got it in bulk from someone who brewed it and yum it is so so good.

DoubleCrowned
July 21st, 2011, 10:05 AM
Very scientific and much better than my explanation, Doublecrowned. Thanks !!

The only think we do differently is to add the sugar while the tea is hot. We lose some to the tea bags of course, but we find it stays dissolved that way.

I wanted to make my process as simple as possible, so rather than deal with hot tea bags, I let them cool with the water, kettle tightly covered. Because that could easily mean overnight or longer in my very large kettle, I did not want to risk inviting contaminants by having sugar in it, especially since my schedule is likely to change suddenly, leaving the tea longer than expected.

Your method is superior for people who do not want to wait around for the tea to cool on its own. Friends of mine put the kettle in a cold water bath (I sometimes do in the summer to keep the kitchen cooler) or pour it into large bowls to cool faster.

proo
July 21st, 2011, 01:14 PM
One day I suddenly realized that my hobbies, breadmaking, beermaking, kombuchamaking, and composting all had to do with fermentation . ..showin some kind of pattern here.