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StephanieB
May 1st, 2011, 08:11 PM
This is posted in my blogs, but IIRC, not everyone can access blogs, and I'm sure that not everyone looks at them. So, here goes...

Has anyone used an old-fashioned barber on their long hair before?
And, if you have, were you happy with the cut?
Or did you regret it?


Now that my hair has suddenly undergone a sudden growth spurt, and the fairytale tips reach just about 26" long (just shy of BSL on me)... I'm noticing that I can't use most of my hair toys - or not so easily - any more.

PLUS, on top of that, I've noticed how much harder it is for me - with my limited mobility - to wash my hair, etc. I've been tearing at it in frustration whenever I try to detangle it; I can't hold my arms up high enough for long enough to patiently and safely detangle my hair... so I just rip away at it. Not good, of course. Hard on my morale, and harder, even, on my poor hair!

Sooo... I'm thinking it might be time to cut it back some. If I cut about 4 inches off of it, I think, I can have a nice thicker blunt hemline - making many styles easier to do, and it will look better - both hanging loose, ponytailed, or in updos. My hair is thin enough, as it is; why make it appear even thinner, with a fairytale hemline?

The only problem is finding a hairstylist that will cut ONLY just exactly what I ask for - and no more. I know, from experience, not to trust any hairstylist that I know currently: ALL of them will lie about how much they cut/will cut, and none will use an actual tape measure.

I'm considering letting hubby's old-fashioned barber cut my hair for me; he is trustworthy to use an actual tape measure AND show it to me in two mirrors before taking the first cut AND then show me with mirrors after the first cut to make certain I'm happy with it before he continues. He wants to cut my hair DRY so that it hangs as it will normally (dry), to get it looking 'right'. He promises me that he can give me exactly what I want - a blunt cut at a specific length - that I will love... and at a fraction of the prce of any salon stylist (of course). $24 -- the same price he charges men for hair cuts. (He charges more for doing beards and mustaches. But that doesn't apply to me. lol)

This barber is an old-fashioned barber! He's 63 years old, and his barber shop is a very bare-bones barber shop, period. No wash sink in the premises. He cuts hair dry because - he says - hair does not usually hang the same way when wet as it does when dry AND one walks about with dry hair, so... duh! This guy only cuts men's hair. He's never been asked by a woman to cut her hair, and, he claims, that this is the ONLY reason why he's never cut a woman's hair... no prejudice involved, and, he insists that most hair styles for women are styles which he can cut (he doesn't do curling, styling, etc, of course - nor perms, nor does he color - but he can do precision cuts). My husband is 65 years old, and he and his barber are old childhood friends of a lifetime: This barber would never risk that friendship by messing up my hair! He (the barber) says that he can cut my hair as I keep saying I want it cut - several inches off, blunt hemline.

BUT... I've never been to a barber before! I mean, I've been in this barber shop (in the waiting room, waiting for hubby) plenty of times before... I'm one of the few women who will venture in there, apparently. The two barbers who own the shop never mind my presence... and the customers apparently don't mind me being there... and I never give the men any reason to wish I wasn't there. I know when to be too engrossed in my book to notice a male-thang that isn't meant for ladies' ears or eyes, and when to notice a friendly 'hello' or bit of conversation. But I've never actually sat in a barber's chair, and let a barber cut my hair, before.
I wonder if it's okay?
Or if I'll regret it??

If I do let hubby's barber cut my hair... it'll be the first woman's hair he's ever cut in his own shop / and since he was in school some 50 years ago. He learned all about hair, and he's clearly knowledgeable about it... he and I have had many discussions on women's hair and on long hair and on growing hair long. In fact, this barber hasn't disagreed with anything I've ever said about long hair, and he seems to agree with general LHC principles. And I've heard him explaining things properly to his male customers, at times, after my chit-chat with him has prompted discussion between the men.

Sooo... will I be sorry if I let hubby's barber cut a few inches off of my hair, and give it a blunt hemline?????
I wonder.....

Any advice?????

metricfuture
May 1st, 2011, 08:19 PM
I think you've brought up a great idea here, and I think dry cutting ends up with far more reliable results overall. Also, I feel compelled to add that every cut that I've actually been totally satisfied with was done by someone I know well (my aunt, my sister and an old friend are all stylists, but they're 1000 miles away now, so I just cut my own when I feel daring enough)..

Sundial
May 1st, 2011, 08:24 PM
Hey StephanieB! Haven't seen you posting for a long time :flower:

In response to your question, I have never done this but i know a regular poster at the Long Hair Loom who *only* goes to barbers. And she says they have *never* taken off more than what she asked for.

MeganE
May 1st, 2011, 08:28 PM
Based on what you wrote about it, it seems like a pretty safe bet. The only thing that worries me is that he's never cut a woman's hair before, like you said. In theory, it should work fine, but what if it doesn't?

Maybe have him cut less than you're looking for, just in case? Like only three inches? Then if you like it, you can go back in a couple of months and get two more taken off?

I noticed a barber shop near my grandmother's house, and I've been thinking about seeing them for a trim. Then I remembered that Feye's method worked for me last time I tried it, so I might just do that again. Decisions, decisions!

Mesmerise
May 1st, 2011, 08:31 PM
To me it sounds like a good plan! If he's using a tape measure and everything, how can you go wrong?? Go for it!

Madora
May 1st, 2011, 08:31 PM
YES. VERY SATISFIED.

jaine
May 1st, 2011, 08:53 PM
I'll be honest ... I would go to someone who cuts women's hair all day ... they are likely to be better at it than someone who cuts men's hair all day. It sounds like what you want is relatively simple but it can be surprisingly hard to cut in a symmetrical line.

But if you must go... how do you plan to detangle it before he puts a comb through it? I'm picturing how most stylists do a "precision cut," with a fine-tooth comb ... dry curly hair + fine-tooth comb? Sounds a bit distressing to me unless it's thoroughly detangled first. But maybe that's just me and my tangle-prone hair.

Mesmerise
May 1st, 2011, 09:01 PM
I'll be honest ... I would go to someone who cuts women's hair all day ... they are likely to be better at it than someone who cuts men's hair all day. It sounds like what you want is relatively simple but it can be surprisingly hard to cut in a symmetrical line.

But if you must go... how do you plan to detangle it before he puts a comb through it? I'm picturing how most stylists do a "precision cut," with a fine-tooth comb ... dry curly hair + fine-tooth comb? Sounds a bit distressing to me unless it's thoroughly detangled first. But maybe that's just me and my tangle-prone hair.

Well don't make the assumption that barbers all do "short" cuts on men! There are men with long hair who go to barbers too, so I guess most would have had experience doing straight cuts on guys, and probably wouldn't want to faff around by adding layers and stuff as so many women's hairdressers want to do!

kwaniesiam
May 1st, 2011, 09:13 PM
Absolutely go get your hair cut by the barber. Men's scissor cuts involve all of the same techniques women's cuts do. It's just angles of holding the hair out from the head and following a guide. A blunt hemline is a very simple cut to do as well, so no problems there.

fluffybunny
May 1st, 2011, 09:14 PM
Go for it! My only hesitation about a traditional barber would be the discomfort of going in and asking. Here you have an inside deal with the barber already.

I used to be fanatical about a straight even hemline, and with my irregular wave pattern, a dry cut was the *only* was to achieve that. I found one stylist who did a dry cut for me with no argument-- she had a little one-chair salon in a beach town. Went back years later, it wasn't there anymore. I have always thought a traditional barber would be the best way to find this same service.

Aliped
May 1st, 2011, 09:31 PM
Hi Stephanie, I've been thinking the exact same thing for a while. Except I don't know any barbers. :( You are really lucky to have one that values your husbands friendship. Best of luck with your trim!

Nevvie
May 1st, 2011, 09:40 PM
I haven't been to anyone for a haircut/trim since in years (I do my own now) but when I was younger I did go to a barber quite a few times. After my childhood hairdresser retired I'd had bad luck with any and all places I tried. Since I was a kid/young teen they seemed to think they could do what they wanted with my hair. They ALWAYS wanted to chop my hair and add in layers to 'define' the curls (a.k.a. make me look like a mushroom head). It didn't matter what I asked for I always ended up with layers. It's amazing how some people think they can sneak a couple extra inches off the ends and layers that you specifically say no to and expect you to be happy with it... Bah.

Anyways, after alot of frustration and probably a year of not trimming at all (which my Mom was nagging me about) I started badgering my brother's and Dad's barber to trim the ends. He didn't want to do it at first, said he knew nothing about women's hair and had never cut any women's hair beyond his granddaughter's bangs. Eventually I talked him into it and it was PERFECT. His lack of knowledge meant there was no pressure for layers, complicated styles or extreme cuts (which he didn't know how to do anyways). He trimmed it bluntly across the ends and that was it. I went back there a couple times a year until he retired. By then luckily I was an adult and could trim my own hair without my parents giving me grief about it.

I've always recommended barbers to people I know who just want a simple, no fuss trim and everyone I know who has tried it has been satisfied. The hard part is usually finding one willing to try it but you already have that part covered. Good luck!

PraiseCheeses
May 2nd, 2011, 12:07 AM
My last haircut (late October) was done at a barber. Old-school Italian in Boston's North End. He chopped my APL+ layers to blunt at collarbone, just as I asked. No fuss, no straightening irons, no push for products. One of the two best haircuts I ever had, and certainly the cheapest. He did miss one small lock of hair, but I trimmed it myself once home, and I've been happy with the cut ever since. If you're not going for a specific style, I'd say go for it!

(Oh, and hello hair twin! :D)

Dragon
May 2nd, 2011, 02:22 AM
I think he sounds very trust worthy. But if he hasn’t done a blunt hemline before, I would be a little worried. Since you are wanting to take off length, if he hasn’t done a blunt hemline before, maybe get him to cut half as much as you want off and if you are happy with it, get the rest taken off. I also do think it’s a good idea since you won’t have to worry about him going wild with your hair. Also if you are worried about him ripping through with a fine tooth comb, maybe bring your own brush or comb.

share801
May 2nd, 2011, 04:49 AM
My former stylist (female) was also a barber. She told me it was actually more training than traditional women stylists received. No real idea if that is a fact, but she did do a good job.

Dragon
May 2nd, 2011, 05:03 AM
My former stylist (female) was also a barber. She told me it was actually more training than traditional women stylists received. No real idea if that is a fact, but she did do a good job.


Itís true that it does take longer. One of my aunties trained to become one, Donít know if she ended up completing the whole course but my Mum told me after finding out from her it does take longer to become one which surprised me.

celebriangel
May 2nd, 2011, 08:25 AM
I woul totally go for it. Blunt cuts aren't hard - I used to do them for my mum all the time with zero expertise and it came out nicely even on her mostly-straight hair. A barber knows how to cut hair, and is used to taking off very small and precise amounts, and has little to no need or want to push for something fashionable. Barbers make their money from speed and efficiency, since they charge less per cut, whereas hairdressers make their money by taking longer to pamper and style each client perfectly, then charging lots per client. So I would always trust a barber over a hairdresser! (No offence LHC stylists; I know you understand!)

GlassWidow
May 2nd, 2011, 08:39 AM
I think if you are comfortable with the idea of going to this barber vs. a salon, then do it. Hair is hair, regardless of who's head it is on; from your post, it sounds like this barber knows hair.

I look at it this way - you're not looking to have a perm or color or a "fashion cut" so why would you go somewhere that specializes in that? This barber, it sounds like, specializes in what you are looking for - a precision cut at a specific length without all the "extras." You have the added benefit of trust, considering this is someone your husband has known for 50+ years. How great is that, right?!? :)

I'd be interested in hearing what you decide, and seeing how it comes out, if you go through with it.

angelthadiva
May 2nd, 2011, 08:48 AM
:waving: Hey girl! Long time no type!

I was in the same boat a few weeks ago w/my velcro ends that were driving me bonkers! Typically hubs would trim up the ends for me, but this "trim" I wanted several inches off. He would not do it. If I knew a barber that I trusted I would have totally gone to him. Barbers are typically cheaper and they are about the cut--Not inferring what they think you meant or adding their interpretation on the style you wanted.

In the big scheme of things he stands to lose more if he were to mess up than you. Think of it, your hair can grow back--However; it would be harder to mend the broken 50 year long friendship not to mention to have a mad as hell StephB in his shop! Lord have mercy, there isn't enough whiskey in Kentucky, girl!

I took matters into my own hands and made hubs fix it. I have a blunt hemline now :joy: I went from past classic to about TBL. It was a sacrifice, yes, but I am happy with the results and my hair is all one length...FINALLY!

walkinglady
May 2nd, 2011, 09:31 AM
Years ago I went to a barber. He was nervous about cutting my waist length hair. He would only cut a few inches. Told me if I wanted more to come back and he would cut again free of charge. He wanted to make sure I had no regrets. I did go back a week later and had him trim more, he held true to his word and did not charge. I went to him off and on for a couple years until I started the no trim plan. I don't think you'll have regrets, sounds like the barber you are talking to is a trustworthy person to touch your beautiful locks. Let us know your end results : )

Anje
May 2nd, 2011, 09:37 AM
I haven't (haven't had a pro cut my hair in ages, though), but I've seen other LHCers go to barbers and come away thrilled. They've reported getting exactly the cut they ask for from a barber, which can be rather hit-and-miss from many stylists.

As long as you're not asking for some fancy women's style that he might not know the angles for and wouldn't have practice at, I'd bet a barber is likely to give you the cut you ask for in most instances.

lapushka
May 2nd, 2011, 10:15 AM
I'd try it. Barbers will give you a no frill hair cut for a lot less, and will do what you ask. There's less likelihood of you ending up with a pixie or bob, or with a style cut into it when all you want is just a little bit cut off from the bottom.

sherigayle
May 2nd, 2011, 11:05 AM
I used to see a barber regularly when I had a shoulder length bob. I always got a perfect cut. If I get to the point where I can't cut my own hair any longer I will most likely go back to a barber.

StephanieB
May 2nd, 2011, 11:15 AM
Wow. I see a whole lt of assumptions made in this thread about barbers! Just wow!

To correct some of these misconceptions - just in case other LHCers want to know the truth and/or want to try a barber - I'll (hopefully gently) correct those misconceptions. Okay? :)

First: Barbers go to school almost twice as long as salon hairstylists before they are permitted to work as full-fledged barbers. Honest!

Step into any local barbershop, and ask the barber (most are men, but nowadays a fed might be women), spend time talking to the barber, and stick around to watch the clients (what they look like when they come in and what they look like when they leave). You'll soon see the world of difference between how hair is treated inside barbershops vs salons (even salons that cater to men).

Second: Barbers are trained to work with the same hair types as salon stylists. Hair is hair. Some barbers regularly do fancy salon-stype cuts, and are therefore expereinced with such cuts. Others don't generally do them, and are therefore not so experienced at such cuts. But they all learn how to do them in school, just as salon stylists do. A good barber can cut a woman's hair just as well as he can a man's hair.

For this matter, barbers learn the same things that salon stylists are supposed to learn about hair care. And, also, barbers know what we LHCers know about hair care.
I'm about to admit something that will shock most of you: Hubby's barber is already a member here. During my last ban (from mid-Jan to mid-April), he (the barber) joined LHC specifically out of curiosity, after a discussion with me on Saturday morning about LHC hair care practices - during which he agreed with me on almost everything I said... and I was, at the time, discussing both non-commercial hair care recipes and complaining about salon stylists not doing what a client wants. It turned out that a dozen of the barber's regular clients - men who've been his clients for YEARS AND YEARS learned some things about their own hair (and, I think, their wives' hair). I don't think that the barber visits LHC too often, but he has read a lot here.




Now, in case anybody wants to try a local barber, here's a bit of advice regarding the differences between how things work in a barbershop vs how things work in a salon:

Understand that many barbershops are places where the local men hang out - so ladies might not be too welcome in some barbershops. Old fashioned barbershops are often places where men come to sit own, hang out together, and b-s together - much like ladies do in manicure salons. So, in some such places, the men are more... eh.. colorful... than in other such shops; LHC ladies need to be able to 'read' the barber(s) and their clients body language... and skip out for the next one down the street if you get the feeling that the men are uncomfortable with your presence. BUT don't mistake surprise and curiosity at your sudden unexpected presence for your being unwelcome, either. If you aren't sure, and\/or if you don't trust your own judgment in such social matters - ASK THE BARBER (preferably quietly, aside from his clients hearing... not while standing at a chair with a client seated in it) if he - the barber - or if he thinks that his clients mind if you wait your turn for a consultation for yourself. The barber will tell you if there is a problem. if the barber is okay with you being there, then his clients will also be okay with it... if for no other reason than it's the barber's place of business.

Behavior in most barbershops is very different than it s in most salons.

Understand that there are never appointments at barbershops; they all work on a first-come/first-served walk-in service practice. SO... that means that you must take careful note of who is already there in the shop when you walk in, and you must know who came in after you did. Know your place in line for service. Many times, the men who are there solely for social reasons (and even sometimes the men there for a cut or shave but also for social reasons) will offer to let you go ahead of them... because they do that for other men who might be on a busier schedule, as well. Sit patiently while you wait your turn. If a man offers to let you go ahead of him at his turn - just thank him, pause long enough to see that the barber agrees, and sit down in the barber's chair. If the ma whose turn it is has let you go ahead, it's already all right with the other clients there; that's just how it works. Conversely, once you are an established client, if a man walks in who is clearly in a hurry, and if you feel like it, when it's your turn, you may be kind and offer to let him go ahead of you; pass it on, so to speak -- just don't do that too often. In some shops, the person who made such an offer takes the pace of the person who was permited to jump the line; in other shops,he (or she) will be the net person taken by the barber. The barber (and, usually, his clients, as well) will let you know what to do and when. Or you will know by having previously observed how it's done in that particular shop as you have become a regular client there.

Bring a book, magazine, newspaper, or something to do (like needlework), unless you are satisfied to read men's interest mags or newspapers that have been read by everyone from the local wino who lives in the gutter to the town's mayor. lol <--- I'm not joking about that, either!

The men may, or may not, chat with you - especially when you're new. Respect whatever they choose and are comfortable with. If they try to chat you up, be sure to chat back enough to be considered 'social' - or you will be considered stuck-up, conceited, and probably be disliked int he long run. now, even if this happens, the barber might not mind - and if you like his cuts and prices, then you, too, shouldn't mind what the clients think of you; the barber will make sure nothing gets out of hand. And if the men clients more or less ignore you - so what do you care? After all, you're there to get a good cut at a decent price! You aren't there to socialize, right?

Barbers cut hair dry. Some barbershops have a sink, if they do color and/or perms and/or blow-drys for men who still wear their hair feathered, or in other styles that require a blow dryer. But, basically, barbers cut hair dry, so you must have it freshly washed (very clean) and thoroughly dried. If your hair requires a wide-toothed comb or some comb that you prefer to have used on your hair, bring it with you - and if the barber can use that, he will. But any barber will have the basics, because men have the same kinds of hair that we ladies have; hair types are hair types. Getting a dry cut means that you will most likely (as most men must) want to go home and take a shower... or, at the very least, change your clothes... right after your cut. Loose hairs can be annoyingly itchy. Especially if you have coarse hair and or curly hair. If your hair is longer than about APL, this will be less of a problem than if your hair is shorter than about APL.

StephanieB
May 2nd, 2011, 11:30 AM
I guess I just talked myself into it. lol
I'm gonna go to hubby's barber.

For less than $30 (the $24 cut plus a 15%-20% tip), I'm going to get my hair cut back to a more manageable length for my disabilities, and get many of the myriad layers that everyone has cut into my hair against my wishes over the years cut out. I may not end up with a totally correct blunt hemline this cut, coz I don't want to sacrifice more length that I wish to lose just solely for the sake of having a perfect blunt hemline... but that's okay. All I want is a thicker hemline to make nicer-looking (read: thicker-looking and neater-looking) updos. And a shorter total length so I don't have to keep killing myself, and end up crying in pain for hours after each time I have to deal with my own hair.

Hubby's friend is Richie..... but Richie's partner, Gerry, is just as good a choice. Hubby goes happily to whomever is available first. So will I. Gerry has been present during - and participated in - many of Richie's and my hair conversations. I know that Gerry shares Richie's beliefs and abilities about hair.

I'm'a follow Richie's advice and ask him (or Gerry) to cut three and a half inches from my hair length, straight across th back/bottom... and make it as much like a blunt cut as they can without cutting more length off than that.
If that ends up a bit too short, it'll grow back fast enough. If it's not enough off, they will cut more off again, without even charging me more, after a few weeks. They just don't want to cut off more than will make me happy.

angelthadiva
May 2nd, 2011, 11:40 AM
Pictures or it didn't happen ;)

tigr
May 2nd, 2011, 06:51 PM
Inquiring minds want to know!

jojo
May 2nd, 2011, 08:00 PM
Yes but not on this hair growing adventure on a past one and I was always satisfied as they really do listen and tend to cut less than you ask, plus very cheap!

McFearless
May 2nd, 2011, 08:33 PM
For the most part barbers aren't trying to experiment on their clients. They really couldn't care less what you want, they just do it. If you want a blunt trim it might be a good idea.

Sunsailing
May 2nd, 2011, 09:08 PM
Understand that there are never appointments at barbershops; they all work on a first-come/first-served walk-in service practice.

That's just not the case.

The barber shop I went to growing up always required appointments.
My father still makes appointments at the barbershop he goes to.

I guess it depends on the quality of barbershop you go to.

If someone only goes to cheap, walk-in salons, then I guess they would assume (incorrectly) that salons never take appointments.

rogue_psyche
May 3rd, 2011, 02:27 AM
That's just not the case.

The barber shop I went to growing up always required appointments.
My father still makes appointments at the barbershop he goes to.

I guess it depends on the quality of barbershop you go to.

If someone only goes to cheap, walk-in salons, then I guess they would assume (incorrectly) that salons never take appointments.

You know what they say, an expensive stylist can ruin your hair just as bad as a cheap one. Okay, no one really says that, but I think that price and exclusivity (requiring appointments) does not necessarily equal quality.

All that needed saying is that you know of barbers that require/take appointments. Since the barbers the OP speaks of are also considered her friends, it wouldn't be very nice to imply that he's a bad barber.

DBF goes to a super cheap barbershop and his barber does a wonderful job with his thick, stubborn, curly, cow-licked hair. I've tried cutting his hair before, and I refuse to go on that fool's errand again, so DBF's barber is a godsend. I might see her before my sister's wedding...

GRU
May 3rd, 2011, 08:33 AM
In the big scheme of things he stands to lose more if he were to mess up than you. Think of it, your hair can grow back--However; it would be harder to mend the broken 50 year long friendship not to mention to have a mad as hell StephB in his shop! Lord have mercy, there isn't enough whiskey in Kentucky, girl!

That thought right there is enough to strike fear in the bravest of the brave!!! shudder:


That's just not the case.

The barber shop I went to growing up always required appointments.
My father still makes appointments at the barbershop he goes to.

=============================

I guess it depends on the quality of barbershop you go to.

If someone only goes to cheap, walk-in salons, then I guess they would assume (incorrectly) that salons never take appointments.


You might want to read up on the writing guidelines here at LHC and what KNIT is all about. Your post could easily have ended above the red line and conveyed the necessary information. The part below the red line was just plain rude, IMO, in addition to being inaccurate.

High-quality and low-quality barbershops and salons can either take appointments or not, accept walk-ins or not.

I've had my hair butchered by a so-called "high quality" hairdresser (sorry, but six inches is NOT a "little trim"!!!!), and when I was in high school the best hairdresser I had ever had worked at Bo-Rics (which I think had $7 haircuts back in the day, and I paid an extra $1 for the privilege of being able to select my stylist).

The stylist I've had since the early 1990s has worked in someone else's salon, then she rented a chair in a barbershop (but continued with her male-and-female clientele), and now she has her own shop attached to her home. She takes appointments AND she accommodates walk-ins when her schedule allows, and I think she's charging about $18 for a haircut these days. She has an amazingly loyal clientele, because she does an amazingly good job of doing *exactly* what her client wants her to do. The price of her haircut has no bearing whatsoever on the quality of her haircut.



I'm studying nursing right now, and I'll be getting my ADN (associate's degree) to become an RN. Others get a BSN (bachelor's degree) to become an RN. Some people like to infer that a BSN-nurse is "better" than an ADN-nurse, but guess what -- ADNs and BSNs all take the exact same licensing exam, and they both have the title of Registered Nurse after they pass the exam and receive their license from the state. Similarly, the stylist in a "high quality" shop took the same licensing exam as the stylist in a "low price" shop -- they both have the same license as a cosmetologist or barber, regardless of how much you pay for the haircut, and you can get a good or bad haircut in either establishment.

spidermom
May 3rd, 2011, 08:59 AM
I went to a barber years ago. It was a woman. It was kind of funny; I had walked into a hair salon and signed in to the waiting list, then walked over to the barber shop with my husband. They weren't busy, so I had my hair trimmed there. I went back whenever I needed a trim until we moved.

GlassWidow
May 3rd, 2011, 02:04 PM
Since the barbers the OP speaks of are also considered her friends, it wouldn't be very nice to imply that he's a bad barber.

The barber the OP was referring to in her original post is also a member here.

jeanniet
May 3rd, 2011, 03:04 PM
I've been to an old fashioned barbershop for trims before, and I was very satisfied with the job done. This particular barbershop had a woman working there, and as far as I can remember she always did my trims, but I wouldn't have hesitated to have one of the male barbers cut it. All of them listened to theirs clients and were careful in their work. I say go for it! :)

StephanieB
May 9th, 2011, 02:49 PM
You might want to read up on the writing guidelines here at LHC and what KNIT is all about. Your post could easily have ended above the red line and conveyed the necessary information. The part below the red line was just plain rude, IMO, in addition to being inaccurate.

High-quality and low-quality barbershops and salons can either take appointments or not, accept walk-ins or not.

The barber the OP was referring to in her original post is also a member here.
No worries. Hubby's barber - who is indeed (as I had previously said) a new member here - just laughed.

He wondered aloud how anyone who's never seen him or met him, and who's never met any of his clients, could possibly determine how cheap - or poor - a barber he could possibly be...

His comment regarding the rudeness to me was, "Whatever floats her boat. She's not from this area, so she can't possibly know what is standard hereabouts. I'm sure her relative is a far better barber than I... yeah, right, whatever. I'm in my middle 60s, and if I had a penny - just one red cent - for every insult ever cast against me, I'd be filthy stinkin' rich... and I probably wouldn't be working any more, either, 'cause I wouldn't have to work. And I can't remember a single insult ever hurled at me that meant any difference to my life at all... ever."

The barber did point out [to me] that HEREABOUTS, what I said is true - that it's all first-come/first-served basis. No matter how 'good' or 'bad', no matter how expensive or inexpensive, the barber shop is. BUT that in other parts of the country, some barbers may take appointments as well as walk-ins.

StephanieB
May 9th, 2011, 02:59 PM
I want to time my next wash day with a barber shop visit for a cut.

And if y'all want pix, I also must time it with hubby's availability to take digipix. It's his digicamera. i can't work it, nor does my laptop have the software for it loaded onto it. ;)


I need to wash it today or tomorrow morning. But hubby is working late tonight. Ergo - he'll be tired... and probably late waking up tomorrow morning. sigh

And if I don't wash my hair before tomorrow's 11:00am manicure/pedicure appointment, I'm certain to get a big earful from my manicurist, Hoa, (also the salon's owner) about how ratty and bad my hair is looking... :rolleyes:
I just can't win, eh? :-/

Maybe I can oil my hair in the morning... a pre-wash deep oiling - which Hoa knows I do... and then bun it up... so she'll only nag at me for the first half hour of my visit, maybe. And then, I can wash it out in the late afteroon or early evening. And once it's dried, hubbs can take a pic of it. Then, tomorrow, I can go over to the barbershop to get it chopped off. And then hubby can take anotehr pic of it after supper.

I'm thinking maybe I want 4 or 6 inches off. If it's a tad short now... well, it'll grow back. shrug
That will take it a long way towards being less layered. That's get rid of many layers. hmmmmm

StephanieB
May 9th, 2011, 03:09 PM
:waving: Hey girl! Long time no type!

I was in the same boat a few weeks ago w/my velcro ends that were driving me bonkers! Typically hubs would trim up the ends for me, but this "trim" I wanted several inches off. He would not do it. If I knew a barber that I trusted I would have totally gone to him. Barbers are typically cheaper and they are about the cut--Not inferring what they think you meant or adding their interpretation on the style you wanted.

In the big scheme of things he stands to lose more if he were to mess up than you. Think of it, your hair can grow back--However; it would be harder to mend the broken 50 year long friendship not to mention to have a mad as hell StephB in his shop! Lord have mercy, there isn't enough whiskey in Kentucky, girl!

I took matters into my own hands and made hubs fix it. I have a blunt hemline now :joy: I went from past classic to about TBL. It was a sacrifice, yes, but I am happy with the results and my hair is all one length...FINALLY!
ROTFL HA HA HA HA HA

Funny you should say that. The barber himself said something quite similar.
He said, "There isn't enough whisky in all Scotland to settle things back down in here if we wound up with a mad-as-hell Stephanie in the shop! <male-oriented expletive censored!>"


By the way..... just wondering... WHY do the Scots spell the same spirit 'whisky' as the Irish spell as 'whiskey'???
And... while I'm wondering about this purely off-topic query..... Why is it called 'whiskey' in Ireland, but called 'scotch' if it's in Scotland???
I think that we Yanks have a better handle on it: Irish whiskey is usually just referred to as 'Irish', and Scottish 'whisky' is usually just referred to as 'Scotch'. :D
*ducking in anticipation of lots of whiskey/whisky bottles being tossed my way* lol



ETA: I think I'm gonna ponder this ^ a little bit more while sucking down an Irish Car Bomb. LOL Made, of course, with Irish whiskey and Bailey's Irish Cream and a Guiness. Gonna layer the liquors in a shotglass, and drop it down into the beer, and drink it all rather quickly since I have to (1) pre-heat the oven to reheat my Italian meatballs in Marinara, (2) decant the Sicilian red wine to let it breathe for an hour before supper, and (3) chop the chives and add them into the Sicilian Pasta Salad - which, I hope, is room temperature, having been taken out of the 'fridge at 3:15pm.

rogue_psyche
May 10th, 2011, 03:28 AM
ETA: I think I'm gonna ponder this ^ a little bit more while sucking down an Irish Car Bomb. LOL Made, of course, with Irish whiskey and Bailey's Irish Cream and a Guiness. Gonna layer the liquors in a shotglass, and drop it down into the beer, and drink it all rather quickly since I have to (1) pre-heat the oven to reheat my Italian meatballs in Marinara, (2) decant the Sicilian red wine to let it breathe for an hour before supper, and (3) chop the chives and add them into the Sicilian Pasta Salad - which, I hope, is room temperature, having been taken out of the 'fridge at 3:15pm.

Another reason to drink it quickly: it will curdle soon after mixing. ;)

Good luck with the cut. I can't wait for pics.

Khiwanean
May 10th, 2011, 03:38 AM
When I was younger I got my hair cut by the barber my dad went to a time or two. I never had any complaints whatsoever.

StephanieB
May 10th, 2011, 02:26 PM
Another reason to drink it quickly: it will curdle soon after mixing. ;)
Wait... how do you know that???

I've never taken too long to guzzle an Irish Car Bomb, I guess (nor has anybody I know)... coz I have never seen one curdle. ROTFL

I can't be your friend, though, if you take so long to drink down a shot in a beer that it curdles. LMAO (just kidding, of course ;))


*still laughing hysterically*


Thanks for the good wishes on my upcoming barber cut.


Also - do you mind if I regale the customers in the barber shop with this story? (the one about you telling me that an Irish Car Bomb will curdle if not drunk quickly enough)
It'll make 'em all crack up and fall on the floor laughing. :D

spidermom
May 10th, 2011, 02:58 PM
I think scotch is made a particular way, such that all scotch is whiskey, but not all whiskey is scotch.

I'm a fan of bourbon.

ouseljay
May 10th, 2011, 03:05 PM
ROTFL HA HA HA HA HA

Funny you should say that. The barber himself said something quite similar.
He said, "There isn't enough whisky in all Scotland to settle things back down in here if we wound up with a mad-as-hell Stephanie in the shop! <male-oriented expletive censored!>"


By the way..... just wondering... WHY do the Scots spell the same spirit 'whisky' as the Irish spell as 'whiskey'???
And... while I'm wondering about this purely off-topic query..... Why is it called 'whiskey' in Ireland, but called 'scotch' if it's in Scotland???
I think that we Yanks have a better handle on it: Irish whiskey is usually just referred to as 'Irish', and Scottish 'whisky' is usually just referred to as 'Scotch'. :D
*ducking in anticipation of lots of whiskey/whisky bottles being tossed my way* lol



ETA: I think I'm gonna ponder this ^ a little bit more while sucking down an Irish Car Bomb. LOL Made, of course, with Irish whiskey and Bailey's Irish Cream and a Guiness. Gonna layer the liquors in a shotglass, and drop it down into the beer, and drink it all rather quickly since I have to (1) pre-heat the oven to reheat my Italian meatballs in Marinara, (2) decant the Sicilian red wine to let it breathe for an hour before supper, and (3) chop the chives and add them into the Sicilian Pasta Salad - which, I hope, is room temperature, having been taken out of the 'fridge at 3:15pm.

If I remember correctly, the e/no e situation is said to have come about because in the 1800's whisky made in Scotland was of poor quality. So Irish distillers, who were also the people exporting to America, added the e to make the distinction clear. I would guess that since Canada has closer ancestral ties to Scotland than to Ireland the no e spelling stuck there. I would also guess that Scottish whisky is called Scotch in the states for a similar reason, to distinguish it from American whisk(e)y. I think in the UK it's just called plain whisky.

Oh, and the reason an Irish Car Bomb curdles is because the beer and whiskey are slightly acidic, and the Irish cream has, uh, cream. Acids lower the pH of the milk so that the protein molecules become attracted to each other and clump, which is curdling.

/off topic ;)

rogue_psyche
May 14th, 2011, 08:10 PM
Also - do you mind if I regale the customers in the barber shop with this story? (the one about you telling me that an Irish Car Bomb will curdle if not drunk quickly enough)
It'll make 'em all crack up and fall on the floor laughing. :D

Sorry of my response is too late for your trip to the barber, but here's the story anyway:

I don't know if it's a universal tradition for Irish Carbomb drinking where everyone drops the shot in at once and then chugs the drink down. If you don't chug, than you are a [insert feline slang for female genitalia]. Well apparently it was DBF's third Carbomb in a row, and he lost his ability to chug it. As he tells it, he was wondering why the drink tasted worse and worse the longer it took for him to drink it, but he drank it down anyway. Soon after DBF was kneeling before the porcelain idol. At that point my brother explained to us about how Carbombs will curdle within minutes of mixing.

By the way, it is pretty hard to order these drinks, even in the UK. Some consider the name inflammatory, others know about the tendency to curdle and don't want to be responsible for the cleanup, and then others plain haven't heard of it because cocktails aren't as popular in the UK as the US. My Scottish bartender friend could count the cocktails he knew how to make on one hand.

You might like this drink I made up on my BFF's birthday. I named it the "So What I'm Drunk" after the R Kelly song Ignition Remix which features the lyrics "Sippin' on coke 'n' rum / I'm like, 'So what, I'm drunk.'" It tastes like a flat coke and rum but is all liquor. Here's the recipe:

Equal Parts over a full cup of ice:
Rum (I recommend The Kraken, which comes in a nice, piratey bottle)
Vanilla Vodka (I recommend Stoli Vanille)
Amaretto (Almond Liqueur)
Frangelico (Hazelnut liqueur)
Chocolate Liqueur

It is a great sippin' drink. If you want it sweeter proportion more of the liqueurs to the boozes. I had two or three over the course of one party and was pretty ripped the whole time, which is great because although I get drunk quickly, I lose my buzz quickly as well.

/off topic

I've fully decided that a trim at a barber's will be my reward for getting through the Spring semester. Thanks for this thread, which served as inspiration.