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xcrunr2go
April 28th, 2011, 05:15 PM
damage hair? Has anyone ever noticed that the science of Cosmotology needs to change? They need to stop using bleach & chemicals & start implementing henna, cassia, indigo etc! Is it just me or are they still teaching people how to damage hair?:rolleyes:

ellen732
April 28th, 2011, 05:25 PM
damage hair? Has anyone ever noticed that the science of Cosmotology needs to change? They need to stop using bleach & chemicals & start implementing henna, cassia, indigo etc! Is it just me or are they still teaching people how to damage hair?:rolleyes:

You're kidding, right?

jesis
April 28th, 2011, 05:30 PM
You're kidding, right?

What do you mean? Do you think it's impossible?

vanillabones
April 28th, 2011, 05:40 PM
I never even really understood henna before this site. I'm shocked they don't teach it to beauty students who probably won't ever know about it either and those students would be the key to teaching it to the conventional world of hair care :'(

misstwist
April 28th, 2011, 05:43 PM
We all get to make our own choices about haircare. If you don't like those products and methods then don't use them.

ellen732
April 28th, 2011, 05:47 PM
I think there are two schools of thought: the natural route and the chemical route. With that being said, I think you can go the chemical route and still have decent hair. If salons only used henna, cassia, etc. it would definitely limit what colors clients could have on their hair. Hair color on the professional level is an art, IMO, not always a detriment. Look what great hair for instance a lot of celebrities have, or models for that matter; I can tell you right now they aren't using henna or indigo.

celebriangel
April 28th, 2011, 06:00 PM
Stop using bleach etc? Ah...that won't happen. Because people want funky hair, and don't care about damage because, well, they get it chopped off every 6 weeks when they go to the hairdresser.

Also: The current way things work, oftentimes normal shampoo, because of its composition, doesn't work for people. It dries their hair out or makes it too greasy, or it's too harsh, or it dilutes their colour, or whatever. Then the customer buys expensive salon products to remedy this problem, or pays for in-salon treatments/

Additionally, some people want to colour their hair. Currently, bleaching/box colouring your hair by yourself is probably a bad idea and, particularly in the case of bleach, often goes horribly wrong. So people go to the salon to fix the damage they did, or just get a salon colour in the first place. Then, when the colour fries their hair and causes them to get splits, they go for a cut every 6 weeks.

All of this makes *way* more money than they would otherwise. Henna is way too healthy and reliable for their bottom line. People with long healthy hair of course are not what they want, as they can't make any money off them.

And, of course, it leaves room for "long-hair salons" or salons which specialise in natural products, so people pay more money for "special" service they don't get at normal salons.

It's a lovely business model, really. And why should we complain? After all, we get to save tremendous amounts of money by opting out. ...Or we would, if we weren't such hair-toy addicts. Still, I feel good about that, as I'm supporting small craftsmanship-based businesses.

Er...[/:soapbox:]

jesis
April 28th, 2011, 06:02 PM
I think there are two schools of thought: the natural route and the chemical route. With that being said, I think you can go the chemical route and still have decent hair. If salons only used henna, cassia, etc. it would definitely limit what colors clients could have on their hair. Hair color on the professional level is an art, IMO, not always a detriment. Look what great hair for instance a lot of celebrities have, or models for that matter; I can tell you right now they aren't using henna or indigo.

I understand where you're coming from now :)

littlenvy
April 28th, 2011, 06:06 PM
:pI think a lot of it has to do with time. Most natural treaments take a lot of time and are a pain to do ie. wash out.
The results are also not consistent. Imagine how many salons would get sued because the colour did not come out the shade you wanted.
There are also limitations with what natural products can do ie. can't change brown hair into light blonde. And lets face it, a lot of clients want to be blonde.
Natural also does not mean 'miracle-always-good' product; I for instance, find most Indian herbs very drying and damaging to my hair.
However, there ARE hair friendly salons and hairdressers who will tell you what not to use on your typo of hair.
Besides, chemical (or off the shelf) products are getting better and better with each year. Hopefully in not too distant future the natural hair friendly world and chemical world will merge and be one and the same. :D

ellen732
April 28th, 2011, 06:06 PM
Heck, maybe they should just outlaw flat irons too. :p

LisaMonster
April 28th, 2011, 06:10 PM
I don't think that bleach, chemical dyes, heat styling, etc should be done away with, but I do wish that it were easier to receive low damage/damage free treatment at salons. It would be nice if "alternative hair care methods" were taught in cosmetology schools, not even as a primary hair care method, but rather as another option.

Re: Henna: I've thought about this before. I would LOVE to be able to get my henna done at a salon, but personally, I leave it on for six hours. That seems like a long time to be sitting there? Would I put a scarf on and come back later? Rinse it out myself at home?


ETA: It seems to me that the mainstream does seem to be moving in the right direction. LUSH carrying henna hair dyes, I believe, has had a large impact, as well as shampoo companies starting to advertise sulfate and silicone free products.

I think it's also a matter of supply and demand, really. The bleach and the dye and the straightening and the perming is what people want. If that's what's working, why change?

|Xei
April 28th, 2011, 06:20 PM
In most cases, if the bleach or chemical dye is used properly, and the processed hair is properly taken care of post-treatment, then there should not be a significant amount of damage to the hair.

Regarding hair colour alone, the biggest difference between henna and chemical dye is that henna cannot be removed, and chemical dye can be removed. This becomes very significant when changing hair colours, because there are just so many times you can rely on layering colour upon colour to achieve the desired colour, until your hair becomes so loaded with pigments that any colour you put on it just doesn't show up anymore.

Chemical dye is also much more flexible and predictable in terms of colour results. The range of colours that chemical dye can achieve is much wider than that of henna. There is a universal method that stylists use to determine specific colour results with chemical dye, and this takes out all the guess work. This is probably the most significant reason why salons continue using chemical dye instead of henna. No client wants to come into the salon asking for a specific colour, only to be told by the stylist that the colour is unachievable due to her natural hair colour, or due to the limitations of henna. Neither does this client nor the stylist want to guess what colour the client's hair will come out to be.

Carolyn
April 28th, 2011, 06:27 PM
How would I get cool toned ashy blonde hair with henna or indigo?

racrane
April 28th, 2011, 07:46 PM
Like everything else, it comes down to money. What they encourage people to do, what's the norm in society, is what people want. They encourage people to choose the most expensive option. Frankly, what my mom wants she can't achieve with all the heat styling she uses and her hair dyes. She could achieve her hair if she left it alone. But her hairdresser isn't going to tell her that. Hairdressers get annoyed at me when I won't highlight my blond hair. They'll say "It's getting darker, time to highlight!". It makes them money to do it. They're not too happy when I refuse.

leslissocool
April 28th, 2011, 07:59 PM
Honestly it's about education (and money of course).

They need to warn people about this products more. Educated people would know that using your flat iron regularly damages hair. Non educated people can think heat protectors used with a flat iron won't damage it. It still does, less but it does. Or the horrors of bleach.

I don't necessarily think hair salons damage hair. In my experience they chop my hair up all the time :rolleyes: but all the damage I made to MY hair was from box color and bleaching it myself. So really, I think that if you want crazy funky colors then go to a specialist who knows how to work the chemicals so your hair won't be fried, but if you want to do it yourself you should be aware how dangerous it can be.

I am going to teach my daughter how to handle her hair, and the day she wants to dye it blue I will tell her (and show her online) how wrong it can go, then tell her if she wants it like that she can go to a salon. No more at home science projects.

Mesmerise
April 28th, 2011, 08:00 PM
I WOULD like to see more salons offering natural alternatives. And I WOULD like to see more beauty schools NOT teach aspiring hairdressers that "henna is the DEVIL". Seriously :rolleyes:. The number of hairdressers that understand real henna, is very small, because they're STILL being taught about the "metallic salts" in henna, and how you can't dye after hennaing cause your hair will become destroyed (and yes, an excellent hairdresser I know told me this... even though I knew it didn't happen because I'd used henna in the past and I'd dyed over it, and I'd hennaed over that...).

But yes, it would be great if you could go to a salon and get them to henna your hair, especially when you need tricky root touch ups! And it would be great if they didn't push to blow fry your hair, but would just ask if you wanted to let it dry naturally (or used the dryer on a really low setting instead of fry your hair hot).

However, I don't think you're ever going to get rid of chemical colours. A lot of people have short hair, and for them bleaching the heck out of their hair is no biggie (I mean, I'd do it if I only ever wanted a pixie cut!!). While henna, cassia and indigo can offer a range of colours, I don't know if you could successfully use them for lots of the colouring techniques that are used in salons, and nor could you get the real subtle gradations in colour that good stylists are able to achieve.

For me, I care less about that than I do about the health of my hair, which is why I'm happy with my henna red, and I'm gonna STAY happy with it dammit, cause I've sworn off chemical colour :p. But I'm still going to go with my sister next Friday to the hairdresser where she's going to let them go nuts with her hair and dye it whacky colours, and hack it into layers etc (she's got about APL/BSL blunt cut hair now and wants a change), and I'll do it because my sister wants a fun cut and isn't growing her hair long, and isn't fussed about damage!

kwaniesiam
April 28th, 2011, 08:00 PM
Very few people in the world have LHC-standard goals and are very happy with shorter, dyed, heat styled hair. The Cosmetology field is always changing, new products are being released, old ones being updated, and tools are improving. The perms of today are light years improved from the smelly poodle perms of the 80's. One of the newer, higher end flat irons you could use 10 times before it was as damaging as using one once from 5 years ago.

ellen732
April 28th, 2011, 08:41 PM
I always say I am not going to put my two cents into these threads because I understand both sides of the coin. I am a hairstylist but I also hendigo my own hair. Salons and hairstylists aren't all about the money, you are wrong there. It comes down to style and fashion. A lot of people are trendy and frankly they are the ones that make hairstyling a fun and artistic career. I live in NJ and people are very cosmopolitan here. Lots of people work in NY around here and are very fashion forward. A lot of people aren't into "natural" hair care. I am, but I do people's hair who aren't and I think it's great that they want to color and cut into the latest style.

caiti42
April 28th, 2011, 08:45 PM
Heck, maybe they should just outlaw flat irons too. :p

Noooooooooooooooooooo...

PamelaViktoria
April 28th, 2011, 08:53 PM
I've been cutting my own hair for 10 years. This proved very helpful after I moved to china. Hairdressers there never get to cut anything but chinese hair. They will call every other hairdresser over to come feel your hair. I can't stand people touching my hair when I don't know the last time they washed their hands....

krissykins
April 28th, 2011, 08:57 PM
It'd be nice if some salons did that, but salons headed in that direction for a reason. Supply and demand.

growingpains
April 28th, 2011, 09:04 PM
Ya it'd be great if stylists were more in the know about natural hair care and alternate coloring, etc.

But honestly, as others said: supply and demand laws limit the amount of natural currently and stylists participate in the private sector which is often about the economic bottom line.

That said I've met lotsa great hairdressers who say wonderful things. For example: stop straightening your hair if you want to grow it; turn down the heat on your flat iron; don't use box dyes; moisturize the ends; advice re what shampoo does to your scalp.

The only negative as far as I am concerned with respect to most hairdressers is they want you to come in more often than is necessary if you are trying to grow and the result is slllloooowww ass growth.

ibleedlipstick
April 28th, 2011, 09:39 PM
While I have had WRETCHED salon experiences before (when I say that I started off with 0 hair, I mean it. I didn't fry my own hair with bleach, an ignorant stylist did.) I believe that the good ones provide an excellent service.

For about three years, I had a woman who took my waist-length hair from its natural icky brown color, to the most natural looking caramel blonde. My hair was super healthy and thick, and I got compliments from everywhere. She lead me through choosing a good straightener, helped me select an amazing heat protectant, and helped me find amazing styling products styling products that she didn't carry and therefore didn't profit from.

Did she use bleach? Yes. Did she blow dry my hair? Yes. Did my hair look and feel absolutely amazing all the time? Yes.

When she moved, I was devastated, and the woman I went to afterwards destroyed my hair.

I choose not to judge all stylists because I have had a few deeply crappy ones.

Regarding Henna/indigo I have chemically dyed blue-black hair at the moment. I have considered henna and indigo, and decided against it. I dislike the idea of being unable to remove it, I can't stand the smell, and it takes far more effort than it is worth to me.

Quezie
April 28th, 2011, 09:46 PM
I think they should teach about natural hair care as well as conventional hair care, so they can better serve there customers, and give people more options.

Jenn of Pence
April 28th, 2011, 09:46 PM
So, I don't dye and don't know much about that sort of thing, but I personally think one of the most damaging things hair stylists do to my hair is comb it! I have never met a one that I recall who took the time to comb it out carefully. They just rip through it quickly, yanking out any tangles and scraping my scalp while they're at it, too.

Mesmerise
April 28th, 2011, 10:00 PM
So, I don't dye and don't know much about that sort of thing, but I personally think one of the most damaging things hair stylists do to my hair is comb it! I have never met a one that I recall who took the time to comb it out carefully. They just rip through it quickly, yanking out any tangles and scraping my scalp while they're at it, too.

Yes, I'll go with this too. I'll have them brush my hair and it's like "OUCH OUCH OUCH!!" even though I always detangle before I go...sheesh! If I can brush my hair without hurting, they should be able to as well.

The worst things stylists have done to me include: giving me a perm that damaged the roots enough that I ended up with lots of hair broken off at the root, and stubble!

And... blow frying my hair that I'd just had chopped to shoulder length to cut out most of the damage from blonde foils! While the bottom few inches (that had been splitting) had been cut off, the rest should have been okay (still weakened, but okay)... but the stylist dried my hair with a HOT dryer, and she used it really close to my head (she even commented how long it took to dry my hair :rolleyes: so I guess she was trying to speed up the process) and at the end, the remaining blonde ends were FRIED literally. Even after conditioning, they were frizzly, and I ended up snipping them all out myself, leading to some odd uneven layers, which you fortunately couldn't really see, cause at that length my hair is fairly wurly.

Needless to say, I no longer trust hairdressers to know best when it comes to treating my hair! I used to think they knew what they were doing (and I'm sure some do!!)... but I don't trust it now.

Anyway, that being said, again I see no problem with all that colouring, straightening, bleaching, perming etc. if that's what the client wants, but I DO think stylists should be give up to date information about henna etc.

Syaoransbear
April 28th, 2011, 10:21 PM
If you want salons to start providing natural methods so you have more options for your hair at the salon, then start suggesting it or start your own salon. But to have salons stop providing chemicals in favor of natural methods? Well then you've just taken away MY options in favor of yours. That's hardly fair at all.

tanya222
April 28th, 2011, 10:34 PM
Heck, maybe they should just outlaw flat irons too. :p

Heh heh, all of a sudden that just reminded me of that episode of Friends where Rachel burned down the apartment with her hair tools....

Firefigher: We found this curling iron started the fire...
Rachel: Don't look at me. My hair is straight! Straight, straight, straight!
Firefighter: Could be a hair straightener....
Rachel: oh

/sorry, end hijack

lilravendark
April 29th, 2011, 12:57 AM
lol yes some salons could do with some natural hair care enlightenment but that being said I used henna for a long time since discovering it when I was 15 but it only ever gave me one colour a browny red or with indigo a blueish black which is my base colour anyway. Bleach and dyes aren't the devil either if you use them correctly they can give you a nice colour that no natural dye could. I like both methods together I'll use my chemical dyes and bleaches but I can always follow up with a natural treatment like coconut oil or honey and EVOO.

I dont think its fair to say that bleaching and dying your hair will always leave it fried damaged and inevitably have to get chopped off. I'm quite sick of the chemical bashing I'm sure as much as henna heads are sick of hearing of the henna and salts story from ill informed hairdressers

Biedronka
April 29th, 2011, 02:13 AM
it's the Supply and demand law:salons and conventional products are all over the place,because obviously there are many people who want to use them.Are chemicals and heat styling tools damaging?yes.But people are willing to take an amount of damage in exchange for the hairstyle they want.That's not neccessarily a bad thing..A lot of us here are hair-salon free by choice,we trim/dye/style our hair ourselves,and use more natural methods of caring for our hair.Granted,there are times when I wish i could just go to the salon and have them manic-panic or henna my hair and trim it and give me a hot oil treatment,just cause I'm too lazy or really feel like being pampered.I don't think natural methods could or should completely replace the conventional ones.But i think it could be nice for some of us if the natural methods were introduced in salons as well.So that people can have a wider range of choices.

Jomo
April 29th, 2011, 02:52 AM
What Kwaniesiam said - using natural and non-damaging products is really only such a concern here because of the great lengths of hair people are aiming for. When you keep your hair at shoulder length or so the individual hair strands don't have to be kept so pristine, so you can do all sorts of damaging things and it never really makes your hair look bad.

I do think more natural and organic alternatives would be interesting, but I think that it makes perfect sense for hairdressers as a whole to cater to the broader community which isn't so worried with the length of their hair but rather getting a cooler colour or style or amount of curl.

RitaCeleste
April 29th, 2011, 10:12 AM
Take away my hair color and I'd be HAPPY to shave my head. I don't give a crap about growing out my hair natural. I'm not putting henna in my hair, I like to change colors. The only thing I'd want to do with my natural hair is chop it off and throw it away. I've grown it out natural before, lets just say I wasn't impressed with my virgin hair. Its always nice when there are a VARIETY of services around. Nothing wrong with that. Salons exist because they have something people want. Same with Beauty Supply places. People like me want color or curls or straight hair, whatever instead of what we've got. People who wish to tell me what to want just really want to limit my choices.

Eden75
April 29th, 2011, 11:00 AM
To take away the chemical option for people is not fair. I dye my hair as I am going prematurely grey. There is no way as a professional woman that I am going to have white hair at my age! I have very healthy hair and have grown it may times to my waist (as an adult) quickly and without issue. A natural hair care salon would be cool for those who would like to care for their hair that way. As a business owner myself, I would ask; would it be worth opening? It would come down to money in the end. Salons have owners, who employee and provide pay cheques. The bottom line will always win out. If you live in an area where it would be viable, great, but where I am, I don't believe it would be.

I feel bad for those of you who have had crappy hairdressers. That really is unfortunate as a good hairdresser is worth more than you will ever pay them! My hairdresser actually practiced a lot of techniques on my hair when we were in high school (I had mid-back length hair then) and then remained my hairdresser after he went to school and got his tickets. He knows my hair better than I do and I have always had amazing hair when he is done with it. I end up going to see him about every three months for a colour and clean up. Since I have naturally curly hair, he will straighten it for me if I ask and then tell me not to do it with the iron much or I will fry it (that will be ending now that I have told him I want to grow to the waist again, sigh, back to curl products and care for a few months...). If I was to ask for henna or any other natural dye, he would definitely do it for me, I would just have to give him advance notice so that he could have the salon ready as it is such a time consuming process. I don't have the time or patience to go through that process though.

dulce
May 2nd, 2011, 06:58 PM
the last[and only] time 1 had a perm[25 years ago] they left it on too long and all the front of my hair was burnt off at scalp level other mishaps occured also-now that it's long again hubbie cuts my hair and 1 feel better avoiding hair salons..

jojo
May 2nd, 2011, 07:58 PM
We actually have a chemical free salon at the end of my road, which is pretty cool for a little country village.

Fufu
May 3rd, 2011, 07:01 AM
i'm fine with chemical dyes, bleaching, perming, rebonding and all other chemical treatments. I think the issue is how individual takes cares of their hair.

Personally, I chemical dyed my hair twice a year and at the same time I do hair treatments and use 100% natural camelia oil to protect my hair.

dulce
May 3rd, 2011, 06:14 PM
my hair was not processed or coloured-it was completely natural when 1 had this perm-the timer went off-1 told her -she said she'd be there in a minute but she didn't come back for well over 5 min later-my scalp hurt and 1 timed her with my watch and kept hoping 1 was worrying for nothing-1 wasn't, unfortunately.1 had to have a pixie after because of her mistake my hair was so damaged- .

xcrunr2go
May 3rd, 2011, 06:31 PM
my hair was not processed or coloured-it was completely natural when 1 had this perm-the timer went off-1 told her -she said she'd be there in a minute but she didn't come back for well over 5 min later-my scalp hurt and 1 timed her with my watch and kept hoping 1 was worrying for nothing-1 wasn't, unfortunately.1 had to have a pixie after because of her mistake my hair was so damaged- .

Aw I feel your hair pain my deary. It's ok, it will grow back. Did you file a small claim?

In2wishin
May 3rd, 2011, 06:40 PM
What Kwaniesiam said - using natural and non-damaging products is really only such a concern here because of the great lengths of hair people are aiming for. When you keep your hair at shoulder length or so the individual hair strands don't have to be kept so pristine, so you can do all sorts of damaging things and it never really makes your hair look bad.

I do think more natural and organic alternatives would be interesting, but I think that it makes perfect sense for hairdressers as a whole to cater to the broader community which isn't so worried with the length of their hair but rather getting a cooler colour or style or amount of curl.

There is also the stigma left over from the 60's (which still persists around here): "women who use henna are crunchy granola eaters who are separating from normal society" :rolleyes:

Lianna
May 3rd, 2011, 06:41 PM
I dont think its fair to say that bleaching and dying your hair will always leave it fried damaged and inevitably have to get chopped off. I'm quite sick of the chemical bashing I'm sure as much as henna heads are sick of hearing of the henna and salts story from ill informed hairdressers

I believe most who have "fried hair" after some treatment did it wrong. Some people will always do something wrong, we aren't perfect. I don't think the bashing will ever stop, I'm sick of it too.

Please, OP, don't take away one of my few reasons to be happy. :)

I wouldn't mind if you had more salon options, I actually use henna and dyes, since all natural doesn't give me the results I want.

christine1989
May 3rd, 2011, 06:41 PM
We actually have a chemical free salon at the end of my road, which is pretty cool for a little country village.

That's awesome! I live in a big city and can't find any non chemical salons (and this is in the hippie paradise known as Seattle!) I think there would be a lot more henna users if they could pay someone else to do it for them! :)

Malibu Barbie
May 3rd, 2011, 06:44 PM
I'm sorry some of you have had a bad stylist, I have also. I've had great ones too. The one I've had for the last 15 years has done a wonderful job.

If you think its a racket don't go.

If you want natural open a salon or talk to your hairdresser.

Do some research before you go in.

I like choices and I like my color. I'm getting a little tired of everyone saying hair is a damaged mess because Its been colored. This is stereotyping, don't we have enough of this in the world?

dulce
May 3rd, 2011, 06:45 PM
this was 35 years ago- was very young didn't know what to do other than cut it-1 have had some fantastic stylists along the way but because we were military we moved a lot - but sad to say the majority weren't great-once getting my hair streaked they dropped toner [or bleach ]on my jeans and ruined them,also had too many trims that were supposed to be 1/2 inch turn into 3-4 inches against my wishes-so glad to have long hair now and avoid salon surprises/ disappointments-

knotbox
May 3rd, 2011, 06:57 PM
Re: Henna: I've thought about this before. I would LOVE to be able to get my henna done at a salon, but personally, I leave it on for six hours. That seems like a long time to be sitting there? Would I put a scarf on and come back later? Rinse it out myself at home?


But yes, it would be great if you could go to a salon and get them to henna your hair, especially when you need tricky root touch ups! And it would be great if they didn't push to blow fry your hair, but would just ask if you wanted to let it dry naturally (or used the dryer on a really low setting instead of fry your hair hot).


I feel bad for those of you who have had crappy hairdressers. That really is unfortunate as a good hairdresser is worth more than you will ever pay them! My hairdresser actually practiced a lot of techniques on my hair when we were in high school (I had mid-back length hair then) and then remained my hairdresser after he went to school and got his tickets. He knows my hair better than I do and I have always had amazing hair when he is done with it. I end up going to see him about every three months for a colour and clean up. Since I have naturally curly hair, he will straighten it for me if I ask and then tell me not to do it with the iron much or I will fry it (that will be ending now that I have told him I want to grow to the waist again, sigh, back to curl products and care for a few months...). If I was to ask for henna or any other natural dye, he would definitely do it for me, I would just have to give him advance notice so that he could have the salon ready as it is such a time consuming process. I don't have the time or patience to go through that process though.

My hairdresser is also great. Aside from chemical dying in general, I can safely say the boxes are mostly terrible. I wanted to have the golden blonde of my youth and ended up like Gwynth Paltrow as Pepper Potts in Iron Man. Not so bad (I wore a dashing blue dress to prom that year--thought I was very clever.) But I was only pleased with it once my hairdresser had touched it up. It felt healthy, it was shoulder length, but muchos wavy, only once I started growing it out (mostly due to laziness on the upkeep) The very ends seemed so much drier. I can attribute it to my own neglect, those were harrowing months in my senior year.

My hairdresser is wonderful at coloring. I've had friends who dyed their hair all the time, and there is such a difference when they go to the small one on mainstreet, the big one off main street where there are like 5 hairdressers at a time, and then my own, which only has one hairdresser, the owner, and one woman who answers the phone and sweeps hair, although my hairdresser may run to get the phone herself sometimes. XD The reason she's still in business is because she is the goddess of color in our area. She matched my crazy boxed result perfectly. Highlighted the roots so it blended wonderfully and looked like beach hair, and anytime I ask for a suggestion for a cut she does something flattering. (She's pretty keen on getting someone to do something more edgy though.)

And when I told I wanted to do Henna last year, she said if I brought it in, she'd apply it, as long as I had an instruction manual. She remembered that Lucille Ball had it done.

I'm very lucky though. The girls at the big salon (in my small town, 3000 people) don't really listen, I can imagine they damage your hair just as easily. My friend wanted an ash blonde, she was given white blonde... The highlights never match... don't you need a ceritificate before you can touch hair, or do we just never check their 'office walls'?

ellen732
May 3rd, 2011, 07:04 PM
I'm sorry some of you have had a bad stylist, I have also. I've had great ones too. The one I've had for the last 15 years has done a wonderful job.

If you think its a racket don't go.

If you want natural open a salon or talk to your hairdresser.

Do some research before you go in.

I like choices and I like my color. I'm getting a little tired of everyone saying hair is a damaged mess because Its been colored. This is stereotyping, don't we have enough of this in the world?

Thank-you for this. Sometimes I feel like there is a little bit too much hairstylist bashing going on and it starts to get insulting to those who are hairstylists.