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Dragon
January 6th, 2011, 03:01 AM
I was just wondering if anyone else thinks you should have the right to know if its an apprentice or trained hairdresser working on your hair?

I think they should tell you and I think you shouldn’t have to pay full price if they are an apprentice.

cuppycake
January 6th, 2011, 03:07 AM
Yes I think they should have to tell you. And the price should be based on the quality of their work. If u are going in there to just get a trim and they do it perfectly why would you pay them any less just because they are less experienced?

Avital88
January 6th, 2011, 03:07 AM
I agree!once i had a girl blowdrying my hair where i was paying the normal price for but she was just an intern, she was nervous because it was her first time as what i could see.
I could have done it better myself and i suck at blowdrying my hair straight with a brush, i was too young to say anything about it(18) but now i would never let that happen to my hair .

bunzfan
January 6th, 2011, 04:25 AM
I used to be a hairdressing apprentice and the clients are made fully aware before they go near their hair that they are still training and they are asked for their permission first.

torrilin
January 6th, 2011, 04:50 AM
I pretty regularly get my trims at one of the local beauty schools. Well, pretty regularly given my desire to keep trims down to "only when my ends are too split". I haven't regularly had my hair cut by a fully trained professional stylist for over 5 years, maybe closer to 7. And yes, it's definitely part of the deal that if you go to a school salon, you will be used for practice. That's a lot of why I do it. I want to make sure that at least some new stylists have handled longer hair, and have had to work on doing a nice blunt cut.

I'm not aware of any stylist shops that would happily let an intern work on someone's hair. In most states, hairdressers and barbers are licensed by the state, so it'd be illegal to let an unlicensed person do stuff.

I've had bad cuts done by professional stylists. Realistically, anyone can have a bad day or make a mistake. It doesn't mean they're a novice. And since hair much past BSL is fairly uncommon, and it doesn't need cuts often, pretty much all stylists will be novices at handling it. And their equipment doesn't help. A regular salon station chair can just barely go high enough that stylists can comfortably get at my ends. For someone with hair waist length or longer, it might well be easier to get a professional trim while standing!

That's a big reason why I shifted to going to a beauty school for cuts. The teachers tend to be huge fans of hair that is kept in great condition, and they see a much wider range of hair care and hair styles than someone who works in a regular salon. They believe me when I say my hair is too splitty and is tangling excessively. And they can show the students what I mean. And it's fun to see the student's shock when I'm right. My hair is pretty dramatic about it, so I make a good demo.

julliams
January 6th, 2011, 04:51 AM
I'm pretty sure I had the work experience girl blowdrying my hair. It drove me crazy as she was so gentle with my hair it felt like she didn't really want to touch it. After a while, I actually asked for her to stop and for the lady who had cut it to finish it off. Then I never went back. I was never asked permission for her to dry my hair.

Bene
January 6th, 2011, 04:52 AM
I think they should let you know, but I don't think they should get paid less. I mean, if the work is good, then it's good.

lupiae
January 6th, 2011, 04:56 AM
I think they should let you know, but I don't think they should get paid less. I mean, if the work is good, then it's good.

Definitely they have to tell you, it is your right. If the are correct and sure of the professionality of the "beginner", they shouldn't have any problem to tell you.

joiekimochi
January 6th, 2011, 06:22 AM
It never happened to me before, partly because the salon I used to go to was so extremely expensive and high-end that the owner and lead stylist there did not put his trainees to work there. He owns three other salons and his trainees all have to clock in several years of seniority, starting at his most budget salon and working their way up to the 'celebrity' salon (the one that I go to).

It didn't matter to me anyway; I only booked appointments with the owner and became really good friends with him. That way I got such ridiculous discounts that I always end up paying less than if I had booked his other stylists!

That being said, it should reflect on their professional integrity to inform you that a trainee is going to do your hair; I heard a case wherein a customer's hair was ruined due to the inexperienced trainee and the customer wasn't informed of it. However, the salon claims that since the customer did not ask first to clarify if her stylist was a trainee, they had assumed that the customer was fine with the trainee doing her hair. So it's always best, I guess, to stick to a trusted stylist, and if you're going to a new place for the first time, clarify things first, if they had neglected to inform you.

lapushka
January 6th, 2011, 07:25 AM
I had an apprentice cut my hair a few months before graduation, and she messed up badly. There's no other way to put it. She did. I complained, and only then did she tell me she was still learning to cut hair. She went and got the manager, who had actually told her to cut my hair in the first place after I'd explained to her what I wanted (the manager then gave the apprentice instructions). She was embarrassed and clearly very disappointed in the apprentice, and then adjusted the cut for me. Unfortunately it had to be cut right up to my ears in a very short bob. She was very apologetic and tried to accommodate me the best she could.

If they're going to use me to learn, and are prepared to gamble on an apprentice, then yes I want to know, and yes, it would be my decision.

I don't think every salon does this, though. It just hurts me that I had a crappy experience. It could easily have turned out fine.

UltraBella
January 6th, 2011, 07:58 AM
We don't have apprenticeships here for hair. You are a licensed cosmetologist, or not. If you go to a beauty school then you will obviously be services by a student, but in a salon they must already be licensed.

Lostsoule77
January 6th, 2011, 08:07 AM
I definitely think you should be made aware if it is an apprentice cutting your hair. As far as getting paid, the salons around here tend to have a pay scale. You pay more for the more experienced people and less for the less. You choose who you book with so it's up to you. Then again I live in a very small town that has at least 5 salons and 2 barber shops in it so I think they need to keep people happy otherwise it'd be to easy to go elsewhere. :)

Capybara
January 6th, 2011, 08:09 AM
It's been my experience that the only "apprentice" hairdressers are at the hairdressing schools, and it's possible to go there to get a discounted cut/hair treatment/colour.

Where I go to get my hair cut, they have different levels of stylists. I beieve that the levels are based on years of experience, but I'm not exactly sure how it goes. Each level has a different price range, and it's possible to select the level stylist you would like to do your hair.

Miasen
January 6th, 2011, 08:20 AM
Around here you'll usually see signs outside hair dressers, saying if they have apprentices there. If you ask for a cut from one of them it's half the price. I've done this several times, and have been happy every time. They've already been to school, so they know how to cut, just need some experience. And the proper hair dressers usually go over the hair afterwards, making sure it's all even and stuff. Worst that happens is I lost half an inch more than I'd usually do, no biggie.

So you'll only get cut by an apprentice if you ask for it, and it's half the price, so all good!

lapushka
January 6th, 2011, 08:30 AM
It depends on what country you're from. Where I live these kinds of contracts exist. They're called (translated) "apprenticeship contracts". This was done many years ago to have less students drop out of school before they graduated at 18. It means a student goes to school part-time, and works part-time. Several hairdressers and businesses actually want these students to come in as they're cheap labor. And no, there's no reduction in price. You pay full price and sometimes you don't know who's cutting your hair; although her age might have been a *major* clue. :roll: This was 20 years ago, though. Don't ask me about the current situation.

MandyBeth
January 6th, 2011, 09:44 AM
I go to a school, which is cheaper, but there is a teacher always giving the ok.

ericthegreat
January 6th, 2011, 09:55 AM
We don't have apprenticeships here for hair. You are a licensed cosmetologist, or not. If you go to a beauty school then you will obviously be services by a student, but in a salon they must already be licensed.


It's been my experience that the only "apprentice" hairdressers are at the hairdressing schools, and it's possible to go there to get a discounted cut/hair treatment/colour.

Where I go to get my hair cut, they have different levels of stylists. I beieve that the levels are based on years of experience, but I'm not exactly sure how it goes. Each level has a different price range, and it's possible to select the level stylist you would like to do your hair.


Both UltraBella and Capybara are correct. As a young hairstylist myself, I can definitely say that you can't legally work in a professional salon without a license to practice cosmetology. And the only way you can get that license is after you have both graduated from a cosmetology school and completed the required amount of hours (which varies from state to state) of study that your state requires, and also most importantly you need to have taken the State Board exam and have passed it in order to receive that license. I can personally attest that I was ONLY hired to work in the salons I've worked in AFTER I had done all of that and received my license.

However as I bolded, a salon can't legally hire a person without a license to work there, its doesn't mean that some of them still don't do it. Even back while I was in school, I knew of a few fellow classmates who did get jobs at salons when they of course didn't have their licenses yet. Usually it was because they had family connections (their aunt or their uncles's best friend or whoever owned a salon). The salons that do this are always taking a big and in my opinion stupid risk, should an inspector ever walk in and check up on this salon and find out that so-so isn't licensed, the salon would definitely get fined and might even get shut down.

If you are really concerned that you are not getting a licensed hairstylist working on you, then definitely first speak up to the receptionist and demand for a licensed and experienced hairstylist to work on you. And if you still have any doubts, say the stylist they give you looks suspiciously young or very nervous, you can legally demand to see their license which needs to have a photo ID of that stylist.