PDA

View Full Version : Dr. George Michael Philosophy?



Pages : 1 2 [3]

Crumpet
March 6th, 2015, 03:34 PM
My Denman BBB has just arrived and I'm excited to start a regular brushing routine! It's been about 6 years or so since I've had a BBB. And I've got no clue why I stopped using one. Think it had something to do with a dog eating my brush and then cutting my hair off (not necessarily related events). What I DO remember is that my hair and scalped LOVED it. :)

So glad you're doing it too! I mostly stopped because I was doing it wrong. It sounds silly to re-learn how to comb and brush hair as an adult, but it really made a difference to my hair. I hope you enjoy the results you get. I'm still amazed by the impact it has had on my shedding.

georgia_peach
March 6th, 2015, 03:52 PM
Thank you, crumpet! And I'm glad you are having good results with it.

TaterTot
March 7th, 2015, 12:24 PM
I don't think we should brush him off either. The hair he worked with revealed his wisdom.


Hehhehe.... Brush him off.
I have been working up to 50 strokes a day with my BBB but I will for sure be cutting bangs.

evalina
March 14th, 2015, 04:22 AM
Isn't this brushing 100 strokes a day an old grandma/common wisdom? I've heard it a lot in my childhood even from average hairdressers.
I'm probably not brushing 100 strokes per day and surely not head down bc my rather fine hair can't handle that.
I'm for a long time close to buying a proper BBB but so far the experiences of other fine haired longhairs have kept me from it.

LauraLongLocks
March 14th, 2015, 09:25 PM
Isn't this brushing 100 strokes a day an old grandma/common wisdom? I've heard it a lot in my childhood even from average hairdressers.
I'm probably not brushing 100 strokes per day and surely not head down bc my rather fine hair can't handle that.
I'm for a long time close to buying a proper BBB but so far the experiences of other fine haired longhairs have kept me from it.

I have fine hair, and I love what it does for my hair. I just have to be sure that my hair is thoroughly detangled before I start. If it becomes tangled while brushing, I must stop, detangle it again, and then resume brushing. It does wonders for the softeness and shine of my hair. It also reduces my shedding and keeps my scalp clean between washings.

Hopeful65
March 14th, 2015, 11:11 PM
http://i00.i.aliimg.com/wsphoto/v0/1897023170_4/Goody-Brush-Soft-Bristle-Boar-Ceramic-Styling-Brush-Oval-Cushion-pig-hair-comb-Small-to-carry.jpg
I bought this Goody 100% BBB recently and have been trying to use it but I'm just not having great success getting it through my hair. I have fine hair, you would think it could easily get through to my scalp... but no. I've watched your video LauraLongLocks, and other videos as well. I really want this to work for me. Did I get a wrong brush? It's like it just brushes the outer layer without penetrating to the scalp like I was assuming it would.

I use this comb solely on my hair and it works wonderfully http://www.ensleybeautysupply.com/Media/Images/Large/d12.jpg
I know it is plastic, but it doesn't seem to have seams. It doesn't snag, and it really glides nicely though my hair, so I don't think it is doing damage.
Any opinions on this comb?

Marika
March 15th, 2015, 12:43 AM
I've been brushing just 20-30 strokes a day and I'm already seeing benefits. My hair is definitely more soft and silky :) I've been surprised that I don't see any broken hairs in my brush even though my hair is very fine and quite fragile even. I have the ridiculously expensive Mason Pearson brush and softer Kent BBB for fine hair. I've had them for 10 years but haven't used them regularly until now.

Thanks Laura for your great video, it's really helpful!:flower:

LauraLongLocks
March 15th, 2015, 09:12 AM
http://i00.i.aliimg.com/wsphoto/v0/1897023170_4/Goody-Brush-Soft-Bristle-Boar-Ceramic-Styling-Brush-Oval-Cushion-pig-hair-comb-Small-to-carry.jpg
I bought this Goody 100% BBB recently and have been trying to use it but I'm just not having great success getting it through my hair. I have fine hair, you would think it could easily get through to my scalp... but no. I've watched your video LauraLongLocks, and other videos as well. I really want this to work for me. Did I get a wrong brush? It's like it just brushes the outer layer without penetrating to the scalp like I was assuming it would.

I use this comb solely on my hair and it works wonderfully http://www.ensleybeautysupply.com/Media/Images/Large/d12.jpg
I know it is plastic, but it doesn't seem to have seams. It doesn't snag, and it really glides nicely though my hair, so I don't think it is doing damage.
Any opinions on this comb?

I wouldn't like that brush or that comb.

The bristles are too close together on the brush, and not long enough. I don't know how stiff they are. Maybe they are stiff enough they could penetrate to the scalp? My BBB has longer bristles, farther apart, and moderately stiff. They penetrate through to my scalp as long as I don't go too long between washings. If I go more than 3-4 days, my sebum prevents the brush from reaching the scalp. I guess the hair clumps up a bit too much and won't separate apart when the brush is stroked through.

I think the teeth on the comb are way too close together. I much prefer a wide-tooth comb. If you like it and it isn't snagging, then use it! Just be careful that your grip on your comb is a light grip. That way if you come to any tangles, you won't accidentally rip through them.



I've been brushing just 20-30 strokes a day and I'm already seeing benefits. My hair is definitely more soft and silky :) I've been surprised that I don't see any broken hairs in my brush even though my hair is very fine and quite fragile even. I have the ridiculously expensive Mason Pearson brush and softer Kent BBB for fine hair. I've had them for 10 years but haven't used them regularly until now.

Thanks Laura for your great video, it's really helpful!:flower: You're welcome. I'm glad it was useful to you.

Madora
March 15th, 2015, 09:14 AM
Hopeful, while your brush says it is pure boar bristle, it is actually a blend of boar bristles and something else. Probably something "ceramic" (whatever that is) judging from the appearance of the ends of those bristles. A true boar bristle does not end in a tiny knob.

Also, those boar bristle clumps are too thick and placed too closely together. Getting that thing through hair would be a chore.

Alas, sad but true, not all bbbs are created equal when it comes to actually penetrating down to the scalp. In all my years of using them, I've only found one pure bbb that penetrated all the way down to the scalp..the Madora bbb available from the George Michael Salon.

endlessly
March 15th, 2015, 10:26 AM
I think it's true that hair is very strong when one length, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's at its most healthiest at just one length.

I was having quite a bit of breakage along my hairline because of wearing my hair up and pulled back frequently, so I cut bangs in order to alleviate the sensitivity and pulling I had - and, it worked, no more pulling or breakage. And, my hair is stronger as a result since I'm not pulling it anymore.

As for brushing 100 times, I think that can potentially cause a hell of a lot more damage than good. The benefit of brushing is to spread your natural oils from your scalp down to the ends of your hair to keep your hair moisturized and stimulate your scalp. If you brush too roughly, you can rip through knots and tangles and end up causing further damage. If done extremely - and I mean extremely - gently, I'm sure it does benefit your hair and scalp's health, but otherwise, it just seems tedious. I comb my hair twice per day, brushing it only once I've gotten all of the tangles out, and I maybe only do 10 or so passes with my comb and brush each time.

But, what works for me, may not necessarily work for someone else. It's more important to pay attention to your hair's needs versus what everyone else is telling you is the right way.

Hopeful65
March 15th, 2015, 12:18 PM
Thank you for your input Laura and Madora. The brush was under $6 so not a big loss. I will continue to search and learn. As for the comb, I do indeed use it slowly and with a light touch. I'm always open for something new and willing to learn.

chen bao jun
March 30th, 2015, 07:43 PM
Found this. I'm sure its been linked somewhere before but I thought you ladies might like to see it again.
http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/1991-04-26/lifestyle/9104250387_1_care-of-hair-hair-is-short-long-haired

Sarahlabyrinth
March 30th, 2015, 10:17 PM
An excellent article! Thanks for posting it, chen bao jun!

Sarahlabyrinth
March 30th, 2015, 10:23 PM
May I link my inverted BBB brushing video here? My hair is very fine and I certainly don't do 100 brush strokes but find great benefit from BBBing.

https://youtu.be/G8M8jR7RcSo

JRC
June 11th, 2015, 05:27 PM
I've just finished reading through all 52 pages of this thread, and I have some questions. I would be really grateful if anybody is able to answer them. Firstly, I am allergic to boar bristles, and I wondered if there is an alternative? I have recently started using a sisal hairbrush, and I would be grateful if anybody could tell me if it is likely to be safe to use on hair? The bristles are similar to the ones on a sisal body brush. It is from:-

https://www.ecco-verde.co.uk/hair/brushes-combs/oval-hair-brush-6-rows

Also, I have just started going to the George Michael salon in London (The Long Hair Clinic), and I would be interested to know if anybody who has been to either this salon, or one of the other George Michael salons, has been advised not to use hairbands containing elastic in their hair? I was advised to cut a small section from a pair of tights, and to use this in place of a scrunchie or hair elastic. Also, when my hair has been trimmed, Neil always takes a small section from each side at the front of my hair, puts the rest of my hair in a bun, and then twists the front sections of hair around the bun. This is to avoid pulling the front hair too tightly. I haven't seen anybody else who has been to the salon mention this, so I just wondered if anybody has tried this, and if so, how they get on with it? I find that the bun slips while I am trying to wrap the front sections of hair around it, and trying to tie it with the hairband made from tights just makes it all fall down. Avoiding using elastic or metal in the hair does seem to make it difficult to tie it up securely.

I would be interested to know if anybody else has tried this. My hair is very fine and thin, so I tend to find that wooden hairsticks and hairforks are too long, and just fall out, so they are no better than the tights.

LauraLongLocks
June 11th, 2015, 05:49 PM
I think the sisal hairbrush is probably a good alternative, but I have never used it, so I can't say for sure. Be watchful for any possible damage.

I've never used tights as a hairband, but it might work. I have slippery hair too and so I know it would slip on my hair as well. Have you tried Amish hairpins? Spin pins?

sourgrl
June 11th, 2015, 05:59 PM
Found this. I'm sure its been linked somewhere before but I thought you ladies might like to see it again.
http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/1991-04-26/lifestyle/9104250387_1_care-of-hair-hair-is-short-long-haired

Nice to see a good article from the Orlando 'Slantinel' for a change :)

JRC
June 11th, 2015, 06:19 PM
Thank you for your suggestions, Laura Longlocks. I haven't tried Amish hairpins, but I know they're really popular, so I'll see if I can get some. I think I tried spin pins a few years ago, but got my hair tangled in them. The ends of my hair were really thin and damaged then, so maybe they will work better this time. It might be worth asking Neil to show me how they work when I go back to the Long Hair Clinic.

lauren_alia
June 11th, 2015, 08:20 PM
I've just finished reading through all 52 pages of this thread, and I have some questions. I would be really grateful if anybody is able to answer them. Firstly, I am allergic to boar bristles, and I wondered if there is an alternative? I have recently started using a sisal hairbrush, and I would be grateful if anybody could tell me if it is likely to be safe to use on hair? The bristles are similar to the ones on a sisal body brush. It is from:-

https://www.ecco-verde.co.uk/hair/brushes-combs/oval-hair-brush-6-rows

Also, I have just started going to the George Michael salon in London (The Long Hair Clinic), and I would be interested to know if anybody who has been to either this salon, or one of the other George Michael salons, has been advised not to use hairbands containing elastic in their hair? I was advised to cut a small section from a pair of tights, and to use this in place of a scrunchie or hair elastic. Also, when my hair has been trimmed, Neil always takes a small section from each side at the front of my hair, puts the rest of my hair in a bun, and then twists the front sections of hair around the bun. This is to avoid pulling the front hair too tightly. I haven't seen anybody else who has been to the salon mention this, so I just wondered if anybody has tried this, and if so, how they get on with it? I find that the bun slips while I am trying to wrap the front sections of hair around it, and trying to tie it with the hairband made from tights just makes it all fall down. Avoiding using elastic or metal in the hair does seem to make it difficult to tie it up securely.

I would be interested to know if anybody else has tried this. My hair is very fine and thin, so I tend to find that wooden hairsticks and hairforks are too long, and just fall out, so they are no better than the tights.
I use hairbands made from tights to tie off my sleep braid at night. They're pretty much useless for actual ponytails though. It just slips down, and I don't even have slippery hair. Aside from pins like LauraLongLocks mentioned, maybe you could try ficcare-style clips? Or even claw clips? I don't think they're damaging. I don't see how they would be as long as you're careful not to get your hair tangled up on the spring or something.

JRC
June 12th, 2015, 12:38 AM
Thank you, Lauren_Alia, I might try claw clips, as they look as if they might work. I will be trying a Ficcare Maximas clip soon, so I'll let you know how I get on. I had to order it from Germany, as there doesn't seem to be a UK stockist. Maybe that's a good thing, as it helps to deter from the desire to buy too many.

Wusel
June 12th, 2015, 03:31 AM
George Michael?
Who's that?
I only know a singer with that name. :D

BBB brushing = Not for me. Damages my hair. I've tried it for a couple of months and it gave me breakage and dryness and LESS shine. And I am NOT curly-wurly-kinky whatever. I'd love to be but I'm not. :D

Linguaphilia
June 12th, 2015, 05:28 AM
George Michael was a Russian doctor with a passion for long hair on women :) A namesake of the singer.

BBB's are not for me either. I tried them for months and ended up giving my Mason Pearson handy pure BBB to my boyfriend; my other brushes went into the closet. My hair is too fine to not snap with the stiff bristles at some point; there is no way to make all my hairs lie straight down, they end up floating, especially when staticky due to the brush. It was a lot of trouble for me. I prefer to brush with a Tangle Teezer right before I wash my hair. I'm sure it's stimulating enough, and the horn comb I have does a fine job at spreading oils/sebum down the length.

CoveredByLove
June 12th, 2015, 10:08 AM
May I link my inverted BBB brushing video here? My hair is very fine and I certainly don't do 100 brush strokes but find great benefit from BBBing.

https://youtu.be/G8M8jR7RcSo

Great vid Sarah! What BBB brush are you using? I still enjoy BBBrushing my hair, and I notice a marked softness that I don't have when I stop brushing for a while. I find brushing more enjoyable and easier (and safer) to do when I don't use styling products on my hair. I've been using only conditioner to style, and I love the fact I can brush it and get the scalp and hair benefits.
The brush I have is a half round Bass wooden BBB. I have enjoyed using it, but I would like to try others. I love lightweight, small brushes. I see that the brush you are using is small. I find I have more control with smaller brushes than a bulky paddle style brush. Your brush looks similar to the George Michael brush, which I am really interested in.

(Anyone else use and love the George Michael BBB?)

Thanks!

Madora
June 12th, 2015, 11:48 AM
I love my Madora GM boar bristle brush! The only brush that ever penetrated my hair clear down to the roots. It is smaller than my ususal brush but is worth every penny.

CoveredByLove
June 12th, 2015, 12:31 PM
I love my Madora GM boar bristle brush! The only brush that ever penetrated my hair clear down to the roots. It is smaller than my ususal brush but is worth every penny.

Thanks, Madora! :D I was hoping to hear it would penetrate well. Exactly what I'm looking for!

lauren_alia
June 12th, 2015, 01:34 PM
Thank you, Lauren_Alia, I might try claw clips, as they look as if they might work. I will be trying a Ficcare Maximas clip soon, so I'll let you know how I get on. I had to order it from Germany, as there doesn't seem to be a UK stockist. Maybe that's a good thing, as it helps to deter from the desire to buy too many.
You're welcome, good luck to you. :flower:

Sarahlabyrinth
June 12th, 2015, 02:33 PM
CoveredByLove, my brush is the George Michael BBB and is the same as the one Madora uses. I haven't found anything better for inverted brushing, to be honest - it's a stunning brush!.

CoveredByLove
June 12th, 2015, 03:40 PM
CoveredByLove, my brush is the George Michael BBB and is the same as the one Madora uses. I haven't found anything better for inverted brushing, to be honest - it's a stunning brush!.

Great! :D I couldn't quite tell in the video if it was or not. I knew it looked similar. :D Thanks! :flowers:

Gertrude
June 13th, 2015, 11:44 AM
George Michael?
Who's that?
I only know a singer with that name. :D

BBB brushing = Not for me. Damages my hair. I've tried it for a couple of months and it gave me breakage and dryness and LESS shine. And I am NOT curly-wurly-kinky whatever. I'd love to be but I'm not. :D


George Michael the hairdresser pre-dates George Michael the singer. He was Russian and used his first and middle name and not his last name. Made him sound more American. His Hey-day was the 1970s. His ideas are all from that time and the decades before too. It doesn't mean they all bad or all good.His science ideas are certainly wonky now we know more, but he isn't alone in that. Doing things 100 times was an Edwardian idea that became a mantra. Write the line 100 times, brush your hair 100 times.

I do brush my hair, but not for long, and inverting myself makes my blood pressure crash. That's just me of course, but brushing doesn't work for everyone. You don't need to hang your head downwards for your blood to circulate in the scalp. Massaging my scalp, or any part of my skin makes me itch. Going to the GM salon in London for 5 years has transformed my hair. By the thorough S&D and the micro trims. The GM stylist attributes the improvement to his care, his conditioning treatments, the use of the GM products, no metal or elastics in hair, the scalp massage and the brushing. The conditioning treatments, if I can afford them, are for me the ultimate spa experience. Take hours of glossy magazines and being pampered. But there are better conditioners. I can only put my hair up , and have it stay up, with Amish metal wavy hair pins. For days when I wear a plait( braid) I use a chenille covered elastic. Soft and fuzzy outer with elastic inner and a plastic bead. My hair isn't damaged by either. I don't massage, and brush for a few strokes twice a day. Right side up.

Anyone like George Michael, a strong personality saying he is The Expert and his ( or her) way the Only Way, will always get many who reject the advice completely, others who follow it exactly, and the majority who use what they can and combine it with other ideas.

Gertrude
June 13th, 2015, 12:13 PM
I've just finished reading through all 52 pages of this thread, and I have some questions. I would be really grateful if anybody is able to answer them. Firstly, I am allergic to boar bristles, and I wondered if there is an alternative? I have recently started using a sisal hairbrush, and I would be grateful if anybody could tell me if it is likely to be safe to use on hair? The bristles are similar to the ones on a sisal body brush. It is from:-

https://www.ecco-verde.co.uk/hair/brushes-combs/oval-hair-brush-6-rows

Also, I have just started going to the George Michael salon in London (The Long Hair Clinic), and I would be interested to know if anybody who has been to either this salon, or one of the other George Michael salons, has been advised not to use hairbands containing elastic in their hair? I was advised to cut a small section from a pair of tights, and to use this in place of a scrunchie or hair elastic. Also, when my hair has been trimmed, Neil always takes a small section from each side at the front of my hair, puts the rest of my hair in a bun, and then twists the front sections of hair around the bun. This is to avoid pulling the front hair too tightly. I haven't seen anybody else who has been to the salon mention this, so I just wondered if anybody has tried this, and if so, how they get on with it? I find that the bun slips while I am trying to wrap the front sections of hair around it, and trying to tie it with the hairband made from tights just makes it all fall down. Avoiding using elastic or metal in the hair does seem to make it difficult to tie it up securely.

I would be interested to know if anybody else has tried this. My hair is very fine and thin, so I tend to find that wooden hairsticks and hairforks are too long, and just fall out, so they are no better than the tights.

I wrote a reply to this days ago and couldn't post it, so hopefully better luck this time. As for the brushing question you don't need to brush at all. Your hair will be fine. But many of use like to. And there are different kind of brushes at all price ranges. Every brush I have ever heard of is damaging to some people's hair. Even if others swear by the non damaging qualities of the same brush. That said brushes without smooth spines of hair or plastic etc tend to be damaging as the uneven bristles " catch" the hair. Soft nylon bristles bristles or a Tangle Teazer type bristles may well be safer than sisal. Sisal in my limited experience feels rough to me. But damage is all individual. Use your brush for a bit on an area of hair, and then check for signs of damage after a bit is the only way to see if it is good for you.

I have been going to the London GM for five years, and yes, I got the lecture too on elastics and metal. GM is old fashioned simply put. You don't need to cut a bit off a pair of tights. You can get very soft ponios, elasticated fabric, for little girls that work better and are very soft. There are sellers on Etsy who make safe hair ties, and you can get them in shops like Fenwick's in London. I use a ponio at the end of my sleep plait( braid) and at the end of the plait for my braided bun. The ponio will glide off if I tried to wear just a plait for gym or Pilates. I use chenille covered elastics and have no damage whatever.

At the end of a GM trim or treatment Neil will do a half-up or a bun for the other customers I have seen. I have super, super slippery fine hair. No half up do or up do for me (-; I did have a seven point French Twist once at the GM salon , with plastic hair pins, and the GM alternative for back combing and a can of hair spray. Not again. Without metal there's no doing my hair up. Now that took me a long time of hope over experience and many disappointments to work out, and Neil just seconds. He has the experience and the skill.

I can use hair sticks and forks as decorations, but can't anchor my hair with them. Not so I can move my head. As a teenager I was given my great-aunt's old steel wavy hair pins. The ones Neil warns against.
They held, but rusted after cycling a lot in the rain. Through lurking here I found Amish hair pins. Which are the same. With them, and sticking to braided buns, sectioned and not, I can hold my hair up for the day. It may take a lot of them, but it holds. Obviously I don't wear them to the GM salon. They don't do any damage at all. There is a UK seller of the hair pins( and lovely sticks), so if you're interested just send me a PM.

Leaving hair at the front and then winding it around the back is the way hair was always dressed. The Regency lady cut that hair at the front short and curled it. The Victorian lady put combs at either side of the bun and brought the long front locks smoothly back over them from a centre parting. Making the Victorian wings. The Edwardian lady curled them and pulled them back. It looks nice! But it's not needed.

For hair forks to work, or hair sticks you need to pull all the hair back to get the tension. You can get traction alopecia if you pull too hard, but you have to pull very hard and for a very long time.

meteor
June 13th, 2015, 01:30 PM
Also, when my hair has been trimmed, Neil always takes a small section from each side at the front of my hair, puts the rest of my hair in a bun, and then twists the front sections of hair around the bun. This is to avoid pulling the front hair too tightly. I haven't seen anybody else who has been to the salon mention this, so I just wondered if anybody has tried this, and if so, how they get on with it? I find that the bun slips while I am trying to wrap the front sections of hair around it, and trying to tie it with the hairband made from tights just makes it all fall down. Avoiding using elastic or metal in the hair does seem to make it difficult to tie it up securely.

I would be interested to know if anybody else has tried this. My hair is very fine and thin, so I tend to find that wooden hairsticks and hairforks are too long, and just fall out, so they are no better than the tights.

I like to separate front sections of hair to create accent braids/twists with. I find that it lightens up the weight of the bun quite a bit. It also makes the pins grip better. You can either incorporate the front section into the main bun, or just pin it around the main bun.

Here are some tutorials that might help with different ways of sectioning front hair:
Braided Regency Updo - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rhDAeaBggyA or similar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBlPI-JsMfE
Braided Beehive: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBlPI-JsMfE
Ellingwoman Bun (simplified) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_biroGTJ7A
The Julianne - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CgwY67VhQvY



I can use hair sticks and forks as decorations, but can't anchor my hair with them. Not so I can move my head. As a teenager I was given my great-aunt's old steel wavy hair pins. The ones Neil warns against.
They held, but rusted after cycling a lot in the rain. Through lurking here I found Amish hair pins. Which are the same. [...] :scissors:

For hair forks to work, or hair sticks you need to pull all the hair back to get the tension. You can get traction alopecia if you pull too hard, but you have to pull very hard and for a very long time.

I didn't know GM salons warn against using U-pins. :hmm: Is that because they are made of metal? I'm curious what kinds of materials do they like to suggest? Wood? Plastic? Acrylic? Or are there other reasons? :)

About anchoring updos, you mention that you use ponyos - if you can use a ponyo as a ponytail, then it's pretty easy to twist/braid the ponytail and pin it down with sticks/fork/claw-clips/etc, for example. :) It should hold way better (and feels lighter) than a bun without a ponytail base. That's what I would try if the hair is super-silky/slippery.



And I hope it's OK to ask this question here, as it's been bothering me for a while and I can't find any information on this. I would like to try a good quality BBB, because I understand that it makes hair softer and obviously spreads oils much better than my hands or a comb would, but I wonder if a brush achieves its results partly by "polishing" or "buffing" the cuticle scales off hair shaft? Kind of like how buffing nails makes them super-shiny, but ultimately thins them out a bit. So if done right (and not 100 strokes), does it add any mechanical damage? Also, what about the much softer baby brushes? Does anybody like them? :)

Gertrude
June 13th, 2015, 02:14 PM
@ Meteor,

I don't know if other GM salons warn against the metal. The salon itself does use metal hairpins, the very flimsy type, with a plastic coating on and a plastic little bobble on the ends. But plastic, acrylic and wood are recommended. I honestly think it's personal prejudice. The GM salon is really one man, with individual ideas. I actually think, my individual idea (-; that polished metal is very smooth. I used to wear French barrettes a lot, when the big bows were in, and no hair was trapped in the mechanism and I didn't have a kink or any sign of split ends where I wore them. Unlike with bobby pins or regular hair elastics. Barrettes are a no no in GM London as well........They would slide on me, but I just took them out and put them back in again....

Thanks for the ponio ponytail base tip, I will try that. I have found length has helped in the bun department. Having fine hair I don't need a lot of length to help with updos. I don't do smaller plaits at the front because I don't have enough hair for them. They do look amazing and pretty and help distribute the weight of thicker hair. For me weight is a problem. Anything that weighs, claw clip or hair fork winds up sagging hanging painfully because it's heavier than my hair. Same with sectioned buns using other than two equal weight plaits . They wind up sagging and then shedding pins (-; However one tightly plaited braid turned into a simple bun holds really well. I even can put a stick in it or a two prong fork.

The brushing doesn't polish hair like nails can be polished. But it does need something greasy to distribute to make hair smoother. My grandmother would brush her hair 100 times, and had very dry hair with little sebum on her scalp in her 70s and 80s. She used an old fashioned hair dressing which was really wax and oil, and the brush distributed it and did make her hair smooth and shiny. I would guess, not being a scientist , that if you use a brush on dry hair, without sebum, and brushed it for many strokes, you would do damage because in that case you get lots of friction. And static.

meteor
June 13th, 2015, 03:04 PM
^ Thank you so much, Gertrude! :flowers: Super-helpful post! :love:

It makes sense about using oil for brushing if the hair is dry. I think that's why I hear some people brush hair only before a wash when it's full of sebum but skip brushing when it's clean and extra-voluminous.

And thank you so much for the information about which hair tools were used and which ones were avoided. And tightly plaited braid turned into a simple bun is hands-down my favorite style, too :hifive: - doesn't get tangled, holds like a rock, and if it slides and I need to redo it, I still have the braid to work with. I don't even bother to tie off the braid before pinning it up. :)
Oh and yes, French barrettes definitely slide off on me, too, I think it's not uncommon. I use claw-clips instead, the half-moon ones that open like a "C" (http://www.amazon.com/Goody-Half-Moon-Claw-Clip/dp/B004G59GFA) and have strong springs, and they feel pretty light and grippy.
And for really light-weight solutions, thin hairsticks, chopsticks, U-pins, spin pins are probably the lightest... Also, I've heard great stuff about DIY U-pins made from knitting needles bent in a U-shape (around a door handle or something) - I think those should feel pretty light.

Madora
June 13th, 2015, 03:36 PM
Meteor, those baby brushes are fine for infants but do nothing for adult hair because the bristles are too soft to penetrate down into the scalp. All they do is glide over the surface. You want a pure bbb that can penetrate down thru the hair and stimulate the hair follicles and draw the sebum down thru the hair as you brush.

The softness and shine comes with time...and the proper brush and proper technique. This means daily brushing...not just when the mood hits you. I don't think daily brushing hurts healthy hair. It boils down to the type of brush and how you use it. That means no backcombing or teasing...and COMB detangling before the brush is used. Most people have enough sebum to keep their hair healthy and shiny w/o the use of additional oils when brushing. Never liked the idea of additional oil on my hair and certainly not in my brush. But your mileage may vary. There's also the additional question of bacterial buildup in a brush that is used with oil.

I never found brushing 100 strokes a day (and I did just that for decades) to be deleterious to my hair. But then again, my hair was very, very thick and I needed a good brushing to get to all of it. Bottom line: brushing is for more than just shine and softness. It helps remove dead hair cells and dirt and stimulates hair follicles that aid in growth (especially if you do it in the head down position).

meteor
June 13th, 2015, 04:08 PM
^ Thank you very much, Madora! :love:
I just saw those baby brushes and wondered if they would be a safer version, but yes, I can definitely see how they wouldn't fully penetrate, only gloss over hair.
Thank you! :D

JRC
June 17th, 2015, 09:36 AM
Thank you for your suggestions on suitable hairpins / hair ties, Gertrude. Neil does tend to use hair grips with a plastic coating, but they don't hold my hair well when I try to use them. He says that silver isn't as bad as other metals (I have a Sterling silver hair claw), but he suggested coating the silver in clear nail varnish, so that the metal itself doesn't come into contact with the hair. The tights are a bit pointless, as they stretch too much, and slip too easily. I once had a friend who could twist her hair and knot it into a secure bun, without having to pin, clip or tie it, but my hair just slips when I try that.

Thank you for the links to the braided styles, Meteor. They are really helpful. I will need to practise them a few times, to see which work best, but they look really lovely.

lauren_alia
June 17th, 2015, 01:17 PM
Thank you for your suggestions on suitable hairpins / hair ties, Gertrude. Neil does tend to use hair grips with a plastic coating, but they don't hold my hair well when I try to use them. He says that silver isn't as bad as other metals (I have a Sterling silver hair claw), but he suggested coating the silver in clear nail varnish, so that the metal itself doesn't come into contact with the hair. The tights are a bit pointless, as they stretch too much, and slip too easily. I once had a friend who could twist her hair and knot it into a secure bun, without having to pin, clip or tie it, but my hair just slips when I try that.

Thank you for the links to the braided styles, Meteor. They are really helpful. I will need to practise them a few times, to see which work best, but they look really lovely.
Did he give any reason as to why silver is ok but other metals are "bad." That doesn't make much sense to me. I would think as long as the metal pin/stick/fork/whatever was smooth and not going to catch the hair or rust then it should be fine.

JRC
June 17th, 2015, 01:32 PM
I meant to ask the reason why silver is meant to be less of a problem than other metals, but didn't get the chance to. I've got another appointment in 2 weeks, so I'll try to remember then. It will be interesting to find out, but I agree that there doesn't seem to be a logical explanation. It sounds as though a lot of us do use metal clips in our hair, and seem to be fine with them.

meteor
June 17th, 2015, 01:37 PM
Did he give any reason as to why silver is ok but other metals are "bad." That doesn't make much sense to me. I would think as long as the metal pin/stick/fork/whatever was smooth and not going to catch the hair or rust then it should be fine.

Yes, I have the same question. :agree: It seems like, except for sharpness, rough edges/snags, rusting and allergies (some people have nickel allergies, for example), metal should be fine to use, no? :hmm:

Also, how do you guys select an appropriate brush if local stores don't sell any good BBBs? I find it impossible to figure out from pictures online if the bristles would be soft enough or sparse enough... They all look so different.... Seems like it would require a lot of trial and error. Are there any good brands safe to use on dense, classic-length hair that has multiple textures, dry-ish (highlighted) ends if this hair generally responds to low-quality plastic brushes with static/poof? Or is this kind of hair more fitting for wide-tooth combs only?

Also, do you guys use the same brush for scalp and hair? Or do you like to have a separate brush for scalp massages - as it might require different pressure and bristle density?
TIA! :flower:

Tabitha
June 17th, 2015, 02:14 PM
Stone Bridge used to stock Ficcares - I don't know why they stopped.

Madora
June 17th, 2015, 03:51 PM
Also, how do you guys select an appropriate brush if local stores don't sell any good BBBs? I find it impossible to figure out from pictures online if the bristles would be soft enough or sparse enough... They all look so different.... Seems like it would require a lot of trial and error. Are there any good brands safe to use on dense, classic-length hair that has multiple textures, dry-ish (highlighted) ends if this hair generally responds to low-quality plastic brushes with static/poof? Or is this kind of hair more fitting for wide-tooth combs only?

Also, do you guys use the same brush for scalp and hair? Or do you like to have a separate brush for scalp massages - as it might require different pressure and bristle density?
TIA! :flower:

Yes, choosing a good bbb can be a real roll of the dice, Meteor! Frustrating (especially if you chose incorrectly and wound up blowing a lot of $$$, as I did once upon a time).

Guess it all boils down to this: never buy a bbb w/o personally testing it first. By "testing" I mean running your fingers over the bristles to test for firmness (or lack thereof) and also how the brush feels in your hand.

Personally, I prefer bristles with a little bit of stiffness in them..because if you use the brush with regularity, that stiffness will eventually disappear.

And you know, too, that the way those bristles are spaced has everything to do with helping the brush go through your hair properly. Too many bristle clumps packed together does not make for a pleasant brushing experience!

I've never seen a brush yet that was static proof! The brushing creates the static so to help reduce said static you use the palm of your other hand over the portion of hair you just brushed. Or, if that is too much trouble, after you've finished brushing, run your hands down thru your hair several times. (You might want to hold the hair at the scalp--like a ponytail--and then run the rest of it through your other closed hand).

One brush should be able to handle your hair...no matter what your hair's texture is.

While I don't use different brushes for scalp and hair, I do alternate brushes because I want to give my Madora bbb a rest and not use it every day. I guess that's just my miserly instinct kicking in because as much as I love my Madora bbb, I want to keep it around for many years and not need to spring for a new one (very expensive at $40). Thus, by switching between my Madora and my much loved Goody brush (made in the 70s and not available any longer) I get more mileage.


As far as brush recommendations, the Madora bbb wins hands down. Stiff bristles which really penetrate down to the scalp (the only brush I've ever had that did this..but then I had a ton of hair back in the dark ages).

Winner up: The Connair Classic Wood Natural Shine Booster 100 boar bristle brush. Retails for $10.00 at Target

Six rows of nicely placed black boar bristles in an elongated base (no rubber). Shiny brown color. Has a hole in the handle to hang it with. Also has a small, nubby black neophrene rubber band around the neck of the brush, to help give your finger a better purchase on the brush when you use it. My hair hated that band so I cut it out with a box cutter. I liked it so much I bought two of them.

One last thought: if you do purchase a bbb, be sure and wash it before using it. I've seen people actually brushing their hair with new brushes then putting them back on the rack. God, it just creeps me out. Good luck!

meteor
June 18th, 2015, 09:46 AM
^ Thank you so very much, Madora! :flowers: Wow, that's such a super-useful post, it should it "stickied" as great advice for BBB selection!

Madora
June 18th, 2015, 07:05 PM
^ Thank you so very much, Madora! :flowers: Wow, that's such a super-useful post, it should it "stickied" as great advice for BBB selection!

Always a pleasure, Meteor. I wish buying a pure bbb wasn't such a tricky thing. I know I've had my share of ones that were horrible after I got them home. That's why I stocked up on that Goody brush (years ago) and why I bought two of the Connair brush...just to make sure I had an extra brush that truly worked properly!

LadyLongLocks
June 18th, 2015, 08:39 PM
I love my Madora GM boar bristle brush! The only brush that ever penetrated my hair clear down to the roots. It is smaller than my ususal brush but is worth every penny.

So glad you DO like the Brush Madora. Last time we spoke you had not used it and didn't like the looks of it. It is great though and happy you think so too :)

LadyLongLocks
June 18th, 2015, 08:54 PM
I don't brush 100 strokes a day. I have a hard time brushing my hair from roots to tips due to my extreme length. I do however brush my length the best I can but only 10 times or so. I was advised to grow out my bangs in 2005 by someone who studied under GM.He even saw my photo with bangs and hated them! My hair always grew fine with or without bangs. I think no bangs create a more Classic long hair look. Here is the GM BBB in a series of photos. You can get it at the NY salon or Enchantress salon in Ohio. PHOTO ALBUM (http://jjjlonghairphotopage.zoomshare.com/2.shtml/George%20Michael%20-%20Madora%20Boar%20Bristle%20Brush)

Crumpet
June 19th, 2015, 12:09 PM
I don't brush 100 strokes a day. I have a hard time brushing my hair from roots to tips due to my extreme length. I do however brush my length the best I can but only 10 times or so. I was advised to grow out my bangs in 2005 by someone who studied under GM.He even saw my photo with bangs and hated them! My hair always grew fine with or without bangs. I think no bangs create a more Classic long hair look. Here is the GM BBB in a series of photos. You can get it at the NY salon or Enchantress salon in Ohio. PHOTO ALBUM (http://jjjlonghairphotopage.zoomshare.com/2.shtml/George%20Michael%20-%20Madora%20Boar%20Bristle%20Brush)

Just so people know, I don't think the GM BBB is available from the NY salon any longer. I've been to that salon and they don't have it (and have even taken it down from their website), which is too bad!

Sarahlabyrinth
June 19th, 2015, 03:52 PM
Just so people know, I don't think the GM BBB is available from the NY salon any longer. I've been to that salon and they don't have it (and have even taken it down from their website), which is too bad!

Wow, I wonder why they stopped stocking it there? That's too bad, I had been hoping to buy one when I was there in October:(

CoveredByLove
June 19th, 2015, 06:49 PM
Thank you LadyLongLocks for linking your photo album of the GM BBB! It helped me to determine if this is a good brush for me to see it at all different angles!

Lately I have been enjoying my wood pin brush more. With my hair type, a BBB can be cumbersome. I feel that the wood pin brush suits my hair type best, and still distributes the oils, although not quite as efficiently as a BBB. It also penetrates my hair effectively, giving an amaaaazing scalp massage. I like to add coconut oil to my ends and length, detangle with a wide tooth comb, then brush with the wood pin brush in inverted position. Put my hair up for the night, then wash in the morning. :) The BBB brush I use occasionally after using the wood pin brush for a more thorough brush through.

I absolutely do see (and feel) a difference in my hair after starting brushing as apposed to not brushing. My curls actually look more defined and CURLIER than usual. My ends are also super soft, whereas before I was having problems with dry ends. I think curlies are afraid of brushing because they think it will damage their hair or cause the curls to loosen. This hasn't been the case with me so far...and I'm glad because I'm addicted to the scalp massage! :lol: It's so relaxing! :cloud9:

I sure hope that they don't discontinue the GM BBB...I'm still interesting in buying one!

lauren_alia
June 20th, 2015, 12:45 AM
Thank you LadyLongLocks for linking your photo album of the GM BBB! It helped me to determine if this is a good brush for me to see it at all different angles!

Lately I have been enjoying my wood pin brush more. With my hair type, a BBB can be cumbersome. I feel that the wood pin brush suits my hair type best, and still distributes the oils, although not quite as efficiently as a BBB. It also penetrates my hair effectively, giving an amaaaazing scalp massage. I like to add coconut oil to my ends and length, detangle with a wide tooth comb, then brush with the wood pin brush in inverted position. Put my hair up for the night, then wash in the morning. :) The BBB brush I use occasionally after using the wood pin brush for a more thorough brush through.

I absolutely do see (and feel) a difference in my hair after starting brushing as apposed to not brushing. My curls actually look more defined and CURLIER than usual. My ends are also super soft, whereas before I was having problems with dry ends. I think curlies are afraid of brushing because they think it will damage their hair or cause the curls to loosen. This hasn't been the case with me so far...and I'm glad because I'm addicted to the scalp massage! :lol: It's so relaxing! :cloud9:

I sure hope that they don't discontinue the GM BBB...I'm still interesting in buying one!
I am intrigued. What is the wood pin brush you use? I've been thinking it might be easier for me to stretch washes more if I brushed to distribute the oils better (currently I only have a wide tooth comb, no brushes) but I am a bit afraid of the bbb. It just doesn't look like something I'd be able to drag through my velcro hair without breakage. :laugh: By the second day after a wash my roots are oily but the ends are feeling dry.

CoveredByLove
June 20th, 2015, 08:41 AM
I am intrigued. What is the wood pin brush you use? I've been thinking it might be easier for me to stretch washes more if I brushed to distribute the oils better (currently I only have a wide tooth comb, no brushes) but I am a bit afraid of the bbb. It just doesn't look like something I'd be able to drag through my velcro hair without breakage. :laugh: By the second day after a wash my roots are oily but the ends are feeling dry.

I seem to have the thirty-est ends! So I understand! I was a bit nervous first trying a BBB, but I soon noticed my ends felt much better so then I was hooked. I stopped for a while because it did get cumbersome to do, but I'm back at it because it does make a difference.

The wood pin brush I have currently is an Ambassador I bought from iHerb.com

http://www.iherb.com/Fuchs-Brushes-Ambassador-Hairbrushes-Olivewood-Rectangle-Wood-Pins-1-Hair-Brush/55424#p=1&oos=1&disc=0&lc=en-US&w=fuchs%20brushes%20ambassador%20hair%20brush&rc=117&sr=null&ic=7

Its a beautiful little brush! Made of olive wood, fits perfectly in my hands, and is light weight but sturdy. There are no balls on the ends of the pins to snag hair. I bought it at the same time I bought my BBB (Bass half-round off of iHerb also) I do my brushing in stages, and go slowly. I start off erect and detangle in sections with a wide tooth comb. I just grab random sections of hair until my fingers go through my hair easily. It helps to style your hair with gels that are non-sticky and dry soft, otherwise it would be too difficult to detangle. Then I take my wood pin brush and brush in sections, root to tip. I then part my hair in two and bend at the waist, then let my hair down one side at a time, running my fingers through to make sure everything is still tangle free. Then I brush upside down. To stand back up, I part it in half again, stand up, then let each side down. My hair is usually a giant at this point! But not as bad as when I use the BBB...that really, really poofy. :lol:
I always use oil, at least on my ends, when I brush. To me, it lubricates my dry ends and helps the brush glide through easily. But I always brush right before I wash my hair. So, if you are brushing in between washes, I'd go easy with the oils and just work with your natural sebum. I've had no problems with breakage...only softer hair. :) The wood pin brush is not going to be as effective as the BBB, because the pins are large. Boar bristles are much smaller and packed denser, so more oils gets moved down per stroke. Sometimes after I use my wood pin brush I alternate with the BBB for a more thorough brushing. I do this maybe once or twice a week. The rest of the time I only use the wood pin brush. However, recently I did a scalp oil massage, then used my wood pin brush only and noticed the oils were moved nicely down to the ends. Wood is porous, so it soaks in some of the oil, helping it to transfer to the ends. This is my theory anyways. :)

I also have been eyeing this Widu brush. The company says it is designed for long, curly hair. The bristles are made extra long... 1 1/2 inches! to penetrate curly hair better.
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000CBG0EM/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=4WJHCYPKP0CQ&coliid=I1HK8ODHK4YAPD
I also saw on the Widu site, that they make a mixed bristle brush of wood pin and boar bristles. It's mostly wood pins but has four short rows of boar. https://www.widu.com/product/34613

lauren_alia
June 20th, 2015, 11:55 AM
Thanks for the info CoveredByLove! I like the looks of that ambassador olive wood brush, I think I will order one as soon as I can. :)

Crumpet
June 23rd, 2015, 06:32 PM
Wow, I wonder why they stopped stocking it there? That's too bad, I had been hoping to buy one when I was there in October:(

It is really sad! They recommended the Kent brush to me and had one on hand, but it is super expensive. If anyone has information on the Madora/GM BBB, I'd appreciate it (as would Sarahlabyrinth I think!).

Aderyn
June 23rd, 2015, 10:15 PM
Well, I don't know about the Madora/GM BBB brush (though they might have it online), but within the past month I've been seeing some very nice BBBs come into stock at Walmart and a few drugstores around here for about 5-8 dollars, so they might have some in stock around where you live to go look at, too. I liked the bristles on them so thought I'd share. :)

Madora
June 24th, 2015, 04:09 PM
It is really sad! They recommended the Kent brush to me and had one on hand, but it is super expensive. If anyone has information on the Madora/GM BBB, I'd appreciate it (as would Sarahlabyrinth I think!).

Crumpet, the Enchantress GM salon carries the Madora bbb (that's where I got mine). Link: (scroll down a bit): http://www.enchantress.com/ProductsGM.html

Brush might have gone up in price.

Please also see post #545 and click on the PHOTO ALBUM link which will take you to LadyLongLocks lovely photos of said brush.

Crumpet
June 24th, 2015, 07:39 PM
Crumpet, the Enchantress GM salon carries the Madora bbb (that's where I got mine). Link: (scroll down a bit): http://www.enchantress.com/ProductsGM.html

Brush might have gone up in price.

Please also see post #545 and click on the PHOTO ALBUM link which will take you to LadyLongLocks lovely photos of said brush.

Oooh, wonderful! Thank you Madora! I was starting to give up hope! I've seen LLL's photos of the brush. Ooh lala!

Madora
June 24th, 2015, 07:51 PM
Oooh, wonderful! Thank you Madora! I was starting to give up hope! I've seen LLL's photos of the brush. Ooh lala!

My pleasure, Crumpet. I've ordered two items from Enchantress and have been very pleased with their prompt service.

Sarahlabyrinth
June 24th, 2015, 08:10 PM
Thank you for this, Madora. I am wondering whether I should buy another brush. They are so expensive, but at least I KNOW how well they work for me. Also, I virtually never buy clothes so I guess I could justify the expense....

And who knows when they might stop stocking the brush, if the GM Salon has? I honestly don't understand why the GM Salon would stop selling it..... If anyone would stock it and promote it for hair beauty and health, you would think they would...

I think Mr. Michael would be most displeased if he knew.

Crumpet
June 25th, 2015, 08:45 AM
Thank you for this, Madora. I am wondering whether I should buy another brush. They are so expensive, but at least I KNOW how well they work for me. Also, I virtually never buy clothes so I guess I could justify the expense....

And who knows when they might stop stocking the brush, if the GM Salon has? I honestly don't understand why the GM Salon would stop selling it..... If anyone would stock it and promote it for hair beauty and health, you would think they would...

I think Mr. Michael would be most displeased if he knew.

This is my logic about hair goodies as well! I am very frugal in most of my life -- I rarely buy new clothes/shoes/make-up/whatever else most people spend money on. I'm even rather frugal about my hair now that I know what works on it and now that I have a good supply of forks, sticks, and even a few Ficcare. It makes it SO easy to rationalize buying a new brush!

Crumpet
June 25th, 2015, 08:47 AM
My pleasure, Crumpet. I've ordered two items from Enchantress and have been very pleased with their prompt service.

That's good to know! I'm pleased to see how happy people are with this brush. I'm highly temped. I have loved BBB-ing since you taught me proper combing technique. It made a huge difference. It was taking me forever to comb properly until you told me to section it -- such a lightbulb moment! A new brush would be wonderful...

Sarahlabyrinth
June 25th, 2015, 02:38 PM
That's good to know! I'm pleased to see how happy people are with this brush. I'm highly temped. I have loved BBB-ing since you taught me proper combing technique. It made a huge difference. It was taking me forever to comb properly until you told me to section it -- such a lightbulb moment! A new brush would be wonderful...

A little bird tells me you are going to get a GM BBB :p

LauraLongLocks
June 25th, 2015, 06:49 PM
A little bird tells me you are going to get a GM BBB :p

I love this forum.

Dark40
June 25th, 2015, 07:29 PM
I believe 100% about his theory about the 100 strokes a day but hair all in one length without any bangs? No can do. I feel so naked without my bangs. I have had bangs all of my life, and haven't had any hair growth rates problems. My hair grows very fast per month.

Crumpet
June 26th, 2015, 08:00 AM
A little bird tells me you are going to get a GM BBB :p

The little bird is probably on to something. :o

Inching Along
August 31st, 2015, 05:41 PM
LOVE this thread! Thank you so much, everyone, for sharing your knowledge. I'll be trying Dr. George Michael's techniques and tips in growing my hair out. I'm starting again after a bob cut with bangs. I've been using my BBB with my head down, and now I have some work ahead of me to even up layers. Just have to try GM's wisdom and see what happens! :)

Bunnehlvr22
September 4th, 2015, 12:04 AM
I'm sorry if this has been answered already but what if brushing makes the scalp produce more serum? I try to only brush after I wash it (just finger combing after sleeping on it until the next wash). My hair is extremely oily and 1b/1c. I want to try brushing it with BBB as suggested by the GM Method but I don't want to look like an oil sleek everyday either.

As far as moving the part-line. Hah! No... I have a massive cowlick and the beast living on my head taught me a long time ago to obey the cowlick.

Inching Along
September 7th, 2015, 07:19 PM
I'm sorry if this has been answered already but what if brushing makes the scalp produce more serum? I try to only brush after I wash it (just finger combing after sleeping on it until the next wash). My hair is extremely oily and 1b/1c. I want to try brushing it with BBB as suggested by the GM Method but I don't want to look like an oil sleek everyday either.

As far as moving the part-line. Hah! No... I have a massive cowlick and the beast living on my head taught me a long time ago to obey the cowlick.

Bunnehlvr22, I believe that using a BBB consistently as GM suggests helps to distribute your natural sebum. Maybe someone who has tried this and had oily hair before will chime in to give you their experience. I have also heard that if you use a shampoo that strips the oils from your scalp and dries it too much, the scalp can respond by producing more sebum. I have a feeling that is what happened to me in my early teens. Shampoos were kind of harsh then. How often do you wash your hair? That could have an effect on how much sebum your scalp produces, also.

Bent at the waist with my head down, I use a wide-tooth comb to detangle my hair, and then I brush with my BBB and follow each stroke with my other hand to minimize frizz. I tend to do 80 to 100 strokes each morning. I've found that my hair feels softer, which is a great benefit. I'm hoping to see some positive stimulation of growth as well over time.

About the part line, where is your cowlick? I am sure you know best about where your part should be so the cowlick doesn't give you a problem. :) Do you have bangs? I don't have a cowlick, but I found that my hairline changed a little and makes my bangs misbehave, so I am growing them out now. Again.

Bunnehlvr22
September 11th, 2015, 10:38 PM
Bunnehlvr22, I believe that using a BBB consistently as GM suggests helps to distribute your natural sebum. Maybe someone who has tried this and had oily hair before will chime in to give you their experience. I have also heard that if you use a shampoo that strips the oils from your scalp and dries it too much, the scalp can respond by producing more sebum. I have a feeling that is what happened to me in my early teens. Shampoos were kind of harsh then. How often do you wash your hair? That could have an effect on how much sebum your scalp produces, also.

Bent at the waist with my head down, I use a wide-tooth comb to detangle my hair, and then I brush with my BBB and follow each stroke with my other hand to minimize frizz. I tend to do 80 to 100 strokes each morning. I've found that my hair feels softer, which is a great benefit. I'm hoping to see some positive stimulation of growth as well over time.

About the part line, where is your cowlick? I am sure you know best about where your part should be so the cowlick doesn't give you a problem. :) Do you have bangs? I don't have a cowlick, but I found that my hairline changed a little and makes my bangs misbehave, so I am growing them out now. Again.

I usually wash my hair twice with it upside down. Kills my back but seems to give the hair more volume. My hair tangles no matter how gently I move it. My hair looks waxy and feels gross if I don't wash it at least every other day. I try to wash it every day (currently using ogx) greasy hair breaks my scalp out also. Brushing my hair tends to make it look greasy fast also. It's very depressing. I don't have bangs. They get greasy looking too fast.

gingeralex
October 24th, 2015, 12:50 PM
I just had my first visit to see neil in london on wednesday! It was wonderful. Cost a bomb but it was a birthday present, so :)

I've got a better brush for brushing (lol, I was doing it wrong, that's why I was getting breakage), and I picked up some mesh rollers and a bonnet dryer on amazon because I was so happy with the way my hair looked after the roller set. Volume! At the top! Flicks out at the ends!

My new brush (a kent finest soft one) is way better than my old one, and I'm actually using it everyday now I'm not worrying about damage.


I'm so happy with my trim too. My hair was a mess at the ends, and I think he took like 2-3 inches off, which seems like a lot but it was all tiny wispy bits, and my hair looks a mile better. I can wear plaits now bc my ends don't look pathetic.

Definite convert :)

gingeralex
October 28th, 2015, 12:46 PM
I've run into some problems with the washing upside down thing :(
I keep getting water up my nose.
And last time I shampooed loads of my hair was still greasy, but I think that was probably me not diluting the shampoo. On that note, how much should I dilute it? I put half a teaspoon in a 100ml bottle, but I'm still not sure I got it through all my hair. I suppose I'll see when it dries :/
And I forgot to do the squeak test to see if it was clean again. Oops.

Ingrid
October 28th, 2015, 06:05 PM
I wash my hair upside down under a tap in the sink, seems that I don't really get water in my nose that way, whereas if I wash in the shower, then water definitely ends up there!

I don't really have any advice about diluting shampoo, I think that just comes down to experimentation. I found that with my hair all shampoos (no matter how dilute) tended to leave a residue which made my hair look greasy. I've been using soap to wash my hair and I don't have the residue problem anymore.

But... I don't think the "squeak" is necessarily a good sign, it means that your hair has been stripped completely of all the protective sebum and natural oils.

gingeralex
November 1st, 2015, 08:20 AM
Neil said it should for my hair (fine and tending to greasy).

I would try washing it in the sink, but mine is both low and very hard to keep clean.

littlestarface
November 25th, 2015, 04:33 PM
I dont understand what makes his way the best way? From what i've been reading about him an technique is shampoo at least 2 times and then apply conditioner, deep conditioner and then another conditioner. Comb hair and make it go straight with some big curlers. So its basically shampoo and condition like everyone in this world does but isnt that not good for hair? Doesnt that strip off all the oils we need? I dont see how this way makes hair better especially when we all know about co and and cwc etc.. Does his technique not know anything about curly or wavy hair?

I honestly dont see anything special or long hair worthy in his technique.

meteor
November 25th, 2015, 05:24 PM
I have a question :) : how do GM salons approach detangling very long hair after they wash it? Do they rough-dry it first or do they simply comb wet hair before roller-setting? What kinds of tools/methods do they use and do they apply any leave-in products, oils...? Do they let the client help along?... Thank you! :flower:

LauraLongLocks
November 25th, 2015, 10:50 PM
I dont understand what makes his way the best way? From what i've been reading about him an technique is shampoo at least 2 times and then apply conditioner, deep conditioner and then another conditioner. Comb hair and make it go straight with some big curlers. So its basically shampoo and condition like everyone in this world does but isnt that not good for hair? Doesnt that strip off all the oils we need? I dont see how this way makes hair better especially when we all know about co and and cwc etc.. Does his technique not know anything about curly or wavy hair?

I honestly dont see anything special or long hair worthy in his technique.

When I wash twice as recommended, I can go 5, almost 6 days between washes. Don't know why that's the case, but I like it. I'm getting really close to being a once a week washer, which will be super nice for me. Just wash on weekends and I'll be good all week.