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RapunzelKat
August 27th, 2014, 08:23 PM
Madora, how do you know if a BBB is worn out? I'm having a heck of a time getting mine to get to my scalp in the bent-waist position. I'm not sure if the brush is starting to get worn out, or if I might just need a different type of BBB. (It's 100% boar bristle, but just an inexpensive one from Target.) Some of the bristles are starting to stick out a bit and look a little ragged.

Madora
August 27th, 2014, 08:34 PM
Madora, how do you know if a BBB is worn out? I'm having a heck of a time getting mine to get to my scalp in the bent-waist position. I'm not sure if the brush is starting to get worn out, or if I might just need a different type of BBB. (It's 100% boar bristle, but just an inexpensive one from Target.) Some of the bristles are starting to stick out a bit and look a little ragged.

RapunzelKat, the brush begins to show wear when the bristle klumps start to look thin. Also, the wood where the bristles sprout out of gets very weathered. The paint is often missing. The bristles themselves loose the last of their "zip" and it becomes harder and harder to get a decent brushing.

Getting to the scalp seems to be a problem could have several reasons: hair too thick, not brushing correctly (i.e. bent at the waist so that you can reach the nape and under canopy, as well as the outer canopy, or a brush whose bristle clumps are too tightly packed together...or a brush on its last legs (no zip in the bristles).

The only brush that I ever used where I felt it penetrate down to the scalp was the pricey $40 Madora brush...but I wasn't really fully satisfied with it because the handle was rather narrow, the thumb place at the neck of the brush was too small (my thumb JUST fit) and it only had 4 rows of bristles. It also has a nasty habit of turning in my hand at times. So I use it for penetrating down to the strands, but use my trusty Goody bbb for the actual brushing. I recently bought a Conair pure bbb that has been promising so far (only $9.99 at Target). It shed like a cat when I washed it (before putting it on my hair) but since then it has settled down and I'm glad I bought 2 of them.

RapunzelKat
August 27th, 2014, 09:02 PM
RapunzelKat, the brush begins to show wear when the bristle klumps start to look thin. Also, the wood where the bristles sprout out of gets very weathered. The paint is often missing. The bristles themselves loose the last of their "zip" and it becomes harder and harder to get a decent brushing.

Getting to the scalp seems to be a problem could have several reasons: hair too thick, not brushing correctly (i.e. bent at the waist so that you can reach the nape and under canopy, as well as the outer canopy, or a brush whose bristle clumps are too tightly packed together...or a brush on its last legs (no zip in the bristles).

The only brush that I ever used where I felt it penetrate down to the scalp was the pricey $40 Madora brush...but I wasn't really fully satisfied with it because the handle was rather narrow, the thumb place at the neck of the brush was too small (my thumb JUST fit) and it only had 4 rows of bristles. It also has a nasty habit of turning in my hand at times. So I use it for penetrating down to the strands, but use my trusty Goody bbb for the actual brushing. I recently bought a Conair pure bbb that has been promising so far (only $9.99 at Target). It shed like a cat when I washed it (before putting it on my hair) but since then it has settled down and I'm glad I bought 2 of them.

Thanks Madora! Hmm, mine is a Conair too, I bet it's the same one! :) I think I might look at the Goody one and see if I think it might work better, but it could well just be my technique. Always takes me forever to learn a new technique. I've been reading through your posts here on it - I'm determined to get the hang of it!

(On a related Dr. George Michael note - when I wanted to grow my hair out when I was a kid, the first thing my mom did was get me a wide tooth comb and a BBB. She's a confirmed short-hair, and doesn't actually know much about long hair care. But she knew about Dr. George Michael and his hair care techniques! :))

Teufelchen
August 28th, 2014, 01:27 AM
When I was at the GM Salon close to my home I was told to brush only until you feel a slight tingle on your scalp, which comes from increased circulation, more brushing would not be more beneficial. They told me this could be after 30 strokes, after 50 or even after 100, but the number of strokes may very with time.
I was not happy with my BBB and then was recommended a wooden brush without those little knobs at the top and highly polished, I still use it every day for my brushing and I hardly get any split ends.

I guess if a BBB is not working for you, trying a wide toothed comb or high quality wooden brush is definitely worth trying. But I also detangle before brushing.

Madora, I am always stunned by your knowledge about hair.

Teufelchen
August 28th, 2014, 01:32 AM
When I was at the GM Salon close to my home I was told to brush only until you feel a slight tingle on your scalp, which comes from increased circulation, more brushing would not be more beneficial. They told me this could be after 30 strokes, after 50 or even after 100, but the number of strokes may very with time.
I was not happy with my BBB and then was recommended a wooden brush without those little knobs at the top and highly polished, I still use it every day for my brushing and I hardly get any split ends.

I guess if a BBB is not working for you, trying a wide toothed comb or high quality wooden brush is definitely worth trying. But I also detangle before brushing.

Madora, I am always stunned by your knowledge about hair.

hanne jensen
August 28th, 2014, 02:36 AM
Madora and Gertrude, thank you so much for your help.

Yesterday Hubby coughed up for a new mBBB. It is 100% pure boar bristle and everything that Madora said it shouldn't be. It's oval and has a rubber pad. The bristles aren't clumped too close together and the bristles are stiff yet flexible and are a little long. It only cost 150 crowns so I won't cry when the pad wears out. I brushed my hair according to Madora's instructions and it felt wonderful.

I now have a very wierd question. I haven't applied any serums or oils to my hair for 3 days. After brushing every day I've noticed that the scent of my serum and oil is gone. I can now smell my poo and conditioner. Does brushing remove dried products from the hair? I want to know because Saturday is hairwash day and I need to know if I need to clarify my hair and start all over or if it's ok to use a mild poo. My ends don't feel like velcro. The scent from products stick to my hair like glue which makes me think that maybe the brush is removing products as they dry out.

leilani
August 28th, 2014, 02:57 AM
Hanne jensen- I have the handy sized MP nylon boar mixed brush too. I just pulled out all the nylon, it was surprisingly easy.I love the brush, no static, feels great on my scalp!

Teufelchen
August 28th, 2014, 03:09 AM
I now have a very wierd question. I haven't applied any serums or oils to my hair for 3 days. After brushing every day I've noticed that the scent of my serum and oil is gone. I can now smell my poo and conditioner. Does brushing remove dried products from the hair? I want to know because Saturday is hairwash day and I need to know if I need to clarify my hair and start all over or if it's ok to use a mild poo. My ends don't feel like velcro. The scent from products stick to my hair like glue which makes me think that maybe the brush is removing products as they dry out.
I am not 100% sure, but this would make sense, since everybody encourage people to brush out hair spray, not that your serum is the same, but a similar mechanism could be working here.

Ingrid
August 28th, 2014, 03:12 AM
My BBB is 100% boar bristles MP large extra and I love it. Yes, if I try to run it straight through my hair without sectioning it never penetrates to the scalp. But, with proper sectioning and slow brushing I find it penetrates the thickness of my hair quite well. I've had this brush for over a year now and it's been one of the best purchases I've ever made. I've used cheapo brushes (nylon, wood and also boar) and always ended up ripping my hair. Not so with my trusty MP.

And yes, I do find that the BBB is a great hair-cleaner. Really gets rid of lint, dried bits of product, and even smells :o

Madora
August 28th, 2014, 08:39 AM
Thanks Madora! Hmm, mine is a Conair too, I bet it's the same one! :) I think I might look at the Goody one and see if I think it might work better, but it could well just be my technique. Always takes me forever to learn a new technique. I've been reading through your posts here on it - I'm determined to get the hang of it!

(On a related Dr. George Michael note - when I wanted to grow my hair out when I was a kid, the first thing my mom did was get me a wide tooth comb and a BBB. She's a confirmed short-hair, and doesn't actually know much about long hair care. But she knew about Dr. George Michael and his hair care techniques! :))

Mother DOES know best! Great story, RapunzelKat! I just wanted to clarify that my Goody brush is not made any longer. I bought that brush (along with 2 others, in the early 70s. I've been using it six years now (the last of the 3). Because the brush is definitely on its way out (I don't think it will last another 5 years) I purchased both the Madora brush and just recently, the Conair "Classic Wood Natural Shine Booster" with 100% boar bristles (no rubber backing). It does have a narrow black rubber band around the neck of the brush, to help you hold it more firmly when you are brushing. I like it a lot but wish it was a little narrower.)

Madora
August 28th, 2014, 08:44 AM
When I was at the GM Salon close to my home I was told to brush only until you feel a slight tingle on your scalp, which comes from increased circulation, more brushing would not be more beneficial. They told me this could be after 30 strokes, after 50 or even after 100, but the number of strokes may very with time.
I was not happy with my BBB and then was recommended a wooden brush without those little knobs at the top and highly polished, I still use it every day for my brushing and I hardly get any split ends.

I guess if a BBB is not working for you, trying a wide toothed comb or high quality wooden brush is definitely worth trying. But I also detangle before brushing.

Madora, I am always stunned by your knowledge about hair.

The GM salon's comments about brushing were very interesting, Teufelchen.

Thanks for your kind words! Nearly everything I know about long hair (not that much, really) comes from what I learned from Dr. Michael and his book. A lot of it is simply benign neglect, too. "Less is more" really works for me!

Madora
August 28th, 2014, 08:49 AM
Madora and Gertrude, thank you so much for your help.

Yesterday Hubby coughed up for a new mBBB. It is 100% pure boar bristle and everything that Madora said it shouldn't be. It's oval and has a rubber pad. The bristles aren't clumped too close together and the bristles are stiff yet flexible and are a little long. It only cost 150 crowns so I won't cry when the pad wears out. I brushed my hair according to Madora's instructions and it felt wonderful.

I now have a very wierd question. I haven't applied any serums or oils to my hair for 3 days. After brushing every day I've noticed that the scent of my serum and oil is gone. I can now smell my poo and conditioner. Does brushing remove dried products from the hair? I want to know because Saturday is hairwash day and I need to know if I need to clarify my hair and start all over or if it's ok to use a mild poo. My ends don't feel like velcro. The scent from products stick to my hair like glue which makes me think that maybe the brush is removing products as they dry out.

hanne Jensen, that is strange! Sorry, but I have no experience with this. I don't use oils or serums because I depend on my brush to distribute my natural sebum and that's all I need. Maybe someone else can chime in, please?

Madora
August 28th, 2014, 08:52 AM
My BBB is 100% boar bristles MP large extra and I love it. Yes, if I try to run it straight through my hair without sectioning it never penetrates to the scalp. But, with proper sectioning and slow brushing I find it penetrates the thickness of my hair quite well. I've had this brush for over a year now and it's been one of the best purchases I've ever made. I've used cheapo brushes (nylon, wood and also boar) and always ended up ripping my hair. Not so with my trusty MP.

And yes, I do find that the BBB is a great hair-cleaner. Really gets rid of lint, dried bits of product, and even smells :o

Sounds like you have a winner, Ingrid! That's great! A good bbb can do so much...and save you $$$ in the process because you don't have to rely on other products to make your hair soft and shiny.

cocolover
August 28th, 2014, 10:02 AM
Cocolover, using a comb is just fine, as long as it is a wide tooth comb. As I stated before, always be sure to detangle thoroughly, and hold the comb lightly and gently. Move it down the ends from nape and thru the ends. Work in small sections...not trying to get thru the mass all at once. To avoid tangles when using the bent at the waist position, while you are still bent, center part your hair from nape to forehead. Put the right hair in the right hand/the left hair in the left hand. Now stand erect. Gently place the right hair over the right shoulder and let it drop. Ditto for the other side. Check for tangles. Style as desired. You will find that parting and "holding" the hair, instead of flinging/tossing it about when you are finished, lessens the possibility for tangles.

The hair should be either combed or brushed every day because fallen hair should be removed so it does not get tangled in with the still growing hair, creating tangle miseries. It is also good for the scalp (but not as good as daily brushing, in my humble opinion. Curlies don't brush, usually).

Thank you Madora for the information! I have a wide tooth seamless comb, I am going to give this a try! Also, I looked online and my local Target has the Conair BBB. DD has 1a hip length hair and I think I will pick one up for her!

Gertrude
August 28th, 2014, 10:16 AM
Hanne Jensen,

The BBB does remove a lot of smells clinging to the length as well as cat fur, bits of lint, grass seeds.......as they've all ended up in my MP on occasion. The scent of serums/ leave ins evaporates anyway over time, I think the brush just speeds it up. Ser The smell of your shampoo and conditioner sticks to hair better as a little of it is absorbed into the very outer layer of each hair. Also to get brand loyalty shampoos often have very distinctive strong scent in them that lasts up to the next shampoo when your hair and scalp warm up. Like if you're exercising or the brushing is warming and stimulating the scalp.
.
Like you can find that the scent of whatever detergent you washed your work-out clothes in comes back when you heat up.

hanne jensen
August 28th, 2014, 11:28 AM
Tahnks, Gertrude. I guess I'll clarify Saturday so I can start with product free hair. Sebum is the best thing for conditioning and moisturizing hair.

Melika
August 28th, 2014, 01:36 PM
After reading this whole thread I don't think the question of how GM's "part theory" worked was answered? This is what I think he means by the hair growing in a particular direction and why parting on the right is 'better': http://udel.edu/~mcdonald/mythhairwhorl.html Most caucasian people will have a general clockwise hair growth pattern. So the hair is naturally growing towards the right, so when you flip it to the reverse you naturally get more volume.

Obviously this wouldn't be true for everyone, and the study linked points out that the pattern in long-haired people can be difficult to see, but I can understand why it would become one of GM's principles. My hair naturally parts in the center and it gets accustomed to any particular part/direction so I try to switch it up for volume. First time I ever tried a different part was when a hair stylist asked, "So where do you normally part your ha- OH, nevermind, must be where the tan line is." XD

Aside from that, I've really enjoyed reading this thread. Thank you everyone for all of your hard work and time spent answering questions and/or doing research!

Gertrude
August 28th, 2014, 01:58 PM
After reading this whole thread I don't think the question of how GM's "part theory" worked was answered? This is what I think he means by the hair growing in a particular direction and why parting on the right is 'better': http://udel.edu/~mcdonald/mythhairwhorl.html Most caucasian people will have a general clockwise hair growth pattern. So the hair is naturally growing towards the right, so when you flip it to the reverse you naturally get more volume.

Obviously this wouldn't be true for everyone, and the study linked points out that the pattern in long-haired people can be difficult to see, but I can understand why it would become one of GM's principles. My hair naturally parts in the center and it gets accustomed to any particular part/direction so I try to switch it up for volume. First time I ever tried a different part was when a hair stylist asked, "So where do you normally part your ha- OH, nevermind, must be where the tan line is." XD

Aside from that, I've really enjoyed reading this thread. Thank you everyone for all of your hard work and time spent answering questions and/or doing research!
Thanks Melika (-: for finding that.

Tangent warning but at the London GM salon it was suggested that I am actually not a naturally left-handed person. Groan! Not again. Because the clockwise pattern of your hair growth doesn't relate at all to whether you are right- or left-handed.* But yes, that's how it was explained, parting against your natural parting makes the muscles that make your hair stand up stronger** by working harder as well as the hair look fuller.

So after every treatment/trim my hair gets parted so I need to anchor it behind my ear so it does not fall all over my face parted on the right, but the first gust of wind makes me Cousin It.

* Left-handers are often used for popular research purposes. The sample size of the survey is invariably very small. This hair clockwise direction research was done on 43 shoppers in a Pennsylvania shopping mall and actually inconclusive. But it got reported as left handers Hair Grows the Wrong Way! sort of thing. Know one by looking at their scalp. Can't be too careful (-; I am perfectly content to be a southpaw but undeniably my childhood would have been much easier if I would have been right-handed so I did not do it to myself.

** The tiny muscles are under involuntary control, so can't be taught anything.

hanne jensen
September 4th, 2014, 01:18 AM
I never did get around to clarifying Saturday. After brushing the GM way I've noticed that my scalp doesn't smell sebumy at all. My scalp isn't itchy and I don't have pimples on my scalp. I usually get small pimples on my scalp that itch and burn if I stretch hairwashes too long. Not this time. I'm happy because I always break hairs when washing no matter how careful I am. It is now day 11 since my last hairwash and my hair doesn't smell or look dirty. It's still shiny.

Thanks so much for the brushing instructions, it's really helped my hair and scalp.

Teufelchen
September 9th, 2014, 09:35 AM
I just was given the GM book (German version) as a gift, and it is even signed.
I just wanted to share.

Madora
September 9th, 2014, 10:34 AM
I just was given the GM book (German version) as a gift, and it is even signed.
I just wanted to share.

Oooohhh, Teufelchen!! What a wonderful gift! Signed even! Does it contain the glorious color photo of the girl with the gorgeous black dutch braid (slightly red tinged background)? My fave pic from the book! Happy reading!!

ps I think the PM thingie is less full now. Thanks for letting me know!

Teufelchen
September 9th, 2014, 11:03 AM
Yes, I was so happy when I got it. :) It was such a wonderfull gift.

Unfortunately the picture isn't in it.

PS: I did send you the PM now. :)

Inching Along
September 9th, 2014, 11:14 AM
I just was given the GM book (German version) as a gift, and it is even signed.
I just wanted to share.

So exciting, Teufelchen! That is a wonderful gift--and with a signature, too! I have been reading the book digitally (in English) from the Open Library and am enjoying it.

Gertrude
September 9th, 2014, 01:09 PM
That's lovely Teufelchen ! What a lovely gift.

I have one English version, Madora, 1988 and it has a colour photograph of a pretty lady with long blond hair that has clearly been set on rollers and on the back is a black and white photo of the great man himself. Only drawings inside.

Apropos of what he wrote in the book on African hair not growing to knee length in his experience. There's a mother at my daughter's school who is from Ghana, stunning and majestic looking, and has hair in many tiny braids, and she makes amazing hair arrangements with them. Today she just wore the braids straight, with a half up and they reach beyond BCL, so I imagine if stretched fully knee length. It's amazing hair. And definitely all her own.

Madora
September 9th, 2014, 01:51 PM
Thanks for your input, Gertrude! The mother at your daughter's school must have amazing hair! Even better..she knows how to create styles for it!

I'm sorry to read your book doesn't have photos! Maybe someone took them out? There were 8 full color full page photos.

MiamiPineapple
September 9th, 2014, 08:38 PM
I must say I started brushing with a bb brush 2 weeks ago and my hair is looking amazing. My dry ends are getting better and better and my hair feels soft and silly. Unlike many other brushes, a bb never pulls or breaks the hair. I was always so skeptical but after taking madoras advice of less is more which has been working great, I figured she must be doing something right so I incorporated the brush too and I am a believer now :)

Madora
September 9th, 2014, 08:49 PM
I must say I started brushing with a bb brush 2 weeks ago and my hair is looking amazing. My dry ends are getting better and better and my hair feels soft and silly. Unlike many other brushes, a bb never pulls or breaks the hair. I was always so skeptical but after taking madoras advice of less is more which has been working great, I figured she must be doing something right so I incorporated the brush too and I am a believer now :)

MiamiPineapple, I'm so pleased to hear you are having great results using a bbb and that you like it! Music to my ears. A bbb is a wonderful tool, provided you detangle all your hair first, and then brush slowly down the strands. Really, you save yourself a ton of money because the brush does so much for your hair. No relying on stuff to make it shine, or soft. The bbb does all that and removes lint and exercises the follicles too! Happy brushing!

Sarahlabyrinth
September 9th, 2014, 08:51 PM
Me too, I find that using the BBB daily keeps the hair so much cleaner, the roots don't look greasy and it would be much easier to stretch washes. (Only if the BBB is washed daily, though.)

Madora
September 9th, 2014, 08:53 PM
Me too, I find that using the BBB daily keeps the hair so much cleaner, the roots don't look greasy and it would be much easier to stretch washes. (Only if the BBB is washed daily, though.)

Yes! You can stretch your washes further if you bbb your hair every day! A big plus in my book since I hate washing my hair.

Inching Along
September 9th, 2014, 10:33 PM
I've been using my BBB almost daily (I like my hair curly for a couple of days after washing before I brush it). I do think that brushing helps with softness, and I believe my lifelong "baby bangs" are starting to grow longer. Hooray! I am hoping someday I'll have shine from brushing, too. My hair seems shiny nearer to the scalp, so it must be the younger, newer growth that looks shinier and healthier than the rest of my outer canopy. I also wash my hair with my head down as Dr. Michael recommends. Does anyone else do that, and have you seen benefits? I figure it helps with circulation to the follicles.

Ingrid
September 9th, 2014, 11:38 PM
I recently read the book in the Open library as well, it was an enjoyable read. Good practical advice, and a few pseudo-scientific bits as well which were amusing. I really liked the emphasis on keeping hair as natural as possible in order to bring out its beauty.

Teufelchen
September 10th, 2014, 01:01 AM
I did some research on the 8 color photo pages, it seems like the pictures were alternated with each edition of the book, at least that is the case for the German editions, and I think this is true for the English ones as well.

I enjoyed reading the book, but I had to giggle about the 15 cm in a month. I guess that is a typo and should be either 1.5 inch, or 1.5 cm first would be impressive, second still above average. Typos happen, I am the typo queen, so I know that.

I was really impressed on the drawings and pictures of how he puts up hair, but couldn't figure out from the description how to do it myself. Tutorial, anyone? :flower:

cocolover
September 10th, 2014, 12:49 PM
I have been using a comb, combing 50 strokes each morning bent over. I have noticed a decrease in my shed! I am very encouraged and happy I have started doing this! Thanks for all the great information!

Timea
September 10th, 2014, 02:12 PM
i've been doing the daily morning brushings too and it is keeping my hair clean and i like it a lot. i'm still trying to find a comfortable position to do it in. i vary it a bit each time.

most of my tangles seem to come from cat hairs and cat fuzz that gets matted in my hair, and that's something the BBB is really helping with.

Madora
September 10th, 2014, 04:06 PM
I did some research on the 8 color photo pages, it seems like the pictures were alternated with each edition of the book, at least that is the case for the German editions, and I think this is true for the English ones as well.

I enjoyed reading the book, but I had to giggle about the 15 cm in a month. I guess that is a typo and should be either 1.5 inch, or 1.5 cm first would be impressive, second still above average. Typos happen, I am the typo queen, so I know that.

I was really impressed on the drawings and pictures of how he puts up hair, but couldn't figure out from the description how to do it myself. Tutorial, anyone? :flower:

Very interesting, Teufelchen! I didn't know there was more than one edition of Mr. Michael's book...let alone a German translation! I wonder why the color photos were different in each edition? Maybe the 1st edition (which I have) had too many of the famous Clariol Girl long hair photos...so they were removed from subsequent editions. I often wondered why the Clariol Girls got into his book...but the photos are very beautiful...if just a touch hard to believe. You rarely see hair like that in public!!!!

Madora
September 10th, 2014, 04:08 PM
i've been doing the daily morning brushings too and it is keeping my hair clean and i like it a lot. i'm still trying to find a comfortable position to do it in. i vary it a bit each time.

most of my tangles seem to come from cat hairs and cat fuzz that gets matted in my hair, and that's something the BBB is really helping with.

Preach it, Timea! But my main bête noire is LINT. Ugh. I suppose I can only blame myself as I'm not crazing about dusting/vacuuming.

meteor
September 10th, 2014, 06:23 PM
For avoiding lint/dust, what really helps is to wear a silk cap not only during sleep but also when you are alone and don't care what you look like. Dust is always in the air, no matter how much you vacuum, especially if you have pets at home. Also, avoiding linty clothing/bedding materials is pretty helpful. It's crazy how hair attracts dust/lint like a magnet!

winship2
September 10th, 2014, 07:34 PM
For avoiding lint/dust, what really helps is to wear a silk cap not only during sleep but also when you are alone and don't care what you look like. Dust is always in the air, no matter how much you vacuum, especially if you have pets at home. Also, avoiding linty clothing/bedding materials is pretty helpful. It's crazy how hair attracts dust/lint like a magnet!

I third/fourth/fifth the dust and lint thing! I often work at home and really need to start covering my hair. OK, new resolution!

Madora
September 10th, 2014, 08:56 PM
Thanks, Meteor. I can't wear anything on my head at night as I get hot easily. However, I do wear a shower cap plus a scarf over my hair when doing kitty litter box dusty chores. I get awfully hot vacuuming so usually just turn on my air purifier and let 'er rip. Probably one contributor to the lint problem is that I have wall to wall carpeting everywhere (not my idea of fun but I bought my house with the carpeting already installed).

I might have to take a second look at my Lazy Boy recliner as being a culprit..my cats adore sitting on top of it, with resultant cat hair residue. Funny, I rarely find kitty fur in my brushes..but the lint is something else again...which is why I clean my brush every day.

hannabiss
September 10th, 2014, 09:41 PM
So I read all this. Wow the way people defend this guy ...anyways. I don't think he's a quack. Maybe outdated. But in general I think he gets the basic idea less is more. And he said it in a time when it was all about short hair. So that is commendable. And as others have said it has worked for some. But man if this guy ever met my hair line he'd know why I need bangs. And why I cannot part my hair on either side. I have a hair line reminiscent to jud law in a.i. To part my hair on the side only shows how far back my hairline goes on the sides. :(

winship2
September 10th, 2014, 09:58 PM
I might have to take a second look at my Lazy Boy recliner as being a culprit..my cats adore sitting on top of it, with resultant cat hair residue. Funny, I rarely find kitty fur in my brushes..but the lint is something else again...which is why I clean my brush every day.

Madora, what is the daily cleaning of your brush like? Do you wash it every day, or just comb it out?

Madora
September 10th, 2014, 10:52 PM
Madora, what is the daily cleaning of your brush like? Do you wash it every day, or just comb it out?



Winship, I first remove all the stuck hairs with my little metal hair rake. Then I take a nail brush, put some Neutrogena soap on it (so its foamy), hold the brush under running water, then apply the nail brush all through the bristles..top to bottom and side to side. Rinse in cold running water. Shake out brush. Fan bristles with fingers several times. Wipe off wooden handle. Place brush bristles side down on lint free cloth, away from direct sunlight.

Now have 3 working brushes: my trusty Goody, my newish Madora and my very new Conair bbb.

I really like the clean brush idea because I don't see much point putting a dirty brush on hair you're trying to keep clean. Also, my brush doesn't work as well if I don't get out all the fallen/trapped hair in the bristles.
The little hair rakes can be found at Sally's beauty supply for about $6.00.

hypersensitive
September 10th, 2014, 11:18 PM
I will need to try this bbb technique. I have a Sonia Kashuk BBB lying around and the only reason why I don't use it is because it's a pain to clean. My hair loves to pick up lint and dust so that brush gets really gunky really fast. I should have known that you're supposed to clean it after every use. I'll have to stop by a Sally's to pick up the cleaning rake. What does it look like?

hanne jensen
September 11th, 2014, 12:45 AM
I've read as much as possible about the Dr. George Michael method of long hair care. I read an interview with GM on the Long Hair forum and there are some things I don't understand about the hair washing process. GM states that one should apply conditioner to dry hair on the length and canopy. Then wet hair and wash. During conditioning one should repeat. When rinsing conditioner out, won't some of it reach the scalp? Conditioner always leaves something behind, no matter how much one rinses. Does the brushing remove the conditioner residue?

I've been faithfully brushing my hair every day the GM way. I don't have the time to brush in the morning so I brush in the evening.My hair is still happy. I'm starting to notice scents of products that I've used years ago. I do believe that the brushing removes dried products on the hair. Maybe it's the sebum? I've read on the NW/SO thread that sebum is cleansing.

Teufelchen
September 11th, 2014, 01:36 AM
Very interesting, Teufelchen! I didn't know there was more than one edition of Mr. Michael's book...let alone a German translation! I wonder why the color photos were different in each edition? Maybe the 1st edition (which I have) had too many of the famous Clariol Girl long hair photos...so they were removed from subsequent editions. I often wondered why the Clariol Girls got into his book...but the photos are very beautiful...if just a touch hard to believe. You rarely see hair like that in public!!!!
As far as I found out, in the first edition he still worked with Clariol Products and therefore the girl, but after that he brought out his own products, so I guess that's the reason why the Clariol girl disappeared.

@hanne jensen: You are supposed to wash overhead, so no conditioner comes to the roots. But I have to admit, that I am not washing overhead, because it hurts my neck.

Madora
September 11th, 2014, 09:21 AM
hanne jensen, here is what Dr. Michael says about shampooing in his book "George Michael's Secrets for Beautiful Hair" (1981 Doubleday)

pg 52

Here's the correct method for an at-home shampoo. The preferred place is in the shower (although some women find it convenient to bend over a sink). The best position is to bend over, with your head down, a posture which keeps your scalp loose and increases circulation. (When your head is raised above the elbows the scalp "locks." Try it for yourself and you'll see the difference.)

For the first sudsing, the goal is to remove all surface particles of dirt and oil from the scalp. If you're using a good nondetergent shampoo, you won't have much lather on the first sudsing. (In fact, if you do have much lather, you know you're using a detergent shampoo.) This first "sudsing" is simply to slosh off the dirt. During your second lathering you'll be massaging your scalp---not your hair.

For the correct massage, first work around the hairline, moving your hands toward the crown and massaging the scalp; work up under the mass of hair and shampoo the scalp in up and down motions. Don't use the hair itself as a scrubbing mop. After you finish massaging the entire scalp area, pick up the rest of the hair and work toward the endsm, remembering to treat it like silk and taking care to avoid tangles. (Gently launder it).

After the shampoo, make sure you've really rinsed your hair thoroughly with lukewarm water. Would you leave any soapy water on your fine silk negligee? If you don't remove all the lather, your hair will remain dull and sticky. This is another reason why the shower is an ideal place for shampooing because you can direct strong jets of warm water directly on your head. Feel your hair with your hands after rinsing. You shouldn't be able to feel one smidge of shampoo. (Don't ever use rubber devices to scrub the scalp.)

Then, if you can tolerate it, give yourself a final rinse with cold water, as cold as you can stand it. The cold water shrinks the molecules of the hair and knocks off any superfluous coatings, making your hair much more manageable. If you are reading this book in the winter, don't start rinsing with cold water immediately--it will be too shocking. But in any other season when the weather is still fairly mild, adopt a program of rinsing your hair first with warm, then lukewarm, and finally with cold water.

Whether you finish your shampoo with a conditioner or notm, always conclude with a very light application of undiluted creme rinse.

Put a few dollops of rinse in the palms of your hands and pass your hands over the hair. Then rinse with more lukewarm water. When you step out of the shower, use a towel to mop up excess moisture and try to comb our hair with your fingers while it is wet.

Now here comes one of the biggest no-no's about long hair. NEVER, NEVER BRUSH YOUR HAIR WHILE IT'S WET!

All hair has some elasticity to it--in fact, hair can stretch from one eighth to one sixth of its length, but fortunately dry hair can also shrink back. This isn't the case when the hair is wet. In a wet stage that stretched-out hair acts rather like an overstretched old rubber band. And you know what happens to worn out rubber bands. They snap. Forget the brush after shampooing; instead
, use a wide tortoise-shell comb to smooth and untangle your hair.

While theoretically you could shampoo every hour with the proper product, how often you actually do shampoo depends on many factors--your lifestyle, whether your scalp is oily or not, the season. In summer, for example, your hair gets dirtier because you perspire more. If you wear hats or smoke a great deal, you may want to wash your hair more often to eliminate odors that accumulate in the hair. On the other hand, a patient going into the hospital for surgery doesn't have to take rollers and pins along because she won't be exposed to pollution or normal day-to-day soil and won't have to shampoo her hair for several weeks. Basically, long hair should be washed no more than necessary. Too much shampooing dries out the hair, although it doesn't affect the hair root at all.

One technique to cleanse the scalp while avoiding dried-out, overwashed ends is a favorite of danceers, actresses, sports enthusiasts, and other active girls with very long hair. Susan, for example, is a dancer who perspires heavily during her daily workouts. Perspiration isn't damaging to the hair because perspiration is acid and hair is acid, so these two talk to each other very well. But perspiration doesn't smell as nice and clean as you'd like your scalp to smell. So you have to rinse this offending intruder off your scalp. Susan and her roommate have worked out an ideal solution. While Susan shampoos and rinses off only her scalp, Linda holds up the ends of Susan's hair above her head. The ends never even get wet. Susan then pats her hair dry with a towel or sits under the dryer for a few minutes, concentrating only on her scalp. She saves hours of unnecessary drying time required if she wet all her hair as well as her scalp. This method, clearly, is easier to follow if you have a willing friend or mate on hand to assist.

Madora
September 11th, 2014, 09:23 AM
Double post! What is possessing the blasted server????

Madora
September 11th, 2014, 01:30 PM
triple post. Sorry!

Madora
September 11th, 2014, 01:43 PM
I will need to try this bbb technique. I have a Sonia Kashuk BBB lying around and the only reason why I don't use it is because it's a pain to clean. My hair loves to pick up lint and dust so that brush gets really gunky really fast. I should have known that you're supposed to clean it after every use. I'll have to stop by a Sally's to pick up the cleaning rake. What does it look like?

Hypersensitive, here's a link to the hair brush rake cleaner at the Miles Kimball site: http://www.mileskimball.com/buy-hair-brush-cleaner-312810

The wire hair rake at Sally's is very similar. Sally's has another hair brush cleaner but it is deplorably flimsy and not worth the money.

Gertrude
September 11th, 2014, 03:47 PM
To stir the brew a bit more about shampooing, at the GM salon in London I was told to wet my hair, upside down or not if uncomfortable, and apply a cherry pit size amount of the 12 minute conditioner through the ends of the hair to change the PH ?????? it's sort of CWC idea. Then shampoo as Madora describes, and apply conditioner on instructed days, and creme rinse always as Madora describes.

There isn't anything really in the scalp locking, sorry. Scalp is just skin. If I hang upside down the skin on my face is looser too than if I massage it when standing up but as in massaging, be it oil, cream or shampoo, your aim is to move the product over your skin and not your skin with the product it makes no odds. Bending over as recommended does horrible things to my neck as it over-extends and my blood pressure crashes because of a collagen disorder I have, but GM has no difficulty with standing up instead in my experience. if it feels good to wash hair while bending then do it of course.

GM was the hair expert and spokesman for Clairol some time in the 1970s. It's not sacrilege to say that there used to be a Clairol deep conditioner in a jar just like the GM 12 minute one, with a formulation very much like it way back. My friend in Tennessee found a jar of it in her mother's cupboard when her mother sadly passed on. As it has disappeared from the market there's nothing very like the GM 12 minute today. But other good formulations exist.

MJ1972
September 11th, 2014, 04:07 PM
Thanks for that long post, Madora. Good stuff!

*adds new washing techniques to list of things to try*

Madora
September 11th, 2014, 04:11 PM
My pleasure, MJ1972!

winship2
September 11th, 2014, 07:54 PM
I don't mean to take the conversation off-topic, but while we're talking about BBB-- I have my grandmother's wooden BBB and her mother's silver BBB. I don't like the wooden one because I find the bristles super stiff, but the silver one is nice, I think. It's oval, the tips of the bristles make a flat, not domed surface against your hair. I've used it several times and think I'm perfectly happy with it. I see this a lot in antique stores-- the oval, flat-surface kind-- and they're often inexpensive and very pretty-- silver or enameled. Any reason not to use these second-hand brushes of the bristles seem intact and (obviously) you wash them before use?

Madora
September 11th, 2014, 08:02 PM
I don't mean to take the conversation off-topic, but while we're talking about BBB-- I have my grandmother's wooden BBB and her mother's silver BBB. I don't like the wooden one because I find the bristles super stiff, but the silver one is nice, I think. It's oval, the tips of the bristles make a flat, not domed surface against your hair. I've used it several times and think I'm perfectly happy with it. I see this a lot in antique stores-- the oval, flat-surface kind-- and they're often inexpensive and very pretty-- silver or enameled. Any reason not to use these second-hand brushes of the bristles seem intact and (obviously) you wash them before use?

I don't see why not. Wash it well in not too warm water..don't let it soak for more than 7 minutes and rinse w cold running water. Shake it out well, fan the bristles with your fingers several times to remove as much water as possible. Place bristle side down on lint free cloth, out of direct sunlight. How old is your brush?

winship2
September 11th, 2014, 11:17 PM
Maybe 100 years old? It's part of a dresser set that has my great-grandmother's maiden monogram, and she was married in about 1909. For me it's sweet that it's hers, of course, but really I wanted to bring this up because I enjoy going to antique and second-hand stores and very often see brushes from about the same period that seem to be in very good condition and of course are much more affordable than anything so elaborate would be now. Honestly, would any of us now even dream of buying a silver hair brush??? Can you imagine??

Ingrid
September 11th, 2014, 11:49 PM
It's so sweet that you've got your grandmother's and great-grandmother's BBBs, winship2!! :)

I've been wanting to buy an antique BBB for a while, but ones in good condition are difficult to find.

hanne jensen
September 12th, 2014, 02:42 AM
Thanks so much for your long post about hairwashing, Madora. I can't wash my hair bending over as it kills my back. When I brush, I sit in a chair.

Madora
September 12th, 2014, 09:18 AM
Thanks so much for your long post about hairwashing, Madora. I can't wash my hair bending over as it kills my back. When I brush, I sit in a chair.

Oh, hanne Jensen, I'm so sorry to hear about your back troubles! I sympathize greatly! Nasty stuff, back pain!

@winship2...that is SO neat! Your great grandmother's own brush..with a silver backing no less..and a monogram! How charming! I loved going to second hand antique stores when I was younger...mostly in search of lithographs from calendars. So many interesting knickknacks to see. Paperweights were another fun thing..but usually way, way out of my budget! Got a champagne appetite but a beer purse!

CoveredByLove
September 12th, 2014, 09:51 AM
Does he offer any advice for curlies in his book?? From the bits and pieces I've read over the internet, it seems like he only caters to straight hair...:confused: I agree with his advice to use non detergent shampoos though :)

Madora
September 12th, 2014, 11:18 AM
Does he offer any advice for curlies in his book?? From the bits and pieces I've read over the internet, it seems like he only caters to straight hair...:confused: I agree with his advice to use non detergent shampoos though :)

There's no info in his book about curly hair, except how to make short, curly hair look straighter by using some sort of wrapping method. His salon handled all hair types but they were predominately folks with waist or shorter hair...straight or wavy..or very wavy. I never saw a curly haired client on his "wall". He was all for handling curly hair very carefully and detangling slowly, because of curly hair structure.

rowie
September 12th, 2014, 11:28 AM
There's no info in his book about curly hair, except how to make short, curly hair look straighter by using some sort of wrapping method. His salon handled all hair types but they were predominately folks with waist or shorter hair...straight or wavy..or very wavy. I never saw a curly haired client on his "wall". He was all for handling curly hair very carefully and detangling slowly, because of curly hair structure.

Thanks for this info Madora along with the washing technique page. This makes real good sense as I'm a wavy haired person and I think his methods really work, but my texture I think is pushing it because of the nature of the bbb brush alone. It's probably easier to apply his technique on straight hair over wavy hair. I am loosing my wave pattern significantly because of all the smoothing and sebum coating my hairs making it more easier to brush using the bbb brush. coveredbylove you can try it on your hair but you just have to really practice extra care with detangling and brushing if you desire. Just be warned thought it can change your hair texture and I'm not sure how the effects will be for curly hair.

CoveredByLove
September 12th, 2014, 12:10 PM
madora
Thank you for the reply! He does seem to have some great advice overall, and I too appreciate the post you made earlier on the washing technique!

Rowie
Thanks for the reply! I'm sure it would have some effect on my natural curl by brushing and all! My hair is fine, and it would probably do more harm than good for me. I did see some really nice wide tooth combs on his site though! :D
I can't tell from the picture, but at a comb that price, I assume it is seamless.

http://madoralonghair.com/products-page/combs-and-brushes/madora-detangler-comb

hanne jensen
September 15th, 2014, 06:43 AM
It is all right to laugh. There's nothing else to do. After tidying up in several drawers, I found 3, yes 3, brand new never used BBBs. One is wood with no rubber cushion. One is a paddle brush with rubber cushion. (I just bought one just like this 2 weeks ago) One is smaller with only 5 rows of bristles and a rubber pad. I am now the proud owner of 5 BBBs.

Madora
September 15th, 2014, 08:58 AM
Well, you'll never be at a loss for a hairbrush to use, hanne Jensen! If one does not work out, you have several others to choose from!

hanne jensen
September 16th, 2014, 01:11 AM
If I use a different brush every day, the should last forever.

Gertrude
September 16th, 2014, 07:40 AM
If I use a different brush every day, the should last forever.

Well you can change it up every day and have a different brush for every mood (-:

I forgot to say thanks to Madora for posting all the washing information, so I do so belatedly.

Update on London, I went last week and announced I was growing for as long as I could and it was just fine. Nothing mentioned about the perfect length. Also my hair is doing fine with the GM inspired but modified techniques. As in I wash upright, brush in sections while standing upright for a few strokes only with my Mason Pearson BBB cushion brush, not the recommended non cushion BBB and CWC every time, not having conditioner free days or different type conditioners and I use a leave in rather than creme rinse and the progress is just the same apparently as per the feedback at the salon as if I did manage the upside down stance and length of brushing and used the GM products. . Just saying a bad back or allergy to the products, whatever , it doesn't have to stand in your way.

My hair is definitely much longer and in much better condition than when I began GM two years ago.

Teufelchen
September 17th, 2014, 01:36 AM
Gertrude, I am glad it works well for you. I also do a modified routine.
I guess everyone has to adapt it for his/her own needs.

hanne jensen
September 21st, 2014, 03:36 AM
I finally washed my hair yesterday and used the GM method as posted in Vanilla's thread about a visit to GM salon. I washed standing up, but used very gentle products. I washed, rinsed well and then used a good conditioner from roots to ends. Applied a tiny bit of poo to the scalp and rinsed well. What a difference! I didn't break any hairs and my hair was very easy to de-tangle. When dry my hair is soft and manageable.

It had been 2 weeks since my last hairwash. Brushing every day the GM way kept my scalp clean but my hair was filthy. It felt dirty and waxy. It didn't smell or look dirty. It even shined. I'm so happy for the things I've learned on this thread and for all of your advice and help. It suddenly seems plausable that I can achieve knee length hair in time.

Johannah
September 21st, 2014, 03:39 AM
What is the best way to clean a BBB? I'm considering trying to stretch washes again. It didn't work for me in the past but I was using SLS-free shampoo so this time it could be different. I guess a BBB could help me.

hanne jensen
September 21st, 2014, 04:15 AM
What is the best way to clean a BBB? I'm considering trying to stretch washes again. It didn't work for me in the past but I was using SLS-free shampoo so this time it could be different. I guess a BBB could help me.

Madora posted on page 30, post #292 how she cleans her BBB. Madora has been brushing with a BBB for forty years, so she knows what she's talking about.

Johannah
September 21st, 2014, 04:20 AM
Madora posted on page 30, post #292 how she cleans her BBB. Madora has been brushing with a BBB for forty years, so she knows what she's talking about.

Thank you!! :blossom:

Gertrude
September 21st, 2014, 08:39 AM
I finally washed my hair yesterday and used the GM method as posted in Vanilla's thread about a visit to GM salon. I washed standing up, but used very gentle products. I washed, rinsed well and then used a good conditioner from roots to ends. Applied a tiny bit of poo to the scalp and rinsed well. What a difference! I didn't break any hairs and my hair was very easy to de-tangle. When dry my hair is soft and manageable.

It had been 2 weeks since my last hairwash. Brushing every day the GM way kept my scalp clean but my hair was filthy. It felt dirty and waxy. It didn't smell or look dirty. It even shined. I'm so happy for the things I've learned on this thread and for all of your advice and help. It suddenly seems plausable that I can achieve knee length hair in time.

That's great news Hanne Jensen! I am so glad the washing worked so very well for you and happy growing to knee and beyond C-:

Madora
September 21st, 2014, 08:46 AM
I finally washed my hair yesterday and used the GM method as posted in Vanilla's thread about a visit to GM salon. I washed standing up, but used very gentle products. I washed, rinsed well and then used a good conditioner from roots to ends. Applied a tiny bit of poo to the scalp and rinsed well. What a difference! I didn't break any hairs and my hair was very easy to de-tangle. When dry my hair is soft and manageable.

It had been 2 weeks since my last hairwash. Brushing every day the GM way kept my scalp clean but my hair was filthy. It felt dirty and waxy. It didn't smell or look dirty. It even shined. I'm so happy for the things I've learned on this thread and for all of your advice and help. It suddenly seems plausable that I can achieve knee length hair in time.

What a wonderful report, hanne jensen! Good for you! See, with a little TLC, you are eventually going to reach knee! So happy for you.

@Gertrude...thanks for your post too. Glad you are seeing positive results and enjoying your hair.

hanne jensen
September 22nd, 2014, 02:42 AM
Another little update. My hair is now growing like a weed. Hubby dusted me 12 days ago and my hemline already has small wwws. I am convinced that it is brushing with a BBB every evening.

I've tried out all my BBBs and ironically my favorite is a small BBB bought at a pet supply store of all places.

hanne jensen
September 22nd, 2014, 02:43 AM
Another little update. My hair is now growing like a weed. Hubby dusted me 12 days ago and my hemline already has small wwws. I am convinced that it is brushing with a BBB every evening.

I've tried out all my BBBs and ironically my favorite is a small BBB bought at a pet supply store of all places.

Sorry, double post. Computer is acting up. So sorry.

Madora
September 22nd, 2014, 07:23 AM
Another little update. My hair is now growing like a weed. Hubby dusted me 12 days ago and my hemline already has small wwws. I am convinced that it is brushing with a BBB every evening.

I've tried out all my BBBs and ironically my favorite is a small BBB bought at a pet supply store of all places.

Sorry, double post. Computer is acting up. So sorry.

Delighted to hear you are having such good results with brushing, hanne jensen! I can't praise brushing enough. It takes such a little time to do but if you do it consistently you reap such wonderful results! You don't need a ton of products if you brush daily!

hanne jensen
September 24th, 2014, 01:38 AM
Madora, this is a little off topic. You posted a picture of your night braid in a thread. Right after your post another member asked how you secure that night bun. I've searched and searched and can't find the post or thread. How do you secure your night braid?

The reason I'm asking is I BBB my hair in the evening. My hair is already upside down and completely de-tangled and in position to make a braid at the very top of my head.

Madora
September 24th, 2014, 07:31 AM
Madora, this is a little off topic. You posted a picture of your night braid in a thread. Right after your post another member asked how you secure that night bun. I've searched and searched and can't find the post or thread. How do you secure your night braid?

The reason I'm asking is I BBB my hair in the evening. My hair is already upside down and completely de-tangled and in position to make a braid at the very top of my head.

Hi, hanne jensen! Here you are:

1) Bring all hair in front, like a curtain/detangle gently
2) Head should be down -- steeply
3) Divide hair in 3 sections, begin to braid slightly loosely (either Dutch or English style. 4 strands if you're really dexterous/adventurous)
4) Braid down to end/fasten with elastic...or leave loose
(I don't fasten with anything and only braid until I have about 2 inches of tassel left
5) Take the braid. Hold it flat against your head with your hand. Use the other hand to pin it with crimped hairpins in the 4 directions. Tuck in tassel
6) Bingo: one handy dandy single braided bun!

How to use crimped hairpins to secure a style:
1) You want to push the hairpin through the EDGE of the bun or braid. The feet of the pin should face AWAY from the bun!
2) Hold the pin pointing downwards and slowly pivot it down to the scalp. Pick up a tiny bit of scalp hair, then turn the pin with the hair INTO bun. Weave it into the bun in and up and down manner. Don't just stick the pin in the bun and expect it to stay there very long.
3) Pin in the 4 directions..North/South/East/West
4) If you need more pins, use 'em!
5) Wash your pins every month. If they lose a little ball tip, discard immediately!
6) Pins can be found at Sally's beauty supply. Used to find them at Walgreen's too..but that was back in the Dark Ages!
7) Pins should be as invisible as you can possible make them! The whole idea is to see the style and not the pins.
http://i177.photobucket.com/albums/w225/07Erzbet/92214Howtousehairpinsindoublebraidbun.jpg (http://s177.photobucket.com/user/07Erzbet/media/92214Howtousehairpinsindoublebraidbun.jpg.html)

alishaxmarie
September 24th, 2014, 10:35 AM
For Madora and those who comb daily:
Would a wide-toothed wooden or horn comb distribute sebum/oils or would a "normal" or fine-toothed comb be better for this? (finer-toothed combing would follow proper detangling with a wider-toothed comb of course) I want to experiment with wooden combs or maybe horn ones but I'm not sure what tine width would be best for the distribution of oils and I recently purchased a cellulose comb from Eternally in Amber on Etsy (so I would have something for if/when I want to comb damp/wet hair) but I hear that wooden combs glide through hair much easier since there's no static and my hair is awfully prone to snagging combs/TT's...

hanne jensen
September 24th, 2014, 10:51 AM
Hi, hanne jensen! Here you are:

1) Bring all hair in front, like a curtain/detangle gently
2) Head should be down -- steeply
3) Divide hair in 3 sections, begin to braid slightly loosely (either Dutch or English style. 4 strands if you're really dexterous/adventurous)
4) Braid down to end/fasten with elastic...or leave loose
(I don't fasten with anything and only braid until I have about 2 inches of tassel left
5) Take the braid. Hold it flat against your head with your hand. Use the other hand to pin it with crimped hairpins in the 4 directions. Tuck in tassel
6) Bingo: one handy dandy single braided bun!

How to use crimped hairpins to secure a style:
1) You want to push the hairpin through the EDGE of the bun or braid. The feet of the pin should face AWAY from the bun!
2) Hold the pin pointing downwards and slowly pivot it down to the scalp. Pick up a tiny bit of scalp hair, then turn the pin with the hair INTO bun. Weave it into the bun in and up and down manner. Don't just stick the pin in the bun and expect it to stay there very long.
3) Pin in the 4 directions..North/South/East/West
4) If you need more pins, use 'em!
5) Wash your pins every month. If they lose a little ball tip, discard immediately!
6) Pins can be found at Sally's beauty supply. Used to find them at Walgreen's too..but that was back in the Dark Ages!
7) Pins should be as invisible as you can possible make them! The whole idea is to see the style and not the pins.
http://i177.photobucket.com/albums/w225/07Erzbet/92214Howtousehairpinsindoublebraidbun.jpg (http://s177.photobucket.com/user/07Erzbet/media/92214Howtousehairpinsindoublebraidbun.jpg.html)

Thanks so much for your help Madora! I'll try this tonight.

Madora
September 24th, 2014, 08:00 PM
For Madora and those who comb daily:
Would a wide-toothed wooden or horn comb distribute sebum/oils or would a "normal" or fine-toothed comb be better for this? (finer-toothed combing would follow proper detangling with a wider-toothed comb of course) I want to experiment with wooden combs or maybe horn ones but I'm not sure what tine width would be best for the distribution of oils and I recently purchased a cellulose comb from Eternally in Amber on Etsy (so I would have something for if/when I want to comb damp/wet hair) but I hear that wooden combs glide through hair much easier since there's no static and my hair is awfully prone to snagging combs/TT's...

alishaxmarie, it is best to use a wide tooth comb for detangling. As for the type (wood or horn) that depends. You cannot get wood wet w/o hurting the comb. If you drop a horn comb, there is a chance of it getting hurt (chipped or broken entirely).

The detangling process is one of gentle steps:

1) finger comb your hair first. Do it slowly
2) Take SMALL, THIN section of hair. About pinkie size. Start at the ends and slowly comb up the strands, little by little, until you reach the roots.
3) Use a small one piece clip (or a scrunchie) to keep the detangled hair separate from the undetangled hair.
4) Take another SMALL, THIN section of hair and do as before
5) Work you way around your head in this fashion. (Actually, it is easier to do if you first make a center part and divide your hair in two sections. Detangle all the hair on the right and confine it. Repeat for hair on the left.

Now you may think this is way too much effort and time consuming. If you want to have beautiful, healthy hair, you must TAKE THE TIME. Small, fine sections let you do a more thorough "search" of the strands.

6) Don't have the grip of death on your comb! you are not fighting your hair! Hold your comb gently and lightly, as if you were holding a living bird in your hand and you were afraid to crush it.

7) When you are detangling, go SLOWLY! If you feel a tangle, STOP IMMEDIATELY! Isolate the tangle and take it apart with your fingers (hold the tangle horizontally and take it apart with your fingers). If you hold the tangle vertically, it just tightens the tangle and makes it about impossible to save.

Lastly, if you have crunchy hair, or hair that snags combs, it might be a good idea to do a clarifying shampoo (followed immediately afterward with a conditioning treatment. Neutrogena Anti Residue clarifying shampoo has had several good recommendations here.

Personally, I'm using a SPEERT faux tortoiseshell hand made comb from Switzerland. I'm a big fan of the SPEERT company because they make quality combs that last forever. My last SPEERT comb lasted 12 years. I also use an ordinary shower comb from Sally's Beauty Supply. Hope this helps!

ETA: I believe a boar bristle brush is the best hairtool to distribute the hair's natural sebum. Why? Because boar bristles are the hair of the wild boar and most closely mimic human hair. With boar bristles you are able to get closer to the scalp and follicles..and the natural sebum. The boar bristles are finer and more flexible than the hard tines of a comb.

Madora
September 24th, 2014, 08:08 PM
Thanks so much for your help Madora! I'll try this tonight.

My pleasure, hanne jensen. Please let us know how it worked..or didn't.

hanne jensen
September 25th, 2014, 12:41 AM
My pleasure, hanne jensen. Please let us know how it worked..or didn't.

I couldn't for the life of me braid my hair with my head upside down. Another skill I have to learn! I put my hair in a pony and then braided. I then gently removed the elastic and tied off the end of my braid and followed your instructions to the letter. It was very comfy to sleep with and my hair was still up this morning. I did all this without a mirror. When I looked in the mirror after becoming a human being this morning, It looked quite nice and suited my face. The updo evolved into a Gibson which suits my horse face.

Madora
September 25th, 2014, 08:32 PM
I couldn't for the life of me braid my hair with my head upside down. Another skill I have to learn! I put my hair in a pony and then braided. I then gently removed the elastic and tied off the end of my braid and followed your instructions to the letter. It was very comfy to sleep with and my hair was still up this morning. I did all this without a mirror. When I looked in the mirror after becoming a human being this morning, It looked quite nice and suited my face. The updo evolved into a Gibson which suits my horse face.

Very nice! If you have a one piece barrette, you might want to substitute that in place of the ponytail holder. Less wear and tear on your hair!

hanne jensen
September 26th, 2014, 12:26 AM
Very nice! If you have a one piece barrette, you might want to substitute that in place of the ponytail holder. Less wear and tear on your hair!

I use those hair ties that are stretchy ribbon with a knot. I've never had one single hair caught in them. Today I'm just leaving my night do alone and will take it down this evening for brushing. My hair is already in position for brushing. after de-tangling. I don't want to handle my hair too much as it is very fine and delicate.

LongCurlyTress
November 4th, 2014, 08:17 PM
Hi Madora! I just love this entire thread. I plan on returning to it many times to learn new ideas and hair care techniques. Just wanted to thank you for the sincere, helpful information you have posted here and everywhere for that matter.

And, I completely agree with the BBB brushing your scalp to massage the scalp and increase length. It works!! :love:

Selkie-
November 22nd, 2014, 08:21 AM
Wow, thanks for this thread. I just read through the whole thing! Thank you to everyone - especially Madora - who took the time and effort to answer questions here.

I have just started BBB brushing according to the GM technique and am excited to see if it will improve my hair! :)

Madora
November 22nd, 2014, 08:30 AM
Wow, thanks for this thread. I just read through the whole thing! Thank you to everyone - especially Madora - who took the time and effort to answer questions here.

I have just started BBB brushing according to the GM technique and am excited to see if it will improve my hair! :)

You're welcome, Selkie-

Just a word of caution about beginning brushing. If you haven't been brushing much, then it might take a few weeks for your scalp to become accustomed to it. Some folks remarked that after brushing their scalps felt oily. That is to be expected because the brushing stimulates the hair follicles, which in turn stimulates the production of sebum.

Brushing is more than just putting brush to hair and having at it! There's a proper way to brush, and a proper brush to use. Alas, not all bbbs are created equal! But once you find your brush...and your technique..your hair will respond quickly...and I think you will be pleased with the results. It doesn't happen overnight, but you do begin to notice changes after a few weeks in! Qualilty is much more important that quantity when brushing! Above all, brush S L O W L Y, AFTER you have detangled completely! Good luck and happy brushing!

LauraLongLocks
December 16th, 2014, 08:51 AM
It took me two days, but I read this entire thread. I started with BBBing bent at the waist about two weeks ago. Prior to my 2x day brushing with my BBB I was losing 25-30 hairs a day. Not bad, right? In the last two weeks, I've only been losing 10-15 hairs a day. When I shampooed a few days ago I lost 18 hairs, but this morning when I brushed I only lost 3 hairs. I must credit the BBBing for the hair retention. If this keeps up, I might get to be a iii thickness instead of ii. Wouldn't that be something!? My circumference is 7.5 cm, so getting to 10 cm is asking for a miracle, but a girl can dream, can't she?

I think I'll try washing while bent at the waist on my next wash. I have been finding it difficult to get the area between my crown and nape fully cleansed in the upright position. I imagine bent over I'll have an easier time of it.

I'm growing out my bangs for my own reasons, but if it helps my length grow better because of some sort of equalization, bonus!

I parted my hair on the right this morning and wow, instant volume! Nice.

I can't wait to see if the brushing has any impact on my growth rate itself. I don't mean to complain, but I have a growth rate of 4 inches a year, netting about 3 inches after trims. I would love it if I could grow a little faster.

Madora, and heidi w. thank you both for all the useful information in this thread. I especially love the excerpts from GM's book and the tutorials on how to brush and wash. Changing positions from upright to bent at waist has been a source of tangles for me, but this morning I tried it the way you explained, Madora, and had no problem with tangling at all.

I do have to ask, now that your hair is so exceptionally long, Madora, are you able to get through the entire length from root to tip in one stroke? Is it important to make long strokes from root to tip? My hair is short enough I can make it in one stroke, but how about when it gets longer? And what about bending at the waist and having your hair touch the floor while you brush? Problem or no?

Madora
December 16th, 2014, 10:04 AM
I do have to ask, now that your hair is so exceptionally long, Madora, are you able to get through the entire length from root to tip in one stroke? Is it important to make long strokes from root to tip? My hair is short enough I can make it in one stroke, but how about when it gets longer? And what about bending at the waist and having your hair touch the floor while you brush? Problem or no?
I'm glad you are having such good results with brushing, LauraLongLocks. I think you'll see improvement as far as growth rate is concerned after you've been brushing 5 months or so..maybe sooner, if your hair grows faster. That's the great benefit of brushing..stimulating those follicles to better growth! Sometimes they just need that extra stimulation to become rejuvenated.

As far as brushing my hair in one swipe of my brush, that's easy! I prefer the one swipe method because it is better for my hair. Here's how I do it on my knee length hair:


BRUSHING – Canopy hair (standing erect - head slightly bent down - all hair already detangled and in front of me, like a curtain):

Start at the nape and slowly brush down your hair to the very ends. Go slowly!

Follow each swipe of the brush with the palm of your other hand. Your brush is the (+) and your hand is the minus (-). This method helps calm the static made by the brushing.

Underneath the canopy (standing erect, head up):

Place the brush bristles against your forehead and slowly push the brush into your front scalp hair. Slowly raise the hair filled brush UP slightly (about 3 inches), then extend your hair filled brush directly OUT in front of you then DOWN to the floor. The brushing motion should be fluid. Moving from the hairline, up, out and down..all ONE motion..no jerking. Do it slowly! This UP, OUT and DOWN motion is ONLY for the FRONT CANOPY hair. The back of the head hair is brushed in the usual way, from the nape to the ends, with no lifting of the strands.

Do not mix styles: Do the back of the head brushing first (in the bent at the waist position) then stand erect, check for tangles, then do the front canopy hair last.

When hair has been fully brushed, check for tangles then part it from nape to forehead so that it is in two sections.

Hold the ends of the hair so that the left section is in the left hand and the right section is in the right hand.

Take the hair in the right hand and gently place it over the right shoulder and let it fall.

Do the same with the left hand side.

Check for tangles once again, then style as desired.

Number of strokes: Is a matter of preference. Consistency is more important than quantity.

Once in a while I'll brush while seated but this takes more time as I have to be careful to keep the strands separated when brushing (I just divide the bulk of the hair in 3 sections and then brush each section individually. As always, the hair is completely tangle free before the brush touches it). Oh, and my hair doesn't touch the floor usually, unless I'm too bent forward. And a tip to avoid loose hair all over when brushing: I have a large piece of oilcloth that I place on the carpet before I brush. It's a pale color so my dark shed hairs are easy to see, and scoop up with a piece of sticky tape from a lint roller. This oilcloth bit I learned from reading about Empress Elizabeth of Austria's hairdresser, Fanny Angerer. She always placed a large white square of cloth on the carpet because her mistress was a bit fanatical on keeping count of how many hairs she shed in each brushing session. Fanny would collect the fallen hairs, and sometimes, when she thought the Empress wasn't looking, would stuff the hairs inside her pocket. Elizabeth wasn't fooled though. She always demanded to see how many hairs she had lost during each hairdressing session.

LauraLongLocks
December 16th, 2014, 02:00 PM
I'm glad you are having such good results with brushing, LauraLongLocks. I think you'll see improvement as far as growth rate is concerned after you've been brushing 5 months or so..maybe sooner, if your hair grows faster. That's the great benefit of brushing..stimulating those follicles to better growth! Sometimes they just need that extra stimulation to become rejuvenated.

As far as brushing my hair in one swipe of my brush, that's easy! I prefer the one swipe method because it is better for my hair. Here's how I do it on my knee length hair:


BRUSHING – Canopy hair (standing erect - head slightly bent down - all hair already detangled and in front of me, like a curtain):

Start at the nape and slowly brush down your hair to the very ends. Go slowly!

Follow each swipe of the brush with the palm of your other hand. Your brush is the (+) and your hand is the minus (-). This method helps calm the static made by the brushing.

Underneath the canopy (standing erect, head up):

Place the brush bristles against your forehead and slowly push the brush into your front scalp hair. Slowly raise the hair filled brush UP slightly (about 3 inches), then extend your hair filled brush directly OUT in front of you then DOWN to the floor. The brushing motion should be fluid. Moving from the hairline, up, out and down..all ONE motion..no jerking. Do it slowly! This UP, OUT and DOWN motion is ONLY for the FRONT CANOPY hair. The back of the head hair is brushed in the usual way, from the nape to the ends, with no lifting of the strands.

Do not mix styles: Do the back of the head brushing first (in the bent at the waist position) then stand erect, check for tangles, then do the front canopy hair last.

When hair has been fully brushed, check for tangles then part it from nape to forehead so that it is in two sections.

Hold the ends of the hair so that the left section is in the left hand and the right section is in the right hand.

Take the hair in the right hand and gently place it over the right shoulder and let it fall.

Do the same with the left hand side.

Check for tangles once again, then style as desired.

Number of strokes: Is a matter of preference. Consistency is more important than quantity.

Once in a while I'll brush while seated but this takes more time as I have to be careful to keep the strands separated when brushing (I just divide the bulk of the hair in 3 sections and then brush each section individually. As always, the hair is completely tangle free before the brush touches it). Oh, and my hair doesn't touch the floor usually, unless I'm too bent forward. And a tip to avoid loose hair all over when brushing: I have a large piece of oilcloth that I place on the carpet before I brush. It's a pale color so my dark shed hairs are easy to see, and scoop up with a piece of sticky tape from a lint roller. This oilcloth bit I learned from reading about Empress Elizabeth of Austria's hairdresser, Fanny Angerer. She always placed a large white square of cloth on the carpet because her mistress was a bit fanatical on keeping count of how many hairs she shed in each brushing session. Fanny would collect the fallen hairs, and sometimes, when she thought the Empress wasn't looking, would stuff the hairs inside her pocket. Elizabeth wasn't fooled though. She always demanded to see how many hairs she had lost during each hairdressing session.

Ha ha, that last part was great. Thank you for the detailed explanation. So, when you are brushing hair that is longer than your reach, do you use your non-brushing hand to help pull the hair all the way through to the ends?

Madora
December 16th, 2014, 03:12 PM
Ha ha, that last part was great. Thank you for the detailed explanation. So, when you are brushing hair that is longer than your reach, do you use your non-brushing hand to help pull the hair all the way through to the ends?
No, I don't need to use my non-brushing hand to help pull the hair all the way through to the ends. I have a funny way of brushing when bent at the waist, brushing the front canopy hair. I push the brush into my scalp at the front and then bring it up several inches above the scalp. My left arm is held up in front of my face (eyebrow level) and I use the entire arm (extend it out and UP a little in front of me) and that motion lifts up the hair up higher so I can finish my single stroke down thru the ends. Hard to explain. Doing it that way lets me brush the entire length w/o stopping.

Come spring and warmer weather, and my sister being available, I hope to do one or 2 hair videos about how I detangle, air dry, and brush my hair. Have to experiment a bit with the camera lighting as photographing hair as dark as mine requires a bit of experimentation to look halfway decent.

LauraLongLocks
December 16th, 2014, 03:21 PM
No, I don't need to use my non-brushing hand to help pull the hair all the way through to the ends. I have a funny way of brushing when bent at the waist, brushing the front canopy hair. I push the brush into my scalp at the front and then bring it up several inches above the scalp. My left arm is held up in front of my face (eyebrow level) and I use the entire arm (extend it out and UP a little in front of me) and that motion lifts up the hair up higher so I can finish my single stroke down thru the ends. Hard to explain. Doing it that way lets me brush the entire length w/o stopping.

Come spring and warmer weather, and my sister being available, I hope to do one or 2 hair videos about how I detangle, air dry, and brush my hair. Have to experiment a bit with the camera lighting as photographing hair as dark as mine requires a bit of experimentation to look halfway decent.

I eagerly await such a video. Thanks for answering all my questions.

Sarahlabyrinth
December 16th, 2014, 03:38 PM
I also am eagerly awaiting a video. I love the inverted brushing and the way it makes my hair and scalp feel so great. I don't love the having to detangle all over again after I place my hair (carefully) behind my shoulders afterwards. I just wish it wouldn't tangle when I do that. Maybe that's fine, floaty hair for ya.

Madora
December 16th, 2014, 04:01 PM
I also am eagerly awaiting a video. I love the inverted brushing and the way it makes my hair and scalp feel so great. I don't love the having to detangle all over again after I place my hair (carefully) behind my shoulders afterwards. I just wish it wouldn't tangle when I do that. Maybe that's fine, floaty hair for ya.

Hmmm.... tangles and fine, floaty hair. That would drive me up a Eucalyptus in no time flat! I wonder..depending on how you feel about scrunchies, Sarahlabyrinth, how about doing slight variation on the above...ergo, BEFORE putting your hair over each shoulder, maybe you could scrunchie the last 4 inches..very loosely, then put your hair (ends in scrunchies) over each shoulder, then pull off the scrunchies once the hair was fully down. Would that help with the tangle situation?

Sarahlabyrinth
December 16th, 2014, 04:07 PM
Well, I can certainly try this, Madora. The tangles seem to be in the 8 inches closest to the scalp though, as if the hair just tangles during the process of moving from inverted to non-inverted. It's so annoying.

Annalouise
December 16th, 2014, 04:34 PM
I also await the video Madora!

Madora
December 16th, 2014, 06:23 PM
I also await the video Madora! Thanks, Annalouise. I'm hoping that I can do it, with my sister's help.

memeow
December 16th, 2014, 06:57 PM
Well, I can certainly try this, Madora. The tangles seem to be in the 8 inches closest to the scalp though, as if the hair just tangles during the process of moving from inverted to non-inverted. It's so annoying.

I have this same problem! Also with fine, floaty hair. And the tangles are so high up it takes a while to work them all loose. I haven't tried a scrunchy but I have tried holding the ends firmly when I move each section. It helps a little, but not completely. For me, I think it has to do with how the hair by my scalp falls. Flipping my head changes the direction, and somehow my hair catches on itself when it does that? It's never fully made sense to me.

Sarahlabyrinth
December 16th, 2014, 07:02 PM
I have this same problem! Also with fine, floaty hair. And the tangles are so high up it takes a while to work them all loose. I haven't tried a scrunchy but I have tried holding the ends firmly when I move each section. It helps a little, but not completely. For me, I think it has to do with how the hair by my scalp falls. Flipping my head changes the direction, and somehow my hair catches on itself when it does that? It's never fully made sense to me.

Yes, this is it! It's the hair near the scalp catching on itself when it changes direction. Maybe it's a fine hair problem?

I just don't like having to detangle it twice - twice the handling, twice the risk of mechanical damage.

Madora
December 16th, 2014, 07:07 PM
I have this same problem! Also with fine, floaty hair. And the tangles are so high up it takes a while to work them all loose. I haven't tried a scrunchy but I have tried holding the ends firmly when I move each section. It helps a little, but not completely. For me, I think it has to do with how the hair by my scalp falls. Flipping my head changes the direction, and somehow my hair catches on itself when it does that? It's never fully made sense to me.

If flip or toss or fling your hair, you're inviting tangles to congregate!

Sarahlabyrinth
December 16th, 2014, 07:12 PM
I don't flip or toss mine, but place it gently, as per your instructions Madora. Flipping would be a big no-no!

LauraLongLocks
December 16th, 2014, 07:14 PM
Re: The tangling of hair near the scalp when you change the direction of the hair.

Today I did it in a way that I had no tangles. Gently and thoroughly detangle before bending at the waist. When you bend at the waist, do not flip your hair over. What I did was part my hair in center, and bring both sides to the front. Gradually, I started to bend at the waist, and while gradually bending, I fingercombed as I went on both halves. I continued fingercombing until I had all the hair fingercombed forward. Then I gently and thoroughly detangled with my comb. There were no tangles. I brushed my hair from nape to tips, from forehead to tips, and from ears to tips. Then I combed again, making sure there were no tangles. After that, I parted my hair from the nape to my forehead and took one half of my hair in each hand. I gradually stood erect and gently placed one half over my shoulder, fingercombing as I went to ensure it would lay smooth. I did the same with the other side. At that point my hair was fingercombed through and I made sure it was thoroughly detangled again with my comb. No tangles. Not even one.

I have noticed that the more I use my BBB the fewer tangles I get. I don't know how or why this is happening, but it is, and so I am now a convert to BBBing.

Madora
December 16th, 2014, 07:36 PM
I don't flip or toss mine, but place it gently, as per your instructions Madora. Flipping would be a big no-no! I'm sure you don't, Sarahlabyrinth!

Sarahlabyrinth
December 16th, 2014, 07:40 PM
Re: The tangling of hair near the scalp when you change the direction of the hair.

Today I did it in a way that I had no tangles. Gently and thoroughly detangle before bending at the waist. When you bend at the waist, do not flip your hair over. What I did was part my hair in center, and bring both sides to the front. Gradually, I started to bend at the waist, and while gradually bending, I fingercombed as I went on both halves. I continued fingercombing until I had all the hair fingercombed forward. Then I gently and thoroughly detangled with my comb. There were no tangles. I brushed my hair from nape to tips, from forehead to tips, and from ears to tips. Then I combed again, making sure there were no tangles. After that, I parted my hair from the nape to my forehead and took one half of my hair in each hand. I gradually stood erect and gently placed one half over my shoulder, fingercombing as I went to ensure it would lay smooth. I did the same with the other side. At that point my hair was fingercombed through and I made sure it was thoroughly detangled again with my comb. No tangles. Not even one.

I have noticed that the more I use my BBB the fewer tangles I get. I don't know how or why this is happening, but it is, and so I am now a convert to BBBing.

This sounds very good and sensible, Laura. Would you consider doing a video tutorial?

LauraLongLocks
December 16th, 2014, 07:46 PM
This sounds very good and sensible, Laura. Would you consider doing a video tutorial?

Yes. Let me get through this semester of school first. And Christmas. I have a backlog of videos I want to make.

Melika
December 16th, 2014, 07:48 PM
Re: The tangling of hair near the scalp when you change the direction of the hair.

Today I did it in a way that I had no tangles. Gently and thoroughly detangle before bending at the waist. When you bend at the waist, do not flip your hair over. What I did was part my hair in center, and bring both sides to the front. Gradually, I started to bend at the waist, and while gradually bending, I fingercombed as I went on both halves. I continued fingercombing until I had all the hair fingercombed forward. Then I gently and thoroughly detangled with my comb. There were no tangles. I brushed my hair from nape to tips, from forehead to tips, and from ears to tips. Then I combed again, making sure there were no tangles. After that, I parted my hair from the nape to my forehead and took one half of my hair in each hand. I gradually stood erect and gently placed one half over my shoulder, fingercombing as I went to ensure it would lay smooth. I did the same with the other side. At that point my hair was fingercombed through and I made sure it was thoroughly detangled again with my comb. No tangles. Not even one.

I have noticed that the more I use my BBB the fewer tangles I get. I don't know how or why this is happening, but it is, and so I am now a convert to BBBing.

I will try this. I, too, have fine and floaty hair that tangles just changing direction. Even moving my part is a task in itself- all the tangling! I love the inverted brushing, but not having to detangle so much twice. I found I had to limit how often I brushed inverted, as I was accumulating damage from all the extra detangling.

memeow
December 16th, 2014, 08:01 PM
If flip or toss or fling your hair, you're inviting tangles to congregate!

Haha, I did not mean flip as in flip my whole head, just the act of turning it back right-side up! I use the method you've described for holding each section and placing them gently behind my shoulders. When I pick my head back up there's like...a bubble of hair on the back of my head? And I haven't figured out a way to smooth it out that doesn't involve tangling again!

Edit: Just read Laura's post about her method. I will try this! :D

Sarahlabyrinth
December 16th, 2014, 08:15 PM
Yes. Let me get through this semester of school first. And Christmas. I have a backlog of videos I want to make.

YAY Thank you Laura:)

Yes, Melika I get the same thing!

memeow, I get a basketball size great lump of hair I need to sort out. It really looks so awful.....the thought of detangling it always makes my heart sink.

LauraLongLocks
December 16th, 2014, 08:34 PM
Haha, I did not mean flip as in flip my whole head, just the act of turning it back right-side up! I use the method you've described for holding each section and placing them gently behind my shoulders. When I pick my head back up there's like...a bubble of hair on the back of my head? And I haven't figured out a way to smooth it out that doesn't involve tangling again!

Edit: Just read Laura's post about her method. I will try this! :D


YAY Thank you Laura:)

Yes, Melika I get the same thing!

memeow, I get a basketball size great lump of hair I need to sort out. It really looks so awful.....the thought of detangling it always makes my heart sink.

Yes, give it a try. I did it again tonight and again, I had no tangles. My hair is becoming silky smooth. Smoother and softer than it ever has been in my life. The big basketball lump of hair that needs detangling is totally eliminated with my method. At least, in my hair it is. I hope it works for others, too.

Sarahlabyrinth
December 17th, 2014, 02:03 AM
Yes, give it a try. I did it again tonight and again, I had no tangles. My hair is becoming silky smooth. Smoother and softer than it ever has been in my life. The big basketball lump of hair that needs detangling is totally eliminated with my method. At least, in my hair it is. I hope it works for others, too.

Ooh I love the sound of that, I must indeed try it. Silky smooth tangle free hair - who wouldn't want it. Now I am REALLY wanting you to make a tutorial - lol.

vega
December 17th, 2014, 03:59 AM
[QUOTE=LadyinWaiting;1386800]What do you all think about Dr. George Michael's philosophy that hair is at its strongest all one length with

I think his method
Doesn't apply to us curliest bbb brush is the worst kind of brush for curliest and im extremely gently when I used bbb

Annalouise
December 17th, 2014, 06:28 AM
What happens to me after doing the inverted brushing is that the hair at the back of my head STAYS in the upward position after I
have stood upright. So the hair in the front falls down, and the hair in the back continues to stand straight up and only the ends of my
hair are falling towards the ground. Imagine the letter 'r'. My hair goes UP the back of my head, with only the ends flopping over.

So then I have to detangle the hair.

I think this happens to Fine hair. It doesn't have enough weight to "fall down'". It continues to stick straight up. As if I had gel or hairspray on my hair. And I could walk around for hours and it wouldn't fall down. It STAYS like that.

Does anyone else have this type of hair?

purplevickie
December 17th, 2014, 06:41 AM
My hair does that! It also happens when I wash my hair upside down and wrap it in a turban while flipped over, then take the turban off. I have to very gently ruffle it back into place. If done dry, I get a massive ball of hair around my head and just the ends flop down. I'm always amazed by the volume, as my hair is usually quite fine and loses bounce easily! I find parting my hair, ruffling through with my fingers and leaning my head sideways as I stand up helps.

Annalouise
December 17th, 2014, 06:52 AM
My hair does that! It also happens when I wash my hair upside down and wrap it in a turban while flipped over, then take the turban off. I have to very gently ruffle it back into place. If done dry, I get a massive ball of hair around my head and just the ends flop down. I'm always amazed by the volume, as my hair is usually quite fine and loses bounce easily! I find parting my hair, ruffling through with my fingers and leaning my head sideways as I stand up helps.

Oh good I'm not alone. :) Oh good Lord, no I can't "ruffle through it with my fingers!" haha Oh my. I have to do what Madora says and section it in very thin strips, and detangle each strip CAREFULLY. If I stick my fingers into it and try to pull them out I can't. And if I "ruffle" it then I just create a BIG GIANT spider web MESS.

If I wash my hair upside down it stays like that also. And I have a HELLUVA time getting it to 'come back down.' "You get back down here hair, I MEAN IT!"
Yelling at hair doesn't do anything.:cool:

purplevickie
December 17th, 2014, 07:07 AM
Oh good I'm not alone. :) Oh good Lord, no I can't "ruffle through it with my fingers!" haha Oh my. I have to do what Madora says and section it in very thin strips, and detangle each strip CAREFULLY. If I stick my fingers into it and try to pull them out I can't. And if I "ruffle" it then I just create a BIG GIANT spider web MESS.

If I wash my hair upside down it stays like that also. And I have a HELLUVA time getting it to 'come back down.' "You get back down here hair, I MEAN IT!"
Yelling at hair doesn't do anything.:cool:

It's very careful ruffling ;) My hair isn't long (yet) so doesn't tangle much except at the very ends - it's more like it's meshed together and needs coaxing apart.

Annalouise
December 17th, 2014, 07:12 AM
It's very careful ruffling ;) My hair isn't long (yet) so doesn't tangle much except at the very ends - it's more like it's meshed together and needs coaxing apart.

Ohhhh right. That would make a difference.:agree:

LauraLongLocks
December 17th, 2014, 11:11 AM
What happens to me after doing the inverted brushing is that the hair at the back of my head STAYS in the upward position after I
have stood upright. So the hair in the front falls down, and the hair in the back continues to stand straight up and only the ends of my
hair are falling towards the ground. Imagine the letter 'r'. My hair goes UP the back of my head, with only the ends flopping over.

So then I have to detangle the hair.

I think this happens to Fine hair. It doesn't have enough weight to "fall down'". It continues to stick straight up. As if I had gel or hairspray on my hair. And I could walk around for hours and it wouldn't fall down. It STAYS like that.

Does anyone else have this type of hair?

I have fine hair, too, and the method I described a few posts up works. I don't get the lowercase r effect you describe now that I am doing it this way, but before I learned this method, I always had the problem you describe. What you need to do after brushing with the BBB is to comb it again before trying to stand upright. Somehow the brushing makes the hair sort of stick together, so you need to comb afterwards. Comb it with a wide tooth comb, then split it from nape to forehead and hold half of your hair in each hand. Stand upright but don't let go. Lean to the left at your waist, let your left hand free, and fingercomb it out with your free left hand. Meanwhile, you hold onto the right side of your hair and do not let go of it. Once you have fingercombed it a bit, you can stand upright and place the hair behind your shoulder, or in front, it doesn't really matter. I am finding that at this point I like to have the hair placed in front of my shoulder because then it doesn't mix with the hair from the right side when I lean to the right and let go to fingercomb. Okay, so once you have the left side of your hair fingercombed and placed gently where you want it, then lean to the right at the waist and let go of your right hand. Fingercomb the right side while still leaning to the right. Continue fingercombing as you gradually stand erect. Now both halves of your hair should be detangled, but just to check, run a comb through it. Using a wide tooth comb, start at the bottom and work your way gradually up until you reach the scalp.

If you are using your BBB every day, soon you will find no tangles at all, especially if you can use the gradual techniques I describe. I admit when I first started, it took about 3-4 days for my hair to begin getting smoother and tangle-free. It is amazing now. I've never been happier with my hair. It never tangles through this entire process and it feels so soft I want to run my fingers through it all day long (but I don't... I wear it up because I don't want mechanical damage and tangles). It is also super shiny, and I don't have to use as much leave-in conditioner or oil in my hair. In fact, last wash, I didn't use leave-in conditioner at all. That's a first. It was unnecessary because my hair remained practically tangle-free the entire time through washing, combing, and drying. I did have a few small nape tangles, but I figured out the culprit, and likely won't have much of a problem at all next time. I did use a small amount of oil to seal in the moisture on my length, but the amount of oil I use for sealing my hair has been almost halved.

I want to share the washing technique I tried last wash. I did all my washing bent at the waist. I was skeptical, but it really worked well. The scalp got much cleaner and I avoided nearly all my usual tangles. Next time I am sure I can avoid ALL tangling because I know where I went wrong and caused a few tangles at my nape.

First, I detangled and brushed my hair while bent at the waist, then I gathered my hair at the top of my head and made it into a cinnabun at the top of my head. I secured it with a couple jaw clips. This way I could be upright without my hair having to change directions. I got into the shower standing upright instead of having to remain bent over because my hair was all under control and secure. When it came time to wash my hair, I bent over at the waist, wetted my hair down, and applied my cleansing conditioner to my scalp. This is where I went wrong. I did a few circular motions on my scalp near the nape. Instead, I should have worked it into a bigger lather in my hands before applying so that I didn't have to try and create a lather on my scalp. Madora also instructed me, after my wash, on a technique of sectioning the hair in rows to keep all motions in one direction. This prevents tangling while shampooing. I'm going to try it next wash and I can almost guarantee I won't have difficulty with tangling at the nape again. Okay, so after the cleanser was applied and worked into my scalp, I rinsed it out, remaining bent at the waist the whole time. Then I applied conditioner to the length and made another cinnabun while still bent at the waist. Secured with jaw clips and stood upright. I finished all the rest of my showerly duties while standing upright and keeping my hair in a conditioner-laden cinnabun. Then I bent at the waist again, took out my jaw clips, and rinsed the conditioner out. I made another cinnabun after my hair was rinsed and secured it so I could step out of the shower in the upright position.

Once I got out of the shower, I grabbed my turbie twist. Then I bent at the waist, took out the jaw clips and secured my hair into the turbie to dry. This entire time my hair has not had to change directions, so it remained fairly tangle-free, aside from my circular motioning which caused the nape tangles. After drying and dressing, I bent at the waist again, and took off the turbie. I detangled with no additional detangling spray or leave-in conditioner. It was really easy. There were no tangles, until I made it to the nape, and the tangling there was not horrible. To get my hair to lay nice in the upright position again, I split it from nape to forehead and took half in each hand. I leaned left, let the left hand go, fingercombed it and gradually stood upright. Then I leaned right, let the right hand go, fingercombed it, and gradually stood upright. Tada! My hair was perfectly detangled and all I had to do was add a little jojoba to my length to keep moisture sealed in. Bam!

I blow dry on cool, using Madora's technique, or something similar to it. I need to update my video that I have about getting hair dry, because now I am doing it in smaller sections than when I made my video and it goes even faster.

I will get my videos up as soon as I can.

About curly hair, the technique is different, and not all curlies will find it beneficial, but I am linking this tutorial on BBBing afro hair, the curliest/kinkiest of all, in case any with afro or curly hair want to give it a try. I think this could be one of those ymmv things, but I'll put it out there for you anyway, and let you decide. I am guessing that curlies may actually want a brush that has soft bristles that will bend instead of stiff ones that could cause breakage in the curls and kinks.


http://youtu.be/ToLMOwlrgm0

meteor
December 17th, 2014, 11:37 AM
Madora also instructed me, after my wash, on a technique of sectioning the hair in rows to keep all motions in one direction. This prevents tangling while shampooing. I'm going to try it next wash and I can almost guarantee I won't have difficulty with tangling at the nape again.

Thank you very much for all the useful details on how to wash hair to prevent tangles. I'm also very curious about Madora's method of sectioning hair in rows for washing hair.

My hair tangles dramatically only when I wash it, so I'd really love to improve my washing technique. I tend to both stand upright and then bend, flip hair over a few times, because it makes it easier to clean the scalp a lot more thoroughly, but it causes tangles, obviously.

About that "inverted r" problem... I used to always have it when my hair was shorter (until about BSL) and brushed upside down, and this problem solves itself with length. With longer hair, under all that weight, the hair doesn't stick out if you brush it upside down anymore.

Sarahlabyrinth
December 17th, 2014, 01:10 PM
LLL, I tried BBBing my hair as you describe so well this morning. I forgot the part about combing it through again after brushing before standing upright. Even so I still managed to prevent around 70% of tangles. I am so delighted, and excited to see how it will be tomorrow when I remember that step. I am actually looking forward to it:) Thank you for your great and so-helpful advice!

Unfortunately our shower is so tiny there really isn't room to wash hair in the inverted position - however I don't mind as I have never had any problem with tangling using the upright method.

Annalouise
December 17th, 2014, 02:52 PM
Lauralonglocks- I love that guys energy in his videos(the morocco method guy), he is so MELLOW.:cool:
Thanks for the instructions. I'm going to try it if and when I resume brushing.
(I'm on a temporary hiatus due to shedding issues).

But I'll try the inverted washing method you described soon! I'm kindof skeptical because last time I washed my hair upside
down it was a hot mess.:p

roseomalley
December 17th, 2014, 05:01 PM
Annalouise,my fine hair does the same as your hair when I brush upside down. I look like a lion, the back of my hair remains standing straight up and tangly. Then, I have to detangle all over again.

pearlsandpinups
December 17th, 2014, 05:10 PM
I have fine hair, too, and the method I described a few posts up works. I don't get the lowercase r effect you describe now that I am doing it this way, but before I learned this method, I always had the problem you describe. What you need to do after brushing with the BBB is to comb it again before trying to stand upright. Somehow the brushing makes the hair sort of stick together, so you need to comb afterwards. Comb it with a wide tooth comb, then split it from nape to forehead and hold half of your hair in each hand. Stand upright but don't let go. Lean to the left at your waist, let your left hand free, and fingercomb it out with your free left hand. Meanwhile, you hold onto the right side of your hair and do not let go of it. Once you have fingercombed it a bit, you can stand upright and place the hair behind your shoulder, or in front, it doesn't really matter. I am finding that at this point I like to have the hair placed in front of my shoulder because then it doesn't mix with the hair from the right side when I lean to the right and let go to fingercomb. Okay, so once you have the left side of your hair fingercombed and placed gently where you want it, then lean to the right at the waist and let go of your right hand. Fingercomb the right side while still leaning to the right. Continue fingercombing as you gradually stand erect. Now both halves of your hair should be detangled, but just to check, run a comb through it. Using a wide tooth comb, start at the bottom and work your way gradually up until you reach the scalp.

If you are using your BBB every day, soon you will find no tangles at all, especially if you can use the gradual techniques I describe. I admit when I first started, it took about 3-4 days for my hair to begin getting smoother and tangle-free. It is amazing now. I've never been happier with my hair. It never tangles through this entire process and it feels so soft I want to run my fingers through it all day long (but I don't... I wear it up because I don't want mechanical damage and tangles). It is also super shiny, and I don't have to use as much leave-in conditioner or oil in my hair. In fact, last wash, I didn't use leave-in conditioner at all. That's a first. It was unnecessary because my hair remained practically tangle-free the entire time through washing, combing, and drying. I did have a few small nape tangles, but I figured out the culprit, and likely won't have much of a problem at all next time. I did use a small amount of oil to seal in the moisture on my length, but the amount of oil I use for sealing my hair has been almost halved.

I want to share the washing technique I tried last wash. I did all my washing bent at the waist. I was skeptical, but it really worked well. The scalp got much cleaner and I avoided nearly all my usual tangles. Next time I am sure I can avoid ALL tangling because I know where I went wrong and caused a few tangles at my nape.

First, I detangled and brushed my hair while bent at the waist, then I gathered my hair at the top of my head and made it into a cinnabun at the top of my head. I secured it with a couple jaw clips. This way I could be upright without my hair having to change directions. I got into the shower standing upright instead of having to remain bent over because my hair was all under control and secure. When it came time to wash my hair, I bent over at the waist, wetted my hair down, and applied my cleansing conditioner to my scalp. This is where I went wrong. I did a few circular motions on my scalp near the nape. Instead, I should have worked it into a bigger lather in my hands before applying so that I didn't have to try and create a lather on my scalp. Madora also instructed me, after my wash, on a technique of sectioning the hair in rows to keep all motions in one direction. This prevents tangling while shampooing. I'm going to try it next wash and I can almost guarantee I won't have difficulty with tangling at the nape again. Okay, so after the cleanser was applied and worked into my scalp, I rinsed it out, remaining bent at the waist the whole time. Then I applied conditioner to the length and made another cinnabun while still bent at the waist. Secured with jaw clips and stood upright. I finished all the rest of my showerly duties while standing upright and keeping my hair in a conditioner-laden cinnabun. Then I bent at the waist again, took out my jaw clips, and rinsed the conditioner out. I made another cinnabun after my hair was rinsed and secured it so I could step out of the shower in the upright position.

Once I got out of the shower, I grabbed my turbie twist. Then I bent at the waist, took out the jaw clips and secured my hair into the turbie to dry. This entire time my hair has not had to change directions, so it remained fairly tangle-free, aside from my circular motioning which caused the nape tangles. After drying and dressing, I bent at the waist again, and took off the turbie. I detangled with no additional detangling spray or leave-in conditioner. It was really easy. There were no tangles, until I made it to the nape, and the tangling there was not horrible. To get my hair to lay nice in the upright position again, I split it from nape to forehead and took half in each hand. I leaned left, let the left hand go, fingercombed it and gradually stood upright. Then I leaned right, let the right hand go, fingercombed it, and gradually stood upright. Tada! My hair was perfectly detangled and all I had to do was add a little jojoba to my length to keep moisture sealed in. Bam!

I blow dry on cool, using Madora's technique, or something similar to it. I need to update my video that I have about getting hair dry, because now I am doing it in smaller sections than when I made my video and it goes even faster.

I will get my videos up as soon as I can.

About curly hair, the technique is different, and not all curlies will find it beneficial, but I am linking this tutorial on BBBing afro hair, the curliest/kinkiest of all, in case any with afro or curly hair want to give it a try. I think this could be one of those ymmv things, but I'll put it out there for you anyway, and let you decide. I am guessing that curlies may actually want a brush that has soft bristles that will bend instead of stiff ones that could cause breakage in the curls and kinks.


http://youtu.be/ToLMOwlrgm0

The results you're getting with the BBB have inspired me to start it up as well! I'm so excited! My hair's already pretty slippery and not very tangle prone, but if I can make it even less so and SUPER SHINY I'd love it!!! :D I'll be reporting in!

LauraLongLocks
December 17th, 2014, 06:08 PM
I'm glad it was helpful to a few of you. I eagerly await your progress reports.

Annalouise
December 17th, 2014, 06:15 PM
Annalouise,my fine hair does the same as your hair when I brush upside down. I look like a lion, the back of my hair remains standing straight up and tangly. Then, I have to detangle all over again.

Yay, a hair sister! haha, and a fellow Canadian!:) ( I live in the U.S. though). Your braid in your picture looks very nice.

AmberJewel
December 17th, 2014, 06:58 PM
Same here! I've been using my BBB every day for the past week and my scalp is loving the extra TLC and the length is less dry/brittle feeling. I'm only using about 50 strokes so far and I'm loving the difference in my hair! But I do feel like I have a lion's mane when I stand back up, so I've been using my wide-tooth comb to detangle again once I'm upright. I'll probably try LLL's method tomorrow.

DreamSheep
December 17th, 2014, 07:28 PM
I feel very naughty, because I definitely flip my hair back a lot after bending over, sometimes gently, sometimes with force - although fortunately it never tangles despite being fine.
However, I try to be more mindful about it...

Also, thanks LLL for the superdetailed explanations :) Will definitely be giving them a go!

Sarahlabyrinth
December 18th, 2014, 03:05 PM
Ok, a progress report. This time I BBB'd following each step LauraLongLocks described. My tangling was reduced by around 90% and I'm confident that with practice this will improve.

I do have to set aside the time to do this, it isn't exactly a one minute procedure. I tell myself it will be to my hair's benefit and not to rush through it. If I have a hurried morning where I know I can't take the time to go SLOWLY, then I either miss it out that day or do it in the evening when I have more time.

I feel so much happier about doing this now:)

Sarahlabyrinth
December 18th, 2014, 03:06 PM
Double post...........

LauraLongLocks
December 18th, 2014, 04:07 PM
Ok, a progress report. This time I BBB'd following each step LauraLongLocks described. My tangling was reduced by around 90% and I'm confident that with practice this will improve.

I do have to set aside the time to do this, it isn't exactly a one minute procedure. I tell myself it will be to my hair's benefit and not to rush through it. If I have a hurried morning where I know I can't take the time to go SLOWLY, then I either miss it out that day or do it in the evening when I have more time.

I feel so much happier about doing this now:)

So glad it is working for you. Yes, it does take time. It's something I have just decided to be committed to. This morning I only shed ONE hair! If this keeps up, I will have a much thicker mane in a few years than I do now. :)

Madora
December 18th, 2014, 04:32 PM
:cheer:Cheers to you, Sarahlabyrinth and LauraLongLocks, for being patient! LLL, you're noticing the rewards of gentle detangling (and brushing) now. Sarahlabyrinth has the right idea too! Nothing beats gentle, patient TLC!

Crumpet
December 19th, 2014, 10:01 AM
I've been using my BBB with close to correct methods during the past few months (I've had the BBB for ages, but went on and off using it). I love it!

Thanks for taking the time to explain the method more clearly Madora and LLL!

Madora
December 19th, 2014, 11:54 AM
I've been using my BBB with close to correct methods during the past few months (I've had the BBB for ages, but went on and off using it). I love it!

Thanks for taking the time to explain the method more clearly Madora and LLL! You're welcome, Crumpet!

Halliday
December 19th, 2014, 01:14 PM
I feel very naughty, because I definitely flip my hair back a lot after bending over, sometimes gently, sometimes with force - although fortunately it never tangles despite being fine.

Aaagh, I do this too, but I never even notice myself doing it, I had no idea it was damaging. Hair is so vulnerable :bigeyes:

Sarahlabyrinth
December 19th, 2014, 03:38 PM
This morning's update: I did every step at a snail's pace today and had NO TANGLES! Thank you so much Madora and Laura! It is now a pleasure.

I timed myself this morning, out of interest and it took me 12 minutes.

Madora
December 19th, 2014, 03:40 PM
This morning's update: I did every step at a snail's pace today and had NO TANGLES! Thank you so much Madora and Laura! It is now a pleasure.

I timed myself this morning, out of interest and it took me 12 minutes.

That's great, Sarahlabrynth! You'll find that as you become more accustomed to the slower procedure that you can actually shave some time off your 12 minutes.

CoveredByLove
December 20th, 2014, 07:52 AM
Lauralonglocks
I've been enjoying brushing my 17 month old's hair with a very soft %100 BBB. The shine on her hair now is unreal! Anyways, I enjoyed the relaxing procedure of brushing her hair so much I longed to brush mine...but...I have 3a hair. I've thought about GM method in the past, but thought perhaps it wasn't for me.
After seeing you post the video of how to brush kinky-curly hair, I thought "Well, if she can, I can at least give it a try!" So far, I've only done it twice, but still have some reservations about it, since it doesn't seem like many curlies do this.
It's been ingrained in my head so long not to brush curly hair that I'm afraid of it. I was very careful to fully detangle my hair prior to brushing. I used a conair %100 BBB that has fairly stiff bristles. Both times I brushed the GM way as described on this thread. I only brushed at night before washing it, instead of the morning and night routine that is recommended. There are a couple things I noticed after brushing: SOFTNESS. I thought it had to be a fluke or something, but my hair felt super soft (and incredibly fluffy as well :p) both times I tried. Even after washing it, it was softer than usual. The only thing was my ends felt dry...like i wasn't getting the oils all the way down to my ends. Is this normal for someone who hasn't done it very long? Or am I not doing it correctly? Will I notice more supple ends after I've been doing it a while? Another thing I noticed was my hair was extra curly after washing it...which surprised me. I was afraid of ruining my curl pattern, but mine looked extra tight...like 3b instead of 3a. It could have been because it was rainy that day. I did have more frizz than usual, but that could have been due to rain as well and not the BBB.
I wish there were more info out there for curlies who BBB or want to try it. :( I've looked all over the internet and came up with hardly anything. However, I don't think it was unheard of in earlier eras for curlies to brush. In many old Victorian photos I've seen, I can tell the ladie's hair was quite wavy or curly and that she brushed it. I'm wondering how soft of a BBB I should be using. I noticed you suggested a soft one to avoid breakage. After using the Conair BBB, I had only a couple hairs in it and they had follicles on the end (I looked!), so I assume they were shed hairs and not broken ones. After I stood up, I smoothed down the canopy of my hair with the brush. Even though it was very fluffy, it looked kinda pretty actually. lol! I had nice, shiny waves that all flowed together...not unlike the victorian photos.
My first attempt was scary for me, but after I relaxed I really, really enjoyed it. The second time I was even more relaxed and it was almost therapeutic. I hope I can continue doing it without any ill effects just because it felt so amazing. If not, I'll just count it as one of my many hair experiments. :p

LauraLongLocks
December 21st, 2014, 12:52 AM
:cheer:Cheers to you, Sarahlabyrinth and LauraLongLocks, for being patient! LLL, you're noticing the rewards of gentle detangling (and brushing) now. Sarahlabyrinth has the right idea too! Nothing beats gentle, patient TLC! It's awesome!


I've been using my BBB with close to correct methods during the past few months (I've had the BBB for ages, but went on and off using it). I love it!

Thanks for taking the time to explain the method more clearly Madora and LLL! Glad you like it!


This morning's update: I did every step at a snail's pace today and had NO TANGLES! Thank you so much Madora and Laura! It is now a pleasure.

I timed myself this morning, out of interest and it took me 12 minutes. So happy it worked for you. Wonderful to have NO TANGLES when brushing!


Lauralonglocks
I've been enjoying brushing my 17 month old's hair with a very soft %100 BBB. The shine on her hair now is unreal! Anyways, I enjoyed the relaxing procedure of brushing her hair so much I longed to brush mine...but...I have 3a hair. I've thought about GM method in the past, but thought perhaps it wasn't for me.
After seeing you post the video of how to brush kinky-curly hair, I thought "Well, if she can, I can at least give it a try!" So far, I've only done it twice, but still have some reservations about it, since it doesn't seem like many curlies do this.
It's been ingrained in my head so long not to brush curly hair that I'm afraid of it. I was very careful to fully detangle my hair prior to brushing. I used a conair %100 BBB that has fairly stiff bristles. Both times I brushed the GM way as described on this thread. I only brushed at night before washing it, instead of the morning and night routine that is recommended. There are a couple things I noticed after brushing: SOFTNESS. I thought it had to be a fluke or something, but my hair felt super soft (and incredibly fluffy as well :p) both times I tried. Even after washing it, it was softer than usual. The only thing was my ends felt dry...like i wasn't getting the oils all the way down to my ends. Is this normal for someone who hasn't done it very long? Or am I not doing it correctly? Will I notice more supple ends after I've been doing it a while? Another thing I noticed was my hair was extra curly after washing it...which surprised me. I was afraid of ruining my curl pattern, but mine looked extra tight...like 3b instead of 3a. It could have been because it was rainy that day. I did have more frizz than usual, but that could have been due to rain as well and not the BBB.
I wish there were more info out there for curlies who BBB or want to try it. :( I've looked all over the internet and came up with hardly anything. However, I don't think it was unheard of in earlier eras for curlies to brush. In many old Victorian photos I've seen, I can tell the ladie's hair was quite wavy or curly and that she brushed it. I'm wondering how soft of a BBB I should be using. I noticed you suggested a soft one to avoid breakage. After using the Conair BBB, I had only a couple hairs in it and they had follicles on the end (I looked!), so I assume they were shed hairs and not broken ones. After I stood up, I smoothed down the canopy of my hair with the brush. Even though it was very fluffy, it looked kinda pretty actually. lol! I had nice, shiny waves that all flowed together...not unlike the victorian photos.
My first attempt was scary for me, but after I relaxed I really, really enjoyed it. The second time I was even more relaxed and it was almost therapeutic. I hope I can continue doing it without any ill effects just because it felt so amazing. If not, I'll just count it as one of my many hair experiments. :p Thanks for your report back. I am glad you tried to experiment to see if this was for you. Over time, the ends will feel more supple, but you will likely never eliminate the need for additional oils on your ends. All I have noticed is that I can cut back on how much I have to use oils, not totally eliminate them. Your hair sounds like it is becoming so lovely from the brushing.

Halliday
December 21st, 2014, 03:05 AM
I need to buy a BBB :stirpot: I have a Denman natural bristle brush but I'm not sure if that's the same thing.

Madora
December 21st, 2014, 07:40 AM
I need to buy a BBB :stirpot: I have a Denman natural bristle brush but I'm not sure if that's the same thing.

As long as the bristles are 100 boar bristle, with no plastic mixed in, then it is a pure boar bristle brush. Not all bbbs are the same, however. It all boils down to how they were made and what type of boar bristles were used (long/thick/short/thin). Brushes with more widely spaced clumps work much better going thru the hair than brushes with clumps close together. Also, the stiffness/flexability of the bristles can make or break a brush too.

Hopeful65
December 21st, 2014, 08:33 AM
I'm getting re-intrigued about trying a boar bristle brush. I bought one a few years ago, back when I first started growing out my bleach damaged hair. It didn't seem to work at all for me at that time, but I think I chose the wrong brush. The bristles were very compacted together and wouldn't go through my hair to reach the scalp.
Now, my hair is all grown out to virgin, and is very healthy. I want to take the best care of it and am wanting to try the boar bristle brush again, but I think I need one with spaces between the clumps of bristles. I'm considering this one: http://www.sallybeauty.com/Boar-Bristle-Brush/SBS-217201,default,pd.html#start=114&sz=12&viewAllProducts=true
I have fine, thin, silky, straight type of hair.
Any opinions, please. :)

Madora
December 21st, 2014, 09:19 AM
Alas, Hopeful65, the brush in your link is not a pure boar bristle brush. It is a brush with reinforced bristles, which means plastic bristles are mixed in with the pure boar bristles. Plastic is not good for your hair.

If you are looking for a pure boar bristle brush, and if you live near a Target store, you might want to check out the Conair Classic Wood Natural Shine Booster brush: link: http://www.target.com/p/conair-classic-wood-natural-shine-booster-hair-brush/-/A-13958189

I liked it so much I bought two. However, my hair didn't like the small, nubby black neophrene band around the neck of the brush (to give you a better grip when you brush) so I cut them out with a box cutter.

Special note: the copy notes that the bristles are nylon. This is incorrect as the labeling on the brush says they are natural boar bristles. The Conair brush has six rows of nicely placed bristle clumps, an elongated shape and retails for $9.99.

However, it is HOW you use the brush (and how you detangle your hair before your brush touches your head) that makes all the difference. I love bbbs and have been using them since 1960.

LauraLongLocks
December 21st, 2014, 11:25 AM
Hopeful65, another brush you might try is a Spornette Deville. I got mine on Amazon and it is great.

Hopeful65
December 21st, 2014, 12:43 PM
I'm glad for the input Madora and LauraLongLocks. Both of the brushes suggested look nice. I do have a Target nearby.
I did not see plastic mixed in the brush I was considering. Hopefully I would notice it when seeing it in person and refrain from buying it. I will keep a sharp eye out for those sneaky plastic bristles. ;)
Thank you!
:)

LauraLongLocks
December 21st, 2014, 01:10 PM
Hopeful65, it was in the description of the brush you linked at Sally's. It said it was made of reinforced boar bristle. That means something aside from boar bristles is in the brush. Hope you find a brush you love.

LadyCelestina
December 21st, 2014, 01:12 PM
CoveredByLove,I'm a curly who uses a boar bristle brush :beerchug: I can share how I do it,I'm no brushing guru and always try to tweak things so that they fit my hair. First off,I only brush on non-damaged hair which is basically only my non-dyed "roots" which are currently at around APL. I finger detangle very well,arrange my hair so that no strands are criss-crossed or something,then brush it gently.

Why I do a) not brush all of my hair = my lengths are dyed which means they are more prone to cuticle damage which is done by the brushing.I can't let my scalp get so greasy that the ends get coated with sebum anyway.

b) Brush.First off,my hair is really fussy about water.I can't wet it too often or it gets damaged.(I found that out when I was doing the CG method which requires quite a lot of wetting the hair down if you want 'perfect' curls.)
This means ideally,I should be wetting my hair down every 3-4 days.3-4 days without combing my hair is tangle carnival and oily roots.Finger combing and bbb in between washes solve both.The bristles also seem to soothe my scalp.My hair looks at least presentable even on wash day if I don't forget to brush.Which is hard since I'm not very patient with stuff so when my hair is too hard to quickly detangle and brush properly ,I just braid it and wait till washing.Usually happens near wash-day.

About BBB ruining the texture.I think it's a hair-type thing.I have a stubborn texture - always returns to it's default.Can be a bad thing because this means straightening (or curling) doesn't really work on my hair,but I think it's a good thing when I want to brush and comb and that.

Hope this isn't too long and boring.

LadyCelestina
December 21st, 2014, 01:26 PM
oh and I almost forgot: the biggest tip I can give is not to throw your hair around too much when it's been brushed.Even if it looks good after brushing I would give it some time to re-clump,since (i think) the clumps protect your curly strands.

Hopeful65
December 21st, 2014, 02:01 PM
Hopeful65, it was in the description of the brush you linked at Sally's. It said it was made of reinforced boar bristle. That means something aside from boar bristles is in the brush. Hope you find a brush you love.

Yes, Laura, I finally realized the key word 'reinforced'.
I found another brush on the Sally's site that at a glance looks identical, but it has softer bristles, and does not use the word 'reinforced'. By looking at the picture it looks like boar bristles only.
http://www.sallybeauty.com/Soft-Boar-Bristle-Brush/SBS-217309,default,pd.html#prefn1=brand&prefv1=BRSHST&start=17&sz=12&viewAllProducts=true
Thanks for the education. At least I know to look closely when I find a brush that I'm interested in. I have a hunch I'll get a Sally's gift card for Christmas. :D

memeow
December 21st, 2014, 09:26 PM
I'd really like to BBB, but I think I need to wait until I've trimmed off more of my white dots. About two months ago, I started brushing every morning, but noticed little bits of the ends fluttering to the ground every time. It did make my hair so shiny and smooth, so once I've grown out the worst of the damage I will definitely get back to it. And reward myself with a brand new brush... :D

Xena
December 23rd, 2014, 12:54 PM
I bought the Cream Rinse Extra Sensitive today. How much product shall I dilute in which amount of water? Any advice?

Greets,
Xena

Madora
December 23rd, 2014, 03:43 PM
I don't know how much hair you have, Xena. I've always used the George Michael Pink Crème Shampoo and used one tablespoon of shampoo to 10 ounces of warm water. (I've been doing this for 15 years and my hair is knee length). You might have to experiment a little to see how your type of shampoo does with water. Dr. Michael always said to use the shampoo undiluted, but I found that diluting the shampoo with water worked just fine too...and made it last longer, as it is expensive (but worth every penny).

Annalouise
December 23rd, 2014, 03:55 PM
I bought the Cream Rinse Extra Sensitive today. How much product shall I dilute in which amount of water? Any advice?

Greets,
Xena

I have a question for you... I'm dying to know, does the extra sensitive cream rinse have fragrance in it???:confused:

Xena
December 23rd, 2014, 04:57 PM
@Madora: I bought the cream rinse. This is the stuff after shampooing. You use it after shampoo and conditioner. But there is no advice on my bottle how much product and water is needed.

@Annalouise: I will look at the ingredient list and tell you if it contains any fragrance.

Annalouise
December 23rd, 2014, 05:23 PM
Thanks Xena, let me know. I was interested in trying their 'sensitive' line but I don't know if it contains fragrance.:)
If you want you can just send me a message on my profile when you receive the product. I would greatly appreciate it.:)

Madora
December 23rd, 2014, 08:16 PM
@Madora: I bought the cream rinse. This is the stuff after shampooing. You use it after shampoo and conditioner. But there is no advice on my bottle how much product and water is needed.

@Annalouise: I will look at the ingredient list and tell you if it contains any fragrance.

Xena, I also diluted my GM conditioner (when I used it) with 10 ounces of warm water. I stopped using the conditioner for financial reasons).

Melika
December 27th, 2014, 12:34 PM
Combing fine hair again after BBBing is definitely the key for me when doing inverted brushing. :D Thanks a lot, LLL! The rest I already had tried, but it wasn't enough. Combing again was the BEST suggestion ever!

I realized this when I forgot to comb it one of the times and tried to fingercomb my hair upright... it was baaaaad. As long as I comb it again (which LLL pointed out separates the hairs again) before moving upright (the way Madora explains throughout this whole thread), everything is peachy.

LauraLongLocks
December 27th, 2014, 01:28 PM
Combing fine hair again after BBBing is definitely the key for me when doing inverted brushing. :D Thanks a lot, LLL! The rest I already had tried, but it wasn't enough. Combing again was the BEST suggestion ever!

I realized this when I forgot to comb it one of the times and tried to fingercomb my hair upright... it was baaaaad. As long as I comb it again (which LLL pointed out separates the hairs again) before moving upright (the way Madora explains throughout this whole thread), everything is peachy.

So glad you found it helpful. :flower:

Vanilla
December 29th, 2014, 07:23 AM
I'm back into BBB using as of last night. My roots have been super oily lately, but my length super dry. I've clarified and a SMT to try to remedy the problem, but it hasn't been working. I brushed with the BBB last night and this morning, and my hair looks and feels quite a bit better.

I had stopped using a BBB previously, as I felt it was too damaging, but I've modified my technique and use my TT type paddle brush (The Wet Brush) first while bent at the waist, then the BBB. When I flip upright, I just detangle again with the detangler brush and then resume with the BBB.

A wide tooth comb does not get out all of the small tangles that develop in my fine hair, so I think this might help other fine hairs who have trouble with BBBing.

Madora
December 29th, 2014, 07:34 AM
Vanilla, you'll save yourself a little bit of time (and help your hair also!) if you refrain from flipping after you have brushed your hair. Instead of flipping, just make a center part so that your hair is in two sections.

Hold each side of your hair with each hand (left hair in left hand, right hair in right hand). Still holding your hair, stand erect, then gently place your hand behind your shoulder and let the hair fall. Repeat with other hand. Check for tangles, using a finer comb (not a wide tooth one, and go slowly), then style. It might be easier for you to check for tangles with the finer comb before placing your hair behind your shoulders. To help isolate small snarls, separate the hair in pencil thin strips, then go up each strip, little by little, until you reach the scalp. Take another thin strip and repeat, until all the hair on one side is done.

LauraLongLocks
December 29th, 2014, 08:05 AM
Vanilla, I have fine hair, too. I have found that flipping from erect to bent at waist or from bent at waist to erect causes so many tangles. They can be avoided in the first place if you do as Madora says. When I need to change directions, I do it gradually while fingercombing and I have no tangles at all. Combing before changing directions helps a lot, too. Good luck. I think this really needs to be my next video, even though I have had a few other videos bumping around in my head a while.

Vanilla
December 29th, 2014, 08:24 AM
Thanks for your advice and expertise ladies! I will try this next time I brush and let you know.

LauraLongLocks
December 29th, 2014, 11:14 PM
My BBB video is up!!!


http://youtu.be/OKpcpmeNJ48

Sarahlabyrinth
December 30th, 2014, 12:55 AM
Dying to watch it but we have visitors right now and can't be rude and disappear for half an hour.....lol

gnome82
December 30th, 2014, 02:13 AM
Thank You for sharing, looking forward to my hair being long enough to try it.

Sarahlabyrinth
December 30th, 2014, 02:37 AM
A great, well thought out video - your hair behaves so well during brushing. Mine turns to floof - tangle free floof, I will admit, but floof never the less. A great video - thank you!

Selkie-
December 30th, 2014, 05:01 AM
Thank you so much for posting that video Laura! :blossom: It is really helpful and just what I was looking for to help me in my BBB journey. :D

slynr
December 30th, 2014, 06:24 AM
Good job LLL. Very helpful information. Thank you for taking the time to put that together:)

Madora
December 30th, 2014, 08:18 AM
Nicely done, LauraLongLocks! You have a very winning personality and it certainly "sells" your video. Just 3 suggestions: your hair looks lovely indeed and it is plain to see that it is in great condition. That makes combing easy peasy for you but not everyone is so fortunate. if you redo your video, go a mite slower with that comb. The other suggestion is don't forget your nape hairs when you swipe down your hair with your hand after brushing. Last suggestion: instead of detangling upright, then detangling again when you're bent at the waist, just bend then bring all your hair over in front of you, like a curtain, then begin the detangling process. On second thought, perhaps you detangle upright because it is easier for you to handle? I can certainly understand that! I think it is simpler to detangle once, when you're bent at waist and avoid any mechanical damage by doing the detangling twice.

As for the bumps at the back of your nape, you might want to use a comb after you've detangled with your fingers. Combing with a comb is more thorough in sorting out those bumps.

LadyCelestina
December 30th, 2014, 09:04 AM
Can't wait to watch it!

LauraLongLocks
December 30th, 2014, 09:55 AM
Thank You for sharing, looking forward to my hair being long enough to try it.


A great, well thought out video - your hair behaves so well during brushing. Mine turns to floof - tangle free floof, I will admit, but floof never the less. A great video - thank you!


Thank you so much for posting that video Laura! :blossom: It is really helpful and just what I was looking for to help me in my BBB journey. :D


Good job LLL. Very helpful information. Thank you for taking the time to put that together:)


Nicely done, LauraLongLocks! You have a very winning personality and it certainly "sells" your video. Just 3 suggestions: your hair looks lovely indeed and it is plain to see that it is in great condition. That makes combing easy peasy for you but not everyone is so fortunate. if you redo your video, go a mite slower with that comb. The other suggestion is don't forget your nape hairs when you swipe down your hair with your hand after brushing. Last suggestion: instead of detangling upright, then detangling again when you're bent at the waist, just bend then bring all your hair over in front of you, like a curtain, then begin the detangling process. On second thought, perhaps you detangle upright because it is easier for you to handle? I can certainly understand that! I think it is simpler to detangle once, when you're bent at waist and avoid any mechanical damage by doing the detangling twice.

As for the bumps at the back of your nape, you might want to use a comb after you've detangled with your fingers. Combing with a comb is more thorough in sorting out those bumps.


Can't wait to watch it!

Thanks, everyone. Sorry to have kept all of you waiting so long for it.

Madora, I guess I'm not understanding what you mean by "like a curtain" when you say to bring around the hair in front. And yes, I comb fairly quickly because my hair is really mostly tangle-free. It has even fewer tangles since I started using the BBB twice a day. Yes, I prefer to have tangle-free hair before I switch from upright to bent-at-waist because I end up with no tangles while switching positions that way, and I do find it easier to handle while upright. I was just about to reach for the comb when I stopped to fingercomb that little bit out, but it felt alright, so I didn't grab the comb.

Madora
December 30th, 2014, 10:20 AM
LauraLongLocks, "like a curtain" means to bring all your hair in front of you so that it falls to the floor, like a curtain hanging on a curtain rod..i.e. straight down. Then detangle as I described.

LadyCelestina
December 30th, 2014, 11:12 AM
Wow,good job! Is that the way it should be done according to the book? You can really see how the shine increases with each stroke of the brush.Thank you for sharing.I always had trouble visualizing the process from the written instructions.Was a bit shocked to see you really have your head almost 'upside down' ...I always did anything upside down a bit less...upside down :lol:

LauraLongLocks
December 30th, 2014, 02:31 PM
LauraLongLocks, "like a curtain" means to bring all your hair in front of you so that it falls to the floor, like a curtain hanging on a curtain rod..i.e. straight down. Then detangle as I described. So, is the method of bringing the hair around to the front different than what I did in my video?


Wow,good job! Is that the way it should be done according to the book? You can really see how the shine increases with each stroke of the brush.Thank you for sharing.I always had trouble visualizing the process from the written instructions.Was a bit shocked to see you really have your head almost 'upside down' ...I always did anything upside down a bit less...upside down :lol:

I don't know if that's how GM's book says to do it. I've never read his book, though I would certainly love to read it. Yeah, I'm pretty well bent in half, lol.

LauraLongLocks
December 30th, 2014, 02:40 PM
I don't know if that's how GM's book says to do it. I've never read his book, though I would certainly love to read it. Yeah, I'm pretty well bent in half, lol.

I fixed that just now... went onto Amazon and got a used copy for $36.20. I can't wait until it arrives.

Madora
December 30th, 2014, 03:23 PM
So, is the method of bringing the hair around to the front different than what I did in my video?



I don't know if that's how GM's book says to do it. I've never read his book, though I would certainly love to read it. Yeah, I'm pretty well bent in half, lol.

Dr. Michael never fully described the method you use to bring all your hair down. He wrote that for best results, to brush in the bent at the waist position (after detangling your hair first) and to always follow the stroke of the brush with the palm of your other hand (to cut down on static).

It doesn't matter HOW you get all your hair in front of you. Your method certainly works for you! I prefer to bring all the hair in front of me, then detangle it, then brush it..and yes, I have a slightly different method of brushing.

The thing to remember is to fully detangle before putting brush to hair, and to go SLOWLY when combing and brushing.

lapushka
December 30th, 2014, 03:59 PM
A great, well thought out video - your hair behaves so well during brushing. Mine turns to floof - tangle free floof, I will admit, but floof never the less. A great video - thank you!

Maybe that's because you have wavy hair. ;)

Sarahlabyrinth
December 30th, 2014, 06:25 PM
Maybe that's because you have wavy hair. ;)

Yes, I'm sure that's the reason :)

LauraLongLocks
December 30th, 2014, 09:07 PM
Dr. Michael never fully described the method you use to bring all your hair down. He wrote that for best results, to brush in the bent at the waist position (after detangling your hair first) and to always follow the stroke of the brush with the palm of your other hand (to cut down on static).

It doesn't matter HOW you get all your hair in front of you. Your method certainly works for you! I prefer to bring all the hair in front of me, then detangle it, then brush it..and yes, I have a slightly different method of brushing.

The thing to remember is to fully detangle before putting brush to hair, and to go SLOWLY when combing and brushing.

Thank you for all the feedback and guidance, Madora. I have you to thank in convincing me to give the BBB an honest try. I don't know why I waited so long to give it a go, but I'm glad I'm using it now. I'm forever a convert. Thanks for all your help.

Madora
December 30th, 2014, 09:56 PM
Thank you for all the feedback and guidance, Madora. I have you to thank in convincing me to give the BBB an honest try. I don't know why I waited so long to give it a go, but I'm glad I'm using it now. I'm forever a convert. Thanks for all your help.

I'm delighted that you're enjoying using your bbb, LauraLongLocks! Happy brushing!

vega
December 31st, 2014, 03:11 AM
Maybe that's because you have wavy hair. ;)

Good point lapushka , this philosophy is really not for me as I'm curly 3G , if anything I found this method damaging

Xena
December 31st, 2014, 02:23 PM
Xena, I also diluted my GM conditioner (when I used it) with 10 ounces of warm water. I stopped using the conditioner for financial reasons).

Thx I tried the Cream Rinse today and diluted it in 500ml of water. Its great! I want to try the 12 Minutes Vanilla Confitioner too. But the price :( I have to wait a lil bit and save some cash first ;)

CoveredByLove
December 31st, 2014, 03:43 PM
I fixed that just now... went onto Amazon and got a used copy for $36.20. I can't wait until it arrives.

I just bought a used copy as well. :p I can't wait to read it! I know I may or may not be useful information for my hair type. (doesn't seem to be a popular method for curlies/wavies). Regardless, I'd love to have a copy and read the renowned Dr. George Michael's long hair care method for myself. I fascinated by it!

Vanilla
December 31st, 2014, 04:25 PM
Really helpful video, LLL!

curlsgalore
December 31st, 2014, 04:36 PM
I'm a 3a curly and my longest hairs are at fingertip length and very tapered. It's medium thickness as well. I've been experimenting with a BBB brush lately. Actually, I have several now and a couple wooden bristle brushes :blushing:. Anyway, I always detangle gently with a wide tooth comb first and then use my BBB and the wooden bristle brush. I've seen the tutorial on the morroccomethod site and it has helped me too. I brush upside down and then right side up. I can say that my hair has been feeling soft and just really nice. I Do add coconut oil to my ends when brushing and my hair is loving this. I've noticed I don't lose as much hair and it's so much easier to deal with my hair when washing/conditioning it. I do this on dry hair either at night or before washing. I usually wear my hair curly a day or two and then do the brushing. My hair is happy :).
I recently bought a Bass brush from iherb that I love. It's a firm BBB. I'm going to buy another as a backup...like I need another brush ahem....:p

LauraLongLocks
December 31st, 2014, 05:15 PM
Really helpful video, LLL! Thank you. I am glad it was helpful.


I'm a 3a curly and my longest hairs are at fingertip length and very tapered. It's medium thickness as well. I've been experimenting with a BBB brush lately. Actually, I have several now and a couple wooden bristle brushes :blushing:. Anyway, I always detangle gently with a wide tooth comb first and then use my BBB and the wooden bristle brush. I've seen the tutorial on the morroccomethod site and it has helped me too. I brush upside down and then right side up. I can say that my hair has been feeling soft and just really nice. I Do add coconut oil to my ends when brushing and my hair is loving this. I've noticed I don't lose as much hair and it's so much easier to deal with my hair when washing/conditioning it. I do this on dry hair either at night or before washing. I usually wear my hair curly a day or two and then do the brushing. My hair is happy :).
I recently bought a Bass brush from iherb that I love. It's a firm BBB. I'm going to buy another as a backup...like I need another brush ahem....:p It's great to hear from someone with curls on the BBBing. Glad you like it so well.

Sarahlabyrinth
December 31st, 2014, 05:38 PM
I'm loving my BBBing now, Laura! Though I brush very slowly and gently, otherwise my fine hair tries to wrap itself around the brush. Has a mind of its own....

CoveredByLove
December 31st, 2014, 05:50 PM
I'm a 3a curly and my longest hairs are at fingertip length and very tapered. It's medium thickness as well. I've been experimenting with a BBB brush lately. Actually, I have several now and a couple wooden bristle brushes :blushing:. Anyway, I always detangle gently with a wide tooth comb first and then use my BBB and the wooden bristle brush. I've seen the tutorial on the morroccomethod site and it has helped me too. I brush upside down and then right side up. I can say that my hair has been feeling soft and just really nice. I Do add coconut oil to my ends when brushing and my hair is loving this. I've noticed I don't lose as much hair and it's so much easier to deal with my hair when washing/conditioning it. I do this on dry hair either at night or before washing. I usually wear my hair curly a day or two and then do the brushing. My hair is happy :).I recently bought a Bass brush from iherb that I love. It's a firm BBB. I'm going to buy another as a backup...like I need another brush ahem....:pI recently bought a Bass brush from iherb that I love. It's a firm BBB. I'm going to buy another as a backup...like I need another brush ahem....:p[/QUOTE]

Thanks for posting this! I'm glad to see another 3a curly experimenting with BBB. :flowers: Do you section your hair like the girl in the morocco method video does? I have a BBB that is soft and one that is more stiff...I think my fine hairs are liking the soft one better so far. I also BBB before washing or at night. :)

curlsgalore
December 31st, 2014, 05:59 PM
My hair is not as thick (or as curl) as the girl with curly hair in the video so I just part it in half. I part my hair in half and then detangle with my wide tooth comb. Then I slowly flip my head over and make sure there are no tangles. I then start brushing my hair with the BBB and alternate with the wooden bristle brush (old style body shop) like the blonde girl in the other video, from the nape of the neck to the ends. I part my hair (middle) while upside down and slowly pick my head back up. Make sure again there are no tangles and brush again the same way right side up. I hope that was helpful and not confusing:).

wilderwein
December 31st, 2014, 07:03 PM
I'm loving my BBBing now, Laura! Though I brush very slowly and gently, otherwise my fine hair tries to wrap itself around the brush. Has a mind of its own....

Happens to me too! It's like my hair becomes alive hahaha I found that using the other hand (like Laura showd in her video) really helps, not only for the static part but also for the "I wanna hug the brush" hair thing

LauraLongLocks
December 31st, 2014, 07:16 PM
I'm loving my BBBing now, Laura! Though I brush very slowly and gently, otherwise my fine hair tries to wrap itself around the brush. Has a mind of its own....

So glad you are enjoying it.

Yes, I must brush and comb fast, because it has been mentioned more than once, ha ha. I guess I have well-behaved hair. ;)

CoveredByLove
December 31st, 2014, 07:57 PM
My hair is not as thick (or as curl) as the girl with curly hair in the video so I just part it in half. I part my hair in half and then detangle with my wide tooth comb. Then I slowly flip my head over and make sure there are no tangles. I then start brushing my hair with the BBB and alternate with the wooden bristle brush (old style body shop) like the blonde girl in the other video, from the nape of the neck to the ends. I part my hair (middle) while upside down and slowly pick my head back up. Make sure again there are no tangles and brush again the same way right side up. I hope that was helpful and not confusing:).

Thanks! Made perfect sense :)

Melika
January 1st, 2015, 03:03 AM
I'm loving my BBBing now, Laura! Though I brush very slowly and gently, otherwise my fine hair tries to wrap itself around the brush. Has a mind of its own....

Mine too! It also goes "fluffy" during this process, all the more reason to comb and brush slowly. The combing again before standing upright really works to smooth it back down a bit and keep it from evolving into it's own life-form.

It takes me anywhere from 30 to 45 minutes to do a complete brushing. I have to detangle before bending over, and then detangle again, or I would have difficulty separating my hair into two parts to move it to begin with (not to mention the extra tangling). It's become a bit of a therapy. XD

CoveredByLove
January 2nd, 2015, 01:07 PM
I thought I'd share this for anyone interested in how curly hair looks after BBBing. :-) After I detangled and brushed, I stood upright and glazed over my hair with wet hands to smooth any frizzies and this is what I got.

http://i1364.photobucket.com/albums/r740/mamabshire/EE61A6A0-2671-4B75-B5AA-2371666F58FB_zpsc38nqep5.jpg (http://s1364.photobucket.com/user/mamabshire/media/EE61A6A0-2671-4B75-B5AA-2371666F58FB_zpsc38nqep5.jpg.html)

Keep in mind I'm a 3a/2c, so not tightly curly. If I wash or rescrunch it, I get more definition of course. Like this- (ignore the annoying layers I'm growing out)

http://i1364.photobucket.com/albums/r740/mamabshire/19FD0ED8-1670-4786-B1A8-237133A6E979_zpsspuaruj9.jpg (http://s1364.photobucket.com/user/mamabshire/media/19FD0ED8-1670-4786-B1A8-237133A6E979_zpsspuaruj9.jpg.html)

I don't use a lot of hair products and especially no sticky stuff- just mineral oil and a cone-free light curl cream that is mostly natural.
My hair is noticeably softer since using a BBB, and so far no ill effects. I have also used it to distribute a pre-poo oil treatment through my hair, let it sit for awhile (or overnight),then wash. This seems especially beneficial.

Agnes Hannah
January 2nd, 2015, 01:40 PM
Laura, what a lovely video, really detailed and well explained, thank you for posting!

LauraLongLocks
January 2nd, 2015, 01:48 PM
I thought I'd share this for anyone interested in how curly hair looks after BBBing. :-) After I detangled and brushed, I stood upright and glazed over my hair with wet hands to smooth any frizzies and this is what I got.

http://i1364.photobucket.com/albums/r740/mamabshire/EE61A6A0-2671-4B75-B5AA-2371666F58FB_zpsc38nqep5.jpg (http://s1364.photobucket.com/user/mamabshire/media/EE61A6A0-2671-4B75-B5AA-2371666F58FB_zpsc38nqep5.jpg.html)

Keep in mind I'm a 3a/2c, so not tightly curly. If I wash or rescrunch it, I get more definition of course. Like this- (ignore the annoying layers I'm growing out)

http://i1364.photobucket.com/albums/r740/mamabshire/19FD0ED8-1670-4786-B1A8-237133A6E979_zpsspuaruj9.jpg (http://s1364.photobucket.com/user/mamabshire/media/19FD0ED8-1670-4786-B1A8-237133A6E979_zpsspuaruj9.jpg.html)

I don't use a lot of hair products and especially no sticky stuff- just mineral oil and a cone-free light curl cream that is mostly natural.
My hair is noticeably softer since using a BBB, and so far no ill effects. I have also used it to distribute a pre-poo oil treatment through my hair, let it sit for awhile (or overnight),then wash. This seems especially beneficial. Thank you for posting. I really appreciate the photos. All it took to cut the frizz was wet hands smoothed over your hair? That's great. I hope this helps anyone with wavy/curly texture who wants to BBB but is afraid of the frizz factor.


Laura, what a lovely video, really detailed and well explained, thank you for posting! Thank you so much. :)

CoveredByLove
January 2nd, 2015, 02:01 PM
LauraLongLocks

Yep. That's all I did! :lol: I too hope it's helpful for other curlies curious like me about using a BBB.

curlsgalore
January 2nd, 2015, 11:32 PM
CoveredByLove, your hair looks AMAZING!! My hair looks like a giant poofball after using a BBB, lol! What curl cream do you use? My curls are definitely tighter, I'm at least a 3a.

momschicklets
January 3rd, 2015, 07:27 AM
Well after reading through the last 20 pages or so of this thread, I think I'd like to try BBBing (took me half an hour just to figure out what that meant LOL). Can anyone suggest an affordable but quality brush for me though? I've looked around a bit at Sally's and Amazon, but not really sure what to look for. Madora and LLL, I'm so grateful that you two spend so much time helping others with this. You go to great lengths (see what I did there??) to explain, instruct and encourage....and it means so much to relative newbies like me :blossom:

CoveredByLove
January 3rd, 2015, 08:01 AM
Curlsgalore

Thanks! I should have posted a "before tamed" picture for comparison. :lol: My curl tightness depends on a lot...whether I air dried or not, what kind of styling product I used, and, of course, the weather. Right now its winter, but summer is coming! With air drying I get much more stretched out, due to the weight of the water. I'm trying to do more of that lately instead of using a diffuser. Out of the shower, I apply a few drops of mineral oil to seal in moisture, then I put about a quarter size amount of Curl Junkie Coffee-coco Cream Lite. On second day hair, I sometime use a bit of Curl Junkie Curls In a Bottle (Yeah...I'm a Curl Junkie junkie! Pricey, but worth it.)

momschicklets

Madora and LLL are much, much more knowledgable about BBB than me...I'm a newbie. :) But the one I use at the moment is a Conair wooden (no cushion base) 100% boar bristle brush I bought from walgreens about a month ago. I don't remember the price, but it seems to be of decent quality and hasn't shed bristles very much at all. It has been a good "first brush" for me so far. If it doesn't say, 100% boar bristle than more than likely it is reinforced with nylon, and you don't want that.

momschicklets
January 3rd, 2015, 08:14 AM
Thank you CoveredByLove! That was actually very helpful....I have a Walgreens close by and may check it out later today.

Madora
January 3rd, 2015, 08:29 AM
Well after reading through the last 20 pages or so of this thread, I think I'd like to try BBBing (took me half an hour just to figure out what that meant LOL). Can anyone suggest an affordable but quality brush for me though? I've looked around a bit at Sally's and Amazon, but not really sure what to look for. Madora and LLL, I'm so grateful that you two spend so much time helping others with this. You go to great lengths (see what I did there??) to explain, instruct and encourage....and it means so much to relative newbies like me :blossom:

Momschicklets, I recommend the Conair Classic Wood Natural Shine Booster, available at Target for $9.99. I liked it so much I bought two of them. The Conair has six rows of nicely placed bristle klumps on a slightly ovoid rectangular base. There is a small black, nubby Neophrene-like band around the neck of the brush which is supposed to give your thumb a better purchase when you brush. My hair hated that band so I took a box cutter and cut it off. Here's a link: http://www.target.com/p/conair-classic-wood-natural-shine-booster-hair-brush/-/A-13958189#prodSlot=_2_7

Please note that the brush IS 100% pure boar bristle, not plastic. The back is flat (about 2 inches across). Brush is about 8 inches long. Not to be confused with the square version which is not what I'd call hair friendly (shape wise and bristle wise).

One special note: I washed the Conair before I used it and it shed like a cat. I was very surprised and not happy when this happened as I've never had a brand NEW brush loose so many bristles upon a first washing (about 25!). However, after that initial washing, the brush has been as good as gold.

It does NOT penetrate down to the scalp but overall it does what I want it too in splendid fashion. If you desire a brush that penetrates down to the scalp, then the Madora brush is the brush for you. It is only available from the George Michael salons, like Enchantress, in Ohio, or the GM salon in NYC. Be warned: it is expensive $40.00 and it only has 4 rows of bristles, and is very, very narrow. I love it! But I alternate it with the Conair every other day as I'm hoping to extend the life of the Madora brush to at least 10 years. I hope this helps. If you have any bbb questions, please pm me! Thanks!

Selkie-
January 3rd, 2015, 08:40 AM
I am brushing with a BBB once a day in the morning and doing about 30 strokes. I am trying to build up slowly. How many times a day do others brush?

Thanks! :blossom:

Madora
January 3rd, 2015, 08:45 AM
I am brushing with a BBB once a day in the morning and doing about 30 strokes. I am trying to build up slowly. How many times a day do others brush?

Thanks! :blossom:

Hi, Selkie! I brush 50 to 60 strokes -- in the morning. If you possibly can, try and do your brushing right after you get up in the morning. Dr. Michael said that that time was the most optimum for brushing (something to do with the circulation). I've got 8 kitties so brushing is deferred until they are taken care of!

Selkie-
January 3rd, 2015, 09:48 AM
Hi, Selkie! I brush 50 to 60 strokes -- in the morning. If you possibly can, try and do your brushing right after you get up in the morning. Dr. Michael said that that time was the most optimum for brushing (something to do with the circulation). I've got 8 kitties so brushing is deferred until they are taken care of!

Thanks Madora. :flower:

I am on the right track then cause I am trying to do the BBB straight after getting up in the morning. My maine coon cat lies in the bathroom and watches me while I brush - he is learning to wait patiently for his breakfast! ;)

My scalp is feeling a little tender the last few days - is this normal when one starts BBB?

Madora
January 3rd, 2015, 10:07 AM
Thanks Madora. :flower:

I am on the right track then cause I am trying to do the BBB straight after getting up in the morning. My maine coon cat lies in the bathroom and watches me while I brush - he is learning to wait patiently for his breakfast! ;)

My scalp is feeling a little tender the last few days - is this normal when one starts BBB?

Yes, Selkie-, your scalp may be reacting to the brushing, particularly if you have not brushed before. If it is bothering you too much, perhaps you might dial back the number of strokes you are currently doing. Ideally, if you've never brushed, or it has been some time since you brushed, you should detangle your hair, then try 10 strokes. If your scalp is fine with 10, then increase the number of strokes by 5 more and see how your scalp responds. If you are brushing in the bent at the waist position, then it may be that your scalp tenderness is due to the fact that your follicles are still accustomizing themselves to being drawn in a different direction than they are accustomed to...hence your scalp tenderness. It's best to start out slowly and gradually increase the number of strokes over a 3 week period.

You've trained your Maine Coon well! My herd start tearing at the carpet if they think I'm late with their breakfast..and they eat early..6:30 AM!

LauraLongLocks
January 3rd, 2015, 01:59 PM
Well after reading through the last 20 pages or so of this thread, I think I'd like to try BBBing (took me half an hour just to figure out what that meant LOL). Can anyone suggest an affordable but quality brush for me though? I've looked around a bit at Sally's and Amazon, but not really sure what to look for. Madora and LLL, I'm so grateful that you two spend so much time helping others with this. You go to great lengths (see what I did there??) to explain, instruct and encourage....and it means so much to relative newbies like me :blossom: I still feel like a newbie, and ask Madora questions all the time. Poor lady probably feels hassled by me, lol.


Curlsgalore

Thanks! I should have posted a "before tamed" picture for comparison. :lol: My curl tightness depends on a lot...whether I air dried or not, what kind of styling product I used, and, of course, the weather. Right now its winter, but summer is coming! With air drying I get much more stretched out, due to the weight of the water. I'm trying to do more of that lately instead of using a diffuser. Out of the shower, I apply a few drops of mineral oil to seal in moisture, then I put about a quarter size amount of Curl Junkie Coffee-coco Cream Lite. On second day hair, I sometime use a bit of Curl Junkie Curls In a Bottle (Yeah...I'm a Curl Junkie junkie! Pricey, but worth it.)

momschicklets

Madora and LLL are much, much more knowledgable about BBB than me...I'm a newbie. :) But the one I use at the moment is a Conair wooden (no cushion base) 100% boar bristle brush I bought from walgreens about a month ago. I don't remember the price, but it seems to be of decent quality and hasn't shed bristles very much at all. It has been a good "first brush" for me so far. If it doesn't say, 100% boar bristle than more than likely it is reinforced with nylon, and you don't want that. I tried the Conair wooden brush but the bristles are too close together for me, and so they do not penetrate to my scalp.


Momschicklets, I recommend the Conair Classic Wood Natural Shine Booster, available at Target for $9.99. I liked it so much I bought two of them. The Conair has six rows of nicely placed bristle klumps on a slightly ovoid rectangular base. There is a small black, nubby Neophrene-like band around the neck of the brush which is supposed to give your thumb a better purchase when you brush. My hair hated that band so I took a box cutter and cut it off. Here's a link: http://www.target.com/p/conair-classic-wood-natural-shine-booster-hair-brush/-/A-13958189#prodSlot=_2_7

Please note that the brush IS 100% pure boar bristle, not plastic. The back is flat (about 2 inches across). Brush is about 8 inches long. Not to be confused with the square version which is not what I'd call hair friendly (shape wise and bristle wise).

One special note: I washed the Conair before I used it and it shed like a cat. I was very surprised and not happy when this happened as I've never had a brand NEW brush loose so many bristles upon a first washing (about 25!). However, after that initial washing, the brush has been as good as gold.

It does NOT penetrate down to the scalp but overall it does what I want it too in splendid fashion. If you desire a brush that penetrates down to the scalp, then the Madora brush is the brush for you. It is only available from the George Michael salons, like Enchantress, in Ohio, or the GM salon in NYC. Be warned: it is expensive $40.00 and it only has 4 rows of bristles, and is very, very narrow. I love it! But I alternate it with the Conair every other day as I'm hoping to extend the life of the Madora brush to at least 10 years. I hope this helps. If you have any bbb questions, please pm me! Thanks! Yes, the Conair didn't penetrate to my scalp, but my inexpensive Spornette DeVille I got on Amazon.com does penetrate to the scalp. It has a rubber cushion base, so that might be out for some of you who would prefer a wooden base. The Conair did do a decent job on my hair, but the Spornette is amazing on my scalp. It was under $15, with Prime shipping.

momschicklets
January 3rd, 2015, 02:02 PM
Well Madora and LLL, I sure am glad you mentioned that the brush doesn't penetrate to the scalp....because of course I ran out and bought one and tried it and was a bit baffled that it doesn't seem to touch anything but my top layer. But I guess it's not for detangling, right? It's to distribute the oils...so I'm going to use it for a couple of days and give it a chance to work. Everyone has such high praise for it so I will perhaps section my hair and do small parts at a time so it can do its thing. I'll keep you posted!
l;.

Madora
January 3rd, 2015, 03:30 PM
Well Madora and LLL, I sure am glad you mentioned that the brush doesn't penetrate to the scalp....because of course I ran out and bought one and tried it and was a bit baffled that it doesn't seem to touch anything but my top layer. But I guess it's not for detangling, right? It's to distribute the oils...so I'm going to use it for a couple of days and give it a chance to work. Everyone has such high praise for it so I will perhaps section my hair and do small parts at a time so it can do its thing. I'll keep you posted!
l;.

A brush is not a detangler. You use a wide tooth comb to detangle. The reason being: a brush has all those little bristles but a wide tooth comb has a limited number of tines to go through your hair, meaning less mechanical damage, provided you use the proper technique when detangling.

Sarahlabyrinth
January 3rd, 2015, 03:33 PM
I use about 50 strokes on my hair in the mornings. I don't brush it at night, it goes straight from its updo into a sleeping cap and is only detangled and brushed first thing in the morning.

Crumpet
January 5th, 2015, 04:00 PM
As a side note about cats (there seem to be a lot of cat keepers on the LHC!), I have to lock mine out of the bathroom whenever my hair is down, they think my hair is an amazing cat toy otherwise and do not aid the brushing process with their antics. They are only 6 months old now so maybe they'll calm down at some point.

arr
January 6th, 2015, 11:16 AM
Ive been reading this thread and watched LLL's video on proper brushing and was inspired to try it today. I really liked it! I followed the technique which was easy and i took my time, so i did not end up with a bunch of tangles. For the first time ever, i felt like my BBB actually penetrated to my scalp. It was way more effective for me than brushing with my head up. My only thing is, while doing it my scalp felt great, really energized if that makes sense, but now it feels a little sore. I only did 30 strokes. I read that this can happen and my follicles just need to adapt. Im going to do this every other day to get used to it.

Sarahlabyrinth
January 6th, 2015, 11:51 AM
Ive been reading this thread and watched LLL's video on proper brushing and was inspired to try it today. I really liked it! I followed the technique which was easy and i took my time, so i did not end up with a bunch of tangles. For the first time ever, i felt like my BBB actually penetrated to my scalp. It was way more effective for me than brushing with my head up. My only thing is, while doing it my scalp felt great, really energized if that makes sense, but now it feels a little sore. I only did 30 strokes. I read that this can happen and my follicles just need to adapt. Im going to do this every other day to get used to it and also because it really stimulated oil production for me.

That's great, arr, that you are enjoying inverted brushing :). Take it easy with how many strokes you do until your scalp gets used to it, do it really gently, and it is important to keep your brush really clean, because your brush is also helping to keep your hair clean and you can't do that with a dirty brush. It does make your scalp feel so energised!

arr
January 6th, 2015, 11:58 AM
Thank you sarahlabyrinth. Do you think 30 strokes every other day is a good plan to ease into it or should I change something? As I sit here I realize it's not my scalp that is sore but the actual hair follicles, just like when wearing an unfamiliar hairstyle for the first time.

Sarahlabyrinth
January 6th, 2015, 12:01 PM
Thank you sarahlabyrinth. Do you think 30 strokes every other day is a good plan to ease into it or should I change something? As I sit here I realize it's not my scalp that is sore but the actual hair follicles, just like when wearing an unfamiliar hairstyle for the first time.

Well, I would suggest maybe 10-15 strokes and see how you go with that. It won't take your follicles too long before they are lapping it up with delight:)You can increase the strokes later to whatever number you are happy with.

Crumpet
January 6th, 2015, 12:31 PM
Just chiming what Sarahlabyrinth already said: the GM brochure (and our own Madora) recommend starting with 10-15. That's what I'm doing. They say that consistency is better than the quantity of brushing, so I'm sticking with that for a while myself.

arr
January 6th, 2015, 12:43 PM
Thanks everyone. I'm going to switch to 10-15. How long have you been doing the inverted brushing crumpet? I'm wondering how long it takes for the follicles to adapt?

Crumpet
January 6th, 2015, 01:07 PM
I've been doing it for about a month, but not consistently (I did it very occasionally before then -- such as once a week or so) and have only become more regular in the past 5 days or so. Madora gave me some great advice that really changed how I comb out my hair ahead of time and I think that helps.

According to the GM brochure, you should move up very gradually, but some may be able to move up faster than others. I saw LLL's video just now and she does a lot of strokes (a lot more than I probably will), which seems to suit her. I think we all have lots of different responses. (LLL -- your hair looks SO glossy and thick by the way!).

arr
January 6th, 2015, 02:00 PM
I'm sorry to keep posting so much on this, but I'm getting increasingly alarmed. It's been several hours and my scalp is hurting even more. I'm not ready to give up on inverted brushing but is this normal? It hurts bad enough that it is distracting. I'm going to the gym now and washing my hair later. I'm hoping the washing will help. I Guess I'm just looking for reassurance that this is a normal side effect at the beginning. For the record, I never wear high buns because they hurt and also my brush is 100% boar bristle and medium stiffness. Too soft and it doesn't penetrate my hair.

Sarahlabyrinth
January 6th, 2015, 02:04 PM
You have likely just overdone the follicle stimulation. Particularly since you say that high buns hurt. Your follicles just aren't used to it and they are complaining vociferously. Leave them alone until the pain has gone and then try again with much less brushing. It can take time to get your follicles used to this kind of thing. Slowly, gradually, gently. Follicle pain is just AWFUL!

Once you have trained your follicles, inverted brushing won't hurt at all.

I upset my follicles once and they complained for 3 days afterwards.....

LauraLongLocks
January 6th, 2015, 02:08 PM
I've been doing it for about a month, but not consistently (I did it very occasionally before then -- such as once a week or so) and have only become more regular in the past 5 days or so. Madora gave me some great advice that really changed how I comb out my hair ahead of time and I think that helps.

According to the GM brochure, you should move up very gradually, but some may be able to move up faster than others. I saw LLL's video just now and she does a lot of strokes (a lot more than I probably will), which seems to suit her. I think we all have lots of different responses. (LLL -- your hair looks SO glossy and thick by the way!). Thank you, and someone counted for me... it was 92 strokes in my video. I am sure I do at least 80 every time, if not 90+.


I'm sorry to keep posting so much on this, but I'm getting increasingly alarmed. It's been several hours and my scalp is hurting even more. I'm not ready to give up on inverted brushing but is this normal? It hurts bad enough that it is distracting. I'm going to the gym now and washing my hair later. I'm hoping the washing will help. I Guess I'm just looking for reassurance that this is a normal side effect at the beginning. For the record, I never wear high buns because they hurt and also my brush is 100% boar bristle and medium stiffness. Too soft and it doesn't penetrate my hair. I didn't experience any soreness or tenderness when I started brushing. The sides of my head, above my ears, is the only tender area I have. I try to take it very gentle on those areas or it causes me pain. I'm actually considering a softer brush for those side parts. I hope your tenderness stops. I would definitely not brush more than 10 strokes next time you brush. I brush twice a day (because my scalp craves it), but if I was having the soreness you are having, I would brush only once a day.

Islandgrrl
January 6th, 2015, 02:18 PM
I have what is perhaps an idiotic question.

If the BBB doesn't penetrate to the scalp for the majority of my brushing (it does only around the "edges"), how does this benefit my scalp? And how do my hair follicles know good things are happening?

I know....I'm probably missing something obvious here....

LauraLongLocks
January 6th, 2015, 02:22 PM
I have what is perhaps an idiotic question.

If the BBB doesn't penetrate to the scalp for the majority of my brushing (it does only around the "edges"), how does this benefit my scalp? And how do my hair follicles know good things are happening?

I know....I'm probably missing something obvious here....

If it isn't penetrating your scalp, you might try sectioning it so that you can get the full benefit on the scalp. I have average thickness hair, and my brush does penetrate to the scalp, but if my hair was thicker it would not. I did not like the Conair brush because it didn't penetrate to the scalp, and I like the stimulation to my scalp from it. If sectioning doesn't help as much as you want, then maybe you need a brush with stiffer bristles.

Crumpet
January 6th, 2015, 02:42 PM
I have what is perhaps an idiotic question.

If the BBB doesn't penetrate to the scalp for the majority of my brushing (it does only around the "edges"), how does this benefit my scalp? And how do my hair follicles know good things are happening?

I know....I'm probably missing something obvious here....

I haven't had this problem due to both my thinner hair and the brush I use works for it. Madora recommended the Madora George Michael brush since it penetrated to her scalp (I think I'm right about this). You may need a brush such as that one for your super-thick hair.

Madora
January 6th, 2015, 02:45 PM
I have what is perhaps an idiotic question.

If the BBB doesn't penetrate to the scalp for the majority of my brushing (it does only around the "edges"), how does this benefit my scalp? And how do my hair follicles know good things are happening?

I know....I'm probably missing something obvious here....

That is a good question, Islandgrrl! While the brush may not penetrate down to your scalp, the bent at the waist position allows for better blood circulation in your scalp area while you are brushing...whether or not your brush bristles actually penetrate all the way down.

There must be something to this because I never would have been able to grow to my current length w/o help from good circulation and daily brushing.

LadyLongLocks
January 6th, 2015, 04:38 PM
I never do 100 strokes...would take me forever. 15-25 maybe, and not very often. Floor length is not easy to go from scalp to tips. I mainly just brush the length in a ponytail. Sometimes I use coconut oil and brush it into my hair (a specific brush, soft)
I did however grow out my bangs in 2005 following his philosophy. I knew someone who studied under him and they encouraged me to grow them out. They even sent GM a photo of me with bangs and he was mad I had them! My bangs are to my knees or longer now. Do I think they stunt growth? Probably not. I had long hair(tbl) for 10 years with bangs and my hair grew fine.
I was told any hair around the perimeter of the hair line that is short will stunt growth. Taken with a grain of salt and all due respect.

Ingrid
January 6th, 2015, 05:19 PM
Does that mean my baby hair regrowth after shedding all around my scalp actually stuns growth? :ponder:

LauraLongLocks
January 6th, 2015, 05:26 PM
I haven't read the book (yet) but I think the idea is that more hair protects the hair as it grows. So if you have some short hair, or layers, or baby regrowth, the longer hair wouldn't be as protected from damage as it could be if there was more hair. Am I making sense? I don't know if that's what he meant, but it's the best I can come up with. After I read the book I will know better his reasoning.

LauraLongLocks
January 6th, 2015, 05:53 PM
double post

meteor
January 6th, 2015, 06:45 PM
There must be something to this because I never would have been able to grow to my current length w/o help from good circulation and daily brushing.
This is very interesting, Madora! :) I'm very curious as to why. Do you suspect that your hair would fall out earlier than your genetic norm without the scalp stimulation from the brush?


I haven't read the book (yet) but I think the idea is that more hair protects the hair as it grows. So if you have some short hair, or layers, or baby regrowth, the longer hair wouldn't be as protected from damage as it could be if there was more hair. Am I making sense? I don't know if that's what he meant, but it's the best I can come up with. After I read the book I will know better his reasoning.

This is very logical, LauraLongLocks. :thumbsup: To me, at least this explains why canopy hair tends to show more sun-bleach and other forms of damage compared to the underlayers, as canopy hair covers the rest, and it also explains why hair that is always covered with a scarf or something (say, for cultural reasons) often appears pretty luscious. I don't know if it relates directly to bangs though. However, bangs often tend to be abused by styling, frequent washing, brushing, constant touching - so I can see how that layer of hair may be exposed to too much manipulation and potential damage. So I can sort of see how somebody like GM who wanted his clients' hair to be thick, long and in optimal condition would prefer bangs grown out? But I still suspect that it was a bit of his personal preference, rather than some kind of real need.

Madora
January 6th, 2015, 06:53 PM
This is very interesting, Madora! :) I'm very curious as to why. Do you suspect that your hair would fall out earlier than your genetic norm without the scalp stimulation from the brush?



This is very logical, LauraLongLocks. :thumbsup: To me, at least this explains why canopy hair tends to show more sun-bleach and other forms of damage compared to the underlayers, as canopy hair covers the rest, and it also explains why hair that is always covered with a scarf or something (say, for cultural reasons) often appears pretty luscious. I don't know if it relates directly to bangs though. However, bangs often tend to be abused by styling, frequent washing, brushing, constant touching - so I can see how that layer of hair may be exposed to too much manipulation and potential damage. So I can sort of see how somebody like GM who wanted his clients' hair to be thick, long and in optimal condition would prefer bangs grown out? But I still suspect that it was a bit of his personal preference, rather than some kind of real need.

Meteor, while I think my years of brushing have been beneficial to my hair health, I don't think the brushing would have any bearing on when the hair fell out. When the hair has reached its final peak, that's it, it falls out. I think brushing is beneficial to the scalp in that it helps stimulate the follicles to promote growth...IF the brush bristles reach down that far. That's the only fly in the ointment...finding a bbb that will do that. I never had any success in that respect until I purchased the Madora brush a few months ago.

sourgrl
January 6th, 2015, 08:12 PM
Question for those using the GM conditioners: Do they have silicones in them? If so, which ones?

LauraLongLocks
January 7th, 2015, 10:00 AM
Just have to share my milestone I reached this morning. I have been brushing with a BBB twice daily for just over a month now, and this morning when I brushed I didn't lose a single hair. Not even one! I'm sure I'll lose a few hairs tonight when I brush, but this is incredibly awesome. Here's hoping this keeps up and someday I'll have iii thickness.

Gertrude
January 7th, 2015, 12:13 PM
Question for those using the GM conditioners: Do they have silicones in them? If so, which ones?

No, as they're actually older than the silicone generation of conditioners. The treatment is very like the 12 minute conditioner, and the 60 second conditioner is a diluted version of that. There is also a light conditioning cream rinse which is close to the cream rinse in formulation . George Michael was for several years in the 1970s the spokesperson/hair expert talking head for Clairol. The early GM salons used Clairol products.

Clairol made , perhaps, the first " deep conditioner" which they called the 20 minute conditioner. It came in a small white pot. I am no chemist but it's definitely first cousin to the George Michael treatment and 12 minute conditioner. In those days you had mainly cream rinses, light lotions full of quats changing the electrical charge on hair and make it less flyaway. Polyquaternium compounds were big in the 1970s and made fabric conditioner possible to make your clothes softer and less static as well as making hair anti-static so less tangly. Quaterniums also fill gaps in the cuticle and act a lot like silicones. Without being silicones. A fair number of quats actually don't rinse at all and evaporate off hair. Others rinse poorly and build up. Yet others rinse clean and clear away. They can be hugely moisturising. Because of the way they alter electrical charge they will cling more to parts of hair with the cuticle disrupted and with more of the protein showing under a microscope. So suddenly you got these clever conditioners in the 1980s that conditioned the dry bits of your hair more! They all did. Cover Girl also marketed a lipstick you could revive by pressing your lips together. Works with any lipstick. Back to GM conditioners

Slicone free yes, but all the conditioners are full of quats in the GM line. There are lots of glycerins, fatty alcohols, thickeners, many preservatives, a bit of panthenol B5 which was also big in the 70s and perfectly good, in the 12 minute conditioner. And the baby powder like perfume products had until Vidal Sassoon came up with his marzipan smelling line of salon products. There is a lot of myristyl myristate in the 12 minute conditioner and the one hour treatment. It's not for those with acne as it blocks pores, but woah is it a smoothing and luxurious feeling compound. Very softening, comb glides through hair afterwards.

The cream rinse and 60 second conditioners also have distearyldimonium chloride. It's a positive surfactant, very cheap, in lots of cheap conditioners. It rinses poorly so clings well to hair. But builds up. They also both contain a lot of alcohol. It makes my fine hair a bit sticky, so it tangles. Except for the hair in my nape, mine doesn't much tangle normally. The shampoo used before the treatment is safe but drying so it means hair is super receptive to the quats and fatty ingredients.

It may be why you are not supposed to use the conditioners often and the GM theory warns of over-conditioning. You are supposed to have weeks with no conditioner.

I am sorry, because I always feel like this ghastly ice bucket pouring cold water on GM despite being a regular. The prices of the products are high and the hype surrounding them is to me a bit unintentionally comical. My mother swore by permanent waves which destroyed her hair but the Clairol 20 minute conditioner was like redemption for hair. So I remember it well. Simple products are often good, and there are plenty of oldie but goodies in skin care . But the 12 minute conditioner is $ 50 here. But I am sure someone out there has hair for which it is the perfect conditioner. Nothing harmful.

What keeps me still going after three years is the S&Ds, the trims, the gentle, pampering treatment clients receive, the up-dos and most of all a genuine enthusiasm for long hair and your long hair. it's not a temple, it's not like heaven on earth, it is a very good hair dressing set of salons, as long as they don't rest on their laurels and retain that genuine enthusiasm for long hair and for hunting split ends. The skill and the ability to really trust the person with the skill.

Customers stay loyal for decades, but that's as long as the unique care is there at the salon.

CoveredByLove
January 7th, 2015, 02:16 PM
Just have to share my milestone I reached this morning. I have been brushing with a BBB twice daily for just over a month now, and this morning when I brushed I didn't lose a single hair. Not even one! I'm sure I'll lose a few hairs tonight when I brush, but this is incredibly awesome. Here's hoping this keeps up and someday I'll have iii thickness.

Congrats LLL! That's wonderful! :applause: I wish you iii thickness in the near future! :D

I received my used copy of "George Michael's Secrets For Long Hair", and I am so glad I ordered it. I've been devouring it since it arrived. Reading his theory "from the horse's mouth" is much better (and more accurate!) than "hear-say". I can relate to his theory so far in many ways, and I feel his claims are founded on both wisdom and expertise.

arr
January 7th, 2015, 03:54 PM
Just have to share my milestone I reached this morning. I have been brushing with a BBB twice daily for just over a month now, and this morning when I brushed I didn't lose a single hair. Not even one! I'm sure I'll lose a few hairs tonight when I brush, but this is incredibly awesome. Here's hoping this keeps up and someday I'll have iii thickness.

Very interesting. Is it the idea that it strengthens the hair follicles so that they hold onto the hairs better, thus less shedding? Or is it that, with so much brushing, one just stays on top of the shed hairs better? Either way, im glad the inverted brushing is working so well for you. I cant wait to see what kind of results i will have myself.

meteor
January 7th, 2015, 04:10 PM
Thank you so much for sharing the details on GM conditioning, Gertrude! :D It's truly fascinating.
I found it particularly interesting how, according to GM, you are supposed to go for weeks without conditioner. Did they at least recommend "creme rinse" after every wash?


Just have to share my milestone I reached this morning. I have been brushing with a BBB twice daily for just over a month now, and this morning when I brushed I didn't lose a single hair. Not even one!
Congratulations, LauraLongLocks! :D Sounds absolutely awesome!
I'm curious: when you started brushing, at the very beginning, did you see more shedding than normal? Was there an early spike in shedding rates or was it the same as before the BBB? Thank you! :flower:

LauraLongLocks
January 7th, 2015, 07:36 PM
Congrats LLL! That's wonderful! :applause: I wish you iii thickness in the near future! :D

I received my used copy of "George Michael's Secrets For Long Hair", and I am so glad I ordered it. I've been devouring it since it arrived. Reading his theory "from the horse's mouth" is much better (and more accurate!) than "hear-say". I can relate to his theory so far in many ways, and I feel his claims are founded on both wisdom and expertise.


Very interesting. Is it the idea that it strengthens the hair follicles so that they hold onto the hairs better, thus less shedding? Or is it that, with so much brushing, one just stays on top of the shed hairs better? Either way, im glad the inverted brushing is working so well for you. I cant wait to see what kind of results i will have myself.



Congratulations, LauraLongLocks! :D Sounds absolutely awesome!
I'm curious: when you started brushing, at the very beginning, did you see more shedding than normal? Was there an early spike in shedding rates or was it the same as before the BBB? Thank you! :flower:

Thanks, everyone. I am delighted by this development in my shedding rate. I think the increased blood flow has something to do with it. In any case, I'm impressed. I did not experience an increase of shedding at first. No, it immediately started to reduce. I can't wait to get my copy of GM's book. It's on the way!

sourgrl
January 7th, 2015, 07:41 PM
Gertrude thank you so much for that detailed response. I find it all very interesting.

Sarahlabyrinth
January 7th, 2015, 08:52 PM
I too noticed this morning that I shed less hairs than normal when I did my BBBing. I will watch and see if this continues....

Gertrude
January 9th, 2015, 07:25 AM
Thank you so much for sharing the details on GM conditioning, Gertrude! :D It's truly fascinating.
I found it particularly interesting how, according to GM, you are supposed to go for weeks without conditioner. Did they at least recommend "creme rinse" after every wash?


Congratulations, LauraLongLocks! :D Sounds absolutely awesome!
I'm curious: when you started brushing, at the very beginning, did you see more shedding than normal? Was there an early spike in shedding rates or was it the same as before the BBB? Thank you! :flower:

[QUOTE=meteor;2913528]Thank you so much for sharing the details on GM conditioning, Gertrude! :D It's truly fascinating.
I found it particularly interesting how, according to GM, you are supposed to go for weeks without conditioner. Did they at least recommend "creme rinse" after every wash?


Thanks Meteor! The " without conditioner" is actually not really without. George Michael had a lot of very good ideas. He drew conclusions from them that weren't always right, but they were early days.

The GM method of washing consists of taking a small quantity of the 12 minute conditioner and dividing that in your wet hair before washing the scalp with your shampoo. The whole thing preferably bending over so your hair is over your face . Then you apply the cream rinse. The method for that is the same as my mum's fabric softener/conditioner. She was frugal and there was a brand where you bought a small bottle and then put a teaspoon of the solution in a plastic jug and added half a litre of water.Half a US quart roughly. Actually environmentally sound too, fewer plastic bottles. So you mix the cream rinse solution, keep it aside and when you have finished rinsing out the shampoo you pour it over your hair.

The 12 minute conditioner doesn't rinse out completely, the cream rinse is the best selling GM product as it feels almost like a leave-in, so actually your hair is conditioned. Not in a moisturised way, and also if you are prone to build up the charm wears off. My hair becomes more dry and feels gooped after a few uses. But I get horribly gooped by any formulation with guar in it and lots and lots of happy long hairs swear by it and get benefit from it.

In all cases nobody thought of anything CWC like until decades later, he was a pioneer then. After I bought, ouch my wallet, the GM ones I found the right C and the right W and CWC has made my hair much happier and it shows and has helped me grow past BSL with shiny hair with unfrayed ends. For a whole inch, so far, but for me a record (-;

The GM treatment, one hour with heat cap, does stay on your hair for a long time. I wash every four days or so, and after the treatment it's still noticeable for the next two washes. George Michael concluded from that that the treatment ab-sorbed into your hair, when actually it ad-sorbs, sticks to your hair. But it wears off in the end. The GM salon talks of the treatment oxidising in the hair, which would make it a permanent colourant like effect.

When hair structure was considered by cosmetic chemists and the way permanent waves and bleaches worked was looked at with a view of making conditioners to restore the " health" as in feel of the hair the role of the cuticle wasn't really understood.

The scales do lift a little when hair gets wet, but it's not like they open and close like a clam shell. The cuticle closes again without really opening Dramatically lifting the cuticle for perming or bleaching means damaging the hair. The cuticle scales won't close again as before. If you have short permed hair it will soak conditioner up. If you have long hair in very good condition, worn up, handled gently it will " need" conditioner less than the permed hair. Certainly if you avoid drying shampoos. Back in the day there was optimism and conditioners worked miracles and " changed" hair. Now there are much better products and this forum! So it's something lost and gained every day.

arr
January 21st, 2015, 06:00 PM
Just checking in to say that my follicles are no longer hurting when I do my inverted brushing. I would say it took about 10 days or so. I find that my scalp and hair feel quite happy with around 30 strokes, give or take a few. I see no need to increase, personally. I was worried it would make my hair greasier but the inverted position really spreads the sebum way better than when I used to use the BBB in an upright position. I'm really happy this is working so well. It feels magnificent while brushing and my hair is softer and shinier than ever.

Madora
January 21st, 2015, 08:02 PM
Just checking in to say that my follicles are no longer hurting when I do my inverted brushing. I would say it took about 10 days or so. I find that my scalp and hair feel quite happy with around 30 strokes, give or take a few. I see no need to increase, personally. I was worried it would make my hair greasier but the inverted position really spreads the sebum way better than when I used to use the BBB in an upright position. I'm really happy this is working so well. It feels magnificent while brushing and my hair is softer and shinier than ever.

Glad to hear that brushing is working for you, arr, and that your hair is happy with it! Thanks for your input!

TaterTot
January 28th, 2015, 08:52 PM
Bought a BBB you had recommended from Target online somewhere in this thread, thanks for leaving so much advice, I have ultra short hair right now but I'm going to get my scalp used to it. My cat wants one too now!

midnight_blue
January 29th, 2015, 07:36 AM
Ah... I gave up using a BBB because while my lengths loved it it was making my canopy severely oily and as I'm trying to stretch washes adding more grease was not helpful! Hopefully using the inverted method will stop that happening so much. I need to buy another brush because although the listing said 100% boar bristle, when it arrived it had the word "reinforced" in small letters, not happy! Plus I need a softer one for my son's hair which is very fine.

Sarahlabyrinth
February 5th, 2015, 08:52 PM
Does anyone know how to, or can demonstrate George Michael's method of dividing the hair into seven parts for doing flattering updos?

memeow
February 5th, 2015, 10:45 PM
I don't know whether this is the same thing, but I know many hair stylists use 7 sections for cutting. Do you think these are the same sections?

http://www.hairfinder.com/techniques/sectioninghair.htm

Crumpet
February 17th, 2015, 08:36 AM
Just checking in to say that I started BBB-ing in earnest a few months ago. Madora kindly gave me some additional guidance after I started and helped me to stick with it. I think it has helped my hair. I definitely have less shedding, which is pretty wonderful. I think my hair is also smoother and shinier from spreading the sebum. I'm glad I started this and I plan to stick with it.

Madora
February 17th, 2015, 09:12 AM
Just checking in to say that I started BBB-ing in earnest a few months ago. Madora kindly gave me some additional guidance after I started and helped me to stick with it. I think it has helped my hair. I definitely have less shedding, which is pretty wonderful. I think my hair is also smoother and shinier from spreading the sebum. I'm glad I started this and I plan to stick with it.

Great to read you're having good results with bbb-ing, Crumpet! Thanks for sharing!

LauraLongLocks
February 17th, 2015, 10:01 AM
Just checking in to say that I started BBB-ing in earnest a few months ago. Madora kindly gave me some additional guidance after I started and helped me to stick with it. I think it has helped my hair. I definitely have less shedding, which is pretty wonderful. I think my hair is also smoother and shinier from spreading the sebum. I'm glad I started this and I plan to stick with it.

Yay! Madora's help meant a world of difference with my hair also.

georgia_peach
March 6th, 2015, 03:19 PM
My Denman BBB has just arrived and I'm excited to start a regular brushing routine! It's been about 6 years or so since I've had a BBB. And I've got no clue why I stopped using one. Think it had something to do with a dog eating my brush and then cutting my hair off (not necessarily related events). What I DO remember is that my hair and scalped LOVED it. :)