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PraiseCheeses
December 7th, 2010, 09:40 PM
This may fall into the category of Really Stupid Questions, but I have to ask anyway...:oops:

In just over a month, my hair is at least an inch and a half longer than when I had it chopped and just *looks* a lot longer. From what I know and from what I've read here about growth rates, this seems highly unlikely. I generally follow a good diet, take a multivitamin, etc, but I don't do anything like Monistat or castor oil or silica and protein pills or anything like that, so I question where this is coming from.

What makes me raise the question is this: Up until a week ago, I would straighten and dry my hair either with a blowdryer or by bunning, waiting, brushing straight, rebunning in the opposite direction, waiting, brushing straight, etc. In either case, it was a lot of damp brushing and pulling to straighten.

When I picked up a shed strand the other day, out of curiosity I tested its elasticity. Now I've heard that hair can stretch 30% when pulled slowly, but mine barely stretched at all before it snapped. Here is my stupid question: Have I stretched out all my hair with all of the damp brushing and pulling? Is it possible to do that? In my mind that could certainly account for both the obscenely fast gain in length and the lack of elasticity in a shed strand (if it was already stretched out). Is this possible, or is this like the time I was a little kid and thought people died because they ran out of blood? (You could bleed to death by being shot or cutting a major blood vessel, and old people were all wrinkly because their blood had drained little by little through all the little cuts they'd had throughout their life and they were running low. And since red blood cells lack a nucleus, they couldn't reproduce like other cells. It all fit. No one bothered to tell me about bone marrow for some time.:p)

I am not asking about whether I am speeding up my growth by pulling hair out of my follicles like out of a spider's spinnarets. I am asking if it's possible to brush and pull the hair too much when it's wet or damp and permanently stretch it to the point where it won't snap back.

Sorry if this is a really silly question. :run:

LornaDoone
December 8th, 2010, 12:01 AM
I had to laugh at your theory on why old people get wrinkled and die.:laugh: It reminded me of the time when I was a kid and got the idea in my head that that your heart would only beat a set number of times in your life. I avoided exercise because I knew that made your heart beat faster and I didn't want to die any sooner than I had to. :rolleyes:

To answer your question: yes and no
It is possible to stretch out your hair, but it will typically only be one or two strands not your whole head. Have you ever found a hair that has a very tight spiral curl for the last inch or so? Or even somewhere in the middle of the hair? That would be a hair that likely got caught in your brush or something and was stretched beyond it's limit. I find them occasionally but a lot less often since I switched from brushes to combs.

As for why your shed hair snapped instead of stretched, I would say your hair was dry and in need of moisture. It was too brittle to stretch very far. This might be a good time to try a SMT.

PraiseCheeses
December 8th, 2010, 01:05 AM
Thanks so much for your response! I will certainly try an SMT sometime soon (been thinking about trying one for a while now) and then just lie back and revel in how fast my hair is growing! (I'm also quitting the repeated brushing while wet - that can't be good no matter what.)

I had to chuckle at your theory (and your preventative measures) as well! I'd love to see a thread sometime about all the crazy ideas everyone had when they were little about how the world worked! :D

Cailie
December 8th, 2010, 01:15 AM
did you try to wet some shed hair (leave it under water a few minutes), let it dry naturally, and test if the elasticity is back ?

what about water followed by some oil ?

I agree with time for deep conditionner ! :)

Igor
December 9th, 2010, 09:32 AM
What makes me raise the question is this: Up until a week ago, I would straighten and dry my hair either with a blowdryer or by bunning, waiting, brushing straight, rebunning in the opposite direction, waiting, brushing straight, etc. In either case, it was a lot of damp brushing and pulling to straighten.

When I picked up a shed strand the other day, out of curiosity I tested its elasticity. Now I've heard that hair can stretch 30% when pulled slowly, but mine barely stretched at all before it snapped. Here is my stupid question: Have I stretched out all my hair with all of the damp brushing and pulling? Is it possible to do that? In my mind that could certainly account for both the obscenely fast gain in length and the lack of elasticity in a shed strand (if it was already stretched out)
Damp brushing and pulling cant do that
You have damaged the internal hair structure and protein bonds with blow-dryer and straight iron
The protein bonds and structure in hair is what gives it both elasticity and the ability to ďfreezeĒ in shape when it dries up
When hair snaps instead of stretching itís because of lack of protein or damage to the protein structures in it
You might be able to add back protein to the hairs using protein treatments, but itís not sure you can get the undamaged elasticity back