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Niwa
November 3rd, 2010, 02:39 PM
How can one maintain or promote one's thickness from root to tip? I wonder if anyone who is also concerned with avoiding fairy tale ends would like to brainstorm with me (or share, if they have already discovered a way to maintain thickness). Clearly, cutting off the tapered ends is one approach, but I am thinking of how to avoid the need for cutting in the first place by promoting thickness as the hair grows out.

Is there anyone whose hair used to taper, but no longer does?

Also, can hair taper for reasons other than damage or heavy shedding? I used to think that taper (aka "fairy tale ends") was a sign of damage, but since joining this forum, I have come across women who seem knowledgeable and who have hair that seems healthy, yet their hair still tapers a lot. Granted, their hair could be damaged on the ends.

aenflex
November 3rd, 2010, 02:44 PM
Not being an expert I would say that S&D can lead to different tapers, as can purposeful layers. As can damage/weathering of the ends, since they are oldest. I think a nice blunt hemline can help with the 'appearance' of thicker hair. But getting hair to have the same circumference from root to tip is still a mystery, to me anyway :) Some folks, myself included, use Henna or Henna glosses to get some extra thickness.

Oh, and - some people like fairy-tale ends, they have the taper on purpose :)

OhioLisa
November 3rd, 2010, 02:55 PM
Also, can hair taper for reasons other than damage or heavy shedding? I used to think that taper (aka "fairy tale ends") was a sign of damage, but since joining this forum, I have come across women who seem knowledgeable and who have hair that seems healthy, yet their hair still tapers a lot. Granted, their hair could be damaged on the ends.

Some people have a taper no matter what. Hair does not have to be blunt-cut and thick-ended to be healthy. I speak from experience. Thanks.

Niwa
November 3rd, 2010, 02:58 PM
Some people have a taper no matter what. Hair does not have to be blunt-cut and thick-ended to be healthy. I speak from experience. Thanks.Yes, as I observed in my post, it does seem some people's hair just tapers naturally. Your hair is no less beautiful for its taper, however. :) The updos in your signature are gorgeous.

Do you have any ideas on why your hair tapers naturally? For instance, might it be that different parts of your hair have different terminal lengths?

Night_Kitten
November 3rd, 2010, 02:59 PM
I have considerable taper (hopefully most of it is from pre-LHC damage), I plan to start trimming more regularly after I reach classic to try and thicken up the ends, as that's the only way I know of to try and reduce taper, but that slows down the growth considerably... :( I wish there was a way to avoid taper completely, that would be awsome :)

jel
November 3rd, 2010, 03:13 PM
A taper on healthy hair is a sign of different terminal lengths of individual hairs. Basically, some hairs finish their growth cycle faster than others. So, to avoid taper, you must keep your hair trimmed to the length of the shortest terminal hair shaft. As to how to determine that - observation!

Also, you could look into supplements that can prolong a hair's lifecycle. I read that MSM has that effect, but some people believe that it can also lead to very many hairs shedding at the same time after a prolonged life...

Protecting the ends wouldn't hurt, either. Protective updos, gentle handling, oiling... Obviously, do not S&D individual splits but have regular blunt trims. However, ultimately, the taper is about individual hairs' terminal lengths.

BTW, I personally appreciate the fairy tale ends look, as is obvious from my siggy (including the link to the No Trimming Club)!

princessp
November 3rd, 2010, 03:19 PM
I have curly ends, so it is hard to see if I have a taper or fairy tales. My hair is past waist. Once I feel like my dry hair has reached tailbone (it is there when wet), I guess I'll have to re-evaluate and maybe do a trim to thicken my hemline. I haven't cut my hair since last March. I'm very interested to hear what others have done to thicken theirs.

Gulbahar
November 3rd, 2010, 03:40 PM
Do you have any ideas on why your hair tapers naturally? For instance, might it be that different parts of your hair have different terminal lengths?
Might be. But one of the main reasons is that hair is constantly growing, shedding, regrowing. Once a hair has reached the end of its growth cycle it stops growing and after a couple of weeks it falls out. After a while a new hair starts growing from the same follicle. See, it STARTS growing - it isn't magically long the first moment it surfaces. And at the same time the other hairs on the head all are of a different age - and thus of a different length.
In fact, the only way to have hair of only one length on your head would be to somehow synchronise the growth cycles of all your hairs. But then they also would all fall out at the same moment and you'd be bald. :D
How much taper you have depends on genetics too. Some people do have a lot and some hardly have any taper at all. Not fair. :rolleyes:

spidermom
November 3rd, 2010, 03:50 PM
The only way I know to keep ends on the thick side is regular small trims. Each hair on your head has its own growth cycle. Some grow faster, some grow slower, some grow for a longer period of time, others grow for only a few months to a couple of years, then shed out.

Trimming keeps more hairs on the same level. Nearly everybody I have ever seen who did not trim had a lot of taper no matter how healthy the hair. But in spite of trimming, I think that most people are going to develop at least somewhat of a taper because the percentage of hairs that stay on your head long enough to gain the most length is going to be smaller in percentage than hairs that shed out sooner at shorter lengths.

It looks like I have a large percentage of hairs that will get to waist length, and from there the thickness tapers out in spite of trimming. At nearly classic length (picture in my growing concern album), the ends are see-through on the left side (right side is thicker).

Vermelha
November 3rd, 2010, 03:51 PM
Here are a few ideas:
Take MSM, Biotin and B-Vitamins - these vitamins are great for prolonging the hair growth cycle and promoting thicker, fuller hair growth. Taken together seems to give the best results. (Consult your doctor first before starting a vitamin regimen)

Ditching the shampoo - Regular shampooing is an American/Western trend that is pretty much misleading towards getting healthy, thick hair. Hair only really needs to be washed twice a week, or even less, and you don't have to use shampoo. I know many Indian women (who are known for their lush hair) who wash weekly to every two weeks with herbs that they prepare at home and various ingredients. Shampoo strips the cuticle and dries out hair. Most people can get away with not shampooing and using natural alternatives (hint: Most, some have to have shampoo).

Scalp Massages - Whether you use oil or not, scalp massages can be very helpful. Some use a brush to stimulate their scalp, while others just use their fingers. However you do it, it can definitely help stimulate bloodflow (while also being very relaxing). Oils are great too! Some use olive and jojoba oil (for moisture), castor oil (for a clean scalp/thickening) and coconut oil (for stronger roots and hair).

Eating differently - Foods high in proteins and antioxidants are great for hair growth while cutting back on bad things that compromise growth. Excess sugar and bad fats aren't good for hair growth. Eating more dark, leafy greens and beans (I <3 beans!), lentils, other legumes are great. People may avoid this step, but it is probably the most essential step towards thick hair and a healthy body overall.

A good cut (or trim) - Keeping the hair trimmed is very helpful, but not too often. Search and Destroy method may be nice for maintaining length, but it also causes the hair to taper (if you're not into that). It's just best to cut all of the hair evenly if you want the hair to appear thick and cut it as it grows to keep it that way. If you're taking care of your hair, you won't need to cut any more.

Maintenance and regular daily styling - Avoid too tight hair styles (like braids or tightly pulled-back styles) and avoid heat and opt for air drying. Wearing hair looser can help, whether down or up.

*phew* that was a lot of stuff! Anywho, HTH!

MsBubbles
November 3rd, 2010, 04:02 PM
In addition to what everybody else has already said, hang out here a few months, read and absorb all the info of so much experience! I don't think there is a magic bullet or single solution, but a combination of what works best for your hair, and causes it the least amount of damage. Damage can contribute to an unwanted taper so I'd start off by reading Nightshade's damage article in the articles section. :)

Niwa
November 3rd, 2010, 04:14 PM
Vermelha, that was fantastic information! Thank you. I am doing everything you suggested except for the scalp massages. Just a little over a year ago, I had mid-back length hair that was thick from root to tip, so I have achieved it before at that length, and know I can get all my hair to be blunt and thick at waist length. I want to make sure it continues to be thick at longer lengths, so I figure I should make that a priority now.

Spidermom, your post was great too. I suppose, after doing all one can, one can only hope that most of one's hairs can reach one's goal length before shedding.

MsBubbles - thanks for the recommendation.

Great posts so far, everyone!

Vermelha
November 3rd, 2010, 04:21 PM
Vermelha, that was fantastic information! Thank you. I am doing everything you suggested except for the scalp massages. Just a little over a year ago, I had mid-back length hair that was thick from root to tip, so I have achieved it before at that length, and know I can get all my hair to be blunt and thick at waist length. I want to make sure it continues to be thick at longer lengths, so I figure I should make that a priority now.

Spidermom, your post was great too. I suppose, after doing all one can, one can only hope that most of one's hairs can reach one's goal length before shedding.

MsBubbles - thanks for the recommendation.

Great posts so far, everyone!

Glad I could help some :) Growing thicker/fuller hair is my mission too, so I've spent years preparing and learning others' habits, and they're paying off for me so far. Good luck on your journey!

OhioLisa
November 3rd, 2010, 04:27 PM
What you also need to keep in mind is that everyone has different results, so the key is finding what works for YOU. For some, supplements don't do much. For others, it helps a lot. Many people, especially those of us with oily skin and fine hair combo, NEED to wash more often, and our hair actually benefits from doing so. For some of us, scalp massages actually increase shedding, so the benefits are far outweighed. Some people can also S&D without a noticeable impact on thickness. Just saying, it's a lot of trial and error, so blanket statements and claims are not necessarily beneficial.

Vermelha
November 3rd, 2010, 04:37 PM
^Well, finding what works for one can be hard though, especially when you don't know where to start...or even what works to begin with.

Maybe connecting with someone who may have the same hair as you could be helpful. See what they do, try it out, stick with it, and if you don't like it, modify or try something else. I guess that could be a start :)

Aliped
November 3rd, 2010, 04:43 PM
I have considerable taper (hopefully most of it is from pre-LHC damage), I plan to start trimming more regularly after I reach classic to try and thicken up the ends, as that's the only way I know of to try and reduce taper, but that slows down the growth considerably... :( I wish there was a way to avoid taper completely, that would be awsome :)

Yup. me too!:pumpkin:

mira-chan
November 3rd, 2010, 06:54 PM
My hair tapers a lot, I don't have any splits or damage in it until past classic length (last 2 inches at most). It's just how it grows plus I had a shed that reduced my hair thickness significantly a while ago.

A couple of my hairs can grow over two inches in one month, others take more than half a year to grow the same amount. I stopped trimming for a while so it naturally grew into a taper.

As is, to have no taper I have a choice or cutting to above waist, which would leave me with fewer updo options (not what I want), or patiently wait and hope some thickness moves down as I maintain at this length. It might not thicken at the ends at all because of hormone changes and such.

At mid back, my hair is even thickness now, it's after waist that it really starts tapering.

pepperminttea
November 3rd, 2010, 07:16 PM
Sometimes it's an indication of terminal length on perfectly healthy hair, sometimes it's damage that can be grown out by maintaining with frequent trims and some TLC. Cinnamon Hair (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=41940)'s the best, and rather thud-worthy, example of the latter.

Niwa
November 3rd, 2010, 07:27 PM
Sometimes it's an indication of terminal length on perfectly healthy hair, sometimes it's damage that can be grown out by maintaining with frequent trims and some TLC. Cinnamon Hair (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=41940)'s the best, and rather thud-worthy, example of the latter.Cinnamon Hair's story is amazing! Thanks for posting the link. I look forward to posting updates like that.