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Karinochka
September 30th, 2010, 10:41 AM
Hello everyone!

I'm new here and I'm impressed at the knowledge and advice members have. I have a question about braids, which I love to wear. I have tried different techniques for English braids (my favorite) but I always have the same problem, no matter how loosely I braid: tension and pulling on the scalp. Strangely, it seems the looser I braid the more pull downward there is on my scalp after the braid is bound off. I even try to weave the strands in a loose horizontal manner while working them, but the result is the same.

I am afraid of breakage. Any advice on techniques for braiding that is gentle on the scalp would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for your help in advance!

angelfell
September 30th, 2010, 10:43 AM
-lurks- I can't do a braid to save my life, so I'm glad you asked this question.. I'm interested to see the answers :)

Peter
September 30th, 2010, 10:54 AM
When you're crossing the sections over each other, pull them snugly, but not tightly. You don't need to pull hard to have a "tight" braid.

Also, make sure your three sections of hair stay separate. For me, when a few hairs get transferred from one section to another, it pulls on my scalp and I have to redo the braid.

Hope that helps!

little_acorn
September 30th, 2010, 11:54 AM
When you're crossing the sections over each other, pull them snugly, but not tightly. You don't need to pull hard to have a "tight" braid.

Also, make sure your three sections of hair stay separate. For me, when a few hairs get transferred from one section to another, it pulls on my scalp and I have to redo the braid.

Hope that helps!

Totally agree with this :) - it's the same for me, snug braiding is better than loose and transfering hairs does cause it too pull

Karinochka
September 30th, 2010, 12:33 PM
Wow, so maybe braiding more snugly (but not tightly) is better than loose? It's true that the looser I go, the more the sections closer to the scalp seem to pull. Thanks, Peter and little acorn!

pepperminttea
September 30th, 2010, 12:34 PM
When you're crossing the sections over each other, pull them snugly, but not tightly. You don't need to pull hard to have a "tight" braid.

Also, make sure your three sections of hair stay separate. For me, when a few hairs get transferred from one section to another, it pulls on my scalp and I have to redo the braid.

Hope that helps!

This, especially the second point; when hairs get mixed up, even just a few, they always pull. You might also want to try Dianyla's English braid technique (http://archive.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=23652). I'm rather terrible at it, but a lot of members swear by it.

lajsa
September 30th, 2010, 12:51 PM
Thanks, Pepperminttea, that link just made me want to redo my sleep braids just to see how nice I can make it look with that technique... :p

yellowchariot
September 30th, 2010, 02:09 PM
Peter brought this point out great. I'll follow up on the rest of the members who posted afterwords, I agree with them all. It is in the "crossover" of the braid, that is needs to be "tight" and not so much by pulling back your hair. I used to think this for a long time. The strands of your hair, does need to be separated so you don't catch any snags or breakage. I still have this issue. Also, there are many methods and techniques for achieving a "tight" braid based on your comfort level. I am currently still searching one of these techniques out ;)

sunrain
September 30th, 2010, 02:51 PM
In regards to the "tight" braid, here is an article on how to make your braids smoother/snugger.
http://dreamweaverbraiding.com/braids/Smoothbraids.htm

MissManda
September 30th, 2010, 03:05 PM
I agree with all of the points brought up by the previous posters. I would like to contribute some more braiding technique info that you might find useful. This article (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/vbjournal.php?do=article&articleid=59) gives a great visual example on what you should be looking for when braiding snugly.

I would also like to state that my hair holds in braids best when it is damp, so I keep a spray bottle of water on hand to help my braids stay in place.

Hope that helps! :flower:

Karinochka
October 1st, 2010, 07:12 AM
Thanks everyone for the great links. I gues it's a matter of experimenting till you find the technique that works for you. And one of these days I'll have the patience to sit down and figure out how to post pictures!

Squeak toy
October 1st, 2010, 11:33 AM
I have fine hair that is slipery and hairstyles frequently pull. My fine hairs just slide like when in a low ponytail, the hairs wil start to fall to the side and part. If I do an English braid the hairs will always pull. French or Dutch is the only ways for me to not have pull.

katha
October 1st, 2010, 11:44 AM
For me, braids only pull if I, for some reason, braid a tiny little strand of hair tighter than the rest. So it's not like my whole head hurts, just that tiny spot where this little strand grows.
Usually this happens when sections are not seperated in an orderly fashion when I start the braid. I use the technique pepperminttea posted earlier, and it works very well, so maybe that's worth looking into for you.
Also, make sure your hair is combed out well. If it's all tangled before you even started, it'll be difficult to make a good braid out of it. If you feel your hair is a bit coarse, do it on well conditioned hair.

supermanok03
October 1st, 2010, 04:36 PM
i never have trouble with braiding too tightly. to be honest, i usually braid very tightly and have no trouble with pulled hair because it was 'too tight'.
now, what DOES get my hair pulled is if i braid my hair while holding it in a different direction than it will be laying. (that sounds confusing). what i mean is, if i START braiding while holding my hair pointing UP, and then finish it off and lay it down, then probably the scalp hair will be pulled tight.
i have to make sure that i start my braid off in the right direction, or it will pull my scalp hair. as long as i have the first couple inches braided in the right direction, i can braid it as tight as i wasnt with no pain. but if i pull it sideways over my shoulder while i start braiding and then pull it to lay down my back, the scalp hair at the side will be pulled.

i know i'm not explaining this properly lol, sorry!

Jadewtch
October 1st, 2010, 06:06 PM
I have a question that looks like it would fit perfectly into this thread (not trying to hijack, honest!)

Whenever I braid I end up with one section longer than the other two. What can i do to stop this from happening. It makes me nuts.

Karinochka
October 2nd, 2010, 09:21 AM
Supermanok03 -- that makes a lot of sense. Maybe I am starting the braid out in a way that it will not be lying comfortably. I'll try it and see.

Jadewtch -- that happens to me too, sometimes, and I think it's because the three strands were different thicknesses. The thinner sections seem to end sooner, if that makes any sense. Also if I can tell one of them is thinner or will be ending sooner, I always make sure it is not the strand I end on -- I always pass the next strand over it so the shorter/thinner one gets hidden in the middle.

schweedie
October 2nd, 2010, 09:43 AM
Whenever I braid I end up with one section longer than the other two. What can i do to stop this from happening. It makes me nuts.


Jadewtch -- that happens to me too, sometimes, and I think it's because the three strands were different thicknesses. The thinner sections seem to end sooner, if that makes any sense.
Yeah, I get that, too.
Also, I think it might depend on how you part your hair - my part is slightly to the left, so the hair on that side is a little shorter while the hair on the other side is a little longer, which means that the sections are different in length when I braid. It's a bit annoying, but I guess there's nothing to be done about it!