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View Full Version : Interesting little fact? Who knows?



kristymarie87
September 10th, 2010, 07:32 AM
I just read that coating your hair band (those little elasticy ones for ponytails) with conditioner and leaving it to dry overnight stops the bands from cutting into your hair and thus not causing so much damage to the ponytail resulting in less broken hairs.....

What do you think?

UltraBella
September 10th, 2010, 08:36 AM
I think there will be no difference once it is dry.

kristymarie87
September 10th, 2010, 09:05 AM
Thats what i thought but then maybe it softens the fibres or something... i'd try it but i dont get much breakage from hairbands anyway, i was just curious.

I read little tips in magazines all the time and wonder if they work!

berr
September 10th, 2010, 09:07 AM
Those thick 'no-dent' bands work better for me. I don't like the skinny bands.

Maddy25
September 10th, 2010, 09:07 AM
hmmm, I would be interested to see if this is true, althought I usually use one of those beak clips to hold my hair, rather than a pony holder.

JenniferNoel
September 10th, 2010, 09:12 AM
I've never had a problem with skinny bands, as long as there are no metal clasps/prickly things. They're as benign or damaging as the one who uses them IMO, like, I've only had breakage from "pulling" them tight once the elastic is already in place. That causes unnecessary "rubbing" and breakage. I usually just use a leather-ish scrunchy for ponytails.

Anje
September 10th, 2010, 09:22 AM
Interesting idea... I imagine it might make it pull out smoother with a coney conditioner (or just soak the thing in silicone serum).

I like the hosiery-type ties for my braids, though. They're softer than the standard thread-wrapped rubberbands, and I can get huge packs of colorful ones at the dollar store.

halo_tightens
September 10th, 2010, 09:44 AM
I like the hosiery-type ties for my braids, though. They're softer than the standard thread-wrapped rubberbands, and I can get huge packs of colorful ones at the dollar store.

These are what I use, too. They often DO get soaked with conditioner, simply because I'll use one to hold my hair back while it's soaking in a conditioning potion. I never rinse them out, and they do feel a little different after the conditioner has dried in them. I 've never really thought about it either way; I just keep right on using them!

KittyLost
September 10th, 2010, 10:32 AM
I've heard that if you don't have a hair bobble handy and need to tie back your hair you can get an elastic band and lather it in conditioner and use it straight away to avoid breakage.

I don't know if that'd work with an elastic band, but it might be an improvement on a hair bobble.

RachelRain
September 10th, 2010, 10:45 AM
I use the thick flat hair bands as much as possible, but they still snap a lot when I go to put them in.

I actually haven't noticed much breakage, but I use conditioner as a leavein a couple of times a day, so maybe my hair's just got extra protection? (I also only put my hair up wet, so I wonder if that helps too... hm.)

HairColoredHair
September 10th, 2010, 10:58 AM
I'm guessing it would make it sticky.

And the rolled fabric ones don't do my hair much harm anyway (compared to the glued or metal ones).

virgo75
September 10th, 2010, 11:14 AM
I've actually experienced breakage from the little "ouchless" Goody rubber bands that don't have metal on them. I just noticed it recently. :(

I don't know that conditioner or even oil would make a difference considering how much conditioner and oil I put on my hair. My bands end up coated in them anyway, but my hair still broke.

Now I'm only using these mini scrunchies. They're much more gentle. :agree:

little_cherry
September 10th, 2010, 12:16 PM
I've had no problem with hair ties..I do like those terry cloth covered ones...they're fairly gentle.

Never, ever use plain rubber bands to tie your hair with- no matter what you coat them in. They squeeze the life out of your hair like a boa constrictor and whatever you dip them in will quickly wear off making the hair stick to them like glue making them very difficult to remove.

Anje
September 10th, 2010, 01:14 PM
I've heard that if you don't have a hair bobble handy and need to tie back your hair you can get an elastic band and lather it in conditioner and use it straight away to avoid breakage.

I don't know if that'd work with an elastic band, but it might be an improvement on a hair bobble.
I'm not sure I can understand how a person would not have a hair tie available, but would have conditioner.

Carolyn
September 10th, 2010, 02:55 PM
I've heard that if you don't have a hair bobble handy and need to tie back your hair you can get an elastic band and lather it in conditioner and use it straight away to avoid breakage.

I don't know if that'd work with an elastic band, but it might be an improvement on a hair bobble.What is a "hair bobble"?

I don't know that the conditioner trick would work but I don't see how it could hurt either.

Cinnamon Hair
September 10th, 2010, 07:32 PM
I've heard that if you don't have a hair bobble handy and need to tie back your hair you can get an elastic band and lather it in conditioner and use it straight away to avoid breakage.

I don't know if that'd work with an elastic band, but it might be an improvement on a hair bobble.

Those magazines can be silly. Who would have conditioner handy but not a hair tie? It's not like I carry conditioner around in my purse. Maybe some people do? :silly:

ETA: Carolyn, a hair bobble is the figure 8 shaped elastic with beads on the end that you slip over each other.

Double ETA: Sorry KittyLost, didn't meant to gang up on you there. I didn't realize everyone else had already quoted your post. :flowers: Still though some fashion magazine advice is just plain kooky.

Anywhere
September 10th, 2010, 07:40 PM
I'm not sure I can understand how a person would not have a hair tie available, but would have conditioner.

:spitting: I think i'd be more likely to have a hair stick or a pencil than a rubber band/conditioner or a hair tie.

As to the original posting, I've never experienced much breakage from hairties but they did get softer after being brought into the shower by way of my wrist.. :hmm:

KittyLost
September 12th, 2010, 01:41 AM
Haha CinnamonHair don't worry, I was just stating what I once read I took no offence from people's comments :)

Carolyn, a hair bobble is just a hair tie. I live in England and we call them bobbles instead of ties, at least that parts true for the area I'm from I don't know about the rest of England.

PrincessBob
September 12th, 2010, 02:32 AM
Sounds more like an interesting little theory to me.:cheese:

skaempfer
September 12th, 2010, 03:07 AM
Depending on what's in the conditioner, it might break down whatever's making the elastic stretchy, though... I'm thinking the old Vaseline vs condom problem. Some store-bought conditioners do have mineral products in them.

Someone needs to program us a cute smiley fluffing it's hair!

stinamoo
September 12th, 2010, 06:27 AM
Carolyn, a hair bobble is just a hair tie. I live in England and we call them bobbles instead of ties, at least that parts true for the area I'm from I don't know about the rest of England.

I call them bobbles and I live down south, my parents are from Scotland and they also call them bobbles sometimes :D

kristymarie87
September 12th, 2010, 06:54 AM
Im from London and a hair bobble is indeed just a hair tie here. Maybe its a uk thing?

And i used to never have hair ties but always had conditioner, why is that weird? I just never tied my hair up so didnt need a hair tie. And now i lose them all the time!!

I still havent tried it yet but maybe i will.

adiapalic
September 12th, 2010, 07:28 AM
My conditioner (AO Honeysuckle Rose) can be pretty slick (but grimy) when it's dried on the bottle. I'd have to try to see if it actually works. But it also has no preservatives, and is prone to growing molds if its not contained properly. Those fat ouchless rubberbands work fine for me without anything on them. :shrug: