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CherrySilver
May 11th, 2008, 01:08 PM
You're not going to believe this -- just came across this video clip. I was horrified when I saw it -- the poor girl. This teacher should be arrested for assault and fired from her job. I'd love to find out what school she works for.

[link removed by moderator - please do not post cutting links here, as it's the polar opposite of our purpose here]

magda
May 11th, 2008, 01:11 PM
Impossible :demon:
1. call the police
2. fire this teacher

savi
May 11th, 2008, 01:24 PM
Seriously?? That's just.. :hatchet:
That's an assault on another person.

domonic_uk
May 11th, 2008, 01:26 PM
What a terrible thing to do teachers are there to set an example not behave like this.

Lixie
May 11th, 2008, 01:29 PM
Poor girl, what a horrible thing to happen. Especially coming from somebody in a position of trust, that's such an abuse of power.

It strikes me as a little odd that the report makes no mention of how the school has responded though. Just me? :shrug:

Nimue10
May 11th, 2008, 01:29 PM
That is so cruel! What if the girl was a Sikh, and she was not cutting her cair for religious purposes!? There is no question that that is an abuse of authority. And there's so much unsaid- the teacher was "threatening" to cut the girl's hair for a while. How in the world is that appropriate for a teacher?

akurah
May 11th, 2008, 01:29 PM
Wow. I'm curious to see what happens to that teacher.

Fortunately she didn't cut it ridiculously short, just... it looked like she cut perhaps five inches off, tops? If she had cut it to the kid's shoulders or worse, that'd be awful.

SurprisingWoman
May 11th, 2008, 01:38 PM
With it being an ABC news clip I feel sure it is a valid story. I think that teacher needs to be fired and prosecuted for assault. I can't believe they would let her get away with something like that, even in Texas.

The girls ends do look a little thin so the teacher may have felt the last 5-6 inches were not in good shape and thought she would "correct" the situation but that is ridiculous. It wasn't her call to make.

kwaniesiam
May 11th, 2008, 01:40 PM
That teacher needs to be fired and charged with assault, at the very least. This point was already brought up, what if her hair was kept like that for religious purposes?

CherrySilver
May 11th, 2008, 01:43 PM
Poor girl, what a horrible thing to happen. Especially coming from somebody in a position of trust, that's such an abuse of power.

It strikes me as a little odd that the report makes no mention of how the school has responded though. Just me? :shrug:

Well, I think that this incident only recently occurred given that the video was only posted this morning. I'm sure that school is going to have LOTS of phone calls on Monday about their psycho, hair-cutting math teacher.

camillacamilla
May 11th, 2008, 01:45 PM
That is insane! That teacher assaulted that child. The nerve that is would take to do that to someone else against their wishes. Teacher needs to be fired.

Lixie
May 11th, 2008, 01:45 PM
That's a good point, CherrySilver, but I think they should mention whether the reporters have made an effort to get in contact with the school or not. It makes for a more balanced report.

CherrySilver
May 11th, 2008, 02:26 PM
That's a good point, CherrySilver, but I think they should mention whether the reporters have made an effort to get in contact with the school or not. It makes for a more balanced report.

Absolutely -- I called the main switchboard at the station, but they're not open till Monday. Guess I'll have to wait till then....

Rapunzelwannabe
May 11th, 2008, 02:43 PM
I read on MSNBC that the girl was Pentecostal and so it was part of her religion. Since I didn't see the video I don't know if they said that the teacher had made comments on the girl's hair in the past but apparently the woman had told her that she didn't like her hair and that she wanted to cut it since the beginning of the year! Call me crazy but that's a bit creepy and I'd have said something before then, but obviously this girl never thought the teacher was serious. The article goes on to say that the teacher has not allowed to go back to school until the investigation's over, so hopefully there will be some justice in this case.

Nimue10
May 11th, 2008, 03:07 PM
I'm still just really outraged. I had really thick eye brows in high school. What if some teacher considered it ok to just go at them with some tweezers?

On one hand, it's tempting to say "at least she didn't cut that much, she cut off the split ends, etc" but if that girl has made the decision to not cut her hair that's her right to make that decision even someone else may not agree with it. It's the principle of the thing to me.

If anything, it speaks highly of the girl that the teacher has been threatening to cut her hair all year and the girl has just been ignoring it.

birdiefu
May 11th, 2008, 03:10 PM
That is just horrible! No teacher should *ever* think this is an okay thing to do, and the fact that supposedly this teacher laughed while the student cried is an outrage. What makes it even worse IMO is that this poor girl had been growing her hair since birth and never had a cut before the teacher went at it.

swanns
May 11th, 2008, 03:23 PM
Managed to find the clip on ABC's page... Just, wow. How did the teacher even manage to do that? She must've just attacked the girl with scissors.

Pursuer
May 11th, 2008, 03:33 PM
I think the most surprising thing about this is that the teacher was so bothered by long hair - why? It's made me question if the teacher had some traumatic experience with long hair or by someone with long hair, or if the teacher simply felt long hair was too feminine and that repulsed her, or maybe she thought it was her duty to "keep it healthy."
I doubt the last excuse, because of her threatening the girl for a whole year and LAUGHING as the girl was crying - doesn't add up for someone with a helping heart.
At any rate, though I am intrigued as to what was going on in that messed up little brain of the teacher, none of those reasons excuse her from doing what she did. She should be fired for taking advantage of a student and crossing the line. Honestly? I think she crossed the line by threating to cut it at all. Who the crap she thinks she is, I dunno.
That video at ABC is sad - you can see her hair is all messed up at the ends. I'd like to see what happens to the teacher and if the school doesn't do anything, what the family will do in response.

buttons
May 11th, 2008, 03:36 PM
Here's an article about it from a Houston news station, if anyone was interested:

http://www.click2houston.com/news/16211187/detail.html?subid=10100242

That teacher needs to be punished. For some people it might be "just hair", but, like the girl's mom said, it was her daughter's identity and her family's religious choice. It wasn't the teacher's choice to make.

ETA: The article has a link to a video discussing the cutting, but there aren't videos of the actual cutting being done. If that isn't allowed here could a mod please take it out? Thanks.

Cinnamon Hair
May 11th, 2008, 03:52 PM
The video of the 14 year old and her mother is easy to find if you go to abcnews.com and look around. It doesn't show any cutting though, just a close-up on her ends.

Bad as it is, the girl is very lucky no more was cut. She still has tailbone length; it could have been much worse.

Lixie
May 11th, 2008, 03:58 PM
Thanks for that link, buttons. I was glad to read that the situation is being investigated.

swanns
May 11th, 2008, 03:59 PM
Bad as it is, the girl is very lucky no more was cut. She still has tailbone length; it could have been much worse.

I wonder why the teacher didn't cut off even more? If her reason was she doesn't like long hair then surely tailbone lenght wouldn't satisfy her.

Lixie
May 11th, 2008, 04:02 PM
I wonder why the teacher didn't cut off even more? If her reason was she doesn't like long hair then surely tailbone lenght wouldn't satisfy her.

Perhaps the girl had fairytale ends further down? Not as many people outside of LHC can appreciate them, although that does not at all justify the teacher's actions. Just a thought.

Angellen
May 11th, 2008, 04:53 PM
How horrible! A teacher is there to educate--school is supposed to be a place of protection and safety in addition to a learning environment. This is such an awful thing to happen. Poor girl.

GlennaGirl
May 11th, 2008, 06:54 PM
The sad part to me was that the girl said she had never in her life cut it. Now she can't say that. :( This was pretty shocking. Most of the teachers I've had experience with have been wonderful--it takes something special to want to teach--but I can say that this is something I'd see my son's current teacher doing. She has a real cruel streak in her. There are crazies in every profession, unfortunately.

This was just really sad.

AJoifulNoise
May 11th, 2008, 06:59 PM
The sad part to me was that the girl said she had never in her life cut it. Now she can't say that. :(

If I were her, I'd still say "I've never cut it". That wouldn't be a lie because she didn't (want it, ask for it, or do it herself).

That doesn't make it any less sad... Or scary. I keep my hair long for faith reasons, as well. I don't cut at all. If someone came up and chopped off 7 inches of my hair I'd be devistated.

Nynaeve
May 11th, 2008, 07:04 PM
Oh my god.
In elementary school, the nuns used to pull on my braids, but I can't imagine how violated I would have felt if one of them had cut it off!
I can't believe this.


Poor girl, what a horrible thing to happen. Especially coming from somebody in a position of trust, that's such an abuse of power.

It strikes me as a little odd that the report makes no mention of how the school has responded though. Just me? :shrug:

Agreed. No one with that amount of power and influence over a child should behave in such a way. That's "downright" disgusting.

TheSpottedCow
May 11th, 2008, 07:15 PM
This is really disgusting, but also just strange. I mean... What the heck was that teacher thinking? The weirdness of this totally blows my mind.

Rebelkat
May 11th, 2008, 08:16 PM
I can't even imagine. What a horrible thing to do to someone! In the article it even says the teacher laughed after she did it. Two words... psychological examination!

kwaniesiam
May 11th, 2008, 08:20 PM
The fact that the teacher was most likely aware of her religious beliefs as well does not sit right with me. What kind of person would so blatantly disrespect someone else's faith, and then laugh about it?

Nevermore
May 11th, 2008, 09:01 PM
I'm absolutely disgusted, horrified and angry for this girl. I'm not surprised by this though, I've only had a handful of good teachers and I wouldn't put this past many of the ones I've dealt with.

There's probably a reason why the teacher didn't cut off more: she didn't get a chance to. Maybe the girl had her hair in a braid and pulled away, so the teacher only cut it as far as she did, I really doubt it was some kind of mercy on the teacher's part. The other possibility is that the teacher sneakily cut some of her braid or loose hair that was hanging out of her chair back, instead of being obvious.

Morag
May 11th, 2008, 09:47 PM
Bad as it is, the girl is very lucky no more was cut. She still has tailbone length; it could have been much worse.

I agree that's something to be thankful for, Cinnamon Hair, but the amount of hair that was cut doesn't change the fact that what that teacher did was legally an assault. I agree with the mother that there should be a mental evaluation done before the teacher is allowed to resume her duties.

Cinnamon Hair
May 11th, 2008, 09:55 PM
I agree that's something to be thankful for, Cinnamon Hair, but the amount of hair that was cut doesn't change the fact that what that teacher did was legally an assault. I agree with the mother that there should be a mental evaluation done before the teacher is allowed to resume her duties.

Just to clarify, I totally agree with the previous posters and am not at all taking the teacer's side. I'm just sayin' it coulda been worse! When I think of someone having his/her hair cut without permission, the mental image I see is hair cut as close to the scalp as possible, not tailbone length.

Deborah
May 11th, 2008, 10:12 PM
Too fiercely worded. Think I'll not comment on this one.

socks
May 11th, 2008, 10:20 PM
Gosh, that's horrible. Imagine the what that girl must be experiencing right now. What I find really interesting, though, is what drove the teacher to do that? A sense of power gained, perhaps? Some kind of neurosis? The worst thing is, the teacher's mentality isn't that unusual.

I've had people jokingly come at my hair with scissors, before, and others who have talked about cutting it in my sleep, and it's terrifying. Once a girl in elementary school snuck up and cut a few strands and when I was young, my mom would always promise to cut no more than a half-inch and would end up cutting several inches. I no longer let anyone near me or my hair with scissors. I used to hide behind my hair, but I haven't felt safe with it down for years, and keep it up nearly all of the time for more reasons than just that of keeping it healthier. I've gotten over my old habit of sleeping with my hair covered or twisted around my hands, but I don't think I'll ever feel entirely comfortable with it down.

Morag
May 11th, 2008, 10:53 PM
Just to clarify, I totally agree with the previous posters and am not at all taking the teacher's side. I'm just sayin' it coulda been worse! When I think of someone having his/her hair cut without permission, the mental image I see is hair cut as close to the scalp as possible, not tailbone length.

I'm sorry, Cinnamon Hair - I didn't mean to imply that you were on the teacher's side at all. I guess my own reaction to this event is just not so much about the hair.

For me, this is a big ball of freedom of choice, freedom of religion, and personal safety issues. Is the teacher upset about the hair because it is a religious preference? Would she have reacted the same way to any child with long hair, or was it something in particular about this child? If the girl had been less trusting and tried to defend her hair, might someone have been physically injured? What does it mean to a child of this age when control of her body - any part of her body - is taken from her by a person whom she has assumed is trustworthy?

I freely admit that I am hypersensitive on all these issues.

noelgirl
May 11th, 2008, 11:14 PM
Not hypersensitive at all; the bottom line is, the fact that the teacher cut any hair at all means that a line was crossed. It could have been worse but it shouldn't have happened at all.

angelthadiva
May 11th, 2008, 11:22 PM
I have to take my hat off to this girl's mother...She's way calmer than I would be given the situation!

Words escape me as to what in the heck possessed this teacher to do something like that? I think she's a danger to OP and should not be around children...I would totally file a police report...A Psy eval, yeah! Early retirement, oh yeah!

She better not be having a paid leave either! This is not a dang vacation.

And who cares if the teacher didn't like her hair, it wasn't the teacher's hair to like or not to like...They can't just impose their will on their students...She chose to grow her hair long for religious reasons, that should have been the end of discussion between the student and teacher...It shouldn't matter if her ends were split/fairy tale or whatever--That is between the child and her parents...She wacked off about a years worth of growth off that girl, there is something seriously wrong with this teacher...There is nothing she could say to justify what she did, nothing!! Temporary insanity, is about the only thing she could come up with...UGH!

j4zzin
May 12th, 2008, 12:12 AM
I can't believe they would let her get away with something like that, even in Texas.

I'm as appalled as everyone else is about this, but I think that comment was a little bit unfair to Texans. :sad

k_hepburn
May 12th, 2008, 01:30 AM
I agree with RebelKat, it sounds like this teacher is having a psychological problem, for her to be obsessing about a student's hair for months up to the point where she commits a physical assault on her student. I very strongly suspect this woman is not fit to be a teacher and needs treatment. I do wonder if the school has fulfilled it's duty of care towards its students, because I cannot imagine that there were no warning signs that should have alerted the school that this teacher is going off the rails.

I feel very sorry for the girl. Of course it's "just hair", but obviously, if you have hair that has never been cut, that would be part of defining who you are, and that has been taken away from her.

katharine

jojo
May 12th, 2008, 04:59 AM
its assault at the end of the day, i remember in the early 80's when i was in a needlework class a couple of girls where talking in class, the teacher threw a board rubber at one of the girls, when the girls continued to talk she walked behind one of them and cut her waist length braid off, completely off. This girl had never cut her hair for religious reasons. Nothing was ever done about it, I hope the teacher in this instance is struck off and arrested, this is diabolical, if anyone did that to any of my daughters, they would have to be brushing their teeth via their backsides!

levelek
May 12th, 2008, 07:01 AM
My SO's teacher also cut his hair in primary school. His parents had sent him to school with shoulder length blonde locks, and he returned with a buzz cut.

Of course that was in a country under a rock solid communist dictatorship.

Les
May 12th, 2008, 07:11 AM
That is just unbelievably horrible. I don't see how people can think they have the right to impose themselves on others so aggressively.

I imagine it varies by jurisdiction, but is cutting someone's hair without their consent a criminal or civil offense? Could they be sued for time & effort (24 hours a day at minimum wage at a 0.5 inch per month rate)? I've wondered this before, but this thread brought the question back to my mind. If someone "attacks" my hair, what legal recourse do I have?

CherrySilver
May 12th, 2008, 09:34 AM
Well, I called the school this morning and it seems that the teacher in question no longer works there. YEAH!!! Now, it's up to the parents of the girl to press charges. Given that she probably doesn't have a criminal record, chances are that she'll end up with at least community service and probation. Keep your fingers crossed!

connie
May 12th, 2008, 10:37 AM
I can't imagine how devastating that must feel for that girl. I'm surprised how calm the mother was....my reaction would be more, hmm, let's just say not calm, IYKWIM. :luke:

I realize she didn't lose alot of length, but just the idea of someone taking control of something so personal seems like a very dangerous violation for a person in a position of trust to commit. I sincerely hope they press charges against her, if nothing else than to send a message to the daughter that she has the right to say what happens to her body & no one else does.

Islandgrrl
May 12th, 2008, 10:42 AM
I agree that's something to be thankful for, Cinnamon Hair, but the amount of hair that was cut doesn't change the fact that what that teacher did was legally an assault. I agree with the mother that there should be a mental evaluation done before the teacher is allowed to resume her duties.

Assault defined: A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault.

Battery defined: A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how severe the injury. A fist fight is a common battery; being hit by a wild pitch in a baseball game is not.

Clearly, what this teacher did is much more than simple assault. And she should, in my opinion, be charged as such.

One might even make a case for robbery: The taking of something by means of force or fear directed at the victim.

I'm just saying....

Alun
May 12th, 2008, 06:58 PM
In looking for this story I found two others as well. One was in Thailand, where the teacher accidentally cut off part of the girl's earlobe while hacking at her hair, and it couldn't be reattached because it was left for too long. The other news story was in India, and the parent's of the girl who had the forced haircut managed to whip up an angry mob who ransacked the school building, causing the school to close down
due to the damage.

Teacherbear
May 12th, 2008, 08:56 PM
As so many have said, this was a violation of the student.


With it being an ABC news clip I feel sure it is a valid story. I think that teacher needs to be fired and prosecuted for assault. I can't believe they would let her get away with something like that, even in Texas.

(my emphasis)

If you read some of the news stories on this topic the teacher has been directed to not come to school until the investigation is over. I can't find any updates since Friday. From what I understand no charges have been filed, YET. I suspect the teacher will have charges filed against her. Because those things hadn't happened yet, does not mean the teacher is "getting away with it," . . . EVEN in Texas.

On to another topic, did you know if you google this general topic LHC is the 2nd and 3rd returns (depending on the word combination). And people wonder why the moderators are diligent at keeping discussion of chopping and hacking out of our site.

LisaButz2001
May 12th, 2008, 09:50 PM
Presumably, God would forgive the child since she didn't break her vow purposely. What are the religious reprecussions? Is she punished or obliged to do some kind of pennance? I find it inconceivable that a woman with such obvious instability could have kept it under wraps for 18 years, so, either it was building and the girl's hair was a catalyst for something with no correlation, or there are other unreported incidents. She can be charged for a lot more violating the Amendments of the Constitution, Child Endangerment, Child Abuse.

kikuko
May 12th, 2008, 10:50 PM
This happened to a friend of mine from elementary school. We both went to daycare at my other friend's mom's house. Apparently my friend's hair was messy or in bad condition so the lady that ran the daycare just hacked it off one day. My friend was 4 years old at the time and had had waist length hair. Somehow she was still going to the same daycare at age 11. I later learned the lady that ran the daycare was very very mentally unstable, though I guess she kept it hidden from the parents pretty well.

noelgirl
May 12th, 2008, 11:13 PM
Presumably, God would forgive the child since she didn't break her vow purposely. What are the religious reprecussions? Is she punished or obliged to do some kind of pennance? I find it inconceivable that a woman with such obvious instability could have kept it under wraps for 18 years, so, either it was building and the girl's hair was a catalyst for something with no correlation, or there are other unreported incidents. She can be charged for a lot more violating the Amendments of the Constitution, Child Endangerment, Child Abuse.

I noticed that her mom (presumably of the same faith) didn't have uncut hair, so the impression that I got was that it's more of a personal decision that she made in how she chooses to observe her faith, rather than something subject to punishment. Still, whether it is or not, it is a violation of her religious freedom (among other things) as it is a spiritual thing for her personally.

AngelicBrunette
May 12th, 2008, 11:19 PM
Still, why even bother bringing up the religion? If she just had long hair due to her own personal choice is that not good enough? Would the teacher somehow be justified in cutting it if it were simply a personal choice? (lesser importance assigned to the decision?)

I think that the teacher was way out of line and it rather confuses me, honestly. I cannot IMAGINE any of my teachers, past or present, doing anything like that. It's baffling.

Kleis
May 12th, 2008, 11:26 PM
Still, why even bother bringing up the religion? If she just had long hair due to her own personal choice is that not good enough? Would the teacher somehow be justified in cutting it if it were simply a personal choice?

I completley agree. Religion shouldn't be the defining factor between right and wrong in cutting off someone's hair without their permission. If the girl had been an atheist, she's been no less assaulted.

noelgirl
May 12th, 2008, 11:34 PM
It wouldn't be justified even without the religious aspect of her choice, hence the "among other things" - the intrusion on personal space and everything about what the teacher did was unacceptable. However, the religion is another angle to look at it from, and not an insignificant one. She (or her mom) said so herself that it was a significant spiritual decision for her.

angelthadiva
May 13th, 2008, 08:21 AM
Presumably, God would forgive the child since she didn't break her vow purposely. What are the religious reprecussions? Is she punished or obliged to do some kind of pennance?<snip>

She didn't break her vow, so there is nothing for God to forgive...She made a promise that she would not cut her hair, she didn't. Her hair was cut without her consent.


I noticed that her mom (presumably of the same faith) didn't have uncut hair, so the impression that I got was that it's more of a personal decision that she made in how she chooses to observe her faith, rather than something subject to punishment. Still, whether it is or not, it is a violation of her religious freedom (among other things) as it is a spiritual thing for her personally.

People of the same faith can have different convictions. For example I once knew a gal who gave a vow to not gamble (because her father was one and it ruined his life)...She would not even play cards for fun...Another example, my pastor gave a vow to not drink alcohol. He has honored that vow. He is not against drinking, (in moderation) but for him personally he has made a vow not to...

God takes vows very seriously...As believers our "yesses are yes, and are nos are no", but when we vow that is a serious thing, and God will hold us to that vow.


Still, why even bother bringing up the religion? If she just had long hair due to her own personal choice is that not good enough? Would the teacher somehow be justified in cutting it if it were simply a personal choice? (lesser importance assigned to the decision?)
<snip> and
I completley agree. Religion shouldn't be the defining factor between right and wrong in cutting off someone's hair without their permission. If the girl had been an atheist, she's been no less assaulted. and
It wouldn't be justified even without the religious aspect of her choice, hence the "among other things" - the intrusion on personal space and everything about what the teacher did was unacceptable. However, the religion is another angle to look at it from, and not an insignificant one. She (or her mom) said so herself that it was a significant spiritual decision for her.

I think they are bringing religion into it because it was a form of her expressing her religious beliefs. It was not just a personal decision, she was doing it as a form of religious expression. The First Amendment grants free exercise of religion...When the teacher cut her hair; she was infringing on the girl's religious freedom...

So long as a religious freedom does not break a law...And anyway you slice and dice it (totally no pun intended), growing your hair long to bring honor and glory to God is not breaking a law.

Rustella
May 13th, 2008, 10:08 PM
Well put, angelthadiva! :)

Tashomani
May 13th, 2008, 10:43 PM
I am STUNNED......How Dare that teacher! I am just stunned! How do we contact this gal to give her support?? Although I am sure she has plenty already!

angelthadiva
May 14th, 2008, 06:31 AM
Well put, angelthadiva! :)

Thank you!


I am STUNNED......How Dare that teacher! I am just stunned! How do we contact this gal to give her support?? Although I am sure she has plenty already!

That's a good idea. I'm sure a little more support wouldn't hurt...What the devil meant for evil; God will use for good. I know I will be praying for her, and the teacher as well.

suicides_eve
May 14th, 2008, 07:22 AM
Note* i only read the first few response as the link has been broken (not that i would want to see something like that any way : P) forgive me if i touch base on something already stated


My dd grandmother (dad's side) pulled a similar move and cut her pretty hair while she was visiting one day- her excuse- "her hair was in her eyes and you obviously weren't doing anything about it" - oh i gave that witch an ear full and cut her out for 3 major holidays; i was PO.

Now if a teacher had done it i think i would have went ape sh!t on her, and demanded that she be removed from her position. I would also demand that she is brought up to date on the definition on assault and releated school policies- officials don't let students get away with such nature why should the staff?


having such a traumatic event behind the hair cut the poor girl will probably suffer for the rest of her days. poor dear

Alun
May 14th, 2008, 09:29 AM
I am not a lawyer, but this comes up repeatedly online, so here goes.

If you cut off someone's hair against their will, this is both a criminal offence and a civil tort if you are in a jurisdiction where the law is based on the common law of England (most parts of most English speaking countries are common law, but not Louisiana, Scotland or the Channel Islands). If you are in a civil law jurisdiction (pretty much everywhere that isn't common law) I have no idea what the law is.

Most states of the US have codified their criminal law and have different offences now, and in fact even in England the relevant offences are now defined by statute and have changed a bit from the common law. The old common law criminal offences were assault, battery and mayhem. The common law definitions of assault and battery have already been given in this thread, and mayhem involved cutting off arms, legs or ... umm, other bits (youch!!!), but not hair.

English criminal law still has assault and battery, but now followed by actual bodily harm (ABH) and then grievous bodily harm (GBH). FWIW, I personally think hair cutting should be ABH, but that depends on the jury and the instructions from the judge, but it is definitely at least battery. OTOH, in most states of the US AFAIK there is now only assault and then aggravated assault, which depends on the circumstances rather than how much you damaged the other person. So, in most states the criminal offence is probably only assault.

Filing criminal charges doesn't prevent you from filing a civil suit for a 'tort', or what Blackstone would have called a 'private wrong', but it's usual to do it after the criminal case, so obviously the outcome of the criminal case makes a huge difference to whether you will get damages and how much. However, the civil suit only has to be decided on a 'balance of probabilities' standard', which is not as tough to meet as the 'no reasonable doubt' standard of a criminal case, so it's not completely impossible to get damages after a not guilty verdict (it happened in the OJ Simpson case). Also, you can still sue even if no criminal case was ever brought, for whatever reason. If there isn't strong enough evidence for a prosecutor to even go ahead, there might still be enough to successfuly sue.

Under the 'English rule' the loser has to pay costs, which puts many people off, but under the 'American rule' each side pays their own costs, but wherever you are it's always possible you could still get stuck with costs.

Most torts are common law, not statutory, so even if their is no battery offence in your state you can probably still sue for battery, if you see what I mean, and in England I think you would sue for assault and battery even if you could get a conviction for the more serious ABH, because there is no ABH in the common law.

I should probably go to law school, but it's so d*mn*d expensive!

swanns
May 14th, 2008, 09:52 AM
I noticed that her mom (presumably of the same faith) didn't have uncut hair, so the impression that I got was that it's more of a personal decision that she made in how she chooses to observe her faith, rather than something subject to punishment.

Didn't it say they're pentecostalists, right? Having long hair is not a pentecostalist thing, I know a whole lot of them and none of them have very long hair. I'm guessing it was just the girl's personal choise :)

florenonite
May 14th, 2008, 10:07 AM
Didn't it say they're pentecostalists, right? Having long hair is not a pentecostalist thing, I know a whole lot of them and none of them have very long hair. I'm guessing it was just the girl's personal choise :)

I think it's optional for Pentecostals, so some women choose not to cut their hair, others don't in the same faith.

Pursuer
May 14th, 2008, 10:22 AM
Didn't it say they're pentecostalists, right? Having long hair is not a pentecostalist thing, I know a whole lot of them and none of them have very long hair. I'm guessing it was just the girl's personal choise :)

Within all of Christianity (i.e. different denominations) this is a personal religious conviction. Many, many, many women that are pentecostal, baptist, adventist, etc. keep their hair a short, fashionable cut. There are a smaller percentage of women within each denomination that become convicted about 1 Corinthians 11.

You are right that it's a personal choice, but it also goes with the news clip where she said that it was a religious conviction. She is personally convicted in her religious views that it is special and a glory to grow her hair out long. :D

Deborah
May 14th, 2008, 02:55 PM
It depends on what Pentecostal group her family belongs to. Some hold that I Cor.11 indicates that all Christian women should wear their hair long (as do many other Christian groups), while some hold that a Christian woman should never cut her hair, and others do not address the issue at all. So it may be personal conviction or it may be a very strongly held belief in her church.

(Whether her mother holds to the conviction/belief for herself is not relevant. She may vary in her practice for any number of reasons, so it is not profitable to speculate.)

I hope that helps. :flower:

Alun
May 15th, 2008, 05:04 PM
I think the vast majority of hispanics are catholics, and even if the girl is pentecostal her mum may not be. I don't think you can always assume the child will be of the same faith as the parents, even at a relatively young age.