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coscass
March 20th, 2010, 12:16 PM
This is gunna sound stupid, but... Is there any difference? I've seen some cute styles on YT, but they all say you have to plat, and I'm over here going ":confused:plat? what's that?"

AmericanWoman
March 20th, 2010, 12:24 PM
It's "plait' and it means the same thing as braid. I always put my hair in a braid before I bun it, it holds much better.

coscass
March 20th, 2010, 12:27 PM
I thought it was plait, but everyone keeps pronouncing it "plat", so I thought maybe I Was wrong lol

chopandchange
March 20th, 2010, 12:45 PM
It's the English word. (British English, as opposed to American English). It's both a verb and a noun. It means the same as braid, and yes, it's pronounced "platt."

I am British, and I actually say "plait" myself, and have done all my life, but since these forums are predominantly American English-speaking, I tend to adapt my language so that people here will understand me, and say "braid" instead in most of my posts. :)

Carolyn
March 20th, 2010, 01:58 PM
I've always "said" plait as plate. I don't think I've ever said the word out loud though. A plait is the same thing as a braid. I was under the impression braid was more of an American word and plait was more of a European word. Or maybe it's regional :shrug: Anyways, it's all the same thing.

chopandchange
March 20th, 2010, 02:48 PM
I was under the impression braid was more of an American word and plait was more of a European word..

Maybe I am wrong here, but, apart from the UK, I can't think of another country in Europe whose first official language is English. :confused:

Liss
March 20th, 2010, 03:07 PM
Until I joined LHC and started referring to all types of plaits as braids, the only time I ever used the word braid was to describe the styles that are braided over the head, gathering pieces into the braid as it is created (dutch braid, English braid - which was referred to as French braiding). A regular plait started at either the nape of the neck or from a ponytail and was plaited down the length. Have I confused anyone yet? Anyway, I grew up using a mix of UK and American English, depending on the different schools I went to, so I'm used to changing my terminology to fit the majority - although I still tend to use predominantly UK English spelling.

Carolyn
March 20th, 2010, 03:16 PM
Maybe I am wrong here, but, apart from the UK, I can't think of another country in Europe whose first official language is English. :confused:OK yes I do know that. What I was thinking was I've seen some LHCers from various European countries use the word "plait" meaning "braid". I guess I thought that was clear. Sorry if it wasn't :shrug:

FrannyG
March 20th, 2010, 03:22 PM
Yes, it does seem that aside from UK LHCers, European LHCers from non-English speaking countries use the word "plait" as well. In North America, people whose second language is English generally use the word "braid". I see the same thing, Carolyn.

Stevy
March 20th, 2010, 04:39 PM
Plait = braid.

I'm British and pronounce it 'plat'. I have never heard anyone pronounce it 'plate' but I can see how you could make that mistake if you'd only seen it written down!

chopandchange
March 20th, 2010, 04:39 PM
Hmm. I see what you mean now.

Maybe they are being taught British English at school rather than American English.

Finoriel
March 20th, 2010, 05:04 PM
Maybe they are being taught British English at school rather than American English.
:agree: Exactly.
Though IŽd be surprised if plait would be included in school vocabulary.

Ramona_Fosca
March 20th, 2010, 05:14 PM
Maybe they are being taught British English at school rather than American English.

At least for Germany that is true - or was at least when went to school. My English teacher used to correct us very fiercly when we slipped into American English. On a vocabulary test, candy, french fries or pants would score zero points.

Sarahmoon
March 20th, 2010, 07:36 PM
Maybe I am wrong here, but, apart from the UK, I can't think of another country in Europe whose first official language is English. :confused:

Ireland

And in Australia they also pronounce it "platt". Not sure if "braid" is also used but a lady there told me she liked my plait.
(Yes I know Australia isn't part of Europe :P)

McKanna91
March 20th, 2010, 08:01 PM
I always assumed "braid" was American English and "plait" was British English. Being a bit of a word nut, I looked up the etymology on Etymonline (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php).


braid
c.1200, breidan "to dart, twist, pull," from O.E. bregdan "to move quickly; pull; shake; draw (a sword)" (class III strong verb, past tense brægd, past participle brogden), from P.Gmc. *bregthan "make sudden jerky movements from side to side" (cf. O.N. bregða "to brandish, turn about, braid;" O.S. bregdan "to weave;" Du. breien "to knit;" O.H.G. brettan "to draw, weave, braid"), from PIE base *bherek- "to gleam, flash" (cf. Skt. bhrasate "flames, blazes, shines"). The broader word survives only in the narrow definition of "plaiting hair," which was in O.E. The noun meaning "anything plaited or entwined" (especially hair) is from 1520s. Related: Braided; braiding; braids.


plait
late 14c., "to fold, gather in pleats," from O.Fr. pleir "to fold," from L. plicare "to fold." The noun meaning "a fold, a crease" is attested from c.1400, from Anglo-Fr. pleit, O.Fr. pleit, ploit "fold, manner of folding," from L. plicatus, neuter pp. of plicare (see ply (v.)). Meaning "interlaced strands of hair, ribbon, etc." is from 1520s.

*Aoife*
March 20th, 2010, 08:04 PM
Braiding seems to be the American term. I use it sometimes here and it's seeped into my everyday vocab. I said something about my braids and got a really funny look.
We just say plaits, pronounced as "plats". Although my Russian friend pronounces it as "plates".

Nae
March 20th, 2010, 08:15 PM
At least for Germany that is true - or was at least when went to school. My English teacher used to correct us very fiercly when we slipped into American English. On a vocabulary test, candy, french fries or pants would score zero points.

Okay, the American over here is wondering what IS the UK version of candy and pants? I am guessing "chips" instead of french fries. Yes? No?:confused:

On an off note, is iced tea totally weird for UKers? I was in London last year and asked for an iced tea and the waitress looked at me as if I had grown another head. My DH, a Belgian, looked at the waitress, shrugged and said "Americans!":rolleyes: I was thrilled, "Gee, thanks honey, really appreciate it.":smack:

On the actual topic, I always said "plate" but now am not sure if I heard it that way or just pronounced it that way after seeing it in print.......:shrug:

*Aoife*
March 20th, 2010, 08:35 PM
Okay, the American over here is wondering what IS the UK version of candy and pants? I am guessing "chips" instead of french fries. Yes? No?:confused:

Chips and trousers. And what you call chips are crisps :)



On an off note, is iced tea totally weird for UKers? I was in London last year and asked for an iced tea and the waitress looked at me as if I had grown another head. My DH, a Belgian, looked at the waitress, shrugged and said "Americans!":rolleyes: I was thrilled, "Gee, thanks honey, really appreciate it.":smack:


Yeah, it's not the prefered drink of most. Most people I know love a piping hot mug of tea, so cold tea just seems a little alien to me.


On the actual topic, I always said "plate" but now am not sure if I heard it that way or just pronounced it that way after seeing it in print.......:shrug:
Well the word "straight" is pronounced like "strate", so it sort of makes sense that "plait" would be pronounced "plate".
But it's not. And you'd get funny looks for saying it that way. I'd give someone the benefit of the doubt if their first language wasn't english though.


I know I'm not from the UK, but I am right next door!

Sarahmoon
March 20th, 2010, 08:44 PM
After finding out a few years ago that "sew" doesn't rhyme with "few", I've given up trying to find the logic in English language :laugh: No seemingly weird pronunciation surprises me anymore.

Interesting about the Iced Tea. It doesn't taste like a cooled down regular tea at all so I wonder why people don't like it?

*Aoife*
March 20th, 2010, 08:52 PM
After finding out a few years ago that "sew" doesn't rhyme with "few", I've given up trying to find the logic in English language :laugh: No seemingly weird pronunciation surprises me anymore.


Totally off topic (I'm very sorry), but I know a couple of people who make them rhyme and it works!

enfys
March 20th, 2010, 08:54 PM
To me, a braid would be a Dutch/French style, where I use plait to describe what's called an English braid, a plain three strand.

Don't get me started on the confusions between British English and American English. My favourite example is "suspenders and a vest". To an American this is quite smart dressing for a man. To a Brit, this is quite a Rocky Horror Picture Show outfit!

(Plait=platt; I've never heard it said any other way)

Sarahmoon
March 20th, 2010, 08:54 PM
Hahah! I was happy already I never said it out loud before realising I pronounced it wrong "in my head" for years.

lexiflowers
March 20th, 2010, 09:06 PM
Another UK-er here, and I've always said plait (definitely pronounced platt, rather than plate). Personally they're plaits to me and my family whether they're "English braids" or "French braids", or whatever. English braids are just plaits, and French braids are French plaits, and so on...

I find myself writing about "braids" on here though usually, because most people on here seem far more comfortable with American English than English English :p.


Oh, and by the way, to the person who asked... We say sweets rather than candy. :)

enfys
March 20th, 2010, 09:25 PM
Another UK-er here, and I've always said plait (definitely pronounced platt, rather than plate). Personally they're plaits to me and my family whether they're "English braids" or "French braids", or whatever. English braids are just plaits, and French braids are French plaits, and so on...

I find myself writing about "braids" on here though usually, because most people on here seem far more comfortable with American English than English English :p.


Oh, and by the way, to the person who asked... We say sweets rather than candy. :)

Oh well now you've confused me. Yes, French plait sounds familiar. I've spent coming up to a decade having my hair vocabulary altered by American based forums!

Out of interest; had you ever heard of Dutch braiding/plaiting or was it just put to you as a variation on French? I've never heard the term used in "real life".

Masara
March 21st, 2010, 02:47 AM
When I'm talking about hair, I'll use plait instead of braid, except here where I've picked up the forum tendancy to say "braid". This also means I tend to refer to the plaits/braids I've learnt since joining as braids. So I'll talk about French plaits (which I've been doing for years) and Dutch braids (xhich are relatively new). My daughter asks for a "plait" when she wants just a plain English one, but says "crown braid" because those are the terms she's picked up from me.

For non hair items; I'll use plait/plaited if it's been done as a normal three strand plait. For exaple a "plaited loaf" Otherwise I'll probably use the word "woven", not braided. Braided is hair or thread or something like that.

In sewing etc, I'll call the decorative cord "braid".

Languages are fun and frustrating between what the book says and what people actually say. One of my questions in class is to ask pupils what they use to wash the floor. In a single class you'll get six or seven different words for the same thing.

For the British/American English learning in Europe. In my little part of Europe (France) we tend to teach British English a lower secondary school (although there are always a few texts or characters using American English) Then at higher secondary school, they tend to study more and more American English texts. The basic ruling on usage is that they can't use both, they have to stick to one or the other, not mix. That sounds logical but it does depend on them actually being given the correct term in both versions of the language. For teachers this is nigh on impossible because even as native speakers we don't necessarily know all the differences. And it's even more difficult for non native speakers. I've got used to teachers here writing the date the American way and then using nothing but British terms, spelllings and grammar.

I think it's easier for us Brits to be aware of American terms rather than the other way round. Simply because we are exposed to far more American English through films, books and television series. Although I'd love to know what a "brownstone" is exactly. I've worked out it's a building (probably built with brown stone - although "redbrick" universities aren't necessarily built of bricks) but no more than that.

Sorry, I've rambled on. It's Sunday morning and I've got coffee and croissants :coolblue:

Stevy
March 21st, 2010, 05:35 AM
Oh well now you've confused me. Yes, French plait sounds familiar. I've spent coming up to a decade having my hair vocabulary altered by American based forums!

Out of interest; had you ever heard of Dutch braiding/plaiting or was it just put to you as a variation on French? I've never heard the term used in "real life".

When I was about ten, I was at school with a girl who wore her hair in a Dutch braid / plait and called it a Dutch plait. From then until I joined LHC I never heard the phrase again, and people who I said it to seemed quite resistant to it, correcting me to 'inside-out French plait' or 'it's just a French plait whichever way up it is'.

I was really surprised, when I found LHC, to meet my old friend the Dutch braid / plait again!

In answer to the iced tea question, it's only really available in summer, and not massively popular even then. If I met someone who drank iced tea all year round, I'd think they were probably American or had spent time over there. An American friend of mine once totally bewildered a waiter by asking for 'hot tea' in October in a restaurant in Bath!

Nae
March 21st, 2010, 07:03 AM
I think it's easier for us Brits to be aware of American terms rather than the other way round. Simply because we are exposed to far more American English through films, books and television series. Although I'd love to know what a "brownstone" is exactly. I've worked out it's a building (probably built with brown stone - although "redbrick" universities aren't necessarily built of bricks) but no more than that.

Sorry, I've rambled on. It's Sunday morning and I've got coffee and croissants :coolblue:

Brownstone is a type of sandstone. So it can refer to stand alone buildings built of brownstone but it also refers to row houses made out of brownstone. I think though, especially on the east coast where these types of houses are common that when you say brownstone you generally mean a row house. Kinda like sometimes people say "I am going to Xerox this." Instead of "I am going to copy this." Brownstones are pretty regional dependent on what kind of sandstone you can quarry in the area.

Anyways, after browsing around on the internet it seems that you can pronounce "plait" with either a long or short "a" and be correct. Check out this link.
http://www.howjsay.com/index.php?word=plait

Johanna
March 21st, 2010, 07:19 AM
I'm Australian and I also say plait, I pronounce it platt also. Typically here a braid is seen as being more like a french braid and a plait being something that is just split into three and woven like that.

Carolyn
March 21st, 2010, 08:09 AM
Anyways, after browsing around on the internet it seems that you can pronounce "plait" with either a long or short "a" and be correct. Check out this link.
http://www.howjsay.com/index.php?word=plait What a cool site! I think I'll always read/say it as "plate" with a long a. I've been trying to come up with any other words spelled with "ai" where the word would be pronounced with a short a. I can't think of any. Can anyone come up with some?

shrimp
March 21st, 2010, 09:36 AM
Ireland

Ireland has two official languages - Irish and English, Irish is the 'first offcial language' and where there is problem of meaning or interpretation of the law then the Irish takes precedence.

:flower:

Melisande
March 21st, 2010, 09:44 AM
In Germany, they teach us UK English. Well at least they did when I checked last time. ;-) And we read only British literature, far as I remember.

But I never heard the word plait in my school time... which goes to show that you learn nothing useful or relevant at school.

In German, the thing itself is a Zopf, and the verb is flechten. A Flechte is a skin disease... or a growth on a tree. Languages are weird things....

Purdy Bear
March 21st, 2010, 11:02 AM
Im English, and I have to watch myself when going on American Forums, and chat groups. We have a lot of words spelt the same but pronounced differently:

Agoraphobia (English its Agg ro phobia, in American its Aggooooora phobia)
Aluminium (English its Alll uuu mini um in American its All ooo min um)

I first found the braid plait thing on You tube, so now Im a braid person more then a plait, which is quite daft.

Iv often been corrected when using American when I should be using English, and Iv often corrected Americans who say they speak English when its American.

Ok Im getting confused now, better go for a lie down. LOL!

zule
March 21st, 2010, 11:22 AM
Actually, purdy, the proper pronunciation for "agoraphobia" in the US IS "agg ro phobia." Most Americans say in incorrectly. But all the others are precisely right. George Bernard Shaw once said the the US and Britain were two countries separated by a common language. I've always loved that.

Standard American English can be a beautiful language, but it's often used and pronounced wrong by a lot of us. I'm still learning about it and I'm nearly 60! It always amazes me how well Europeans speak English. They've obviously put a lot of work into it. We Americans generally don't study other languages, and few of us speak them well even if we did. It's kind of an embarrassment, but that's our school system.

Masara
March 21st, 2010, 01:49 PM
I've been trying to come up with any other words spelled with "ai" where the word would be pronounced with a short a. I can't think of any. Can anyone come up with some?

I say plaid with a short "a" too.

Most of my pupils learn the word plait or braid at some point. Not because it's in the curriculum, but because most of them need to ask me about my hair. :p Plus we have a chapter about Native Americans and they ask for the word.

wendyg
March 21st, 2010, 05:12 PM
Maybe I am wrong here, but, apart from the UK, I can't think of another country in Europe whose first official language is English. :confused:

The word you're looking for is "Ireland".

wg

chopandchange
March 21st, 2010, 06:06 PM
The word you're looking for is "Ireland".

wg

I beg your pardon, yes! I was of course not thinking of the Republic of Ireland...

Doh!

Silly me!

Carolyn
March 21st, 2010, 06:13 PM
I say plaid with a short "a" too.

Most of my pupils learn the word plait or braid at some point. Not because it's in the curriculum, but because most of them need to ask me about my hair. :p Plus we have a chapter about Native Americans and they ask for the word.I knew there had to be a few words where "ai" is a short a.

Merlin
March 22nd, 2010, 06:33 AM
Plait - generally means your in the UK

Braid - generally means you're in the US (or you're in the UK and have spent so much time on LHC your being linguistically corrupted!

(see also: pigtails / bunches)

GlassEyes
March 22nd, 2010, 07:07 AM
I've used both, and for the record, both pronunciations are considered correct according to what I've found. I say 'plate'.

Also, the saying that it might be in greater use in EUROPE might be true--it's not originally a Germanic word. From what I've found, it's descent can be traced from Norman French, which takes it's roots in some older french dialect and so on. Might be able to trace it back to a latin root--don't really know, but the theory is sound-ish.

shrimp
March 22nd, 2010, 07:12 AM
Ireland has two official languages - Irish and English, Irish is the 'first offcial language' and where there is problem of meaning or interpretation of the law then the Irish takes precedence.

:flower:


The word you're looking for is "Ireland".

wg

(Bolding added to first quote)

:whistle: Ok - I may be looking like a pedantic fool right now... but that is the second time someone has been 'corrected' when they were actualy right.

See Article 8 of the Irish Constitution here (English version linked)
http://www.constitution.ie/reports/ConstitutionofIreland.pdf

freckles
March 22nd, 2010, 07:28 AM
Plait - generally means your in the UK

Braid - generally means you're in the US (or you're in the UK and have spent so much time on LHC your being linguistically corrupted!

(see also: pigtails / bunches)
agreed.

I would never have said 'braid' before the internet, but now I find myself saying it more and more IRL. :)

Merlin
March 22nd, 2010, 07:55 AM
Of course there is a large chunk of Ireland where English is the official first language

:whistle:
(but am I whistling The Sash or The Merry Ploughboy

shrimp
March 22nd, 2010, 08:16 AM
:lol: Good point Merlin. Apologies for not making it clear that when I see Ireland in the context of countries/states I see ROI (for the rather good reason that that is a state).

Obviously the Constitution of ROI does not apply to the North and therefore in some parts of the island of Ireland the constitution of ROI does not apply, so for some parts of the island of Ireland (but not the state of Ireland) Irish is not the first official language (apparently there isn't one in the North according to Wikipedia - so even Northern Ireland doesn;t have English as the first official language it is just de facto so)

Everyone thoroughly confused yet :lol:

Stevy
March 22nd, 2010, 11:43 AM
I've used both, and for the record, both pronunciations are considered correct according to what I've found. I say 'plate'.

Would you care to share your sources? I'd be interested to see who's calling the 'plate' pronunciation correct.

david
March 22nd, 2010, 12:24 PM
Of course there is a large chunk of Ireland where English is the official first language

:whistle:
(but am I whistling The Sash or The Merry Ploughboy

:lol: Since Im from Ireland... English is the most spoken widely spoken language, i.e. first language these days. You would probably have to go to some far reaching outback to find somewhere where Irish is primarily spoken dig up someone from generations ago. You would only find a handful of "irish language" schools. The whole Irish/English translations of things are generally only for political reasons to keep the hard heads quiet. :lol:

But back on topic...I also say plait, i.e english plait, french plait etc.

lexiflowers
March 22nd, 2010, 12:33 PM
Plait - generally means your in the UK

Braid - generally means you're in the US (or you're in the UK and have spent so much time on LHC your being linguistically corrupted!

(see also: pigtails / bunches)

On the pigtails/bunches thing...

I have always called "twin braids" pigtails. Bunches to me are a pair of ponytails in place of a pair of plaits. Yet I see that a lot of people on here call the things I call bunches, pigtails.

Does this make sense?

enfys
March 22nd, 2010, 02:11 PM
On the pigtails/bunches thing...

I have always called "twin braids" pigtails. Bunches to me are a pair of ponytails in place of a pair of plaits. Yet I see that a lot of people on here call the things I call bunches, pigtails.

Does this make sense?

It does to me :o

I can say I have never ever ever ever ever heard anyone say it plate, only ever platt.

Carolyn
March 22nd, 2010, 02:31 PM
It does to me :o

I can say I have never ever ever ever ever heard anyone say it plate, only ever platt.I don't think I'll ever get "plate" out of my head. If I ever come to the UK and say it "plate" will you smack me? :silly:

enfys
March 22nd, 2010, 02:44 PM
I don't think I'll ever get "plate" out of my head. If I ever come to the UK and say it "plate" will you smack me? :silly:

Probably not, but I'm not making any promises :slap:

dropinthebucket
March 22nd, 2010, 03:30 PM
Here in Canada, I've heard "plait" and "braid" about equally. Carolyn, how about "plaid" (rather than "plade") - course, i've got Scottish heritage, so there you go! :)

Carolyn
March 22nd, 2010, 03:52 PM
Probably not, but I'm not making any promises :slap::p


Here in Canada, I've heard "plait" and "braid" about equally. Carolyn, how about "plaid" (rather than "plade") - course, i've got Scottish heritage, so there you go! :)So far plaid is the only word we've come up with. English is an interesting language! When we factor in American English and UK English we have quite a confusing mess :D There are so many rules and all the acceptions to the rules.

Debra83
March 22nd, 2010, 03:57 PM
a pigtail, plait, and braid are all the same to me. a ponytail is .....is.....hmmm...can't think of another name, but it is when you gather the hair and put is in an elastic. You can have it high, medium, or low, or 2 (or more!) ponytails.

Eniratak
March 22nd, 2010, 04:08 PM
I grew up with both plait and braid, but I heard plait more.
I also pronounce it platt.

GlassEyes
March 22nd, 2010, 06:54 PM
Would you care to share your sources? I'd be interested to see who's calling the 'plate' pronunciation correct.
Miriam-Webster, for one.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/plait

I have two other sources as well, though they're less impressive. Two of the sites also share information on the Latin root, carried to english through Norman French (and also proving that it's not an -entirely- English word). Really, you can find it with a simple google of 'plait'.

To go further than this, you'd have to get an Oxford English Dictionary/Online Dictionary account, and sadly, I'm not going that far to prove a point. Someone else on the site may have one, and maybe they'll be willing to look into it.

Stevy
March 23rd, 2010, 05:23 AM
Thanks for the link to Merriam-Webster: that certainly is interesting. I'm sorry if you were put out that I asked you for your sources, but I'm afraid I don't go round taking people's unsupported word for anything on the Internet - even something as minor and silly as this.

There's no need to leave messages on my profile in future: I don't often look at it.

Tabitha
March 23rd, 2010, 06:17 AM
You can quote all the references you like, but if you came to Britain and started talking about "plating" your hair or wearing "plates" in it, people wouldn't understand WTH you meant (images of dishes on your head?).

enfys
March 23rd, 2010, 06:45 AM
You can quote all the references you like, but if you came to Britain and started talking about "plating" your hair or wearing "plates" in it, people wouldn't understand WTH you meant (images of dishes on your head?).

I was thinking of the plates they put into your skull after a terrible injury! :o

If it has a French origin I'd expect a silent t, so it would maybe have been said "play" like "lait" is said "lay". Over time the t might have been audibly added.

However some time between 1066 and 2010 we turned it into "platt" and I've never heard it actually said any other way.

chopandchange
March 23rd, 2010, 09:28 AM
I was thinking of the plates they put into your skull after a terrible injury! :o

If it has a French origin I'd expect a silent t, so it would maybe have been said "play" like "lait" is said "lay". Over time the t might have been audibly added.

However some time between 1066 and 2010 we turned it into "platt" and I've never heard it actually said any other way.

I completely agree with the above. It's never pronounced any other way in Britain.

And we do say bunches instead of pigtails. When I was younger we used to refer to a single ponytail as a bunch, as well. But not on LHC. We adapt and use the Americanisms so our US cousins will understand us. ;)

GlassEyes
March 23rd, 2010, 11:30 AM
Thanks for the link to Merriam-Webster: that certainly is interesting. I'm sorry if you were put out that I asked you for your sources, but I'm afraid I don't go round taking people's unsupported word for anything on the Internet - even something as minor and silly as this.

There's no need to leave messages on my profile in future: I don't often look at it.
Oh, sorry--I wasn't sure if the thread was dead or not. :shrug: I hadn't looked at the mane board.

Edit:

@Tabitha: Then they'll have to stare at me funnily. :)

dropinthebucket
March 23rd, 2010, 11:37 AM
Ok, i've gone and checked my Chaucer (don't laugh, I *had* to take Chaucer, it was a required course!!) - Middle English, being a blend of Norman French and Anglo-Saxon, has a pronunciation for "plait" that is a bit like a short a (as in bad) and a Norman eh (as in eeh, with a breathy sound), along with a pronounced t (unlike the Norman, where the t would be silent) - so, it was "plaeht," later anglicized to "plat" for easier pronunciation. Make sense? Sorry to be all historical about it, i'm just really excited that the huge, expensive Chaucer book i had to buy, and that gave all of us hernias to carry around, actually came in useful for something! :)

dropinthebucket
March 23rd, 2010, 11:51 AM
Sorry, someone has just asked me - Chaucer, middle English poet (forget who played him in A Knight's Tale, but Heath Ledger was so awesome as Will Thatcher in that movie!) - i should also mention i get all these medieval film and TV references from the SCA (Society for Creative Anachronism) ALONG WITH long hair envy! those medieval re-enactment girls really know how to look good in long, beribboned hair! sigh... hope i get there.

Keildra
March 23rd, 2010, 12:06 PM
Brownstone is a type of sandstone. So it can refer to stand alone buildings built of brownstone but it also refers to row houses made out of brownstone. I think though, especially on the east coast where these types of houses are common that when you say brownstone you generally mean a row house. Kinda like sometimes people say "I am going to Xerox this." Instead of "I am going to copy this." Brownstones are pretty regional dependent on what kind of sandstone you can quarry in the area.

That must be a regional thing because I've never even heard the term brownstone and my dad works in construction, I actually had to ask him what it meant. Also I never even knew what "xerox" meant I thought it meant something completely different.
I guess it's like the soda/pop thing. I had a friend that moved from to New York to where I lived in South Carolina, I asked her if she wanted a soda and she had no Idea what I was talking about.

Now to be on topic. I've always thought it was pronounced "Plate" but that's because when I learned the word my English teacher, at the time, pronounced it that way. Now I've never met anyone who actually says plait or "Platt", everyone around here says braid, but if I do meet someone I won't correct them, I'll probably say braid in a reply or something because that's what I'm most familiar with.

Also I like tea cold or hot, but not many places around here offer hot tea I have to make it myself.

Carolyn
March 23rd, 2010, 01:11 PM
That must be a regional thing because I've never even heard the term brownstone and my dad works in construction, I actually had to ask him what it meant. Also I never even knew what "xerox" meant I thought it meant something completely different.
I guess it's like the soda/pop thing. I had a friend that moved from to New York to where I lived in South Carolina, I asked her if she wanted a soda and she had no Idea what I was talking about.

Now to be on topic. I've always thought it was pronounced "Plate" but that's because when I learned the word my English teacher, at the time, pronounced it that way. Now I've never met anyone who actually says plait or "Platt", everyone around here says braid, but if I do meet someone I won't correct them, I'll probably say braid in a reply or something because that's what I'm most familiar with.

Also I like tea cold or hot, but not many places around here offer hot tea I have to make it myself.I think "xerox" might be more of a generational thing as "mimeogragh" would be. I've learned to order "hot" tea if I want it hot and in a mug when I'm in your state. I've learned that ordering "tea" gets me a glass of iced sweet tea. I love it but not at breakfast.

joiekimochi
March 24th, 2010, 10:07 PM
I live in a Commonwealth country and most of my childhood life I've heard "plait" pronounced as "plate" and "pleat"! Anyways we all say "braid" now.

bte
March 25th, 2010, 01:37 AM
Maybe I am wrong here, but, apart from the UK, I can't think of another country in Europe whose first official language is English. :confused:
Ireland in effect has English as the first language, even though Gaelic is the actual Irish language.

Similarly, Malta, Gibraltar and Cyprus all use a lot of English.