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ICor.11:15
December 5th, 2009, 10:43 AM
Hair-static!! = clingy, limpy or frizz!!:(

Don't know if a thread regarding this topic has already been started, but I decided to start one.

With winter coming along, and the wind n' all, my hair has once again started to "cling" due to static. I do use conditioner, but sometimes it just doesn't seem to do its job!!

I seem to find it's just easier to wear it in an updo during the winter in order to avoid it clinging to everything and everyone!! (ok maybe i'm exaggerating a little,...) but still, I like wearing it down in a half-up-do sometimes,... but there it goes again...

Anyone else encounter the same problem??:confused:

Jessikinz
December 5th, 2009, 11:12 AM
I encounter it! it's so annoying. I'm going to keep watching this thread to see if anyone has any advice or solutions haha.

But my hair is up like 95% of the time. So I just get static on the top of my hair, where I have a lot of halo hairs. And I like wearing lots of fluffy warm hats, which doesn't help but I need a warm head when I go outside! haha

*Lyric
December 5th, 2009, 08:47 PM
I do. I have a hair smoothing product that I use though, it helps a lot.

teela1978
December 5th, 2009, 09:26 PM
The only thing that ever helped this at all for me was to run damp hands over my hair every time I washed my hands. Slightly damp hair doesn't seem to get as staticky :)

Raederle
December 5th, 2009, 10:30 PM
You'll probably get more responses to this thread if it's moved out of the New forum. Using either a wood (good) comb or a horn (much better) comb makes static a thing of the past for me.

ICor.11:15
December 6th, 2009, 07:03 PM
thanks for the responses...:) waiting for more...


You'll probably get more responses to this thread if it's moved out of the New forum. Using either a wood (good) comb or a horn (much better) comb makes static a thing of the past for me.

Regarding the suggestion for moving the thread out of the new forum, how to do so? I'm new at this,...help?:)

pinchbeck
December 6th, 2009, 07:06 PM
I spray my seamless resin wide toothed comb with either water, orange blossom water, or a concoction of stuff I throw into a spray bottle (water, jojoba oil, etc.). Since the tines on my comb are wet, I don't experience static while combing.

ICor.11:15
December 6th, 2009, 07:38 PM
ok, well, I do gotta admit one thing....:rolleyes:

I've had long hair foreeeever:), and when I was little my mom used to comb my hair with a "comb", but as I got older, I eventually switched out to a brush:o, now I use the kind that has those little round ends - plastic, not wooden.........I see many of you are saying you use combs, I do have one, but simply think I can detangle my tresses much better with a brush,...yes have some split ends hear and there at all levels, but I say my hair looks pretty:cool: and healthy - just during the winter it can become a headache due to STATIC!!:(

maddog_running
December 6th, 2009, 08:41 PM
Hmmm, I always thought it was static-y because my hair is rather thin. These are all great ideas!

chrissy-b
December 6th, 2009, 08:46 PM
Wood combs help me with static. H2O and a little conditioner or leave-in in a mister bottle helps. Not using cones while I was in N. California helped too (the dry air in the winter was the worst!) Now that I'm in a more humid climate, I don't get static but the humidity frizz!

heidi w.
December 7th, 2009, 01:53 PM
Try using a humidifier at night in the bedroom. Usually these machines have 2 settings, and you can keep it on low. This puts a trace amount of moisture into the otherwise dry air that winter (especially snow country) represents. I posted on MANE FORUM about Time to Get Out the Humidifier.

Use a slippery cloth pillowcase too.

You may need to use a little more conditioner or oiling or whatever in the winter too, depending on hair type -- such as curly.

You might also discover that in winter you don't have to wash the hair quite as frequently.

These machines aren't that expensive--a drugstore brand is fine. Cool or warm/hot air, either way. This isn't about creating steam, like in a shower stall. This will help with nosebleeds, dry nose, dry throat in the morning, dry skin, too.


heidi w.

Bonkers57
December 7th, 2009, 03:31 PM
That's what I do. Since mine's still so short I'm tempted to slick it all back, but that would look awful. So, I've got permanent bed-head :D


The only thing that ever helped this at all for me was to run damp hands over my hair every time I washed my hands. Slightly damp hair doesn't seem to get as staticky :)

faeflame
December 7th, 2009, 05:03 PM
Avoid synthetic fabrics, especially polarfleece! I can wear any combo or blend of cotton, silk, wool but the moment I put on acrylic or polarfleace I get static.

Tinose
December 7th, 2009, 05:04 PM
I admittedly don't wear my hair down, so I might not be the best person to comment. However, I haven't had any static whatsoever since switching to a resin comb and using a little coconut oil.

ICor.11:15
December 7th, 2009, 09:57 PM
Thanks to all who have responded:cheese:!
As for whoever "moved" this thread thanks also!! I'm new to TLHC, so thanks again - will probably get more replies this way!!:D

Ok, well so far my static has remained "tamed" for now, probably just because I've kept it up or in a braid these past few days since I first posted.

Someone in one of the last replies mentioned needing to wash it less in the winter time - I agree, since it's colder and less chance of sweating :o(ew!)

I am one to blowdry my hair after washing, especially when it's cold out, cause I can't handle my hair being wet - makes me feel colder!

So, I will have to go purchase a wooden / resin type comb - um...:confused: do they make 'em in brushes? :p Still can't fathom the "comb" will have to try it - just feel like it takes so much longer to comb out!!

I've got pretty much straight hair, although I had curly hair when I was like three...but as it got longer it straightened out for good....(I kinda guessed on that 1a/f/m/?? thing)

Ok, more replies, this is helpful. Will try the comb thing and post how it comes out - by the end of week hopefully...:)

vampodrama
December 7th, 2009, 10:15 PM
I get crazy static too. What's truly weird is that it doesn't seem to be related to weather, but rather the calendar.... November hits, crazy static begins. It could be +10 degrees outside with pouring rain for weeks on end, and yet my hair could supply an entire small african village with electricity. I always thought static was due to cold and dry weather, but apparently not. I never get static in May, for example, even if it's +10 degrees and rain in May....

Truly odd.

Tressie
December 7th, 2009, 10:48 PM
I have the same problem, and I deal with it the same way.............updo!! It'd be nice to wear it down, for the warmth..........sigh~~ (o:

coscass
December 14th, 2009, 10:37 PM
I do. I have a hair smoothing product that I use though, it helps a lot.
What product do you use?

heidi w.
December 15th, 2009, 09:04 AM
Think about using a humdifier at night in the bedroom. The air is very dry in winter.

heidi w.

heidi w.
December 15th, 2009, 09:11 AM
I get crazy static too. What's truly weird is that it doesn't seem to be related to weather, but rather the calendar.... November hits, crazy static begins. It could be +10 degrees outside with pouring rain for weeks on end, and yet my hair could supply an entire small african village with electricity. I always thought static was due to cold and dry weather, but apparently not. I never get static in May, for example, even if it's +10 degrees and rain in May....

Truly odd.

http://www.sciencemadesimple.com/static.html
We usually only notice static electricity in the winter when the air is very dry. During the summer, the air is more humid. The water in the air helps electrons move off you more quickly, so you can not build up as big a static charge.


In winter, especially snowy winter zones, the air is quite dry, lacking moisture. In May the moisture content in ambient air is more than say, November or December.

Therefore, a humidifier in a room in a house, or a big one that comes with your furnace, can offset all of this by adding a trace amount of moisture in the air.

There are thermometers that measure these things that one can have in their house, if they like.

I learned about using a humidifier from my friend Lady Grace who has stunningly beautiful hair (and personality). In my previous home in Silicon Valley, South Bay, California, the climate was fine, even in winter. Here in Northern Illinois, I need to add some moisture back in. I use one all night long, on the higher setting. It offsets my dry skin, flyaway, and any potential for a bloody or overly dry nose and throat.

PLUS on skin more tepid water, don't wash the face skin with soap, pat the skin dry, only slough with a light scrubby cloth to remove detris, and a heavier moisturizer. I use butters and even coconut oil on arms and legs, for example.

You can have a humidifier running in a common area and the bedroom.

Consider, also, lowering the heat if you can, especially if everyone's gone out of the house/apartment.

heidi w.

heidi w.
December 15th, 2009, 09:13 AM
Washing less frequently is likely an option since the humidity isn't there to contribute to sebum on the head, so it takes a bit more. We sweat perhaps a little less in winter at night.

Unless you're like me, peri-menopausal! Some women will know precisely what I'm talking about.

heidi w.

McKanna91
December 15th, 2009, 09:16 AM
I've noticed a significant decrease in wintertime static since I stopped using traditional plastic brushes. I just use a comb (made of cellulose acetate) which actually seems to help quell the flyaways. Still, it gets so dry up here... it's an uphill battle, fighting the static. :rolleyes:

heidi w.
December 15th, 2009, 09:19 AM
I've noticed a significant decrease in wintertime static since I stopped using traditional plastic brushes. I just use a comb (made of cellulose acetate) which actually seems to help quell the flyaways. Still, it gets so dry up here... it's an uphill battle, fighting the static. :rolleyes:

I hope you saw my suggestion of a humidifier.

heidi w.

curlylocks85
December 28th, 2009, 03:50 PM
I know when I was flat ironing my hair that my hair would get so staticky during the winter. I have since stopped and I have not experienced any static problems this winter so far...

shockinglength
December 28th, 2009, 08:28 PM
I switched to CO and its really helped with the static. Aloe vera gel is awesome for this also. HTH

Darkhorse1
December 29th, 2009, 08:13 AM
Ah, polarfleece = instant static but = warm when you work in the outdoors.

Recently, Marks Work Wearhouse came out with anti-static polarfleece and it's true!! It doesn't cling my hair to it like the older ones!!

I've tried MANY things in my life, and it really is a balance between your life style and the weather. A humidifier will add moisture to the house, but I still had staticy hair at my mom's.

I find the following works for me, as I work outdoors:
pantene color renewel conditioner then integrity leave in conditioner/detangler by joico. This blend after washing with a clarifying shampoo seems to be the only thing that works at the moment. :D AND, I did an oiling after getting my hair colored, and it made my hair soft, but it does make it staticy after the first day (the oiling).

I know people who have used:
bounce sheets (un-used), static guard, spray hair brush/comb with a touch of hair spray

I've also found a huge change when I started using the jojoba oiled brush by Goody.

Bellona
December 29th, 2009, 10:08 AM
I keep dryer sheets in my desk at work because my hair gets static if I wear a hat. Sometimes I just wipe it on my hair, other times I rub my hands with it and then pat the static parts down. It actually works really well, and I don't think it hurts my hair at all. Just makes it smell like laundry!

Mannaz
December 30th, 2009, 04:04 AM
Last winter I was washing with shikakai and soapnuts, and I had no problem with static, same this year when I've been CO, I wonder if hair that is stripped = more static?? I shampooed once before christmas and immediately got static, even with the noise and everything uggh..

Rapunzelwannabe
January 7th, 2010, 10:59 PM
I have a little bowl with water by my heater that I drape a paper towel over as a make-shift humidifier which does a lot of good at home but I work in a mall store that makes my hair static like I've got an armful of balloons overhead! It's not the most comfortable work enviornment and updos seem to give me headaches when I work so is the general consensus wooden combs and a little oil? I'll have to try it!

BonnyJ
January 7th, 2010, 11:18 PM
We have a bedroom humidifier and a larger one in the living room. Besides much less static in my hair my breathing (sinuses etc.) is so much better and no bloody noses. I live in WY, very dry.

Coriander
January 8th, 2010, 12:40 AM
I spritz with water if it gets overly static-y, or do a light oiling. I almost always keep it in an updo so I don't have to deal with static. Nothing drives me crazier. :lol: