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Mrs.X
July 20th, 2009, 01:22 PM
I've been doing a lifeguard training course for the past couple of days which obviously involves swimming every day. Now usually i wouldn't have a problem with this as i'd wear a swim cap or oil my hair thoroughly first to protect it but the course rules state that you have to train in the clothing you would work by the pool in as a qualified lifeguard, and obviously that doesn't include a swim cap. So my hair is being exposed to the chlorine every day which it hates anyway, but as well as that, the course timetable means we are constantly getting in and out of the pool which firstly washes away any oil i use and secondly my hair dries with the chlorine in it between swims as there's no chance to wash it out until the end of the day which i'm guessing is very bad for it. It's only been 3 days so far and my hair feels really dry already so i was wondering if anyone has any tips on how to deal with this kind of damage? Also hairsticks aren't allowed in case they hurt someone so my hairs been in a ponytail the whole time, is there anything more protective i can do to it that is secure when diving etc and uses only hairbands and bobbypins?
sorry for the essay length question!
x

longhairedfairy
July 20th, 2009, 05:41 PM
I've been doing a lifeguard training course for the past couple of days which obviously involves swimming every day. Now usually i wouldn't have a problem with this as i'd wear a swim cap or oil my hair thoroughly first to protect it but the course rules state that you have to train in the clothing you would work by the pool in as a qualified lifeguard, and obviously that doesn't include a swim cap. So my hair is being exposed to the chlorine every day which it hates anyway, but as well as that, the course timetable means we are constantly getting in and out of the pool which firstly washes away any oil i use and secondly my hair dries with the chlorine in it between swims as there's no chance to wash it out until the end of the day which i'm guessing is very bad for it. It's only been 3 days so far and my hair feels really dry already so i was wondering if anyone has any tips on how to deal with this kind of damage? Also hairsticks aren't allowed in case they hurt someone so my hairs been in a ponytail the whole time, is there anything more protective i can do to it that is secure when diving etc and uses only hairbands and bobbypins?
sorry for the essay length question!
x
Why doesn't it include a swim cap? Is it against the dress code?:confused:

longhairedfairy
July 20th, 2009, 05:46 PM
What kind of oil do you use? Maybe you could use something heavier or a mix of oils.

ktani
July 20th, 2009, 06:08 PM
Try pre-soaking your hair with club soda for 15 minutes before you get into the pool for the first time. It takes 15 minutes for hair to be completely saturated, by being kept constantly wet and you may be able to rinse with club soda between swims. Here is an Article I wrote (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/vbjournal.php?do=article&articleid=115) on swimming and hair. It may help you. At night you can use coconut and argan oils as a treatment for about an hour before you wash and condition.

Scroll down under "Details and more" here (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php?p=233176&postcount=1), for information on club soda and pool waters.

Madame J
July 20th, 2009, 06:11 PM
Why doesn't it include a swim cap? Is it against the dress code?:confused:

I think the idea is that you have to wear the same clothes that you wear the whole time you're working around the pool and sitting in the lifeguard's chair, not just when you're in the water. I don't think it would be safe or healthy to wear a silicone swim cap all day, outdoors in the sun, when it's unlikely you'll need to get in the water on a regular basis.

Personally, I suggest rinsing with club soda at the end of the day and treating your hair to frequent moisture treatments during the summer. More damage control than damage prevention, but you do what you have to :shrug:

For my lifeguard training, I was at a sleep-away camp on the Chesapeake Bay and for our final week's testing they would just call us, at any time, from any location, to do a save in one of the swim areas. They timed us, so there was no stopping to change. The LGT students took to wearing a swimsuit under our clothes at all times so we could strip down while running to the waterfront instead of saving in our clothes. We had to do at least 3 of these during the week. One of my saves was the 250-lbs-of-solid-muscle-who-didn't-float-at-all instructor -- fireman carrying him onto the beach was not fun.

ktani
July 20th, 2009, 06:17 PM
Hi Madame J. :waving:

Your club soda and swimming report I put together from different threads, in the peroxide thread, to have it in one place, with all of the information.

"Madame J, club soda rinse on unhennaed hair, after swimming, - http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php?p=603487&postcount=11, amount used - http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php? p=611847&postcount=3"

LittleOrca
July 20th, 2009, 10:45 PM
When you are done swimming, make sure you clean your hair very well! When I get home I often do a conditioner soak as well to make sure my hair is not going to end up drying out the next day.

I also swim with my hair in a braid. That helps keep my hair all together, reduces surface area for the chlorine, and along with the pre-soak the other mentioned, your hair should survive the pool. :)

Mrs.X
July 21st, 2009, 10:25 AM
Thanks for all the help, I think I'll dry the club soda and see if that helps. To longhairedfairy, it's not that a swim cap is against the dress code but I know that realistically I wouldn't want to wear one constantly around the pool when working as there's very little chance I would ever have to actually get in the water and it would be pretty uncomfortable. Unfortunatley this means I can't train with one either. I tried heavier oiling today which helped quite a bit but was mostly gone by the end of the day so if the club soda doesn't work for me I'll go back to that.

Beauty2009
July 21st, 2009, 12:01 PM
I came across something that could also help you out. http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Repair-Swimming-Hair-Damage&id=309601

ratgirldjh
July 21st, 2009, 12:06 PM
Hi Madame J. :waving:

Your club soda and swimming report I put together from different threads, in the peroxide thread, to have it in one place, with all of the information.

"Madame J, club soda rinse on unhennaed hair, after swimming

OK - now I have to ask: what does this do to hennaed hair??? :D

ktani
July 21st, 2009, 04:26 PM
OK - now I have to ask: what does this do to hennaed hair??? :D

It should only remove chlorine and build-up, and any unbound henna, which can be removed by almost anything. If it can remove bound henna, that is a henna removal option just discovered, lol.

florenonite
July 21st, 2009, 04:32 PM
Lifeguard here *waves*

ktani mentioned soaking your hair in club soda before going in the water; if you can't do that even plain water apparently helps. When you have the chance to wash it out, don't use shampoo, just use a conditioner with EDTA. Ordinarily, CO washing just makes my hair greasy, but when I've been swimming it works beautifully.

I would suggest French-braiding your hair and leaving it like that all day. This means that (a) it should stay out of the way and (b) it won't dry with the chlorine in it to the same degree because it will stay wet. Of course, wet hair is more prone to damage, but if it's in a braid or two the damage should be minimal.

You can also try oiling your hair after swimming you wash it to moisturise it; it helps immensely.

teela1978
July 21st, 2009, 04:43 PM
I'll second the french braid (ex-lifeguard myself). I'd just shampoo with something that had EDTA or citric acid (or both) in it, and then condition with something very thick and heavy. Maybe a little oil/aloe vera on the ends. But I've always dealt pretty hard water when I've been in and out of chlorine all day... makes CO not work quite as well (can still smell chlorine on my hair after).

rogue_psyche
July 21st, 2009, 05:04 PM
Lifeguard here *waves*

ktani mentioned soaking your hair in club soda before going in the water; if you can't do that even plain water apparently helps. When you have the chance to wash it out, don't use shampoo, just use a conditioner with EDTA. Ordinarily, CO washing just makes my hair greasy, but when I've been swimming it works beautifully.


Wait, what's EDTA? I bet I'll feel stupid when you tell me.

florenonite
July 21st, 2009, 05:06 PM
Wait, what's EDTA? I bet I'll feel stupid when you tell me.

I don't actually know. I just know it's chelating and it helps remove chlorine. It's listed in the ingredients as "EDTA" or something like "disodium EDTA" or "tetrasodium EDTA". Here's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EDTA) the wiki article on it.

teela1978
July 21st, 2009, 05:12 PM
Just to add a bit... EDTA=ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The tetra-acetic-acid part is the important bit. Vinegar (acetic acid) helps to rinse away minerals and such, and can chelate (essentially bind and remove from solution) many elements to some degree. EDTA is like super acetic acid, 4 of them in one molecule so it does a REALLY good job at getting stuff out of your hair.