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rose_in_bloom
May 11th, 2009, 06:59 PM
http://www.marieclaire.co.uk/beauty/best/3093/1/0/happy-hair-tips.html

Some of these just made me mad. :mad:

Mabel Grey
May 11th, 2009, 07:08 PM
What an interesting bunch of cartoons. I am not sure how they came about but...I wonder who thought them up. as for the one about cheaper brushes..WOW. And the cold water thing...okay that was a bad article, although the cartoons were cute. Too bad it was misleading.

hazelnut
May 11th, 2009, 07:12 PM
Hahaha! You'd swear that these people have never heard of COMMON SENSE. I thought it was quite comical. Especially the part about how there was no scientific evidence proving that shampooing your hair daily was bad for you. :rolleyes:

Norai
May 11th, 2009, 07:30 PM
rofl... I bet my scalp would LOVE for me to put mouthwash on my head. /not

Magicknthenight
May 11th, 2009, 07:37 PM
wow. O_O no damage from blowfrying? I can surely say..that is not true. Along with many of the others. Perhaps this is more of their "opinion" rather then facts..

bjjowett1993
May 11th, 2009, 08:02 PM
OK, I really do not like these either.

1. YES, you hair WILL clean itself after a certain period of time. Not only have I read articles of this happening, by someone that was not trying to sell a product, and who was a short haired male, but my substitute teacher, who just told me last thursday (May 7th, 2009), has a TB lenghted curly-haired friend, who did this, and it worked. Shampooing (AKA with synthetic detergents) strips a layer of our hair (sebum) that is SUPPOSED to be there! We didn't pop out of our mothers with shampoo in our hand, it is not meant to be! The only reason commercial conditioners were invented in the first place, was because during WWII, a shortage of vegetable and fruit oils, needed to make castile soap, the ONLY ACTUAL SOAP that is naturally occuring, so "they" started making synthetic detergents, which were cheap, and effective, yet carcinogenic and stripping, and thus they created conditioner to compensate. Castile soap, is created by the saponification process between an alkaline and an acid from a fruit or vegetable oil (fatty acids), creating what is called 'saponified oils', the most traditional being olive oil, the original castile soap, however, castile soap can be made with any other fruit of vegetable oil. Castile soap is the only naturally occuring foaming/lathering cleansing agent ever, originally made form soda ash (fire ashes - alkaline), and olive oil (fatty acids)

2. !!!! No "scientific evidence, nor physiological reason, why colouring hair makes it fall out or become thinner." That is such an asenine statement!!! OK, well, common ingredients used in hair dye/bleach are: Ammonia, peroxide, and chlorine bleach.

Ammonia is higlhy alkaline, opening up the hair cuticle, which helps the hair enter the medulla, peroxide helps with lightly lightening and lifting colour from the hair, usually used in oxidizing dyes, and chlorine bleach does the same, only very "effectively" and harshly, and is used to reach a very light colour usually.

3. I agree with them when they say that a shampoo (meaning sulfate or other harsh surfactant shampoo) will do just as good of a job with removing buildup, and keeping it that way, unless a silicone conditioner is used.

However, when they say no buildup actually occurs, that is just plain bull****. If you are using a hair product with hold, and/or that gives shine, they will most likely use PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone) or other variations of this, which is essentially a liquid plastic, with carcinogenic and nitrosamine attributes, or they will contain any type of silicone, to give shine. If I rubbed vaseline in my hair (I have before, LOL) I would DEFINITELY have a build-up, or residue in my hair.

4. No disagreements

5. This is partly true, as long at the heat of the air being rushed throught the blowdryer is not exceedingly hot compared to your skin temperature, and you are not holding it directly to your hair, and you are not holding the 'dryer on one area of your hair for a long time, and you stop when your hair is dry, even better barely damp, then it will not cause any damage.

6. Cholrinated water is more likely to give a yellow-green tinge to your hair, plus damage, than the sun is. However, since grey hair has no protective melanin, the UV rays will damage hair much faster. Sunscreens, unless physical sunscreens (Titanium dioxide, and Zinc oxide) are chemicalyy based, and are carcinogenic, and have nitrsamine attributes. DO NOT USE CHEMICAL SUNSCREEN, YOU'LL BE DOING MORE HARM THAN GOOD. The best thing, even better than sunscreen, of ANY kind (including physical), is to cover up with long sleeved, light coloured clothing, and wide brimmed, tightly woven hats, as well as sunglasses. But, don't cover up all the time, your body absorbs vitamin D throught your eyes, and you need about 20-30 minutes each day idealy of sunshine. The sun does not cause cancer unless you burn. The longest yopu should stay without protection is untill your skin turns a very lightly flushed pink. The sun's UV rays are at their most powerful from 10:00 A.M. - 3:00/4:00 P.M. These are idealy when you should be protected, or covered. Try and get your vitamin D outside of this time range, or right at the beginingm, or end of this time range.

7. If you read my article on the affects of acids and bases/alkalis on hair, it mentions the benefits the use of a cold rinse on hair. Cold, acidic, and soft water/liquids close the cuticle, which in turn, makes hair more reflective/shiny/lustrous, and soft.

8. I would not suggest using mouth wash on hair, as most contain alcohol, which would dry out and irritate your scalp more, and the ones not containing alcohol would not have much benefit either. Witch hazel would be good thing, as long at it is alcohol free. Usually all the witch hazel bottles you can purchase at the drug store contain high amounts of ethyl alcohol, which would aslo irritate, dry, and worsen your dandruff and scalp. Also, keep in mind that dandruff is not just a dry scalp issue, but also a fungal issue. The medicine in Head And Shoulders, zinc pyrithione, is an anti-fungal and anti-bacterial.

9. ABSOLUTELY FALSE. ANY natural bristle, preferable Boar, due to its stiffness, and capability to penetrate the hair, are MUCH better for hair, not for detangling, but because it distributes our sebum from the roots on the scalp to the ends, and also smooths the cuticle, helping hair be moisturised, soft, and shiny. Again, we were not born with plastic, it was just not meant to be. However, due to plastic's smoothness, flexible bristles could be a good choice for hair, as long as that have no seams, and are coated or ball-tipped, preventing snagging.

10. Hair loss (alopecia), is affected by genetic, hormonal, health, stress, and nutritional factors. Diet, is just one of many things that will promote healthy hair, skin, bones, and nails, as well as an overall health and wellness. Besides all of that, our hair grows while we are sleeping, so while eating a healthy and balanced diet is a step in the right direction, this tip's direction as to giving a time range in when to eat is is kind of futile.

freznow
May 11th, 2009, 08:08 PM
Wow... if they didn't have that thing about diet, I'd've thought this was sarcasm or something. They're just so egregiously wrong.

joyellen
May 11th, 2009, 08:10 PM
That was a pretty laughable article.

spidermom
May 11th, 2009, 08:12 PM
I read an article written by a trichologist in a magazine recently. It wasn't a "women's" magazine, and he wasn't trying to sell anything. He said there's no such thing as buildup, unless you don't wash your hair, in which case buildup is the least of your problems, poor hygiene the greatest. Ever stand in the bathroom while flushing the toilet, or been in a room with somebody sneezing or coughing? Germs all over you, including in your hair. Plain water doesn't get rid of them. Soap/shampoo or water do.

Anje
May 11th, 2009, 08:35 PM
No such thing as buildup, huh?

Think of your face. You don't use a build-up remover to remove your make-up; you use a cleanser, or soap and water.
Epidermis sheds rather quickly. Hair doesn't. Sheesh!


The energy to form hair cells diminishes four hours after eating a meal...
Ummmm, hair isn't made of cells.

spidermom
May 11th, 2009, 08:37 PM
No such thing as buildup, huh?

Epidermis sheds rather quickly. Hair doesn't. Sheesh!


Ummmm, hair isn't made of cells.

It doesn't say that hair is made of cells. It says "the energy to form hair cells," which happens in the follicle, where there most certainly are cells, which are fed by blood vessels, which receive their energy from the foods you eat.

Peter
May 11th, 2009, 08:38 PM
OK, I really do not like these either.

1. YES, you hair WILL clean itself after a certain period of time. Shampooing (AKA with synthetic detergents) strips a layer of our hair (sebum) that is SUPPOSED to be there! We didn't pop out of our mothers with shampoo in our hand, it is not meant to be! ...

...

9. ABSOLUTELY FALSE. ANY natural bristle, preferable Boar, due to its stiffness, and capability to penetrate the hair, are MUCH better for hair, not for detangling, but because it distributes our sebum from the roots on the scalp to the ends, and also smooths the cuticle, helping hair be moisturised, soft, and shiny. Again, we were not born with plastic, it was just not meant to be. However, due to plastic's smoothness, flexible bristles could be a good choice for hair, as long as that have no seams, and are coated or ball-tipped, preventing snagging.

...
... Appeal to nature? We aren't born with shampoo or plastic, but we're not born with clothes, cars, or computers either. They need to be manufactured just like shampoo and plastic; are they therefore "not meant to be"? Natural doesn't mean good, and unnatural/synthetic doesn't mean bad. Not a personal attack or anything, just sayin'. :)

The article had a surprising amount of factual errors though. :D

spidermom
May 11th, 2009, 08:43 PM
From Hairfinder: Taking nutrients from the dermal papilla, the hair bulb generates new hair cells. As these cells move up through the hair root, they mature through a process called keratinization, fill with fibrous protein and lose their nucleus. When the cell loses its nucleus it is no longer alive. By the time the hair emerges from the skin it is merely fiber made of keratinized proteins.

Pierre
May 11th, 2009, 08:55 PM
Ummmm, hair isn't made of cells.
Actually it is, but the cells fill up with keratin and their membranes disintegrate. Keratin is a protein, so the energy from carbohydrates doesn't matter nearly as much as the quality and quantity of protein in your diet. And unlike your average protein, it's high in sulfur.

How come there's no mention of henna, oil, or S&D?

Rosamunde
May 11th, 2009, 09:01 PM
Wow. I'm a *newbie* here at LHC, and even I can tell that most of these "happy hair tips" would leave me with unhappy hair! Suggesting that products don't build up, and that dyeing and blowdrying is totally fine? Been there, done that, don't want to do it again!

bahannas
May 11th, 2009, 09:49 PM
Oy, that was intense. :hmm: I think that article was more directed towards the style of the hair, rather than the actual health. Yikes, I pity the person who believes all that.

Flynn
May 11th, 2009, 11:57 PM
*Groooan* "There's no scientific evidence..." Well, yeah, sure, only because no-one has actually looked into it yet. Twits.

Flynn
May 11th, 2009, 11:59 PM
No such thing as buildup, huh?

Epidermis sheds rather quickly. Hair doesn't. Sheesh!

Anyway, don't you use a "clarifying" something to remove your makeup? Clean face gets water and a little Simple facewash. Made-up face gets makeup remover, of some shape or form.

Masara
May 12th, 2009, 12:06 AM
After the first three "tips" I actually checked the' date of the article to see if it was from 1st April. It was really quite surprising to see so many "defensive" (i.e. there's no proof...) views in one article.

Then I clicked on the more information button and it led me straight to the Philip Kingsley website. I suppose something obviously sponsored by someone selling brushes, combs, shampoos etc.. is going to give that sort of "advice"

Darkhorse1
May 12th, 2009, 12:12 AM
Those are SO WRONG!
1) protein makes stronger hair NOT carbs!
2) you do NOT need to wash your hair daily unless you get very sweaty or have very greasy hair.
3) clarifying shampoos ARE good to remove dirt build up/grease.
4) cold rinses DO HELP--soothes my scalp and makes my hair shinier


Whoever wrote that did NOT check the validity of what they wrong. This goes against everything that other hair dressers say in Marie Claire!

teela1978
May 12th, 2009, 12:13 AM
I think that for the average person who is not trying to grow their hair any longer than BSL, these aren't so bad. Some things that were vehemently disagreed with that I kinda see some point to...

The washing one: Okay, you don't have to shampoo daily, but... from my experience and from what I've read on this forum, there is no 'washing method' that doesn't work best when you do something to your hair on a regular basis. Whether you are scritching your scalp and thoroughly combing the sebum towards your ends, or using a detergent/soap to remove that oil, you're still doing something to help your scalp say clean. Look at nature, most animals spend half their time preening and keeping their coats/feathers nice and neat. Doing something to your scalp every couple of days is kinda important. If you stop grooming your hair it will get grody. I don't think grooming has to mean shampooing, but few people outside of our community are ever going to do anything more than shampoo to groom their scalp.

The coloring thing: In my experiences I lost oodles of my hair when I dyed it. However, I have friends who have no post-color shedding issues. I tend to think that this is really dependent on the individual. We have plenty of long-hairs on this site who color with conventional ammonia-laden dyes with no problems. If color works for you and you like it, use it! If you shed loads and you hate the smell, don't. edited: You do have to treat it extra nice though. It is damaged, and will be hard to keep from looking damaged past bsl-ish in my experience (I'm sure this varies from person to person).

ETA: I really have never noticed a difference in my hair after a cold rinse versus after a nice warm rinse so I don't bother. I figure the water on my hair cools off before my hair dries anyway, so it is sitting with cool water on it for some period of time. Why freeze when I don't have to?

*BelievingAgain
May 12th, 2009, 01:00 AM
How... Strange. A couple of those 'tips' actually made no sense at all. The one about dyeing not causing damage was a joke to me, I know from first-hand experience that no matter how careful you are in terms of avoiding overlapping applications etc of commercial dye, you're going to have hair that is damaged. I almost thought that the whole article was a joke at one point, the advice seemed so adverse to anything we've come to understand and apply here. Bizarre-ness.. Let's just all be thankful that we have a far better source of hair knowledge!! :cheese:

Samikha
May 12th, 2009, 01:14 AM
I particularly liked the part about stress being the leading cause of dandruff. If that were true, I'd be a dandruff-driven snowstorm.

Flynn
May 12th, 2009, 01:16 AM
I particularly liked the part about stress being the leading cause of dandruff. If that were true, I'd be a dandruff-driven snowstorm.
Werrl, if dandruff is caused by a fungal infection, stress is likely to be a factor in worsening of symptoms, as it is with any illness. Your immune system doesn't do its job as well if you're stressed...

Samikha
May 12th, 2009, 02:07 AM
Werrl, if dandruff is caused by a fungal infection, stress is likely to be a factor in worsening of symptoms, as it is with any illness. Your immune system doesn't do its job as well if you're stressed...

Sure, but I think that shampooing your hair every day, colouring it with harsh dyes, using ball-tip bristle brushes, washing with hot-hot water and never clarifying for build-up might make your dandruff worse too...

Vivien'
May 12th, 2009, 02:13 AM
Why do they tell all these wrong things ?o_O

RancheroTheBee
May 12th, 2009, 02:15 AM
Sure, but I think that shampooing your hair every day, colouring it with harsh dyes, using ball-tip bristle brushes, washing with hot-hot water and never clarifying for build-up might make your dandruff worse too...

From what I understand, actual dandruff is a rather uncommon condition, and usually people have dry scalps or hard sebum and mistake it for dandruff. :hmm: I think. Anyone have some insight into this?

But really. This is the most ill-informed list I've ever seen. Ball-ended brushes are best? Blow-drying isn't damaging? It's like they came here and decided to negate everything we've been talking about.

LittleOrca
May 12th, 2009, 02:20 AM
But really. This is the most ill-informed list I've ever seen. Ball-ended brushes are best? Blow-drying isn't damaging? It's like they came here and decided to negate everything we've been talking about.

Exactly! So that way we go and buy more of their stuff.

What? Blow dryers are ok? As are harsh dyes? Let me at them! I will buy it all up and make more money for the people who put out these items and pay for someone to write these lies.

Always consider the source. :)

Flynn
May 12th, 2009, 02:25 AM
From what I understand, actual dandruff is a rather uncommon condition, and usually people have dry scalps or hard sebum and mistake it for dandruff. :hmm: I think. Anyone have some insight into this?


Exactly what I'm thinking. Flakies =/= dandruff.

lynnala
May 12th, 2009, 02:46 AM
That article was just plain weird!

marzipanthecat
May 12th, 2009, 03:50 AM
Oh, I like this. (sarcasm!) I thought at first it was an article saying "all the following are myths" - but no!!!

Let people go on believing that all this is true, and then continually asking me how I get my hair so long and shiny (mostly benign neglect!).

I've only recently started doing that "rinse hair in cold water" thing (I read about it on LHC!) and I think it does make my hair nice and shiny. Brrrr, though!

Stevy
May 12th, 2009, 04:09 AM
The cartoons are cute, but one-size-fits-all advice on hair or anything else... seldom fits anybody.

It also made me think 'Huh. No clarifying shampoo manufacturers advertising this month, huh, Marie Claire?'

Unofficial_Rose
May 12th, 2009, 04:28 AM
Thank heavens I have found this site and no longer believe these so-called hair experts! I used to read this sort of BS and believe it. No wonder my hair was damaged.shudder:

We know better than them don't we? ;)

Drynwhyl
May 12th, 2009, 04:50 AM
Well alright, we'll let them be ignorant. They will never have beautiful, long hair like us, the chosen ones. ;D

Oh really, the "tips" just sound ridiculous. It's common sense, for duck's sake!

free_hug
May 12th, 2009, 04:59 AM
bjjowett1993, WOW, this was an amazing little comment :) knowledge is power, huh?

Oh, Marie-Claire is a "women's magazine", and for some reason what they to is try to sell stuff (either the magazine itself, products, other bs)
And this was all great advice for high-maintenance-lovers. The correct title is: "10 great hair tips for all those who wish to spend shiploads of money on products and hope to return to the salon every 6 weeks"

Madame J
May 12th, 2009, 06:48 AM
I like the juxtaposition of the shampooing "tip" with the clarifying "tip." I used to act and it involved stage makeup, so maybe the makeup removal analogy was not good for me, but if regular shampoo will strip out all sorts of styling nastiness, what does that say for those who don't use styling products but still shampoo everyday? Wait, I forgot, you're supposed to be coloring your hair regularly and blow-drying everyday, so you'll have to be using hair products.

Yeah, I thought this was a joke, too, until they threw in one or two reasonable ones.

Hannah83
May 12th, 2009, 07:33 AM
WOW, that was just soo... I cant help but wonder what facts it is based on. I think someone have to be bald to give some of those advices, or maby well paid. :rolleyes: It is shamefull, that people read this and trust that this is true, and end up with more damaged hair. Another proof that you should not trust everything you read. :mad:

LiraelQ
May 12th, 2009, 07:58 AM
Wow. Fashion mag writers really are just a bunch of shills for the beauty industry.

SimplyViki
May 12th, 2009, 08:53 AM
Yeah, I thought the article was kinda weird, too. I have to wonder, though, after reading all these responses - What's wrong with ball-tipped bristle brushes? They don't scratch my scalp!

Upside Down
May 12th, 2009, 09:00 AM
Hahha just buy our products and all your troubles go far far away :)

melrose1985
May 12th, 2009, 09:09 AM
WOW! This totally made me laugh!

ATrixie
May 12th, 2009, 09:37 AM
Oh gosh, these are simply hilarious!! :D

Did you notice how if you 'click for more info' (like they tell you) it takes you straight to an ad for 'elasticizer' - a product for heavily damaged hair!! :D

I think that says it all!!! :D

Maybe someone was reading LHC & became scared ladies would stop washing & destroying hair with their products & ordered a full paint-in ad?!! ;)

There are some maybe-truths in there:

witch hazel - maybe, mouthwash - ugh!!

Maybe they/we should name the topic 10 Tips for Happy Advertisers??!! hmm..?!!!
(I do agree about stress causing dandruff.. at least partially..)

Also interested how is fruit/carbs good to form hair if they are made of protein?! hmm..?
/I do agree with healthy snacks & fruit, this one just left me wondering..?)
Of course a healthy balance for all minerals & vitamins is important.. I think my hair grew fastest when I ate more protein though..?!!

Sarahmoon
May 12th, 2009, 09:57 AM
ROFLMAO!!!! I've never read that much nonsense before. Those tips are the exact opposite of the truth LOL is this an April 1st joke or something?

longhairedfairy
May 12th, 2009, 10:53 AM
As for mouthwash, Listerine has been used for quite a long time (at least since my grandmothers were children ETA: born 1932) as a very good dandruff treatment.

bjjowett1993
May 12th, 2009, 12:48 PM
... Appeal to nature? We aren't born with shampoo or plastic, but we're not born with clothes, cars, or computers either. They need to be manufactured just like shampoo and plastic; are they therefore "not meant to be"? Natural doesn't mean good, and unnatural/synthetic doesn't mean bad. Not a personal attack or anything, just sayin'. :)

The article had a surprising amount of factual errors though. :D
I agree totally with what you sre saying, and I DO agree about computers, cars, clothing, etc... But I believe that nsture intended for us to take naturslly occuring minerals, plants, foods, and materials, and create things from them, so therefore, clothing isn't that big of a deak, but computers, cars, and plastic for example, are.

I do also agree when you say natural does not always mean good, and vice versa for synthetic, however, I agree more with naturaly occuring items than synthetic or artificial, as there are many reasons why they are harmful or counter-active, true that this may be said about some naturally occuring items, but not the majority.

Anje
May 12th, 2009, 12:57 PM
From Hairfinder: Taking nutrients from the dermal papilla, the hair bulb generates new hair cells. As these cells move up through the hair root, they mature through a process called keratinization, fill with fibrous protein and lose their nucleus. When the cell loses its nucleus it is no longer alive. By the time the hair emerges from the skin it is merely fiber made of keratinized proteins.

Fair enough. I was under the impression that it was an acellular material, not literally dead.

That said, anucleated cells aren't necessarily not alive. Human red blood cells lack nuclei, and last for several weeks.

Dreamernz
May 12th, 2009, 01:30 PM
I wonder, do the marie-claire team walk around bald.....when I saw the comment about the plastic brush, I just lost it:mad:

Roseate
May 12th, 2009, 01:36 PM
First off, that article is just bizarre. Honestly, even most mainstream mags admit that overshampooing, dyeing, and blowdrying can be damaging, they just usually claim you can totally avoid the damage by using miracle silicone-filled products.

Second, I've heard this claim a bunch of times:


The only reason conditioner was invented in the first place, was because ... "they" started making synthetic detergents, which were cheap, and effective, yet carcinogenic and stripping, and thus they created conditioner to compensate.

But just because there wasn't something in a bottle labelled "conditioner" doesn't mean people weren't conditioning their hair! Oils, honey, yogurt, herbs... people have been using natural conditioners for millenia. The 20th century was big on putting stuff in bottles, but conditioning the hair was not invented when "conditioner" was invented. Natural cleaning methods can be drying too, and some people just have dry hair!

I don't love the detergents myself, but I believe this bit of "evidence" that they are extra bad for hair doesn't make any sense.

Drynwhyl
May 12th, 2009, 01:59 PM
Yeah, I thought the article was kinda weird, too. I have to wonder, though, after reading all these responses - What's wrong with ball-tipped bristle brushes? They don't scratch my scalp!
Well, they get tangled in hair and usually help rip it and break. Personal experience talking, I'm not sure if that's the only wrong thing :P

LutraLutra
May 12th, 2009, 02:08 PM
Oh dearie, dearie me. It's the plastic brush that gets me. :(

florenonite
May 12th, 2009, 02:22 PM
A lot of the things they say aren't damaging may not be damaging for some people, but for many people they are. When giving generic advice it's best to err on the side of caution than vice versa, as they appear to be doing. If I followed these tips I would have very unhappy hair!

viking_quest
May 12th, 2009, 04:06 PM
If I followed these tips I would have very unhappy hair!

Me too.

This list is so misinformed that it's ridiculous.

bjjowett1993
May 12th, 2009, 04:26 PM
bjjowett1993, WOW, this was an amazing little comment :) knowledge is power, huh?

Oh, Marie-Claire is a "women's magazine", and for some reason what they to is try to sell stuff (either the magazine itself, products, other bs)
And this was all great advice for high-maintenance-lovers. The correct title is: "10 great hair tips for all those who wish to spend shiploads of money on products and hope to return to the salon every 6 weeks"
Thank you! :) :D

bjjowett1993
May 12th, 2009, 04:31 PM
But just because there wasn't something in a bottle labelled "conditioner" doesn't mean people weren't conditioning their hair! Oils, honey, yogurt, herbs... people have been using natural conditioners for millenia. The 20th century was big on putting stuff in bottles, but conditioning the hair was not invented when "conditioner" was invented. Natural cleaning methods can be drying too, and some people just have dry hair!

I don't love the detergents myself, but I believe this bit of "evidence" that they are extra bad for hair doesn't make any sense.

I did not mean thing with which you can condition your hair, I meant commercial "conditioners", such as Pantene, etc... as whomever first coined that word made a trend.

:)

Roseate
May 12th, 2009, 04:42 PM
I did not mean thing with which you can condition your hair, I meant commercial "conditioners", such as Pantene, etc... as whomever first coined that word made a trend.

:)

Right, I understand. Commercial bottled conditioner and commercial bottled shampoo became popular around the same time.

I thought you were using that fact to imply that there had not been a need for conditioners (of any kind) before that time because people were using gentler washing methods; I've heard people use it that way in the past. Sorry if I misunderstood!

frodolaughs
May 12th, 2009, 04:51 PM
If I followed those tips I would be close to bald, and my scalp would itch constantly. The cartoons were fun, though, and the defensive tone of the tips was ...odd... I can imagine someone following these tips and concluding (like many people I know) that their hair just can't grow longer than shoulder length.

enfys
May 12th, 2009, 05:03 PM
It's like someone got back from the salon with a very bad to and decided to make everyone else have hair as bad as them.

It's wierd that they are also going against common knowledge. Such as the water one; even normal people have heard of that!

Regarding brushes, I never got on with BBBs despite my best efforts I just got static, whereas my nice Denman plastic paddle brush was great for about 6 years, until beloved tangle teezer.

ImperfectBrat
May 12th, 2009, 05:18 PM
Wow, just wow.

I guess I have to give up my oiling/ butters/ co/ rinses and go blowfry now so I can has nice hair.

:rolleyes:

Darkhorse1
May 12th, 2009, 05:19 PM
I think what bothers me about this is that these seems to be blunt statements---everyone has to follow what works for them.

I use the brushes with the balls on the tops/plastic bristles. Works better for my hair. I like cool rinses because it makes my scalp feel better, seems to keep the oils down and makes it shiney. I clarify due to my excess of oil and lifestyle.

There are 3 grades of dandruff apparently. The mild stuff is just the flakes you see, but the bad stuff is when it's really hard, white and crusty and when you scratch it, it bleeds. THAT is very uncomfortable. That's the kind that makes you lose hair. I had this only once and I was highly stressed out at that time.

A good guideline? Follow what works for you, don't be afraid to try new things, but don't fall for hype.

Coloring never bothered me/caused shedding for me.

bjjowett1993
May 12th, 2009, 05:25 PM
Oh, absolutely no problem! Semantics can be frustrating at times, I should have been a little more explanatory. I will edit my original post, so nobody else will become confused. :D

BlackfootHair
May 12th, 2009, 05:28 PM
I didn't like the article. Sounded like it was written by an egotistical writer who didn't care to do detailed research!

bjjowett1993
May 12th, 2009, 05:33 PM
I agree!!!!!

Flynn
May 12th, 2009, 07:06 PM
I didn't like the article. Sounded like it was written by an egotistical writer who didn't care to do detailed research!

I thought it just read like an ad...

JamieLeigh
May 13th, 2009, 11:16 AM
I'm not surprised that the first time I come across this thread, there are already 7 pages worth of comments!!! I don't think I can add anything different than what others have already said, but I really hate the use of the word "scientific" in those tips. As if hair care ISN'T all just one big science experiment!!!!??? :mad:

Forever_Sophie
May 13th, 2009, 12:28 PM
What a joke! Most of it was outrageous - no such thing as build up?! oy!

Fethenwen
May 13th, 2009, 12:30 PM
I love the way it takes me to a site selling expensive hair products when I click on 'for more information'! Bwhahah! It ways it all.

Kaamos
May 13th, 2009, 01:07 PM
There is no such thing as 'build-up' with hair products. [...] Similarly, your regular shampoo will cleanse your hair of so-called build-up. :eye: I see a contradiction. Why do they say, that regular shampoo can remove build-ups if there aren't any build-ups at all?
Tsssss

Those tips are very entertainig :laugh:
I don't pity people who believe it!

Themyst
May 13th, 2009, 01:10 PM
Well, this is why I don't buy women's magazines anymore. Anyone can submit an article for publication. Anyone. They're just full of fluff and garbage, and this article is just further proof of that.

shadowclaw
May 13th, 2009, 01:52 PM
The article may have been bad, but tip #4 did get me to think about how old my hair is. My hair does grow at approximately 6 inches per year, so my ends are 4.5 years old. I don't know why, but I find that interesting!

rogue_psyche
May 17th, 2009, 12:24 AM
This is the second article along this vein that I've seen recently. Haircare/skincare companies are on the defensive because natural methods are replacing their products. The thing is, most of us on this forum have had so much better results doing the opposite of what they say.

Dementia1013
May 17th, 2009, 12:45 AM
ROFL
If you don't take it seriously it's quite funny...

LILBERT
May 17th, 2009, 06:14 AM
lol! it felt like i was reading a post from here of the biggest hair lies ever told :p

AlisaB
May 26th, 2009, 07:59 PM
This is why I can't read magazines anymore...

Friesiangirl
August 3rd, 2009, 09:22 PM
I just wanted to add that we regularly spray mouthwash (diluted) onto our horses tails and sometimes manes, but only at the base where the hair is growing from. It tends to keep them from itching.

Hayley

GlassEyes
August 3rd, 2009, 09:57 PM
ONly thing that I might -maybe- key into is the listerine. XD

The brush part made me laugh. I don't use them, but jeez.

Reptilia
August 3rd, 2009, 10:05 PM
I'd be willing to bet the author of this nonsense has hair above the shoulders!

Aer
August 3rd, 2009, 10:40 PM
I can not believe that lies like that were actually published. I really feel for those who take these "tips" serious and follow them thoroughly. Publications like that, are in the beauty industry, so they should know better. There is probably a sells motive behind it, infact I'm sure of it. I just get so angry, because I remember a time when I would of fallen for those easily, and did, all the damage I did to my hair unknowingly, and thinking the whole time my hair was just bad hair. Then I got educated, and realized that my hair was nice, and that nobody naturally has bad hair. I could write a letter to the publication, but I don't think they would really care, and like I said before they probably know they are wrong. Sorry for the rant.

heatherdazy
August 4th, 2009, 08:45 AM
Cute pictures, but whoever wrote this is obviously not very knowledgeable about hair!

And I'd love the author to use Redken All Soft shampoo and conditioner for two weeks and get back to me on the 'no build up' thing.

az_sweetie01
August 4th, 2009, 10:36 AM
Good grief! My SD would FREAK out if I put something so harsh as mouthwash on my scalp. Yikes.

heynormy
August 4th, 2009, 11:25 AM
Wow:rolleyes:
Those tips seem to go against almost everything that we believe in! Well..with the exception of tip #4 about using extra conditioner on the ends.
I also wanted to mention that it the way the article was written, it sounds as if they hired a cocky pre-teen to write it.:)

may1em
August 4th, 2009, 11:35 AM
After the first three "tips" I actually checked the' date of the article to see if it was from 1st April. It was really quite surprising to see so many "defensive" (i.e. there's no proof...) views in one article.

Then I clicked on the more information button and it led me straight to the Philip Kingsley website. I suppose something obviously sponsored by someone selling brushes, combs, shampoos etc.. is going to give that sort of "advice"

I smell APRIL FOOLS! too.

Even a lot of mainstream media are saying things like don't shampoo every day.

The Internet keeps things around - had we all been reading this in original magazine form around its publication date, we'd have smelled the joke from a long ways away. In August we don't.

marzipanthecat
August 4th, 2009, 11:47 AM
I've just come back from a trip to the dentist and therefore I have spent a nice time reading magazines in the waiting room.

So, I'm sitting there reading Good Housekeeping (I think it was the June 2009 issue) and it has an article on how to make your hair shiny/glossy. Generally it was pretty sensible. It did assume all women dyed/bleached their hair though (well, in the UK it is estimated 70% of women over 16 do indeed change the colour of their hair - sorry I can't recall what crazy place I read that).

But then - and this DIRECTLY contradicts what is said in that Marie Claire web article - it had some top hairdresser saying that yes, you need to clarify to remove junk.

And it also had a little side bar article about how silicone in all products is not really all that good for your hair, most of the time (I admit I use a coney conditioner fairly frequently, but it works for me!).

nowxisxforever
August 4th, 2009, 11:53 AM
I've just come back from a trip to the dentist and therefore I have spent a nice time reading magazines in the waiting room.

So, I'm sitting there reading Good Housekeeping (I think it was the June 2009 issue) and it has an article on how to make your hair shiny/glossy. Generally it was pretty sensible. It did assume all women dyed/bleached their hair though (well, in the UK it is estimated 70% of women over 16 do indeed change the colour of their hair - sorry I can't recall what crazy place I read that).

But then - and this DIRECTLY contradicts what is said in that Marie Claire web article - it had some top hairdresser saying that yes, you need to clarify to remove junk.

And it also had a little side bar article about how silicone in all products is not really all that good for your hair, most of the time (I admit I use a coney conditioner fairly frequently, but it works for me!).

I love how mainstream care is starting to mimic LHC knowledge... (I never had any luck with cones... but I have a feeling if I found the right coney conditioner, that it would work out fine...)

Wicked Princess
August 4th, 2009, 03:50 PM
Wow...just wow...

I've been told things by my hairdressers (and they're good, talented ladies :) ) that directly contradict over half of the things in this article. ESPECIALLY the stuff about build up, and "having" to wash every day. Admittedly, one of them suggest you use shampoo every two-three days and continue to use conditioner on the days between...whereas I don't always get my hair wet between washings.

I could see many of these tips holding true for some people. But when you're giving general advice to a large audience...this isn't a very responsible list of tips!

Fenix
August 4th, 2009, 04:27 PM
There is no such thing as build-up....well....my hair things there is...so i better start listen to it :p

I feel really sorry for the womans who really believe the article..thinking there doing a good job for there hair....

Ice~Cold~Wind
August 4th, 2009, 04:41 PM
What bologna. I used to use regular plastic brushes and all they ever did was break my hair and get snagged, even when my hair was completely tangle free sometimes. That and the mainstream SLS shampoos are very drying. I know, because I grew up on them(my mom was a stylist back then. Commercial and salon products were all I knew:().