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Fencai
April 9th, 2009, 10:07 AM
Just wondering if any of you, who have been ill for a while, or had surgery and were in bed for some time, had any suggestions for a
"bedside hair care box".

Im having surgery this coming Tuesday, and A) am a total wimp because of a HORRIBLE past experiences with hospitals and my first two surgeries. B) anesthesia ALWAYS makes me really sick (and when I vomit I pass out- again its a mess).

So while, my DH will be with me the day of surgery, Im more concerned about being able to take care of my hair for the next few days while Im in bed hanging out recovering. I'll be at home, so that's a good start.
Im thinking of probably doing a french braid before surgery to keep it out of the way, and to make sure that its short enough that when i get sick, it wont be in my hair.(hopefully!)

So anyone that has suggestions for a hair care box, would be good!

Ursula
April 9th, 2009, 10:17 AM
When ill, the last thing I want to do is mess with my hair.

I'd suggest that you wash your hair before sugery, and put it in two braids. Keep it braided. You can comb out and rebraid one side at a time, as needed and as you have the energy. Do the braids a bit forward, just behind your ears, so that as you lie on your back, you are not lying on a lump of hair, and they can come forward over your shoulders.

A single french braid is apt to be uncomfortable when you're lying on it, but two french braids might be comfortable. I'd do two plain braids, though, if your hair is long enough, as they can be redone with little effort, while doing a french braid requires more time with your hands over your head, which can be tiring.

To bring with you, just extra elastics, and a comb. Ideally a comb you won't mind if you loose at the hospital.

AJoifulNoise
April 9th, 2009, 10:17 AM
When I went in for surgery I took my whole hair box. Which, it was fun to see the nurses peer in and ooooh and aaaah over, but was also overkill. Really all I needed were some hair ties, a comb, and a brush. I lived in twin english braids for about 2 weeks. At first I had others braid for me (because of the IV), but then later braids were all I could do because I was weak and tired.

And, I'd like to give you a hug because I do not react well to anesthesia, either. I vomit violently. :( So, I know how that is. I hope your surgery is successful and as painless as possible.

Anje
April 9th, 2009, 10:27 AM
In addition to braids, I'd get a sleep cap, or a puffy bouffant-type surgical cap from the doctor. You can put that on before surgery, and then just leave it on until you're done with the throwing up and passing out. Hopefully it will keep your braids out of the way and prevent them from getting messy.

frodolaughs
April 9th, 2009, 10:30 AM
I might do 2 french braids to start out with (in my hair, those stay in the best) but plan on rebraiding as english braids because that takes less energy. I sleep with my hair in a single braid, but I sleep on my side. If I have to be on my back 2 braids close to my ears is definitely more comfortable.

Here's to your speedy recovery.:blossom: I hope everything goes smoothly.

Fencai
April 9th, 2009, 10:34 AM
thanks ladies!
I'll switch to the two english braids. DH can hold them out of the way for me!
I'll keep my comb with me, and extra elastics.

and I never would have thought to ask for extra caps from the Dr!! What a GREAT idea!!!!

camirra555
April 9th, 2009, 02:24 PM
Good luck with your surgery!

Speedbump
April 9th, 2009, 02:36 PM
When I had gall bladder surgery last year, I washed my hair the morning of my procedure, then braided it to keep it out of the way. Then I didn't touch it for days. :lol:

However, if you really think you will feel like dealing with it, I would put a comb in that box, maybe an oil or other moisturizing/slippery stuff, a ficcare, some metal-free ponytail holders, and that's it. If you have a silk or satin pillowcase, take it to the hospital. I did and it really, really helped me keep the tangles and knots down in the back.

Otherwise, just keeping it out of the way as much as possible is probably your best bet.

Good luck,

Speedy

heidi w.
April 9th, 2009, 03:53 PM
As a veteran of surgery and illness (14 major surgeries and quite a boatload of minor ones....) here's my input:

I strongly recommend you wash & condition your hair really well before heading to the hospital. It'll be a while before you can do so again.

THEN
braid your hair in pigtail braids.

Braids are easily placed in a surgical cap. The nurses can work around it fairly easily. And you can sleep relatively easily in pigtailed braids.

Practice sleeping one or two nights in such braids so you can tweak where you begin the braid and how tight or loose to place to your skull.

I actually recommend this style of braiding over one long braid or the braided pigtails begun too high, although high and side placement of the pigtailed braids is acceptable too....

I recommend kind of low down, perhaps earlobe region as the starting point. Then I recommend for a long haul in braids you place it pretty tight to the head (not overly loose if you knew you had the energy and ability to take it out the next day). I ALSO recommend making the braiding relatively tight as well. And tie off really reliably -- nothing that slides or slips out too easily.

Plan that all will loosen as you move about or turn your head.

That's ok. Yes, you may have some tangles when you get back to your hair in about 3-5 days, maybe even a few pin knots that will prove frustrating, but overall, braiding will keep your hair in pretty good situation with minimal tangling issues.

Also braided hair is pretty quick and easy to get out of the way when heaving up a vomit.

Secondly, bring a satin pillowcase. This will help to further limit pin knots of the back-of-neck hairs, somewhat. Be careful though: if you go from your room when feeling better, housekeeping may come in and accidentally take your pillowcase to clean. So bring one that is expendable, just in case.

Bring a radio! Music helps a lot.

A comb. Hubs can bring in shampoo/conditioner later. Usually hair washing is suspended for a while, depending. In many hospitals, nurses have to get doctor's orders to wash hair and hospitals aren't well set up for washing hair. And nurses are pretty busy, so your need to wash hair tends to take a lower priority over turning a patient to prevent bedsores or on schedule if on a certain type of bed (just examples).

Even if your hair is icky and gross you can comb it and re-do the braiding when feeling a little stronger, assuming the surgery is not around arms, chest or upper back area overly.

Bring a stuffed animal to hug.

Make sure your file says no cutting of hair unless to save your life. They won't, but I always make sure my medical files have this info.

You can always "scalp" wash your hair....just the top of head and back of head, and not get those braids overly wet....when you feel better and can move and bend and such.

I hope you recover well and quickly!
heidi w.

heidi w.
April 9th, 2009, 03:56 PM
I might do 2 french braids to start out with (in my hair, those stay in the best) but plan on rebraiding as english braids because that takes less energy. I sleep with my hair in a single braid, but I sleep on my side. If I have to be on my back 2 braids close to my ears is definitely more comfortable.

Here's to your speedy recovery.:blossom: I hope everything goes smoothly.

I would not do french braids. When the hair has been a bit tangled from being in such braids for several days or a week or so (depending on your situation), then getting french braids out takes longer and might be a little bit frustrating. Might.

heidi w.

heidi w.
April 9th, 2009, 03:58 PM
In addition to braids, I'd get a sleep cap, or a puffy bouffant-type surgical cap from the doctor. You can put that on before surgery, and then just leave it on until you're done with the throwing up and passing out. Hopefully it will keep your braids out of the way and prevent them from getting messy.

Most surgical procedures they cover your hair/head with a cap. It's a kind of cap to eliminate germs and a certain kind of fabric that's allowed in a surgical room. That sleeping cap may not be allowed in surgery. This is a very clean room, and there are protocols for what's allowed in to eliminate/reduce/prevent infection and germs and so on.

heidi w.

pointydog
April 9th, 2009, 04:31 PM
I'n not a veteran, but I have spent weeks at a time in a hospital..
I usually prepare my hair the night before. I do two braids and wind them over my head into the crown, then lace them in place. If you keep the back of the crown close to the nape, it's very comfortable. I then cover all with a close-fitting headscarf.

I find I can sleep in any position with my hair like this, and the hair is good for at least 3 or 4 days, or will stay a week if I'm not tossing around.

Loose hair will get caught everywhere, and the hospital staff won't think to take it into account when moving you or helping you. I found the laced braids looked so complicated they wouldn't touch my head. It also looked pretty nice without the headscarf, even a few days into my stay.

Here's an earlier thread with a link to an article and some pictures too.
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=22424

Good luck, and best wishes for a speedy recovery. Be sure to tell your anaesthesiologist about your usual reaction. There may be some things he or she can do to help.

Magdalene
April 9th, 2009, 04:39 PM
I second the twin braids, and would add a soft headband that can keep wispies that work their way loose out of your face. A scarf can also serve this purpose. You might even like a soft cap to wear- I always am freezing when I'm in the hospital and it would help tame your hair AND keep you warm.

Anje
April 9th, 2009, 05:12 PM
Most surgical procedures they cover your hair/head with a cap. It's a kind of cap to eliminate germs and a certain kind of fabric that's allowed in a surgical room. That sleeping cap may not be allowed in surgery. This is a very clean room, and there are protocols for what's allowed in to eliminate/reduce/prevent infection and germs and so on.

heidi w.

Oh, I'm well aware of that (I haven't had much done personally, but I used to volunteer in the OR and have in the room for more than a dozen surgeries), but what they might do (depending on the procedure and doctor's discretion, of course) is place the surgical cap right over the top of a satin cap, and the satin could minimize the damage. My thinking was mainly that something containing her hair might be welcome when she was coming out from anesthesia.

Islandgrrl
April 9th, 2009, 05:18 PM
No other suggestions from me - everyone else has it covered!

I just wanted to wish you a successful surgery and a speedy recovery!

Alia
April 9th, 2009, 06:31 PM
Ditto two braids. You could keep some small claw clips handy to keep the braids out of the way, especially if you're making friends with the emesis basin :(. Don't really plan on doing much with your hair, unless you are stuck and really bored--pack some hair scissors for s&d and maybe a hairstyle book. I hope your surgery and recovery go well. :flowers:

Natalia
April 9th, 2009, 06:53 PM
It seems as though you have all sorts of wonderful advice. I wish i had something to add but im still mastering this myself. Ive got several boxes at my bedside one for vitamins/breathing/stomach issues and vomiting/hair. My hair one is the lightest becasue i really dont do that much with it on a daily basis. Its usually a pun help by a clip when i am sitting or a braid when i am lying down. I usually have my hair pretty well ouled to help the braids stay smooth. I am thinking of you and thinking good thoughts for your post surgery troubles to be over quickly <3.

Be well,
Natalia

Ursula
April 9th, 2009, 07:02 PM
Ditto two braids. You could keep some small claw clips handy to keep the braids out of the way, especially if you're making friends with the emesis basin :(. Don't really plan on doing much with your hair, unless you are stuck and really bored--pack some hair scissors for s&d and maybe a hairstyle book. I hope your surgery and recovery go well. :flowers:

Scissors for S&D is a good idea. It is a mindless, low-stress activity that is ideal for when you are feeling out of it.

But don't do any S&D pre-surgery. You want to shower and wash well before surgery, and you don't want to get little bits of hair all over yourself pre-surgery, as the hair snips might wind up inside you, and causing problems with your recovery.

Wait for S&D until after surgery. Before surgery, look for activities that won't leave anything behind, such as reading a good book.

Fillette
April 9th, 2009, 09:43 PM
Good luck with your surgery. I hope you have a speedy recovery :grouphug:

royalscorpio
April 9th, 2009, 10:58 PM
When I was laid up for a while, my hair lived in braids. Just simple english braids. I kept a hair stick nearby to do a quick bun with the braid if I wanted. Regular bun or chinese. A wide toothed comb. Or my hair fork. Otherwise... that's all I needed for quite some time while I was healing.

Debra83
April 10th, 2009, 12:18 AM
I pray all goes well for you, don't forget your vitamins too. (if you are a regular taker of them like I am, you will need your doctors okay on the file like mine did when I gave birth to my son those many years ago!).

Arctic_Mama
April 10th, 2009, 03:30 AM
No advice to offer, but I hope your surgery goes smoothly and a quick recovery to you!

LutraLutra
April 10th, 2009, 03:54 AM
I've got no advive either, but I hope everything goes well for you. :) :flowers: