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View Full Version : Really interesting article on thickness!



Darkhorse1
March 31st, 2009, 09:26 AM
http://www.thetech.org/genetics/ask.php?id=107

I never knew this--that it would depend on the size of the folicle and how it grows on your head! How cool!

jewelotn
March 31st, 2009, 09:30 AM
Cool article!

Never thought that the shape of the follicle is what determines if the hair is straight, wavy, etc...

Barefootgirl
March 31st, 2009, 09:49 AM
What this doesn't seem to explain is why hair can change from wavy to curly as a person ages...I mean, can we assume that follicle shape doesn't change?

Darkhorse1
March 31st, 2009, 10:19 AM
barefootgirl--they did explain that on wikipedia. Just go to www.wikipedia.com and type in hair. You will get your answer on changing textures. It has to do with the hair's aging process.

Helen Baq
March 31st, 2009, 10:20 AM
Makes me think of a Playdough Factory. :laugh:


What this doesn't seem to explain is why hair can change from wavy to curly as a person ages...I mean, can we assume that follicle shape doesn't change?

I recently read some articles about that, it's not really understood why hair sometimes changes character, though I would think the follicle shape does change. :)

Emichiee
March 31st, 2009, 10:24 AM
What this doesn't seem to explain is why hair can change from wavy to curly as a person ages...I mean, can we assume that follicle shape doesn't change?



Right is is not only the follicle shape that determines whether your hair comes out straight or curly. Also:

-the way the bundles of keratin are arranged within the hair shaft
-the position of the hair bulb in the hair follicle. In African hair the bulb lies to the side of the follicle, and so the hair shaft grows out of the follicle at an angle.
-irregular growth in the hair bulb, if it varies slightly to one side or the other the hair may grow wavy
-the shape of the hair follicle, whether it is straight or curved
-the number of twists per unit length.

In another popular research, scientists spoke of the the different shaped follicles in the ethnic groups -> resulting into the different shpaed hair shafts. Saying that even straight haired caucasians have oval shaped follicles and that is is Asians who have a completely round follicle.
However I think it is very possible that - the curlier, the more oval shaped the follicle.

What I am unsure about is the part where it says all african hair is dry and brittle, simply because the oils wont migrate down the hairs twisted texture.
In these days most peoples sebum does not get the chance to travel down because it is usually washed away before :p.
Also, people with african hair have long discovered the use of hair oil. And..I mean I don't go around and rub peoples heads but I doubt everyone with african heritage has C, coarse hair.

Gothic Lolita
March 31st, 2009, 10:31 AM
Thanks Darkhorse for the cool article! I found it interesting and the site is nice too!

GlassEyes
March 31st, 2009, 10:32 AM
oes not get the chance to travel down because it is usually washed away before :p.
Also, people with african hair have long discovered the use of hair oil. And..I mean I don't go around and rub peoples heads but I doubt everyone with african heritage has C, coarse hair.


You're right. In actuality, I'm pretty sure it's UNCOMMON for those with type 4 hair to be coarse as well. Most are fine, because african hair is the most delicate hairtype of all. Some people mistake dryness for texture, and often, many people of african or otherwise linked heritage seem to relax their hair, especially women, which can oftne make it coarser. Though that's not the rule, because all the relazed heads of hair I've felt have still been fine, albeit damaged.

Also a myth: you can't grow relaxed hair long. My friend Myriam has relaxed hair past her butt. xD;

Copasetic
March 31st, 2009, 10:36 AM
That was a great article. I really liked the part about different follicle shapes. I always wondered *why* some hair curls, and some stays straight.

burns_erin
March 31st, 2009, 12:31 PM
You're right. In actuality, I'm pretty sure it's UNCOMMON for those with type 4 hair to be coarse as well. Most are fine, because african hair is the most delicate hairtype of all. Some people mistake dryness for texture, and often, many people of african or otherwise linked heritage seem to relax their hair, especially women, which can oftne make it coarser. Though that's not the rule, because all the relazed heads of hair I've felt have still been fine, albeit damaged.

Also a myth: you can't grow relaxed hair long. My friend Myriam has relaxed hair past her butt. xD;

I think they were using the term coarse in a different way than we do here. I think they were using it to mean rough and not to mean so much the thickness of individual strands. Could be wrong but that is how I interpreted it. And in that case it does make sense, that for at least some African hair (as well as obviously any other raced person with curly hair) that is not getting enough moisture in their hair, it can and does (if I am reading other people's comments and questions correctly) be "rough" or "coarse" as the article is describing regardless of F/M/C texture.

Phalaenopsis
March 31st, 2009, 12:44 PM
It was really interesting to see the different shapes of the hairshafts. So my little hairs are round, hehe :)

GlassEyes
April 1st, 2009, 07:39 PM
I think they were using the term coarse in a different way than we do here. I think they were using it to mean rough and not to mean so much the thickness of individual strands. Could be wrong but that is how I interpreted it. And in that case it does make sense, that for at least some African hair (as well as obviously any other raced person with curly hair) that is not getting enough moisture in their hair, it can and does (if I am reading other people's comments and questions correctly) be "rough" or "coarse" as the article is describing regardless of F/M/C texture.

And what I stated wasn't the thickness of strands either, but the literal texture.

Type 4 hair is usually fine and delicate, maybe dry, but still, fine.

SpecialKitty
April 1st, 2009, 08:35 PM
That was a great article, Darkhorse1! Thanks for sharing it.

My take-away message from the article is that my hair is likely the product of oval follicles, and that for this reason, my hair strands are more "ribbon-shaped." The flatter ribbon shape and resulting waves cause bends in my hair that are essentially weak points where breakage can occur. This makes total sense to me, and explains why it may be harder for me to grow my hair longer (and why updos would be essential!!).

wantslonglocks
April 1st, 2009, 08:41 PM
Wow-good article! Thanks for sharing!