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Wusel
May 13th, 2019, 01:20 PM
I really enjoy massaging my scalp with different oil mixtures every day since I have an itchy, very dry scalp and hair and it helps me with that. I also have my hair up all day and wear beanies due to the cold wind here in North Germany, so, I can do the oily hair sleek-look every day, no problem.
Do you think it's okay to have oil on the scalp all the time? I mean, okay for growth? Or will it clog follicles or something and make my hair grow slower?
Thank you :)

LadyCelestina
May 13th, 2019, 01:48 PM
I think it's all right, as long as the itching and flaking really is a symptom of DRY scalp, not of fungal overgrowth :)

Oil won't clog follicles - and even if yes, a clogged follicle is actually a pimple so you'd def know!

Wusel
May 13th, 2019, 01:56 PM
I think it's all right, as long as the itching and flaking really is a symptom of DRY scalp, not of fungal overgrowth :)

Oil won't clog follicles - and even if yes, a clogged follicle is actually a pimple so you'd def know!

Thank you :) No, it really is very dry... my dermatologist noticed that when I was there because of the shedding. I don't have dandruff though. Only the itchiness and the feeling of dryness, like, I want to moisturize my head all the time. Sometimes I come back from work and first thing I do is spraying my head with rosewater. And my face. My face is the same. Extremely dry sometimes. My legs too. And I have this since childhood. When I was little I would scratch my legs until they started bleeding. :( It's gotten better with the legs and face a bit too since I'm on the ketogenic diet but the scalp still is so damn dry... and so is my hair. Just imagine, I can put 10ml of oil on my not even fully APL hair and it doesn't look greasy because it's all soaked up. Same with my face. I shower it with oil and it just looks well moisturized afterwards, not like a greaseball. LOL!

Wusel
May 13th, 2019, 01:58 PM
I think it's all right, as long as the itching and flaking really is a symptom of DRY scalp, not of fungal overgrowth :)

Oil won't clog follicles - and even if yes, a clogged follicle is actually a pimple so you'd def know!

Btw, are you a vampire? It says Location: Coffin. LOL!
I'll change my location to spaceship since I'm an alien.

nycelle
May 13th, 2019, 02:01 PM
could be a sulfate sensitivity. once i stopped using sulfates, my scalp was no longer irritated.

Wusel
May 13th, 2019, 02:09 PM
could be a sulfate sensitivity. once i stopped using sulfates, my scalp was no longer irritated.

YES! I have stopped the sulphates too and it got better but still not 100%. I think it might be some other ingredients too. What I have found out that Vitamin C irritates and dries out my skin very much, also lavender, Vitamin A... I have EXTREMELY sensitive skin. So, I'm still trying to find out what it is besides sulphates. The oils help with the symptoms but I still need to find out the cause.

lithostoic
May 13th, 2019, 06:58 PM
could be a sulfate sensitivity. once i stopped using sulfates, my scalp was no longer irritated.

Thirding this. I stopped using sulfates on my hair as well as my body and I'm not as horrendously dry as I used to be. Used to leave huge white marks on my skin whenever I scratched because it was so dry and ashy no matter how much I exfoliated and moisturized.

You probably just have allergies. I'm allergic to everything and that's why I have skin problems. Cutting out food allergens has been a huge help. Quitting dairy made the most difference for me. If I have a glass of milk I wake up with a bumpy face.

The-Young-Maid
May 13th, 2019, 07:51 PM
Well it made me shed severely. But if your scalp likes it continue.

JennGalt
May 13th, 2019, 07:58 PM
I have a sulfate sensitivity and a crazy dry scalp (with eczema). There are times when I oil my scalp daily; other times I can get away wih only applying oil directly to my scalp once a week. In spite of all the warnings on here about not oiling one’s scalp, mine is much better off if I oil it whenever it starts feeling a little dry. Otherwise it will get dry enough to flake, crack and bleed, and itch uncontrollably. Oil prevents and fixes all of that for me. Giving up sulfates helped a LOT, but it didn’t solve the problem completely. Some of us just go against the grain and need to oil our scalps :shrug:

I wash or co-wash no more than once a week and have literally never had a clogged hair follicle on my scalp. I didn’t even know that was a thing until I read about it here. I think if your scalp is parched enough to actually need oil, then clogged follicles are unlikely to be a problem.

I did some reading in eczema last week and some research done in 2018 indicated it’s an unfortunate combination of an allergic reaction and genetics. Any perceived irritant (which could be literally anything) triggers a gene in the affected skin to make sebum with unusually short fatty acid chains, thereby renderjng the sebum useless. It can’t do normal sebum things like protect the skin and hair or seal in moisture (stuff you’d need it to do in a cold, dry environment!), which can set one up for a vicious cycle of skin trouble. One article even recommended the use of oil to replace the faulty sebum. All that rambling to say, if you are like me and genuinely need the oil, clogged follicles are probably the least of your skin concerns. You may also want to see about whether you have eczema, since it’s unusual (though possible) for people without it to need* oil applied directly to the scalp.

My only caveat would be to ensure you only use oils you know your scalp likes. I can use most oils, but I got ahold of some low quality (possibly imitation) olive oil right before I joined LHC and my scalp threw a huge itchy fit and shed a bit. Since that incident, I’ve paid more attention and discovered my scalp has favorite oils (namely coconut, almond, and JBCO), but will accept most others if nothing else is available.

*ETA: I should have emphasized the difference between need and preference here. Plently of people simply like to oil their scalps but don’t have eczema.

Dark40
May 13th, 2019, 08:18 PM
Yes, it's okay to have oil on your hair and scalp everyday for hair growth. I apply oil to my hair and scalp 3 times a week, and it hasn't clogged or slowed down my hair growth. In fact, it has increased my hair growth.

AutobotsAttack
May 13th, 2019, 08:34 PM
If you’re using oils to aid with dry scalp, shouldn’t be a problem.
You do live in a cold, mostly arid climate, so it’s a no brainer.

LadyCelestina
May 14th, 2019, 01:31 AM
Thank you :) No, it really is very dry... !Btw, are you a vampire? It says Location: Coffin. LOL!
I'll change my location to spaceship since I'm an alien

Nah, you can be an alien in Germany as well ;D


I have a sulfate sensitivity and a crazy dry scalp (with eczema). There are times when I oil my scalp daily; other times I can get away wih only applying oil directly to my scalp once a week. In spite of all the warnings on here about not oiling one’s scalp, mine is much better off if I oil it whenever it starts feeling a little dry. Otherwise it will get dry enough to flake, crack and bleed, and itch uncontrollably. Oil prevents and fixes all of that for me. Giving up sulfates helped a LOT, but it didn’t solve the problem completely. Some of us just go against the grain and need to oil our scalps :shrug:

I wash or co-wash no more than once a week and have literally never had a clogged hair follicle on my scalp. I didn’t even know that was a thing until I read about it here. I think if your scalp is parched enough to actually need oil, then clogged follicles are unlikely to be a problem.

I did some reading in eczema last week and some research done in 2018 indicated it’s an unfortunate combination of an allergic reaction and genetics. Any perceived irritant (which could be literally anything) triggers a gene in the affected skin to make sebum with unusually short fatty acid chains, thereby renderjng the sebum useless. It can’t do normal sebum things like protect the skin and hair or seal in moisture (stuff you’d need it to do in a cold, dry environment!), which can set one up for a vicious cycle of skin trouble. One article even recommended the use of oil to replace the faulty sebum. All that rambling to say, if you are like me and genuinely need the oil, clogged follicles are probably the least of your skin concerns. You may also want to see about whether you have eczema, since it’s unusual (though possible) for people without it to need* oil applied directly to the scalp.

My only caveat would be to ensure you only use oils you know your scalp likes. I can use most oils, but I got ahold of some low quality (possibly imitation) olive oil right before I joined LHC and my scalp threw a huge itchy fit and shed a bit. Since that incident, I’ve paid more attention and discovered my scalp has favorite oils (namely coconut, almond, and JBCO), but will accept most others if nothing else is available.


Olive oil is rich in oleic acid, which is a) the one malassezia feeds on b) has been shown to compromise barrier function (olive oil).

I find it interesting how deficiencies in sebum production cause disorders that are SO different from eachother. For example acne (regular, not fungal) is caused in part by sebum which contains a lot more free fatty acids than it should, not by sebum itself. So, to treat both, you could try to "alter" the sebum composition a little - for example I use azelaic acid for my acne, which has been shown to decrease the free fatty acid content. For eczema, you need to use oils which replenish the fatty acids you're missing.

luckydandelion
May 14th, 2019, 01:38 AM
Nah, you can be an alien in Germany as well ;D


Olive oil is rich in oleic acid, which is a) the one malassezia feeds on b) has been shown to compromise barrier function (olive oil).

I find it interesting how deficiencies in sebum production cause disorders that are SO different from eachother. For example acne (regular, not fungal) is caused in part by sebum which contains a lot more free fatty acids than it should, not by sebum itself. So, to treat both, you could try to "alter" the sebum composition a little - for example I use azelaic acid for my acne, which has been shown to decrease the free fatty acid content. For eczema, you need to use oils which replenish the fatty acids you're missing.

Adding here! Those con malasezzia sensitivities can use pure caprylic acid oil and squalane oil (do not confuse with squalene) without any issues, since the fungus can't feed on them. Squalane can get pricey, but since you don't need that much oil to oil your scalp I figure it would be alright ocassionally!

RottenMango
May 14th, 2019, 02:17 AM
I think it’s fine as long as you wash frequently enough to avoid build up.

Wusel
May 14th, 2019, 02:17 AM
I have a sulfate sensitivity and a crazy dry scalp (with eczema). There are times when I oil my scalp daily; other times I can get away wih only applying oil directly to my scalp once a week. In spite of all the warnings on here about not oiling one’s scalp, mine is much better off if I oil it whenever it starts feeling a little dry. Otherwise it will get dry enough to flake, crack and bleed, and itch uncontrollably. Oil prevents and fixes all of that for me. Giving up sulfates helped a LOT, but it didn’t solve the problem completely. Some of us just go against the grain and need to oil our scalps :shrug:

I wash or co-wash no more than once a week and have literally never had a clogged hair follicle on my scalp. I didn’t even know that was a thing until I read about it here. I think if your scalp is parched enough to actually need oil, then clogged follicles are unlikely to be a problem.

I did some reading in eczema last week and some research done in 2018 indicated it’s an unfortunate combination of an allergic reaction and genetics. Any perceived irritant (which could be literally anything) triggers a gene in the affected skin to make sebum with unusually short fatty acid chains, thereby renderjng the sebum useless. It can’t do normal sebum things like protect the skin and hair or seal in moisture (stuff you’d need it to do in a cold, dry environment!), which can set one up for a vicious cycle of skin trouble. One article even recommended the use of oil to replace the faulty sebum. All that rambling to say, if you are like me and genuinely need the oil, clogged follicles are probably the least of your skin concerns. You may also want to see about whether you have eczema, since it’s unusual (though possible) for people without it to need* oil applied directly to the scalp.

My only caveat would be to ensure you only use oils you know your scalp likes. I can use most oils, but I got ahold of some low quality (possibly imitation) olive oil right before I joined LHC and my scalp threw a huge itchy fit and shed a bit. Since that incident, I’ve paid more attention and discovered my scalp has favorite oils (namely coconut, almond, and JBCO), but will accept most others if nothing else is available.

*ETA: I should have emphasized the difference between need and preference here. Plently of people simply like to oil their scalps but don’t have eczema.

Interesting :) I've found out last week that my scalp doesn't like olive oil. It started getting itchy so I have washed it out. And it was an expensive organic olive oil. Every other oil I've tried my scalp loves. Especially the extra dark jamaican castor oil.

JennGalt
May 14th, 2019, 03:54 AM
Interesting :) I've found out last week that my scalp doesn't like olive oil. It started getting itchy so I have washed it out. And it was an expensive organic olive oil. Every other oil I've tried my scalp loves. Especially the extra dark jamaican castor oil.

There was a big dustup a few years back in the US about imitation olive oil. Much of it sold in the US is either something else with no actual olive oil in it or olive oil diluted with another cheaper oil. Many brands were tested in a laboratory, across all price points. Price turned out to be no guarantee for purity, and only two brands actually contained pure olive oil; oddly enough, both of those were relatively inexpensive brands. I’m very brand loyal when it comes to olive oil now. I have no idea if that is an issue in Europe, but if your scalp likes castor oil you’re probably better off sticking with that instead.


Nah, you can be an alien in Germany as well ;D


Olive oil is rich in oleic acid, which is a) the one malassezia feeds on b) has been shown to compromise barrier function (olive oil).

I find it interesting how deficiencies in sebum production cause disorders that are SO different from eachother. For example acne (regular, not fungal) is caused in part by sebum which contains a lot more free fatty acids than it should, not by sebum itself. So, to treat both, you could try to "alter" the sebum composition a little - for example I use azelaic acid for my acne, which has been shown to decrease the free fatty acid content. For eczema, you need to use oils which replenish the fatty acids you're missing.

Interesting. I don’t have any issues with malassezia and can use olive oil as long as it’s a good brand. I have no idea what was in the stuff my scalp hated because apparently anything can be sold as olive oil here in the US and they don’t have to disclose the presence of other oils on the label.

I am not exactly sure which fatty acids are missing, but I think that could vary from case to case. There are actually two different genes that can cause the useless sebum associated with eczema, and each causes a slightly different composition of sebum. I suppose a person unfortunate enough to have both genes would have different needs than someone with one gene or the other. And it’s not just missing fatty acids; the sebaceous glands won’t link the ones that are present together as is supposed to happen, which is a different problem altogether. Plant oils have longer fatty acid chains and are thus a good replacement for many; others find more relief through occlusives like shea butter or even silicones. It also depends on what the affected skin views as an irritant, so what works will be different for each case. I don’t produce much sebum anyway, useless though it is, so just about any oil works for me, lol. With a couple exceptions.

~~~~

Also I have one more caveat. Do some label reading before you put anything on your head. Some oils have TBHQ added as a preservative. TBHQ is a synthetic antioxidant that has no benefit to the human body, unlike helpful ones such as vitamins A, C, and E. It is added to keep oils or fatty foods from discoloring, but I had a bad experience with some corn oil that contained it. I am not 100% sure it was the TBHQ and not the corn oil that was the problem, but I’ve never seen a plant oil behave like that before.

Long story short, it was a gross, oily mess that wouldn’t absorb. I NEVER have trouble getting oils to absorb into my hair or skin. If anything, they absorb much more easily for me than for others. But this stuff took on a weird consistency after it was applied and wouldn’t absorb. I wrote about it in my blog if you want details. A few days after writing that I tried to wash my pillow case and a sleep scarf I wore (in an attempt to protect the pillowcase), but I couldn’t salvage either. Neither looked oily prior to washing, but they felt strange and left my fingers a little oily. After washing they looked like they’d been dunked in oil and then hardened a bit. Super weird. I never have trouble with oils seeping out of my hair at night, and I didn’t apply an unusual amount, so it was very bizarre. I highly recommend that you don’t put anything with TBHQ in it on your head.

YvetteVarie
May 14th, 2019, 04:31 AM
All the points raised in this thread are great.

I oil my scalp with no issues. In fact, when I had a bald patch from traction alopecia, I massaged in a shea butter mix, and the hair has grown back in nicely. Do what works for YOU!! Our scalps/hair are as unique as we are, so practices can differ from person to person.

Wusel
May 14th, 2019, 05:50 AM
All the points raised in this thread are great.

I oil my scalp with no issues. In fact, when I had a bald patch from traction alopecia, I massaged in a shea butter mix, and the hair has grown back in nicely. Do what works for YOU!! Our scalps/hair are as unique as we are, so practices can differ from person to person.

Thank you :) My friend from Nigeria who has very dry kinky-curly hair and very dry scalp said that in Africa it's common to oil hair and scalp everyday because this kind of hair needs huge amounts of moisture. And she used to oil her hair and scalp everyday too. She only stopped because her German boyfriend didn't like it *ROLLEYES*. Honestly, I would have dumped the boyfriend, he is an idiot anyway, and continued oiling my hair. It looked SO much better when she did. It was shiny and healthy... now it looks dry and has no shine. Stupid man. She oils her hair once a week now when he's on a business trip. But it's definitely not enough. And she washes it out afterwards while before she used to let it in and it was the perfect method for her.

Cate36
May 14th, 2019, 05:53 AM
I have been told by a few scalp specialist, that oiling the scalp and leaving for long periods, can cause issues because it does block pours. Some users on this forum have had negative effects from applying oil and leaving over night. ON the hair I don't think it is an issue at all.. maybe go for blackseed oil, as it is one of the few that is totally absorbed by the skin...so shouldn't cause issues.. google it.. very potent and highly nutritious oil

Wusel
May 14th, 2019, 07:18 AM
I have been told by a few scalp specialist, that oiling the scalp and leaving for long periods, can cause issues because it does block pours. Some users on this forum have had negative effects from applying oil and leaving over night. ON the hair I don't think it is an issue at all.. maybe go for blackseed oil, as it is one of the few that is totally absorbed by the skin...so shouldn't cause issues.. google it.. very potent and highly nutritious oil

Thank you for the information. Hmm... on my amla hair oil it's written that it can be left on the scalp overnight... I have the oil on since yesterday afternoon and I plan to wash it out in 6 hours, so it will be on since 24 hours.
What was the negative effects, I mean, how can I determine if it's negative for my scalp?
I'm allergic to blackseeds...

The-Young-Maid
May 14th, 2019, 10:31 AM
Thank you for the information. Hmm... on my amla hair oil it's written that it can be left on the scalp overnight... I have the oil on since yesterday afternoon and I plan to wash it out in 6 hours, so it will be on since 24 hours.
What was the negative effects, I mean, how can I determine if it's negative for my scalp?
I'm allergic to blackseeds...

Oh you'll know if it doesn't work because your hair will fall out.:shrug:Mine didn't happen right away but after a few months it was painfully obvious.
*I wouldn't use anything you're allergic to...

Wusel
May 14th, 2019, 12:30 PM
Oh you'll know if it doesn't work because your hair will fall out.:shrug:Mine didn't happen right away but after a few months it was painfully obvious.
*I wouldn't use anything you're allergic to...

OMG! So I don't notice now but if it doesn't work I will shed all my hair later!? So, there is no way to know before!? That's terrible... :(

spidermom
May 14th, 2019, 05:16 PM
It would be a terrible idea for me since my scalp already tends toward oily (though drier than in my youth). But you do you.

milosmomma
May 14th, 2019, 09:28 PM
Wusel, for me and I think most people, if something like an oil or conditioner that was applied to the scalp the shedding would be noticed almost immediately. Like when you wash it out you'd already shed loads so if you dont see anything after 24 hours now I think you are in the clear.

blackgothicdoll
May 14th, 2019, 10:56 PM
As Yvette says it depends on your scalp. I used to always leave oil on my scalp, then I read it was bad so I stopped. I only oil my scalp if it's dry after clarifying (sulfate shampoos). Light oils absorb into my dry skin and I have no problems. Heavier oils will make my scalp begin to smell in a few days, so I'll only use those for over night or a few hours pre-wash.

I don't plan on revisiting oiling my scalp (when it does not feel dry) because I do remember always being a heavy shedder, these days I keep my scalp clean and don't shed nearly as much. But for you I would say if it isn't broke don't fix it. Dry scalp is definitely a pain I can relate to and I would scratch all of my hair out if I did not oil it when it's dry.

blackgothicdoll
May 14th, 2019, 10:59 PM
JennGalt would you mind sharing which brand of olive oil is authentic?

LadyCelestina
May 15th, 2019, 02:33 AM
I wonder if it was perhaps pomace oil?


ETA: I noticed that for example Lidl has no problem labelling a blend of refined and unrefined avocado oil as "Avocado Oil" :/

Cate36
May 15th, 2019, 03:04 AM
My suggestion is to only oil for an hour before you wash. That won't cause any negative effect and you will be safe, and also get the benefit of the oil. Think of the skin on your scalp like the skin on your body. For a while, many years ago, I would moisturise every day after a shower with olive oil. After a period of time, I was getting pimples everywhere because my skin was overloaded with oil. So if you continue to use it over and over and your skin starts to get overloaded, that's when you may have an issue. If you're not noticing anything negative at the moment I'm sure all is OK. But I wouldn't keep oil on your scalp perpetually. Drink a lot of water, eat good oils (Avocado is great for hair, as it is a natural DHTY blocker) and you'll notice that your skin retails moisture better, and that will greatly benefit your hair growth..

YvetteVarie
May 15th, 2019, 06:11 AM
Thank you :) My friend from Nigeria who has very dry kinky-curly hair and very dry scalp said that in Africa it's common to oil hair and scalp everyday because this kind of hair needs huge amounts of moisture. And she used to oil her hair and scalp everyday too. She only stopped because her German boyfriend didn't like it *ROLLEYES*. Honestly, I would have dumped the boyfriend, he is an idiot anyway, and continued oiling my hair. It looked SO much better when she did. It was shiny and healthy... now it looks dry and has no shine. Stupid man. She oils her hair once a week now when he's on a business trip. But it's definitely not enough. And she washes it out afterwards while before she used to let it in and it was the perfect method for her.

Thats so sad. Most people with kinky-curly hair do benefit more from oiling regularly because that does help to keep moisture in. The using oil then washing out may help a bit though

blackgothicdoll
May 15th, 2019, 06:46 AM
My suggestion is to only oil for an hour before you wash. That won't cause any negative effect and you will be safe, and also get the benefit of the oil. Think of the skin on your scalp like the skin on your body. For a while, many years ago, I would moisturise every day after a shower with olive oil. After a period of time, I was getting pimples everywhere because my skin was overloaded with oil. So if you continue to use it over and over and your skin starts to get overloaded, that's when you may have an issue. If you're not noticing anything negative at the moment I'm sure all is OK. But I wouldn't keep oil on your scalp perpetually. Drink a lot of water, eat good oils (Avocado is great for hair, as it is a natural DHTY blocker) and you'll notice that your skin retails moisture better, and that will greatly benefit your hair growth..

That might be another skin type thing. I cut my lotion with oil and use it after every shower, i also use oil on my face sometimes twice a day. That's actually my secret to very smooth skin, I have zero pimples or blemishes but i know other people would have a terrible reaction to that! Just to put into perspective how different people are :)

But I do think it's a very good idea to treat your scalp as you would your face, the skin is connected so it would be expected they would share similarities.

Ylva
May 15th, 2019, 06:49 AM
But I do think it's a very good idea to treat your scalp as you would your face, the skin is connected so it would be expected they would share similarities.

This is why I recently started doing a kind of double exfoliation on my scalp. First physical, then chemical. If I donít physically exfoliate my face, it gets all bumpy and nothing has any effect, no matter how powerful of a serum it is or whatever.

nycelle
May 15th, 2019, 07:42 AM
JennGalt would you mind sharing which brand of olive oil is authentic?

Not Jenn, but I stopped using imported brands after that whole scandal came to light.

Only brand I've been using for a few years now is "California Olive Ranch." It's a little more expensive than the other brands, but worth it since I know I'm getting an authentic product.

There's a ton of articles on the web saying which one's are supposed to be real, but I trust those articles as much as I trust the olive oils they're pushing (in other words, not at all).

The entire olive oil saga wasn't just for oils imported to the US, it happened (is happening) worldwide. The biggest offenders are Italian brands here, but that's because we just seem to have more of them than any others.

JennGalt
May 15th, 2019, 10:35 AM
JennGalt would you mind sharing which brand of olive oil is authentic?

I use the same brand as Nycelle, California Olive Ranch. It’s not super expensive, but it costs a little more than the generic brands, and it’s easy to find at any large grocery store in the US. The other brand that passed the test is the Kirkland brand by Costco. Not sure what’s a good brand for those overseas reading this.

~~~~

It may also be worth mentioning that some oils have been refined through chemical processes and contain varying amounts of irritants from the refining process, so use cold pressed and unrefined stuff whenever possible. I can’t help but wonder if that’s what causes shedding in some people who have trouble with oils. Do your research and know where your oil comes from before trying new brands on your head (or in your food, for that matter).

nycelle
May 15th, 2019, 02:48 PM
I use the same brand as Nycelle, California Olive Ranch. It’s not super expensive, but it costs a little more than the generic brands, and it’s easy to find at any large grocery store in the US. The other brand that passed the test is the Kirkland brand by Costco. Not sure what’s a good brand for those overseas reading this.

~~~~

It may also be worth mentioning that some oils have been refined through chemical processes and contain varying amounts of irritants from the refining process, so use cold pressed and unrefined stuff whenever possible. I can’t help but wonder if that’s what causes shedding in some people who have trouble with oils. Do your research and know where your oil comes from before trying new brands on your head (or in your food, for that matter).

There's a beautiful Olive Oil from France (but the olives are Spanish I believe) called Alziari Olive Oil. OMG- I would never use it on my hair as it's expensive (30-40 USD) but it tastes magnificent. I use it for special occasions- absolutely delish.

Caribbean_girl
June 2nd, 2019, 12:12 AM
I donít think everyday is a good idea, remember that your scalp also needs oxygen to be able to breathe. I must admit iíve always been tempted to oil my hair everyday since my hair growth is slow but I havenít risked it yet.