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KameRose
February 1st, 2019, 08:54 PM
I'm in the process of getting ready replace my current bed set up and I've been contemplating getting a hammock instead of a conventional bed. Still a couple months away from when I need to make a decision. Reading up on hammocks and thier advantages has me seriously considering it. Even if I don't use it all the time, I am rather enamored with the idea. However, it occurred to me there may be some unexpected complications that long hairs may have which wouldn't be mentioned in standard hammock reviews and literature.

So here is my question for anyone that has experience sleeping in a hammock, is there any unexpected complications you experience while sleeping in a hammock hair wise? and what kind of hammock do you use?

I realize that sleeping with ones hair up would probably negate any potential complications but I have yet to find a way to put my hair up that I can fall asleep in.

Tinyponies
February 2nd, 2019, 04:09 AM
I’ve never slept in a hammock but I’d like to try it :) I’ve experimented with sleeping on a hard surface and loved that until I had surgery on my rib cage last year. Would you use a pillow in your hammock?

How do you usually wear your hair to sleep? I see your profile says it’s waist length and fine.

Simsy
February 2nd, 2019, 05:10 AM
My parents used to set up free-standing hammocks on the verandah for us kids during summer when it was too hot to sleep inside. I highly recommend a pillow because the fabric will cause static and damage. It also might pay to wear a bun of some description whilst you’re sleeping. Because of the angle you lie on, braids and loose hair will end up under the pillow and you; and it will hurt. If you fling a braid over the edge, it’s going to be rubbing against the edge of the fabric all night and the tangles might put you off hammocks altogether.

Other than those considerations, hammocks are really comfortable to sleep in and the gentle sway can be very relaxing. Make sure you have a blanket in case things get a little chilly and sleep tight :grin:

MusicalSpoons
February 2nd, 2019, 05:17 AM
Ooh how exciting! I'd recommend a satin or silk sleep cap, so you don't have to secure your hair in a bun underneath it but your hair would still be contained and protected :)

KameRose
February 2nd, 2019, 08:01 AM
Thank-you all for the replies. I really appreciate it.

I sleep with my hair loose. So it gets all over the place now with a conventional bed. I'm afraid of what it would do in a hammock. Every so often I experiment with putting my hair up to sleep, but have yet to find a way that is comfortable enough to fall asleep in. So I always have to take it down to sleep.

I will look into a sleeping cap. Hmm, that will require a whole different kind or research.

I will definitely be using a pillow and a blanket. That is another thing that causes me to have a hard time getting to sleep, having no blanket. Even if it's like 100 F out. :/

I guess I can use these next couple months to try and find a way to sleep with my hair up. :D

cjk
February 2nd, 2019, 08:13 AM
Well hello to you too! I also sleep in a hammock, nightly, and it's not as big an issue as you're expecting.

To start with, hammock sleeping is different from bed sleeping. And a pillow isn't usually needed but if you want one I suggest a horseshoe neck pillow. It's what I use and it works great.

I find that I move very little during the night, the reason we move is because we are uncomfortable which means tossing and turning. That just isn't a thing in a hammock.

And once you get your hang right, be sure to use the hang calculator as a starting point, you just melt into it and fall asleep in minutes.

And your hair can hang over the side.

To answer your question I have a small selection of hammocks. My nightly hammock is one from Walmart, believe it or not, the Equip double nylon hammock. Yes, nylon, no it isn't hot. In fact I sleep in a sleeping bag on top of it because without a mattress underneath you, you get very cold. Even in normal room temperatures.

I also have woven Mayan hammocks from Mexico, but while they feel different and even better, they didn't make it into daily use.

I do use pillows, but under my knees. You lay naturally in the royal position, so this obsession with a pillow is always amusing to me. Try it without. Don't assume.

Oh and be sure to lay diagonally.

Longer hammocks permit a flatter lay.

How do you intend to hang it and where?

KameRose
February 2nd, 2019, 10:54 AM
Hi cjk, thank-you for sharing your experience. I honestly wasn't expecting much of an issue, but thought 'hey, with such a large community of long hairs here maybe they'll have an insight that one wouldn't traditionally find or think of when looking for hammocks'

That is interesting! I would never have thought to eliminate a pillow entirely. One of the tips I read was to use a smaller travel pillow, not sure if I could use a horseshoe neck pillow, but pretty sure I already have one of those somewhere so when the time comes I'll try it.

That's good and one of the things that is really pushing me towards trying a hammock for sleeping. I toss and turn and very rarely wake up how I fell asleep and it usually takes me a while to nod off since I'm looking for somewhere comfortable.

Nice to know you don't have a problem with just letting your hair hang over the side. I often sleep with my loose hair just thrown over the top of my pillow.

Haha, good to know about your hammock from Walmart. I actually already bought a hammock like that last summer, a Guidesman nylon double hammock from Menards. It's nothing fancy and I bought it while it was on rebate, but figured it would be a good starter hammock. I intended to sleep outside for a few nights but the bugs and weather didn't cooperate.

Great to hear about the coolness, recently I've been having trouble being too warm while sleeping even though I am sleeping with only a sheet and a throw blanket. All of this stuff is compounding together and the more research and thought I put into it I am convincing myself more and more that when I finally get around to getting rid of my current bed hat a hammock will be the way to go.

Will keep that in mind about the pillows.

Thank-you for the tips and helpful information.

I am thinking that I will be hanging the hammock from brackets on the wall. Like this one from Dick's Sporting Goods (https://www.dickssportinggoods.com/p/eno-hammock-indoor-hanging-kit-16enoundrhngngktxodr/16enoundrhngngktxodr). That way I won't have a large awkward stand to argue with and I can easily move everything off to the side by switch one end to a different bracket leaving me a large open area for whatever.

milosmomma
February 2nd, 2019, 11:41 AM
This has been very interesting to read. I have 2 hammocks but never thought to replace a convention bed with one! I have terrible RLS most nights and tossing and turning are a huge part of falling asleep. I might just have to try some indoor hammock experimenting! As for hair I think loose or a braid would be just fine. Like cjk said you could just drape over the edge, keep us posted as you get your set up going. I would love to read more.

cjk
February 2nd, 2019, 11:45 AM
That is interesting! I would never have thought to eliminate a pillow entirely. One of the tips I read was to use a smaller travel pillow, not sure if I could use a horseshoe neck pillow, but pretty sure I already have one of those somewhere so when the time comes I'll try it.

As with everything, there is an enormous difference between reading about an experience, and actually doing it.

A hint, with most hammocks of any quality they are constructed of three piece. The big bed sized part, and a contrasting stripe on each side. I find that positioning the seam so that it aligns with the curve in my neck provides excellent support and eliminates the need for a pillow entirely, if done right.


That's good and one of the things that is really pushing me towards trying a hammock for sleeping. I toss and turn and very rarely wake up how I fell asleep and it usually takes me a while to nod off since I'm looking for somewhere comfortable.

It is a very unique sleeping surface. Have you tried it yet? It is NOT a bed, it is entirely unique.

I usually describe it as rock hard. Yet compliant to my body shape. And inherently unstable which means that any movement is permitted and generates a reaction, however minimal.

It's really quite different.


Nice to know you don't have a problem with just letting your hair hang over the side. I often sleep with my loose hair just thrown over the top of my pillow.

My hair is shoulder length, not waist length like yours. There might be other considerations I've not yet encountered, but it's such a flexible sleeping system that I don't expect you'll have issues.


Haha, good to know about your hammock from Walmart. I actually already bought a hammock like that last summer, a Guidesman nylon double hammock from Menards. It's nothing fancy and I bought it while it was on rebate, but figured it would be a good starter hammock. I intended to sleep outside for a few nights but the bugs and weather didn't cooperate.

A hammock like we are discussing is literally nothing but a big sheet of fabric. The primary differences between hammocks of increasing cost is the total weight, lighter is better if you're hiking for instance. And quality of construction, mine is triple stitched. Some of the most expensive do use asymmetrical designs, incorporate stress lines, and so forth but those go beyond this discussion.


I am thinking that I will be hanging the hammock from brackets on the wall. Like this one from Dick's Sporting Goods (https://www.dickssportinggoods.com/p/eno-hammock-indoor-hanging-kit-16enoundrhngngktxodr/16enoundrhngngktxodr). That way I won't have a large awkward stand to argue with and I can easily move everything off to the side by switch one end to a different bracket leaving me a large open area for whatever.

Before you mount them, be sure to use the hang calculator. And in my own case I used a link chain at each end, so I could micro adjust the lengths until I got it right.

Human comfort is never so simple as a mathematical equation, a little adjustability is a good thing.

Do you have a yard? I hung mine across the corner of my fence, between the pickets, so I could get the basic measurements right before drilling any holes inside.

Worked great for me.

sophia_
February 2nd, 2019, 12:42 PM
I go backpacking and use a hammock if it's not too cold/treeless/full of dangerous animals, and I find just braiding it seems to be fine, I tend to not move around as much when I'm in a hammock.

KameRose
February 2nd, 2019, 03:46 PM
This has been very interesting to read. I have 2 hammocks but never thought to replace a convention bed with one! I have terrible RLS most nights and tossing and turning are a huge part of falling asleep. I might just have to try some indoor hammock experimenting! As for hair I think loose or a braid would be just fine. Like cjk said you could just drape over the edge, keep us posted as you get your set up going. I would love to read more.

Will do!


As with everything, there is an enormous difference between reading about an experience, and actually doing it.

A hint, with most hammocks of any quality they are constructed of three piece. The big bed sized part, and a contrasting stripe on each side. I find that positioning the seam so that it aligns with the curve in my neck provides excellent support and eliminates the need for a pillow entirely, if done right.

It is a very unique sleeping surface. Have you tried it yet? It is NOT a bed, it is entirely unique.

I usually describe it as rock hard. Yet compliant to my body shape. And inherently unstable which means that any movement is permitted and generates a reaction, however minimal.

It's really quite different.

No I have yet to try it. Still have a ways to go before I'll get a chance to get rid of my current conventional set-up and be able to experiment. It will be an interesting experience for me regardless of whether I will decide to make it permanent or not.

My only experience in a hammock was with a tippy rope hammock with a spread bar that my father had. Completely different than what we're talking about here. That's why I'm going to be doing a bit of experimenting and doing my research, no reason to make a rushed decision. That and I couldn't switch to a hammock yet even if I wanted to.

Of course it will be completely different than a conventional bed and that is what has me so enamored with the idea of it. Naturally, ones pre-conceived notion will often vary from reality, but that's fine. This is something I'm going to have to try and whether it will or will not work is something that I will only be able to surmise once I get a chance to do my own experimentation.


My hair is shoulder length, not waist length like yours. There might be other considerations I've not yet encountered, but it's such a flexible sleeping system that I don't expect you'll have issues.

A hammock like we are discussing is literally nothing but a big sheet of fabric. The primary differences between hammocks of increasing cost is the total weight, lighter is better if you're hiking for instance. And quality of construction, mine is triple stitched. Some of the most expensive do use asymmetrical designs, incorporate stress lines, and so forth but those go beyond this discussion.

Of course! :p Although most of this beyond the original topic.


Before you mount them, be sure to use the hang calculator. And in my own case I used a link chain at each end, so I could micro adjust the lengths until I got it right.

Human comfort is never so simple as a mathematical equation, a little adjustability is a good thing.

Do you have a yard? I hung mine across the corner of my fence, between the pickets, so I could get the basic measurements right before drilling any holes inside.

Worked great for me.

I was planning on using some chain on either end.

I have the hang calculator bookmarked, along with several articles on hammocks, hammock sleeping, and unconventional beds. It's still too early to be picking out hanging spots for me though.


I go backpacking and use a hammock if it's not too cold/treeless/full of dangerous animals, and I find just braiding it seems to be fine, I tend to not move around as much when I'm in a hammock.

Good to know. Thank-you for weighing in.


And

dyna
February 2nd, 2019, 05:59 PM
I don't have any personal experience, as my hair wasn't long then, but I had a GF with butt-length hair who mostly slept in a hammock. She preferred it to a bed because it didn't hurt her back (back injuries from getting thrown from a horse, car accident). And she was used to it, she lived in Brazil part of the year and I guess everybody uses hammocks there. You probably won't be tossing too much (lying on your side or stomach isn't comfortable). She never had any problem with it, she used a small pillow and slept with her hair loose. sometimes it would hang over the side, sometimes not. If she'd been wearing hair sticks, she'd take them out and jam them through the edge weave (her hammocks were cotton, not nylon). If you don't live somewhere hot, you will need some padding between you and the hammock to stay warm. Cotton breathes better than nylon, and doesn't feel as hard.