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Cate36
December 25th, 2018, 11:57 PM
I have had quite a few people tell me without prompting to get a hormone check... I'm wondering if it's the universe's way of telling me me to...or if it may be at the route of my issues, and if it is, whether there is anything that can be done about it...?

I'm 45.. I have regular periods, and a normal (if anything increased) sex drive..

My thyroid function is fine...

Has anyone here had a hormone test and found an issue that has affected their hair? And if so, what are the treatments for it? Is there anything natural that can help if there is an issue?

:-(

Arciela
December 26th, 2018, 02:27 AM
My sister had to check her hormones when her hair thinned and began falling out quite a lot. She went to a specialist for it, they gave her iron supplement, and spironolactone to help her hormones. Her hair grew back in a year.

I am not sure of the type of place she went..I can ask her tomorrow :flower:

lapushka
December 26th, 2018, 04:33 AM
Sorry Cate, but this is the Mane forum and I'm not going to discuss health related issues in a public (internet readable) forum. :flower: Hope you understand.

Cate36
December 26th, 2018, 04:09 PM
My sister had to check her hormones when her hair thinned and began falling out quite a lot. She went to a specialist for it, they gave her iron supplement, and spironolactone to help her hormones. Her hair grew back in a year.

I am not sure of the type of place she went..I can ask her tomorrow :flower:

Thanks Arciela, that would be really useful - thank you X

Cate36
December 26th, 2018, 04:09 PM
Sorry Cate, but this is the Mane forum and I'm not going to discuss health related issues in a public (internet readable) forum. :flower: Hope you understand.

I understand Xo

MusicalSpoons
December 26th, 2018, 06:00 PM
I think the suggestions were prompted by your worries about thinning/shedding :) From what I've seen/read from you, I'm inclined to think you're *noticing* more rather than actually shedding more - we're all prone to it when we first start taking more notice of our hair, but for you with the damage and stress it's compounded. So if you're not actually shedding more or seeing thinning, and you have no other systemic issues, a hormone test probably isn't necessary or even helpful at this point :flower:

Cate36
December 26th, 2018, 09:20 PM
I think the suggestions were prompted by your worries about thinning/shedding :) From what I've seen/read from you, I'm inclined to think you're *noticing* more rather than actually shedding more - we're all prone to it when we first start taking more notice of our hair, but for you with the damage and stress it's compounded. So if you're not actually shedding more or seeing thinning, and you have no other systemic issues, a hormone test probably isn't necessary or even helpful at this point :flower:

I hear you.. :-( The stress is overwhelming me at the moment because I am home on my own much of the time due to holidays, and focusing WAYYY to much on hair...having said that, when I look back at photos earlier in the year when I had henna on my locks, they were SO much thicker.. I know this is a side effect of henna.. but even so... I WISH i had stopped and spent a good deal of time thinking about it before going crazy stripping the colour which doesn't look as bad as I thought when I look back at it!.

Hence my desire to try cassia or similar..

lapushka
December 27th, 2018, 07:18 AM
Hence my desire to try cassia or similar..

I wouldn't do it on hair that light (yellow stain), as I said in the topic at hand, but I am repeating it here, because you do need to strand test. So those sheds you talked about - keep them!

Reyesuela
December 27th, 2018, 02:05 PM
Hormones are actually the most common culprit for hair thinning!

1) Low thyroid can cause major sheds.

2) Androgen excess can cause sheds to the point where the scalp is visible on even young women. This MAY be associated with irregular periods--usually is for extreme cases--but it may not cause menstrual disturbance.

3) Your own personal level of sensitivity toward your estrogen/androgen balance can cause hair to fall out in female pattern baldness. In this case, your hormones are totally normal for your age, but your hair follicles are sensitive to them. This is the same thing that happens in male pattern baldness. Women can more often than men get diffuse balding, not just pattern balding, that is linked to normal hormone levels plus unlucky genetics.

And 4) (of course) the normal fluctuations associated with pregnancy and childbirth can cause seriously major growth spurts and sheds without anything being actually wrong. This of course doesn't apply in your situation!!!

If you are shedding excessively for an extended period of time, you will notice that your hair is getting thinner in circumference at either the base of your ponytail or at a consistent distance along its length (not the very ends but like at waist level if your hair is TBL, etc.) If you aren't losing circumference, I really wouldn't worry.

Sparkles122
December 27th, 2018, 03:25 PM
I have had quite a few people tell me without prompting to get a hormone check... I'm wondering if it's the universe's way of telling me me to...or if it may be at the route of my issues, and if it is, whether there is anything that can be done about it...?

I'm 45.. I have regular periods, and a normal (if anything increased) sex drive..

My thyroid function is fine...

Has anyone here had a hormone test and found an issue that has affected their hair? And if so, what are the treatments for it? Is there anything natural that can help if there is an issue?

:-(


Back about 5-6 years ago I found out that I had a prolactinoma. Which is a tumor on your pituitary gland that affects your prolactin levels (not all of them affect the hormone prolactin, some can affect other hormones). My hair was falling out but I was also lactacting and most definitely wasnt pregnant. Other symptoms included increased anxiety and acne in places that I had never had it, areas such as my neck. Because my tumor was so small I was able to take medication for 2 years to shrink it and lower my prolactin levels. All returned to normal. I went to an endocinologist. I think a regular primary doctor should be able to order a hormone panel for you if you really want your hormones checked for your own peace of mind

MusicalSpoons
December 27th, 2018, 03:28 PM
Back about 5-6 years ago I found out that I had a prolactinoma. Which is a tumor on your pituitary gland that affects your prolactin levels (not all of them affect the hormone prolactin, some can affect other hormones). My hair was falling out but I was also lactacting and most definitely wasnt pregnant. Other symptoms included increased anxiety and acne in places that I had never had it, areas such as my neck. Because my tumor was so small I was able to take medication for 2 years to shrink it and lower my prolactin levels. All returned to normal. I went to an endocinologist. I think a regular primary doctor should be able to order a hormone panel for you if you really want your hormones checked

I don't know how it all works elsewhere but here they will only order blood tests if there's sufficient clinical need, and I think in the US insurance only covers certain things. I don't know how it is in Australia though.

Sparkles122
December 27th, 2018, 03:32 PM
I don't know how it all works elsewhere but here they will only order blood tests if there's sufficient clinical need, and I think in the US insurance only covers certain things. I don't know how it is in Australia though.

Some doctors will and some wont

lapushka
December 27th, 2018, 03:43 PM
I don't know how it all works elsewhere but here they will only order blood tests if there's sufficient clinical need, and I think in the US insurance only covers certain things. I don't know how it is in Australia though.

Here they don't "just" do bloodtests either.

Sparkles122
December 27th, 2018, 03:48 PM
In her first paragraph she says shes having “issues”, im not sure what the specific issues are, but if its anything that could be hormone related, they will

MusicalSpoons
December 27th, 2018, 05:14 PM
In her first paragraph she says shes having “issues”, im not sure what the specific issues are, but if its anything that could be hormone related, they will

Oh right, yes I see where you're coming from, and that does make sense in the context of this thread. I don't wish to speak out of turn, so I'll just say the issues mentioned are detailed in OP's other threads :)

(Off-topic but my friend's daughter had a pituitary tumour, and among other things was lactating, more so when triggered by the sound of a baby crying ... not helpful for a midwife!! I can't remember how they dealt with it but for her that was by far the symptom she most wanted to stop.)

akurah
December 27th, 2018, 05:20 PM
I don't know how it all works elsewhere but here they will only order blood tests if there's sufficient clinical need, and I think in the US insurance only covers certain things. I don't know how it is in Australia though.

Depends on your insurance. I have Kaiser (HMO) and they're generally agreeable to blood tests, especially if I'm concerned something is wrong. It's the cheapest test they can perform for most conditions

Cate36
December 27th, 2018, 07:57 PM
I'm in Australia, and the healthcare service covers blood tests for any concern.. so you can get one whenever you like.. same in the UK as far as I'm aware..

Cate36
December 27th, 2018, 08:17 PM
The only problem with Australia.. is that it shuts down at Xmas.. for the whole of Jan.. summer holidays.. just called my doctor's surgery to ask for a blood test and she is not back till the end of Jan.. so.. ho hum..

MusicalSpoons
December 27th, 2018, 08:50 PM
I'm in Australia, and the healthcare service covers blood tests for any concern.. so you can get one whenever you like.. same in the UK as far as I'm aware..

Nope, I've had them refuse in the past because previous bloodwork was normal, despite issues worsening. I've also had a blood test turned down by the lab even when the Dr ordered it (for referral to a specialist) because there wasn't 'sufficient clinical evidence' :shake: I'm glad things are a bit more agreeable in Australia though!

Cate36
December 27th, 2018, 09:18 PM
Nope, I've had them refuse in the past because previous bloodwork was normal, despite issues worsening. I've also had a blood test turned down by the lab even when the Dr ordered it (for referral to a specialist) because there wasn't 'sufficient clinical evidence' :shake: I'm glad things are a bit more agreeable in Australia though!

Wow.. I'm originally from the UK.. seems things have changed a bit since I left... that's awful...

lapushka
December 28th, 2018, 05:29 AM
Nope, I've had them refuse in the past because previous bloodwork was normal, despite issues worsening. I've also had a blood test turned down by the lab even when the Dr ordered it (for referral to a specialist) because there wasn't 'sufficient clinical evidence' :shake: I'm glad things are a bit more agreeable in Australia though!

WTH! That's terrible.

Here I get one yearly and my parents too, routine check. But I have health issues (not getting into it publicly) and my parents are in their 70s.

Joules
December 28th, 2018, 05:59 AM
Here they don't "just" do bloodtests either.

Here in Russia you can ask for any test on the free healthcare system, but the thing is, you have to know yourself what exactly you need tested. Doctors in free clinics are grossly underpaid (which means good doctors don't work there, they all go to private hospitals to earn a decent living), and considering the fact that a lot of disorders have misleading symptoms...yeah, it can get bad. They ask standard question without going deeper, because they only have, like, 7 minutes per patient. Sorry for going off-topic, this issue just bugs me a lot.

lapushka
December 28th, 2018, 06:59 AM
Here in Russia you can ask for any test on the free healthcare system, but the thing is, you have to know yourself what exactly you need tested. Doctors in free clinics are grossly underpaid (which means good doctors don't work there, they all go to private hospitals to earn a decent living), and considering the fact that a lot of disorders have misleading symptoms...yeah, it can get bad. They ask standard question without going deeper, because they only have, like, 7 minutes per patient. Sorry for going off-topic, this issue just bugs me a lot.

7 min. per patient? That's not much. What if you have serious health issues. But oh well, we're getting off-topic. ;)

MusicalSpoons
December 28th, 2018, 09:08 AM
WTH! That's terrible.

Here I get one yearly and my parents too, routine check. But I have health issues (not getting into it publicly) and my parents are in their 70s.

The only routine checks here are very, very specific - e.g. blood sugar levels for diabetes, kidney or liver function if you're on medication, basically only specific things directly related to the exact diagnosed medical issues. No vitamin or hormone tests if it's not a part of your condition!

Joules we have 10min appointments, but our doctors are generally at least decent so the main problem is constraints within NHS guidelines (i.e. to cost the NHS as little money as possible). Taking it back to the topic of hair: since shedding and thinning can be such subjective symptoms, it's not seen as a red flag unless it's very obvious.

lapushka
December 28th, 2018, 09:16 AM
The only routine checks here are very, very specific - e.g. blood sugar levels for diabetes, kidney or liver function if you're on medication, basically only specific things directly related to the exact diagnosed medical issues. No vitamin or hormone tests if it's not a part of your condition!

It's a standard blood test here as well, basic "important" things, but it includes checking for B vit., last I had the doctor check my vit. D levels specifically as well.

Joules
December 28th, 2018, 11:51 AM
7 min. per patient? That's not much. What if you have serious health issues. But oh well, we're getting off-topic. ;)

If you have serious issues, you go private, unless you have mad connections and can pull some strings. If you don't have money or connections, don't know your rights and can't fight for yourself, you're screwed. That's Russia for you. We (my family) usually go to free clinics for tests, and private for consultations.

lapushka
December 30th, 2018, 06:04 PM
If you have serious issues, you go private, unless you have mad connections and can pull some strings. If you don't have money or connections, don't know your rights and can't fight for yourself, you're screwed. That's Russia for you. We (my family) usually go to free clinics for tests, and private for consultations.

Sounds like there's issues with *any* system out there. Still, I love generalized health care, even though we pay dearly for it (in taxes).