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Cate36
December 23rd, 2018, 04:52 PM
So.. it's summer here.. and the sun is out.... I know in summer the popular myth is that it helps hair grow faster.. I suspect this is because of Vitamin D etc... I am wondering how much sun exposure (i.e. 30 mins? An hour?) is optimal daily?.. I don't really like sitting in the sun as my skin is fair and I don't want to damage my hair... Anyone know if any studies on it?

Ylva
December 23rd, 2018, 04:55 PM
I can't imagine that being beneficial. The Sun will damage the hair and make it brittle more than it will aid in hair growth.

Riot Crrl
December 23rd, 2018, 05:00 PM
I don't know that UV rays do anything but harm to both the skin and hair. If you have a D deficiency there are supplements.

Crystawni
December 23rd, 2018, 05:06 PM
I suspect it's more to do with the heat than sun (gets the blood flowing nicely to stimulate those follicles), although as I live where it's hot all the time with plenty of white, bright sun and have noted no growth difference, I'd say any of it is bunkum.

blackgothicdoll
December 23rd, 2018, 05:15 PM
From what I know, vitamin D deficiency is more common in people with darker complexions, as melanin in the skin makes it difficult for vitamin D to absorb.

So my perspective is very biased, as I would say to someone of my own complexion to make sure to go outside and get some sunlight. Now, I wouldn't tell them to stand out in 90 degree weather with no cloud cover for an hour, but to go outside and get fresh air and sunlight is good for you in general (IMO).

Now there are some people who are very sensitive to sunlight, so that's not all the case. I guess I would simply say to use common sense and know how your body tolerates or doesn't tolerate the sun. Or sit out under a cover, if it doesn't harm you.

I know nothing of vitamin D helping hair growth, but it does aid with depression.

spidermom
December 23rd, 2018, 06:21 PM
It's not the sunshine per se, it's the hours of daylight. Everything is programmed to grow when the days are long.

Sparkles122
December 23rd, 2018, 07:03 PM
Is it true that hair grows faster in summer than in winter? I havent really noticed, but I havent paid much attention. Maybe I will this coming summer

Crystawni
December 23rd, 2018, 07:04 PM
I submit my study of one. :lol: I've been logging my monthly growth since I joined the forum, so here it is in graph form, from APL+ on April 29th, 2014 through to Classic on December 20th, 2018, trims included. I've moved from living in the upper-south-east of this state, to up (and further up to the top) and down (further than before) and back up again during that time, and encountered a few different seasons and sun-times (it's a big state, going from the sub-tropics in the south to tropics in the north), but my growth rate has remained steady the entire time.

https://i.imgur.com/GjoDPpV.jpg

FennFire911
December 23rd, 2018, 07:08 PM
It's not the sunshine per se, it's the hours of daylight. Everything is programmed to grow when the days are long.

This, precisely. Summer is a growth season for many things because there are enough daylight hours to thrive in. No need to bake yourself. Just enjoy fresh air and good weather. Your hair knows what to do.

FennFire911
December 23rd, 2018, 07:12 PM
Is it true that hair grows faster in summer than in winter? I havent really noticed, but I havent paid much attention. Maybe I will this coming summer


When I had horses I used to have to get their hooves trimmed more frequently in summer than in winter. My chickens lay more eggs in summer than in winter.
Summer is just when things come to life and grow faster. :)

Dark40
December 23rd, 2018, 07:42 PM
I agree with Yiva. The sun will damage your hair it won't aid it adding new growth.

Ophidian
December 23rd, 2018, 11:43 PM
Vit D deficiency can affect fair skinned people too, especially if you are indoors (or covered up) a lot. My levels were quite low last time I had a blood test, so I was advised to start supplementing. I’m not aware of any specific impact on hair growth, but nutritional deficiencies can definitely impact hair growth/health if you are deficient (I think some of my recent shedding may be attributable to this). If you’re already healthy though I don’t think there’s a hair specific benefit to sun exposure (and definite concerns with overexposure).

Cate36
December 24th, 2018, 12:43 AM
I hunted around on the internet and only found two possible explanations that made sense from various hair clinics.. 1) that hair growth does apparently increase in hot climates, and 2) increased Vit D = essential for hair growth.. there doesn't seem to be any other explanation.. but you're right Yiva, most warn against getting hair anywhere near the sun.

Joules
December 24th, 2018, 01:00 AM
I agree that it's not because of the sun itself, but because of heat and daylight time. UV radiation can actually damage not only hair itself, but hair follicles, which can lead to hairloss.

I live in a climate where there's a lot of sun and heat (even too much, if you ask me) in the summer and quite cold during winters, and my hair grows consistently 1.5cm per month, regardless of the season. So idk.

Alibran
December 24th, 2018, 04:36 AM
There are two types of UV rays: UVA and UVB.

UVA is the one that dries out hair and skin, and it's present in sunlight all year round.

UVB is the one that stimulates vitamin D production, and it's present in sunlight for about half the year (around summer), depending on how far from the equator you live. The nearer the equator, the more months of vitamin D.

Vitamin D is essential for all round health (I don't know about hair specifically), and most people are deficient in it. Natural sources of vitamins are always better than supplements, so it's a good idea to get regular sun exposure during the warm months. Also, sunblock is called sunblock for a reason - it blocks all the sun's rays, not just the ones that can cause damage. A few minutes in the sun without sunblock is better than a few hours wearing SPF50.

Joules
December 24th, 2018, 04:59 AM
There are two types of UV rays: UVA and UVB.

UVA is the one that dries out hair and skin, and it's present in sunlight all year round.

UVB is the one that stimulates vitamin D production, and it's present in sunlight for about half the year (around summer), depending on how far from the equator you live. The nearer the equator, the more months of vitamin D.

Vitamin D is essential for all round health (I don't know about hair specifically), and most people are deficient in it. Natural sources of vitamins are always better than supplements, so it's a good idea to get regular sun exposure during the warm months. Also, sunblock is called sunblock for a reason - it blocks all the sun's rays, not just the ones that can cause damage. A few minutes in the sun without sunblock is better than a few hours wearing SPF50.

UVA rays dry out our skin and hair and they cause sunburn, whereas UVB are the ones that go deeper, causing cancer and premature ageing. Both types of rays suppress immune system (which contributes to the increased risk of skin cancer). With the possibility of getting vit. D from other sources, I wouldn't want to risk getting cancer for the sake of being "natural", thanks.

Besides, sun exposure doesn't really impact anything. My Mom's friends spend a lot of time at the sea (at our local resorts in the summer and in countries like Thailand in the winter), on top of living in a very sunny place. They like tanning and they don't care about sunblock. And guess what? All of them are vitamin D deficient.

Cg
December 24th, 2018, 11:40 AM
Is it true that hair grows faster in summer than in winter? I havent really noticed, but I havent paid much attention. Maybe I will this coming summer

Not in my case. My hair and nails grow at the same rate whether it's frigid snowy winter or heat-blasting summer.

Cate36
December 24th, 2018, 12:42 PM
There are two types of UV rays: UVA and UVB.

UVA is the one that dries out hair and skin, and it's present in sunlight all year round.

UVB is the one that stimulates vitamin D production, and it's present in sunlight for about half the year (around summer), depending on how far from the equator you live. The nearer the equator, the more months of vitamin D.

Vitamin D is essential for all round health (I don't know about hair specifically), and most people are deficient in it. Natural sources of vitamins are always better than supplements, so it's a good idea to get regular sun exposure during the warm months. Also, sunblock is called sunblock for a reason - it blocks all the sun's rays, not just the ones that can cause damage. A few minutes in the sun without sunblock is better than a few hours wearing SPF50.

Interesting! Thank you I knew there was a difference between the two, but you put it very succinctly and to the point!.. I've never liked using sunblock.. I'm bathing for 30 mins a day at the moment with no SPF (I don't burn with that exposure), and I figure that's enough?

Alibran
December 24th, 2018, 02:29 PM
UVA rays dry out our skin and hair and they cause sunburn, whereas UVB are the ones that go deeper, causing cancer and premature ageing. Both types of rays suppress immune system (which contributes to the increased risk of skin cancer). With the possibility of getting vit. D from other sources, I wouldn't want to risk getting cancer for the sake of being "natural", thanks.

This would obviously explain why skin cancer rates are so high in Mediterranean countries. *cough*

Most of the 'sun is bad for you' myths come from the companies who make millions selling sunblock, most of which is full of carcinogenic compounds. It doesn't take a genius to observe the correlation between increased sunblock use and increased skin cancer rates.

guska
December 24th, 2018, 02:32 PM
I don't know if summer = increased hair growth, but I do know that I had hair loss and blood test results showed vitamin D deficiency.

Cate36
December 24th, 2018, 02:58 PM
I don't know if summer = increased hair growth, but I do know that I had hair loss and blood test results showed vitamin D deficiency.

Yes same with me.. I had a blood test about a month and a half ago and had Vid D deficiency.. along with iron and B12.. my diet has now totally changed to a lot of oily fish, dairy, and I'm on good quality supplements..the hair on top of my hair is now thickening from where it was.. but I have a way to go.. The thing is, I was getting sun before, but I was also a full on fruitarian, and a very bad one (i could go weeks and weeks on just water melon or juices..) I won't be doing that anymore!

Kalamazoo
December 24th, 2018, 08:01 PM
Sun definitely is NOT all-bad. One of my friends (a doctor's wife) said her doctor had told her to go out & get some sun every day, because she was having health problems that sunlight would definitely ameliorate.

Also, there are natural vision improvement books that strongly recommend sunning the eyes. These days, everybody says to keep your eyes closed & let the sun shine on your closed eyelids; but the older books recommended open-eyed sunning.

(But the downside is accelerated wrinkles.)

So, since our hair seems to be a barometer for the body's over-all health, I tend to think what's good for one part of the body is good for the whole; but balance is key. Too much of a good thing is not a good thing. It seems obvious that different people need different amounts. Another of my friends (who was extremely blonde & blue-eyed) said 10 minutes a day was all the sunshine a person needed!

Cate36
December 24th, 2018, 08:46 PM
Sun definitely is NOT all-bad. One of my friends (a doctor's wife) said her doctor had told her to go out & get some sun every day, because she was having health problems that sunlight would definitely ameliorate.

Also, there are natural vision improvement books that strongly recommend sunning the eyes. These days, everybody says to keep your eyes closed & let the sun shine on your closed eyelids; but the older books recommended open-eyed sunning.

(But the downside is accelerated wrinkles.)

So, since our hair seems to be a barometer for the body's over-all health, I tend to think what's good for one part of the body is good for the whole; but balance is key. Too much of a good thing is not a good thing. It seems obvious that different people need different amounts. Another of my friends (who was extremely blonde & blue-eyed) said 10 minutes a day was all the sunshine a person needed!

Yes I agree.. I'm an advocate of the health care expert Don Tolman.. he pushes the benefits of the sun immensely..including "sun gazing" when the sun is setting for improved vision... he teaches that the sun is literally life itself.. I'm wondering how much is enough a day.. at the moment I'm sitting in it for 30 mins...

Crystawni
December 24th, 2018, 09:23 PM
Sun definitely is NOT all-bad. One of my friends (a doctor's wife) said her doctor had told her to go out & get some sun every day, because she was having health problems that sunlight would definitely ameliorate.

Also, there are natural vision improvement books that strongly recommend sunning the eyes. These days, everybody says to keep your eyes closed & let the sun shine on your closed eyelids; but the older books recommended open-eyed sunning.

(But the downside is accelerated wrinkles.)

So, since our hair seems to be a barometer for the body's over-all health, I tend to think what's good for one part of the body is good for the whole; but balance is key. Too much of a good thing is not a good thing. It seems obvious that different people need different amounts. Another of my friends (who was extremely blonde & blue-eyed) said 10 minutes a day was all the sunshine a person needed!

It's definitely a YMMV kind of thing. With the sun where I am, and a UV index always in the extreme, the burn time is 3 to 4 minutes in summer (I have fair skin, but have built up a base "tan" thanks to getting sun in mostly small increments every day, but still have to be uber careful). Yeah, it's a stinger, and we have the highest rates of skin cancer in the world.

Cate36
December 24th, 2018, 10:04 PM
It's definitely a YMMV kind of thing. With the sun where I am, and a UV index always in the extreme, the burn time is 3 to 4 minutes in summer (I have fair skin, but have built up a base "tan" thanks to getting sun in mostly small increments every day, but still have to be uber careful). Yeah, it's a stinger, and we have the highest rates of skin cancer in the world.

Yeah true.. although chemical sun blocks do have cancer forming ingredients in them, so I try and stick to zinc etc.. I find I am fine in Melbourne with 30 mins exposure an no sun cream.. but then.. Melbourne is v different from Cains! LOL

illicitlizard
December 25th, 2018, 01:48 AM
Yeah true.. although chemical sun blocks do have cancer forming ingredients in them, so I try and stick to zinc etc.. I find I am fine in Melbourne with 30 mins exposure an no sun cream.. but then.. Melbourne is v different from Cains! LOL

Rather have a minute chance of getting cancer from sunblock than a massive chance of getting cancer from UV lol.
I was also fine in Melbourne without sunscreen 90% of the time as a very fair person, but since moving to Brisbane, absolutely not. If I don't wear sunscreen on the daily I will burn from incidental exposure. It's extremely high UV up there all the time.

Kalamazoo
December 25th, 2018, 11:15 AM
Are you familiar with Solumbra clothing? They manufacture the "sunscreen" right into the fabric, so that it isn't a chemical in contact with your skin. Although their clothes can be written off as medical expenses, they make an effort to create styles that look nice.

They sell on Amazon & eBay, as well as from their own website,

https://www.sunprecautions.com/shop/

Joules
December 25th, 2018, 11:56 AM
Kalamazoo, any kind of clothing (except for fishnets maybe) is already a sunscreen, it's a physical block. Otherwise people wouldn't be getting tan lines from swimsuits or t-shirts. No need to waste money on special clothes.

Doreen
December 25th, 2018, 01:26 PM
I have no input on whether sun is helpful or not, but that is a truly awesome and thorough chart Crystawni! Wow!

Crystawni
December 25th, 2018, 04:40 PM
I'd meeeeeeeeeelt in long sleeves. Hubs has to wear long sleeves (and sometimes long pants, although that depends on the job site) as protective clothing per the dress code on industrial worksites (outdoors or in), and more often than not, the guys flake out within minutes thanks to heat stress. It's nuts finding a balance where there is none. Those sleeves get rolled up very quickly, but the extra fabric is still bulky and hot, and the skin's constant coating of sweat almost reflects the sunlight. :lol: Sunscreens are a farce in these conditions (skin barely breathes up here as it is, without coating it in more gunk that either drips off, gets rubbed off when attempting to dry the drips, or suffocates).

And no, no-one notices an increase in hair growth thanks to that sun exposure. :sun:


I have no input on whether sun is helpful or not, but that is a truly awesome and thorough chart Crystawni! Wow!

Thank you! Along with the listed totals and growth rate percentages (adjusted with each updated entry), it gives me a solid idea of what's growing on. :p

Arciela
December 26th, 2018, 01:25 AM
I am not sure about sunlight helping. All I can add is my experience. I usually get a solid 1 inch a month normally...regardless of what season it is. Been that way my whole life! My mom used to comment on how fast my hair always grows. All I do/did is ignore it and put it up.

harpgal
December 26th, 2018, 06:26 PM
Actually hair does grow faster due to an increase in sun angles, not by sun exposure. As the amount of sunlight increases during a season, it has been proven that hair does grow a bit faster.

I was the subject of a very controlled study several years ago. My hair length was measured weekly for one year. As the days lengthened, my hair did grow faster, albeit, not significantly. I lived in a more northern latitude at that time and now live closer to the equator. It would be interesting to be a part of that study again. My hair was between tailbone and classic. Now that I am at ankle, I'm not sure what the difference would be.

Cate36
December 26th, 2018, 07:03 PM
Actually hair does grow faster due to an increase in sun angles, not by sun exposure. As the amount of sunlight increases during a season, it has been proven that hair does grow a bit faster.

I was the subject of a very controlled study several years ago. My hair length was measured weekly for one year. As the days lengthened, my hair did grow faster, albeit, not significantly. I lived in a more northern latitude at that time and now live closer to the equator. It would be interesting to be a part of that study again. My hair was between tailbone and classic. Now that I am at ankle, I'm not sure what the difference would be.

wow so interesting! Thanks for that.. I suspected it may instinctively.. my nails grow faster in summer.. or seem to..

Milkchocolate
December 27th, 2018, 08:55 AM
I can attest that hair does indeed grow faster in hotter climates..well for me personally! My hair goes through a sudden “growth spurt” during the hot summer months. I’ve been particularly paying attention to this pattern for the past 7 years. I am not sure about being directly under the sun..but definitely during the hotter times it grows like weeds! (Coming from a girl with extremely slow hair growth)

I feel like it has something to do with the moisture and sebum my scalp produces when it’s hot out. It seems to accelerate when it’s hotter. Just like with sweat and such. Also, I am outside all the time and rarely spend time at home so my hair is literally drinking up the humidity lol. I’m a firm believer in that climate effects hair growth :)

Ps
I would never recommend to stand directly under the sunlight for too long!

LeyanaWhite
December 27th, 2018, 09:51 AM
It's more the heat than the sun, as a few others have mentioned, because it stimulates blood flow to the scalp. Also it produces sweat and natural oils to the hair & scalp. Really, you could achieve the same thing from exercising and working up a sweat. You don't necessarily have to be outside in the sun.

Milkchocolate
December 27th, 2018, 10:44 AM
It's more the heat than the sun, as a few others have mentioned, because it stimulates blood flow to the scalp. Also it produces sweat and natural oils to the hair & scalp. Really, you could achieve the same thing from exercising and working up a sweat. You don't necessarily have to be outside in the sun.

Hot temperature combined with sweaty cardio= best recipe to grow hair faster in my opinion. SoOoo much intense stimulation coming from the scalp! Along with scalp massaging while the blood is flowing= boom!! That’s been extremely amazing for me.

hollygolightly
December 27th, 2018, 11:17 AM
I submit my study of one. :lol: I've been logging my monthly growth since I joined the forum, so here it is in graph form, from APL+ on April 29th, 2014 through to Classic on December 20th, 2018, trims included. I've moved from living in the upper-south-east of this state, to up (and further up to the top) and down (further than before) and back up again during that time, and encountered a few different seasons and sun-times (it's a big state, going from the sub-tropics in the south to tropics in the north), but my growth rate has remained steady the entire time.

https://i.imgur.com/GjoDPpV.jpg

that's really cool! how do you do that?

lapushka
December 27th, 2018, 11:28 AM
Not in my case. My hair and nails grow at the same rate whether it's frigid snowy winter or heat-blasting summer.

Ditto. I have no difference year round. It's always 1/2 inch, and be happy that you get that, because there are people who get less, since that is just an "average".

dagny
December 27th, 2018, 12:25 PM
This is an interesting thread and something that I, myself, wondered about.
As I have never really taken much notice on how much my hair truly grows throughout the year, i will say that from a subjective point of view it seems as if my hair grows faster in the warmer months.
I shall be taking measurements each month to determine things objectively... I might even make a nifty grow chart like Crystawni! :)

Reyesuela
December 27th, 2018, 01:11 PM
It is known that people shed more hair in fall and retain more in the summer...which matters for density but not speed.

And it's been shown that sunlight destroys some of the testosterone in the hair follicle, too, which promotes density again but probably not SPEED.

But UV also damages hair. So I wouldn't try to get sun to make my hair nicer.

Danglish
December 27th, 2018, 02:22 PM
Completely anecdotal, but my cousin is extremely active, and her hair grows at an insane rate, like a full inch a month or more. Like others have said, it's probably the heat, and maybe the hydration/cell renewal

blackgothicdoll
December 27th, 2018, 06:17 PM
Completely anecdotal, but my cousin is extremely active, and her hair grows at an insane rate, like a full inch a month or more. Like others have said, it's probably the heat, and maybe the hydration/cell renewal

I think people are all just different. In the summer when I work out 4/5 days a week, drink two gallons of water and eat a great diet, my hair does not grow any faster than my depressive winter cycle of pizza hut, beer and 18 hours of sleep a day. >:(

I feel cheated. lol.

Cate36
December 27th, 2018, 09:28 PM
I think people are all just different. In the summer when I work out 4/5 days a week, drink two gallons of water and eat a great diet, my hair does not grow any faster than my depressive winter cycle of pizza hut, beer and 18 hours of sleep a day. >:(

I feel cheated. lol.

LOL so unfair.. I'm on over a gallon of water a day at the moment.. in hope that it will benefit my hair.. on my fourth litre now..

I'm doing between 15 mins and 30 mins in full sunlight..

Basically.. I'm throwing everything but the kitchen sink at my hair without doing anything drastic! Hopefully this forum (and sitting under the watchful eyes of Lapushka) will stop me making any further mistakes..

The only thing I have not done, is forget about it..

littlestarface
December 27th, 2018, 09:34 PM
Yuck I hate summer how can anyone try n find something good about it. I live in the hottest hot and it don't make my hair grow more that's for sure.

Cate36
December 27th, 2018, 09:51 PM
Yuck I hate summer how can anyone try n find something good about it. I live in the hottest hot and it don't make my hair grow more that's for sure.

If you lived in the coldest cold, you would probably crave the hottest hot? :).. having said that.. sun really affected my hair considerably.. bleached it.. now I'm keeping out of the sun, new growth is back to being ginger..

Your hair is STUNNING BTW..I so want to be at knee...

littlestarface
December 27th, 2018, 10:00 PM
If you lived in the coldest cold, you would probably crave the hottest hot? :).. having said that.. sun really affected my hair considerably.. bleached it.. now I'm keeping out of the sun, new growth is back to being ginger..

Your hair is STUNNING BTW..I so want to be at knee...

Oh heck no I really hate the sun, I have to walk in it everyday for work n when I go shopping and my skin is sun sensitive so I get rashes, welts, and i get horribly sick from it. I would be very grateful if I lived in coldest cold. I keep my hair covered all year so my hair wont get abused from the sun too lol.

Thank you sweety.

val.
December 27th, 2018, 10:19 PM
Just a thought but my hair retains more moisture in the summer because of the humidity. In the winter it is dryer and more prone to damage. It doesn't actually grow faster for me, I just experience less brakeage.

blackgothicdoll
December 27th, 2018, 10:39 PM
Summers where I live get to 100 Fahrenheit and like maybe 125% humidity (slight exaggeration). My hair DOES NOT LIKE HUMIDITY!! urghh. I go through jars and jars of hair gel. I don't like the cold either, but when it comes to figuring out what to do with my sweaty self and my frizzy hair, I start missing the winter by June lol.

Danglish
December 28th, 2018, 03:00 AM
This thread is a bit disconcerting, but it's good to dispel some myths, so we can get out of the Dark Ages of Hair(knowledge-wise)

Cg
December 28th, 2018, 10:35 AM
I think people are all just different. In the summer when I work out 4/5 days a week, drink two gallons of water and eat a great diet, my hair does not grow any faster than my depressive winter cycle of pizza hut, beer and 18 hours of sleep a day. >:(

I feel cheated. lol.

Thanks for the :laugh: !

Crystawni
December 30th, 2018, 03:44 AM
that's really cool! how do you do that?

Thanks! The chart is part of a spreadsheet I got from the Managing Hair Growth Data (https://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=36275) thread (post with links for downloads here (https://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=36275&p=3397454&viewfull=1#post3397454)).

snorkie
December 30th, 2018, 11:52 PM
Summer is just a natural growth cycle and as long as you condition and oil your hair regularly,some sun isn’t a problem. Lots of sun will dry the hair out just like it does your skin so do be careful!

MusicalSpoons
January 1st, 2019, 07:35 AM
I would be curious to find out whether general climate affects growth rate. It's all very well most of us saying that the change of seasons doesn't do anything (or minimally) but realistically, 'summer' means different things in different countries, as does 'winter' - 'winter' for some people is when it's just about cool enough for coconut oil to solidify, but for others it means blizzards and ice storms; 'summer' for some people means coconut oil just about liquifies on the hottest days, but for others it means burning within minutes of setting foot outside. This discrepancy makes me wonder whether those in a warmer climate have faster growth rates than they would have in cooler climates, and vice versa. Not that there's any real way of finding out, because even anecdotal evidence from say a few people who've lived for some time in both climates (years, rather than months) wouldn't actually prove anything, but I do wonder :hmm:

The good news is, if climate does affect growth rate, you guys in countries such as Australia are already benefiting from it anyway ;)

(I know this is straying from the OP a bit, but every time I see this thread it gets me thinking.)

Crystawni
January 1st, 2019, 03:50 PM
As someone who has lived in different climates in this vast Australian continent that enjoys all the weather from heatwaves to blizzards (I live in the tropics now at around a latitude of -17° S, but grew up and lived many years around -35° S in a dry, arid state that enjoyed all the seasons, including blasts from the Antarctic that kept things frigid), I can say I haven't noticed any difference in growth rate (mine's around 1.3cm/month). And yeah, I used to be where coconut oil was solid for the year, but now it's always liquid. :p I wonder if our genetics play into whether we respond to these changes?

Cate36
January 1st, 2019, 06:57 PM
As someone who has lived in different climates in this vast Australian continent that enjoys all the weather from heatwaves to blizzards (I live in the tropics now at around a latitude of -17° S, but grew up and lived many years around -35° S in a dry, arid state that enjoyed all the seasons, including blasts from the Antarctic that kept things frigid), I can say I haven't noticed any difference in growth rate (mine's around 1.3cm/month). And yeah, I used to be where coconut oil was solid for the year, but now it's always liquid. :p I wonder if our genetics play into whether we respond to these changes?

But I wonder if the variable comes from how much we expose our scalps to the sun?

Crystawni
January 1st, 2019, 07:24 PM
I dunno. My hubby works in the sun for hours every day, with or without a hat or hardhat (it depends), and also hasn't noticed any change either, even when off work and indoors more (as he is now over the holidays). I trim his hair when it gets bushy (he's a curly) every two months or so, and it's around the same amount each time.