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_janne91_
December 12th, 2018, 07:29 AM
Hi all!

i joined this site 2 years ago and followed advice with great results so Iím back.
for 2 years Iíve CWC, once a week. Dried naturally then heat styled once a week and oiled ends as needed. Simple and easy.

ive moves country and discovered where I live has hard water- Iím renting and cannot install a soft water demineralization. My hair is flat and heavy, oily fast, ends drying and the build up looks like dandruff (or I could have it too now due to dry skin).

Ive looked up the following solutions
- chekating shampoo
- apple cider rinse
- baking soda shampoo

im looking for any advice as to if these have worked or where I should start, or if you have any other solutions I am all ears!!!

thank you :)

lapushka
December 12th, 2018, 08:20 AM
I would clarify/chelate first, then see how you fare. Could be build-up.

I have had hard water all my life and no issues (not saying you can't have them because it does occur).

But maybe buy products in the country you are in, they might be "geared" towards the hardness of the water. Just a quick tip.

ReptilianFeline
December 12th, 2018, 08:24 AM
Avoid baking soda, especially with hard water. You need the other spectrum, the acid side of pH.

A rinse with Magic Water (recipe on this site somewhere) is very helpful... or add a bit of citric acid to your poo mix.

harpgal
December 12th, 2018, 09:51 AM
http://watersticks.com

This works very well for me.

Fethenwen
December 12th, 2018, 10:24 AM
I also have hard water, the only thing that works for me is to add citric acid into the water I use for washing hair, we get water from our well. I fill a large basin with water and add about two teaspoons of citric acid. Works wonders, before I started washing my hair this way, my hair was a frizzy mess and I had to use deep cleansing shampoo once a week. I also notice I need to wash less frequently with this method.

MusicalSpoons
December 12th, 2018, 10:50 AM
http://science-yhairblog.blogspot.com/2016/03/hard-water-and-your-hair.html is a great post about hard water and hair. One point that I don't think is often discussed when this comes up on LHC is that a higher pH means you're more likely to have problems with hard water. (I wonder lapushka what your pH is, whether it's why you and I don't seem to have any negative effects despite both having very hard water? :hmm: Mine is consistently just above pH 7, so almost neutral.)

OP do you know how hard your water is? If you haven't already, you should be able to get a report, even just a general one for your area - water providers over here have them online for free - you'll have a good idea of what exactly you're dealing with, including pH.

As always, what works wonders for some does nothing for others, so it will be a case of just trying things to see. I use a shower filter, not to soften the water (because they generally don't, with a couple of exceptions) but to help with the chloramine - I haven't actually noticed any difference in my hair but my skin tells me when the filter needs changing :lol:

Edit: harpgal thank you for that link - I clicked on it and found an article about why shower filters don't soften water, which is what I've been trying to work out for a while! Yay, thank you!

lapushka
December 12th, 2018, 11:51 AM
http://science-yhairblog.blogspot.com/2016/03/hard-water-and-your-hair.html is a great post about hard water and hair. One point that I don't think is often discussed when this comes up on LHC is that a higher pH means you're more likely to have problems with hard water. (I wonder lapushka what your pH is, whether it's why you and I don't seem to have any negative effects despite both having very hard water? :hmm: Mine is consistently just above pH 7, so almost neutral.)

You also don't have any issues? I am *so* glad! Because I often feel like I'm the only one that's not bothered by it. I once did ACV rinses, made no difference. The citric acid rinses were nice, but in essence made no significant difference (my hair did feel nice, though).

Now I am using a shampoo called "Kiwi shine", by Schwarzkopf (long discontinued) and it is for use with hard water. But I do think the products here in general are catered to the water.

ETA oh and about the pH. Now I'm curious. I do wonder.

AshtangiPNW
December 12th, 2018, 12:11 PM
Hi there! My water's pH is just a bit above 7. Similar to MusicalSpoons and Lapushka. :) I have a water filter on my showerhead. The filter itself doesn't alter the pH but I think that it does remove some of the minerals. It wasn't particularly expensive (maybe, $30?). In any case, I tend to use the Nightblooming Alluvial Chelating Crystal Rinse as a final rinse. I only use a tiny bit (1/4 tsp in a full liter of water). I'm not sure that I actually *need* the final rinse, but it makes my hair feel instantly very silky and smooth! I wonder if a citric acid rinse every once and a while might help? I don't imagine that it could do much harm to try....

MusicalSpoons
December 12th, 2018, 12:34 PM
You also don't have any issues? I am *so* glad! Because I often feel like I'm the only one that's not bothered by it. I once did ACV rinses, made no difference. The citric acid rinses were nice, but in essence made no significant difference (my hair did feel nice, though).

Now I am using a shampoo called "Kiwi shine", by Schwarzkopf (long discontinued) and it is for use with hard water. But I do think the products here in general are catered to the water.

ETA oh and about the pH. Now I'm curious. I do wonder.

Well, I do still have a tiny nagging suspicion that hard water *might* be a contributing factor to why my hair looks oily so quickly, and I'm sure with softer water I might need less conditioning, but certainly no actual problems :) the author of SHB does mention that people who've always had hard water are simply used to it, and I guess that includes unknowingly accounting for the water in our routines :shrug:

Interesting point about products catering to the water. I wonder if that's one reason different markets have different formulations - though in the UK the majority of people have hard or very hard water due to where the population is densest, the actual variation throughout the land is right the way through the spectrum from very soft to very hard (and whole-house softening systems are not particularly common, in my experience).

AshtangiPNW
December 12th, 2018, 01:23 PM
Well, I do still have a tiny nagging suspicion that hard water *might* be a contributing factor to why my hair looks oily so quickly, and I'm sure with softer water I might need less conditioning, but certainly no actual problems :) the author of SHB does mention that people who've always had hard water are simply used to it, and I guess that includes unknowingly accounting for the water in our routines :shrug:

Interesting point about products catering to the water. I wonder if that's one reason different markets have different formulations - though in the UK the majority of people have hard or very hard water due to where the population is densest, the actual variation throughout the land is right the way through the spectrum from very soft to very hard (and whole-house softening systems are not particularly common, in my experience).

I'm also not particularly bothered by the hard water. I have lived in a few areas with *very* soft water, though (cistern rainwater, glacier and spring water). I definitely do notice a difference in the softness and condition of my hair across these sorts of extremes. Rainwater cisterns are *not* common in my current location, though! So hard water it is. haha :) :o

MusicalSpoons
December 12th, 2018, 01:46 PM
Sorry AshtangiPNW I didn't see your previous post before typing mine. Citric acid is one of the primary ingredients in Nightblooming's alluvial rinse, so it probably would have a similar beneficial effect for you.

You can easily buy citric acid and ascorbic acid very cheaply - they are the ingredients for miracle water too. The alluvial rinse has many good things going for it, I'm sure (and if I lived in the US I'd definitely consider trying it), but for anyone like me for whom the cost of postage is prohibitive (or you're on a strict budget) making miracle water is a viable alternative. You can also play with the ratios to get the best results for your water and hair, though I would advise making sure to test the pH if you're going to experiment. SHB has a blog post all about pH and hair so you can make informed decisions if you do go down that route.

Citric acid is supposed to soften the water by binding with some of the minerals, and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) neutralises chlorine and chloramine, whichever one is in your water.

Oh my, glacier and spring water invoke images of meadows and heavenly soft hair ... I've actually considered rainwater but that's a whole other area of research, for how to ensure it's clean (insert mental image of algae and drowned insects here ... shudder: ) and extra effort. I don't have the energy for that!

Obsidian
December 12th, 2018, 02:04 PM
Or you could just buy a chelating shampoo. Joico makes a good one, so does Paul Mitchell.

AshtangiPNW
December 12th, 2018, 03:04 PM
Sorry AshtangiPNW I didn't see your previous post before typing mine. Citric acid is one of the primary ingredients in Nightblooming's alluvial rinse, so it probably would have a similar beneficial effect for you.

You can easily buy citric acid and ascorbic acid very cheaply - they are the ingredients for miracle water too. The alluvial rinse has many good things going for it, I'm sure (and if I lived in the US I'd definitely consider trying it), but for anyone like me for whom the cost of postage is prohibitive (or you're on a strict budget) making miracle water is a viable alternative. You can also play with the ratios to get the best results for your water and hair, though I would advise making sure to test the pH if you're going to experiment. SHB has a blog post all about pH and hair so you can make informed decisions if you do go down that route.

Citric acid is supposed to soften the water by binding with some of the minerals, and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) neutralises chlorine and chloramine, whichever one is in your water.

Oh my, glacier and spring water invoke images of meadows and heavenly soft hair ... I've actually considered rainwater but that's a whole other area of research, for how to ensure it's clean (insert mental image of algae and drowned insects here ... shudder: ) and extra effort. I don't have the energy for that!

haha, thanks MusicalSpoons :) :):flower: That's a great idea to make the miracle water at home for those who are not in the US. As for me, I've hardly made a dent in my small jar so it will be a long, long while before I might even consider making my own. Uff, yes. The holding cistern for the rainwater was underground and I never *actually* looked down there, but I did have a water filter as well. Just in case frogs and other insects found their home down there....shudder: That was also my source of drinking water....:hmm:


Or you could just buy a chelating shampoo. Joico makes a good one, so does Paul Mitchell.

Oh, really? Sounds like it could also be a good idea for those who can use sulfates (alas, my scalp and skin won't tolerate them at all). :)

_janne91_
December 12th, 2018, 03:18 PM
Thank you all so much I’ve read the comments and will follow up on the ph and do some trial error with the recommendations- FYI moved from rural Australia to San Antonio America so big changes all round!
Thanks for link too!!

_janne91_
December 12th, 2018, 03:33 PM
Oh I read this site and it mentioned eczema !! Mine has flared up so badly must be the water...

Ligeia Noire
December 12th, 2018, 03:57 PM
I keep it simple. I chelate and that's it. Joico k-pack is a good choice.

Wendyp
December 15th, 2018, 05:39 PM
Mine was so bad I invested in a water softener system. Huge difference. But if thatís not an option acv rinses will help.

dagny
December 15th, 2018, 06:44 PM
I have hard water and didn't realize it until I kept thinking my hair was dry because it always felt like straw and was frizzy. Nothing ever helped: baking soda, vinegar washes, oils, etc.
After 1 chelation treatment, my hair was amazingly soft and shiny again!

After the chelating shampoo treatment (from Sally's) I have maintained by distilled water/vinegar water as a final rinse.
My method:
1 gallon distilled water with ACV mixed in (mainly to preserve the water). After washing my hair in the shower, I pour the distilled water/ACV into a large container that I got from Ikea. I dunk my head into the container and swish my hair in the water. Then I wrap my hair up in a huge T-shirt and pour the distilled water back into the jug. Every month or so I purchase a new jug of water.

Since the minerals in the hard water are only an issue once the water dries, this is why I continue to use the regular (hard) shower water for washings.

My chelation treatment was done this summer and I have yet to repeat it. My hair is still soft and shiny. :-)

littlestarface
December 15th, 2018, 07:17 PM
My water is very hard all I use is a chelating shampoo and it helps. When people have very hard to extremely hard water it will always help to chelate in one way or another, some people here wont have water as hard as you or probably harder than yours so always keep that in mind. Look up your area for hardness and PH and always keep track of your hair, if your hair is dry tangly coated mess then it will need to be chelated to get those minerals out of your strands.