PDA

View Full Version : "Directly translate" your native hair words to English!



TatsuOni
December 4th, 2018, 05:04 AM
Normally we're using the correct English words for hair stuff, but if we translate some words "directly" it might end up as something else.

Example: A bobby pin is "hårnål" in Swedish and it's actually the words "hair" and "needle" together. So directly translated it's "hairneedle".

U-pin - Knutnål - Knot needle

Claw clip - Hårklämma - "Hair squeeze"


Share your directly translated words and don't forget to tell us what language it is!

MusicalSpoons
December 4th, 2018, 05:21 AM
Ooh what a great idea for a thread! My native language is English (though autocorrect may have you think otherwise) so I have nothing to contribute :-( but I look forward to seeing all the responses :D

RubberDucky
December 4th, 2018, 05:37 AM
Cool idea :D

Some direct translations from Estonian:

hair pin - juuksenõel - "hair needle"

hair clip - juukselõks - "hair trap"

ponytail holder - patsikumm / juuksekumm - "braid rubber" / "hair rubber"

curling iron - lokitangid - "curl pliers"

Joules
December 4th, 2018, 06:07 AM
Here's some Russian for ya'll :bluebiggr

Bobby pin - невидимка (nevi'dimka) - invisible thing (lol, they're very visible sometimes)

U-pin - шпилька ('shpilka) - the same word we use for stiletto heels

Claw clip - заколка-краб (za'kolka-krab) - crab clip (sometimes we just say "crab", like, "I'm wearing a crab in my hair today", or "I'm gonna make a bun with little crabs")

Hair elastic - резинка (re'zinka) - a piece of rubber (I just realised we don't have a separate word for scrunchies, so they're called rubber too, we just specify that thay're velvet rubber or satin rubber, sounds quite ridiculous I know)

Straightening iron - утюжок (utyu'zhok) - little iron (iron being the same word as for the iron you use on your clothes)

Paddle brush - массажная расческа, массажка (ma'ssazhnaya ra'scheska, ma'ssazhka) - massage brush

Hairspray - лак для волос (lak dlya vo'los) - hair polish

lapushka
December 4th, 2018, 06:23 AM
Ooh, I don't know that Dutch is gonna give spectacular results... :hmm:

Bobby pin is "een schuivertje", literally, a "little slider".

Curling iron is "een krultang", literally, "curling tong".
Straightening iron... errr, I don't think we have a word for that in Dutch... or I'm blanking on that!

Blow dryer is "een haardroger", literally, "a hair dryer".

Hair elastic is "een haarelastiekje", literally, "a hair elastic".

Hair brush is "een haarborstel", literally, "a hair brush".

Hair spray is "haarlak", literally, "hair lacquer".

Claw clip is "een klem" or "een klemspeld", literally, "a vice" or "a vice grip" (no joke").

Shampoo = shampoo.
Conditioner = conditioner.
Gel = gel.
Leave-in = leave-in.
Curling cream is "krul crème", literally, "curling cream".

Curls = "krullen"
Straight hair = "glad haar"
Wavy hair = "golvend haar"

I'll see if I can think of other words.

Sid0rela
December 4th, 2018, 07:59 AM
I don't know if there are Albanian people in here, but I'm going for it:

hairdryer- "tharese" meaning 'dryer'
straightening iron - "piaster", idk the literal meaning....
curling iron - "mashe", something like 'fire iron'
pins/clips - "kapese", literally 'holder'
wavy - "onde" literally 'kinks'
straight - "te shtrira" literally 'extended'
elastics - "lidhese" like 'link'

Ligeia Noire
December 4th, 2018, 08:21 AM
Copying some and adding others.

Direct translation from English to European Portuguese:

Bobby pin is "alfinete", just like safety pin.... the proper word is "passador" as in passing because the hair passes through the pin.

Upin is "alfinete em U" literally the same. Proper word is "gancho" which means hook.

Curling iron is "ferro de encaracolar" literally iron to make curls.

Straightening iron is "ferro de alisar" iron to straight/smooth

Hair dryer is "secador de cabelo", literally the same.

Hair elastic is "elástico de cabelo", literally, "a hair elastic".

Hair brush is "escova de cabelo", literally, "a hair brush".

Comb "pente" comes from the word "pentear" to comb.

Hair comb "pente de cabelo" literally the same. Proper word "travessa" or "travessão" like an indent.

Hair fork "garfo de cabelo' literally the same.

Claw clip is "alfinete de garra" meaning claw as in animal claws.
Proper name is "mola" which means pin with spring. It is the same word we use for clothes pins. It is a spring!

Hair stick is "pau de cabelo" literally wood stick. Kind of like a twig. Piece of wood.

Flexi- non existent.

Headband is "fita de cabeça" literally head tape. Proper word "Arco" as in arch. Wich is a regional term. The more common is "bandolete" from the French. We import many words from them.

Shampoo = champô

Conditioner = condicionador

Gel = gel.

Curls = "caracóis" same.

Straight hair = "cabelo liso" same.

Wavy hair = "cabelo ondulado" same.

Thin hair "cabelo fino" same.

Thick "grosso" same.

short "curto" same.

long "comprido" same.

brown "castanho" same.

Blond "Loiro" same.

Red "vermelho" proper is "ruivo"!

Black "Preto". Same.

Milady_DeWinter
December 4th, 2018, 08:21 AM
Ok, here i go! In Spain those are called:


hairdryer - Secador de pelo, literally "hairdyer"
straightening iron - Plancha para el pelo, literally "straightening iron"
curling iron - Rizador de pelo, literally "hair curler"
pins/clips - Horquillas/clips, literally "little pitchfork" and "clips"
wavy - Ondulado, literally "wavy"
straight - Liso, literally "straight"
elastics - Gomas de pelo, literally "rubbers for the hair"
claw clip - Pinza para el pelo (pelo is hair BTW lol), literally "hairgrip"
Hairstick - Palo para el pelo, literally "stick for the hair"
Hair slider - Pasador de pelo, literally "Hair slider"


More added:


Shampoo = champú
Conditioner = acondicionador
Gel = gel.
Thin hair "pelo fino" same.
Thick "pelo grueso" same.
short "corto" same.
long "largo" same.
brown "castaño" same.
Blond "rubio" same.
Red "pelirrojo"
Black "Negro". Same.

ocelot210
December 4th, 2018, 08:54 AM
So cool. I'm English so I don't have any to add.

Ylva
December 4th, 2018, 09:08 AM
A bobby pin is "hårnål" in Swedish and it's actually the words "hair" and "needle" together. So directly translated it's "hairneedle".

I am confused, because when I google 'hair needle' in Finnish (hiusneula), which I know to be a thing, I get results of both bobby pins and hairsticks. I personally thought it meant stick, but now I'm not sure anymore.

Milady_DeWinter
December 4th, 2018, 09:29 AM
I am confused, because when I google 'hair needle' in Finnish (hiusneula), which I know to be a thing, I get results of both bobby pins and hairsticks. I personally thought it meant stick, but now I'm not sure anymore.

That's strange, what thing did you know it to be? I'm quite curious about finnish, I just know the work "perkele" (devil) from the bears situation (https://www.boredpanda.com/wild-bears-yard-finn-vs-canadian/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=organic) :lol:

Ylva
December 4th, 2018, 09:46 AM
That's strange, what thing did you know it to be? I'm quite curious about finnish, I just know the work "perkele" (devil) from the bears situation (https://www.boredpanda.com/wild-bears-yard-finn-vs-canadian/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=organic) :lol:

I took it for a stick, but now that I asked for my mom's opinion, she said that U-pins are also 'hair needles'. Maybe we're just really poor in terms of hair vocabulary - everything's a hair needle. :D Ah yes, the bear clip! :lol: That was a great video, made it to the news here as well.

Serimel
December 4th, 2018, 09:59 AM
Fun thread! Here are some Finnish hair related words I came up with. I didn't list those kind that are basically the same in other languages.

Bobby pin - hengetön - lifeless / spiritless
Scrunchie - hiusdonitsi - hair donut
Claw Clip - hainhammas - shark tooth
Hair Clip - hiussolki - hair buckle
Hair Clip with a sharp head - nokkasolki - beak buckle
Hair tie - hiuslenkki - hair loop
Hairdresser - kampaaja - comber
Split end - kaksihaarainen - two branched
bob - polkkatukka - polka hair
bangs - otsatukka - forehead hair
conditioner - hoitoaine - treatment matter

guska
December 4th, 2018, 10:11 AM
I'll have to look up Finnish, Swedish or Chinese hair words. I'll post later if I find any interesting direct translations :)

One Swedish word I've always thought sounds very funny is polisonger (sideburns). In Finnish it's almost the same, pulisongit. It apparently comes from the French word polisson (meaning "thief boy"). Sideburns in French is rouflaquettes, btw.

blackgothicdoll
December 4th, 2018, 10:13 AM
Ok, here i go! In Spain those are called:


hairdryer - Secador de pelo, literally "hairdyer"
straightening iron - Plancha para el pelo, literally "straightening iron"
curling iron - Rizador de pelo, literally "hair curler"
pins/clips - Horquillas/clips, literally "little pitchfork" and "clips"
wavy - Ondulado, literally "wavy"
straight - Liso, literally "straight"
elastics - Gomas de pelo, literally "rubbers for the hair"
claw clip - Pinza para el pelo (pelo is hair BTW lol), literally "hairgrip"
Hairstick - Palo para el pelo, literally "stick for the hair"
Hair slider - Pasador de pelo, literally "Hair slider"



English is my native language, so the way I literally translate those words are "Dryer of Hair", "Iron for the hair", "Curler of hair", "Grip for the hair", etc. Just like you translated rubbers for the hair, but I'd end up translating it as Rubbers of Hair.

Just like I translate "fin de semana" as 'end of the week', even though it literally means weekend. Might just mean my Spanish is REALLY bad (which is very true)! Language is such an interesting concept. :D

blackgothicdoll
December 4th, 2018, 10:16 AM
Fun thread! Here are some Finnish hair related words I came up with. I didn't list those kind that are basically the same in other languages.

Bobby pin - hengetön - lifeless / spiritless
Scrunchie - hiusdonitsi - hair donut
Claw Clip - hainhammas - shark tooth
Hair Clip - hiussolki - hair buckle
Hair Clip with a sharp head - nokkasolki - beak buckle
Hair tie - hiuslenkki - hair loop
Hairdresser - kampaaja - comber
Split end - kaksihaarainen - two branched
bob - polkkatukka - polka hair
bangs - otsatukka - forehead hair
conditioner - hoitoaine - treatment matter


These made me giggle!

MusicalSpoons
December 4th, 2018, 10:45 AM
I am confused, because when I google 'hair needle' in Finnish (hiusneula), which I know to be a thing, I get results of both bobby pins and hairsticks. I personally thought it meant stick, but now I'm not sure anymore.

In English you'll get a wide range of results for 'hair pin' or 'hair stick' or whatever. Darn the internet for using non-specific vocabulary! (Or more likely, using loads of key words to increase their chances of showing up in search engines.)

TatsuOni
December 4th, 2018, 10:51 AM
I am confused, because when I google 'hair needle' in Finnish (hiusneula), which I know to be a thing, I get results of both bobby pins and hairsticks. I personally thought it meant stick, but now I'm not sure anymore.

Could be that it's the same word.


Thank's everyone for sharing! It's very interesting!

Rebecky
December 4th, 2018, 10:53 AM
"I am going to make a bun with little crabs" :thumbsup:
Bobby Pins are NEVER invisible for me... I detest them. Some women make them look like :magic:

MusicalSpoons
December 4th, 2018, 11:10 AM
I'll have to look up Finnish, Swedish or Chinese hair words. I'll post later if I find any interesting direct translations :)

Oh my, Pleco dictionary has a wealth of direct translation goodies (I really hope a hairdryer really is known as an electric wind tube!). I have no idea which are commonly used though; I'll be interested to see what you come up with :D

lapushka
December 4th, 2018, 11:10 AM
This is such an interesting thread, I *love* it to bits! :D :inlove:

Khristopher
December 4th, 2018, 11:28 AM
Super fun thread!!

Ok, here i go! In Spain those are called:


hairdryer - Secador de pelo, literally "hairdyer"
straightening iron - Plancha para el pelo, literally "straightening iron"
curling iron - Rizador de pelo, literally "hair curler"
pins/clips - Horquillas/clips, literally "little pitchfork" and "clips"
wavy - Ondulado, literally "wavy"
straight - Liso, literally "straight"
elastics - Gomas de pelo, literally "rubbers for the hair"
claw clip - Pinza para el pelo (pelo is hair BTW lol), literally "hairgrip"
Hairstick - Palo para el pelo, literally "stick for the hair"
Hair slider - Pasador de pelo, literally "Hair slider"


More added:


Shampoo = champú
Conditioner = acondicionador
Gel = gel.
Thin hair "pelo fino" same.
Thick "pelo grueso" same.
short "corto" same.
long "largo" same.
brown "castaño" same.
Blond "rubio" same.
Red "pelirrojo"
Black "Negro". Same.


Spanish speaker here too, adding that here (in Argentina):
hair pins= invisibles - "invisible"
hair clips= hebillas - "buckle" or "barrette"
ponytail holders= colitas - "little tails" (the ponytail style has the same name as well)
split ends= puntas florecidas -"flourished ends" though it also could be "blossom ends" (blooming ends?)
hair bun= rodete - google translate gives me "runner" but I think "roll" is more accurate
hair stick= palito - "small stick/twig" (heh I actually made a hairstick from my lemon tree twig)
conditioner used to be crema de enjuague (rinsing cream) but now it's just acondicionador, which is a direct translation
the rest is same as you, can't think of anything else right now (plus I should be studying... shh don't tell anyone I was here lol):run:

guska
December 4th, 2018, 11:34 AM
Oh my, Pleco dictionary has a wealth of direct translation goodies (I really hope a hairdryer really is known as an electric wind tube!). I have no idea which are commonly used though; I'll be interested to see what you come up with :D

That is correct! 电吹风 - diàn chuīfēng - does mean "electric wind tube"! Or rather electric wind machine/engine. There's also the synonym 吹风机 - chuīfēng jī - which means "blow wind machine" :lol:
These translations are very, very clumsy. Every word (character) is translated literally by itself and I always cringe when I read them. That's not what Chinese sounds like to native Chinese speakers! I'd, e.g., rather translate 吹风机 - chuīfēng jī as "wind-blowing machine", because that gives foreigners a better insight in what the whole word means. "Wind-blowing machine" is what we native Chinese speakers actually hear, not "blow wind machine".

Milady_DeWinter
December 4th, 2018, 12:32 PM
Ah, yes. 2 more as for styles in Spain's Spanish:


Bun - moño
Braid/plait - trenza



It's funny how our words can be different in different countries despite talking the same language, Khristopher :)

Pouncequick
December 4th, 2018, 01:43 PM
Fun thread! Here are some Finnish hair related words I came up with. I didn't list those kind that are basically the same in other languages.

Bobby pin - hengetön - lifeless / spiritless
Scrunchie - hiusdonitsi - hair donut
Claw Clip - hainhammas - shark tooth
Hair Clip - hiussolki - hair buckle
Hair Clip with a sharp head - nokkasolki - beak buckle
Hair tie - hiuslenkki - hair loop
Hairdresser - kampaaja - comber
Split end - kaksihaarainen - two branched
bob - polkkatukka - polka hair
bangs - otsatukka - forehead hair
conditioner - hoitoaine - treatment matter

I love these! Finnish is sort of my vague second language that I'm very bad at and I've never even seen hair words come up.

Joules
December 4th, 2018, 01:45 PM
Oh, how could I forget the bun?

We have a ton of weird words for "bun" in Russian, but the most widely accepted one is пучок (pu'chok), directly translated as "bunch", "bundle" or "clump". Not nearly as cute and appealing as its English equivalent! Now no one can stop me from saying I'm making a clump with little crabs, mwahahahahahaha

Also in Russian "braid" and "scythe" are called the same - коса (ko'sa). I wonder why :hmm:

Ligeia Noire
December 4th, 2018, 01:48 PM
Adding hairdos in European Portuguese

Bun- in my region is tôco. Which kind of and sort of is related to wood log.

Braid is trança, a noun derivative from the verb to cross.

Ponytail is rabo de cavalo "horse's tail"

This is s lot of fun. Great thread indeed. I am a Portuguese letters major, so it is always a pleasure to share and to find out words.

MusicalSpoons
December 4th, 2018, 04:26 PM
That is correct! 电吹风 - diàn chuīfēng - does mean "electric wind tube"! Or rather electric wind machine/engine. There's also the synonym 吹风机 - chuīfēng jī - which means "blow wind machine" :lol:
These translations are very, very clumsy. Every word (character) is translated literally by itself and I always cringe when I read them. That's not what Chinese sounds like to native Chinese speakers! I'd, e.g., rather translate 吹风机 - chuīfēng jī as "wind-blowing machine", because that gives foreigners a better insight in what the whole word means. "Wind-blowing machine" is what we native Chinese speakers actually hear, not "blow wind machine".

I think that's part of the point of the thread, to be honest :flower: otherwise it would simply be 'translate your native hair words', not 'directly translate'. At least, that's how I understood the original post, anyway.

[As an aside, one of the things I love about Chinese is its directness and simplicity, which I find quite beautiful. There have genuinely been times when I've been reading a Bible study article in English and not been quite sure exactly which meaning an ambiguous English phrase intended, and looked it up in the Chinese article for clarity. I've never learned hair vocabulary though :lol: and I'm not around any native Chinese speakers any more due to various circumstances changing.]

lapushka
December 4th, 2018, 04:50 PM
Oh yeah, names (in Dutch) for:

bun, "knot" meaning "bun" not knot as in a tangle/knot. You pronounce the K.
braid, "vlecht" meaning "braid".

TreesOfEternity
December 4th, 2018, 04:59 PM
Super fun thread!!


Spanish speaker here too, adding that here (in Argentina):
hair pins= invisibles - "invisible"
hair clips= hebillas - "buckle" or "barrette"
ponytail holders= colitas - "little tails" (the ponytail style has the same name as well)
split ends= puntas florecidas -"flourished ends" though it also could be "blossom ends" (blooming ends?)
hair bun= rodete - google translate gives me "runner" but I think "roll" is more accurate
hair stick= palito - "small stick/twig" (heh I actually made a hairstick from my lemon tree twig)
conditioner used to be crema de enjuague (rinsing cream) but now it's just acondicionador, which is a direct translation
the rest is same as you, can't think of anything else right now (plus I should be studying... shh don't tell anyone I was here lol):run:

I love the “puntas florecidas” part haha :) I miss a term for “fairytale ends” in Spanish, any idea guys?? Also, a term for “classic length” because no one would know what you are talking about if you used the literal translation

enting
December 4th, 2018, 06:33 PM
I'm a native English speaker, but my second (and local) language is Hebrew. I don't know all the terms for things yet, but here's some I do know.

conditioner is either a straight transliteration or "softener"
hair down and loose is "spread out/dispersed"
hair that is put back or up is "gathered"
split or thin or dry ends that hairdressers like to cut off are "burned hair"

As far as I can tell, the same word is used for ponytails and ponytail elastics, but I don't know a translation for it. It's kuku. Though the elastics may also be called "rubbers"

Most terms for creams, gels, and pins are just a straight translation, they're not very exciting in "straight translation".

Obsidian
December 4th, 2018, 07:48 PM
I absolutely love hair squeeze and little crabs :hollie:

leayellena
December 5th, 2018, 01:33 AM
romanian:
gogoaşã de pãr=hair donut. (literally)
coc=loop of hair or hair loop
flat iron=hair plate
bun=chiflă (in english: roll)
curling iron=ondulator=waver (wave maker). sorry about the mistake: it's not curler.

PS: I am slowly forgetting my native language because I speak and write german and english 99% of the time. so some of the words mentioned are taken from some youtube tutorials

TatsuOni
December 5th, 2018, 07:29 AM
I think that's part of the point of the thread, to be honest :flower: otherwise it would simply be 'translate your native hair words', not 'directly translate'. At least, that's how I understood the original post, anyway.

That's indeed the point :)



Some more Swedish words:

Bun - Knut - Knot

Boar bristle brush - Svinborste - Swine brush (Boar is vildsvin - wild swine)

Ponytail - Hästsvans - Horsetail

French twist - Svinrygg - Swine back

French braid - Inbakad fläta - Baked (or in baked) braid

Dutch braid - Utbakad fläta - Baked (or out baked) braid

MidnightMoon
December 5th, 2018, 07:38 AM
I love the “puntas florecidas” part haha :) I miss a term for “fairytale ends” in Spanish, any idea guys?? Also, a term for “classic length” because no one would know what you are talking about if you used the literal translation

I can't think of a term either. It would just be hair that needs to be cut off :lol:
As for classic, the closest would be pelo por debajo del trasero/culo. But to be fair, I don't think anyone who doesn't frequent hair sites would know what classic length means either and would just refer to body markers.

guska
December 5th, 2018, 07:41 AM
I think that's part of the point of the thread, to be honest :flower: otherwise it would simply be 'translate your native hair words', not 'directly translate'. At least, that's how I understood the original post, anyway.

[As an aside, one of the things I love about Chinese is its directness and simplicity, which I find quite beautiful. There have genuinely been times when I've been reading a Bible study article in English and not been quite sure exactly which meaning an ambiguous English phrase intended, and looked it up in the Chinese article for clarity. I've never learned hair vocabulary though :lol: and I'm not around any native Chinese speakers any more due to various circumstances changing.]

I know that :) "There are basically two ways of directly translating Chinese words", that's what I was trying to say. Wind-blowing machine and blow wind machine.Looking back at my sentence that you put in bold, I now understand how unclear my explanation was. I'm sorry :(

Chinese is indeed a very beautiful language. And complex as heck :P

Joules
December 5th, 2018, 10:40 AM
I remembered more today!

Thin hair (i thickness) is sometimes described as "liquid" in Russian (жидкий, 'zhidkiy).

Layered haircut is called "cascade" (каскад, kas'kad) or "stairs" (лесенка, 'lesenka).

Sadly, there are no romantic descriptions of fairytale ends in Russian :( we just call it "thin ends".

We also have a separate word for color. Русый (rusy) means dark blonde/light brown hair. Light brown would be "dark rusy", and dirty blonde would be "light rusy'', it can be cool-toned and warm-toned). Just copy and paste "русый" into google images to get an idea. You need to be platinum blonde to be called blonde here, otherwise you'd be rusy. My natural hair color is medium rusy (https://forums.longhaircommunity.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=30892&d=1521986393)

There's also a lot of confusion with length descriptions. The direct translation of "hip" (бедро, be'dro) usually means hip joints, so when someone says they have hip length hair they most likely mean tailbone length, not lower back.

AmaryllisRed
December 5th, 2018, 12:37 PM
I love this thread!
I'm such a word nerd. So many great translations, I can't choose a favorite.

paulownia
December 5th, 2018, 12:37 PM
Also in Russian "braid" and "scythe" are called the same - коса (ko'sa). I wonder why :hmm:
We used the same word for a braid in polish, but it’s an ancient term ( kosa) now we call it “ warkocz”.
A bun - kok.
A curl - lok. :D

TatsuOni my favorite in Swedish is “ hårbotten ” :D - scalp - literally “bottom of the hair”

enting
December 5th, 2018, 01:29 PM
~snip~
Also in Russian "braid" and "scythe" are called the same - коса (ko'sa). I wonder why :hmm:

I can imagine someone walking and their long braid swinging back and forth in a similar movement as one would use with a scythe. I don't know if that's why, but I could see it.

MusicalSpoons
December 5th, 2018, 03:49 PM
I know that :) "There are basically two ways of directly translating Chinese words", that's what I was trying to say. Wind-blowing machine and blow wind machine.Looking back at my sentence that you put in bold, I now understand how unclear my explanation was. I'm sorry :(

Chinese is indeed a very beautiful language. And complex as heck :P

Ah, 我明白 :) (my apologies, I didn't mean to imply anything negative by using the word 'simple' - as a written language and intertwined with culture it is certainly a very rich language. I think I meant that the grammar is a lot more straightforward, and that oftentimes it's a lot more direct and efficient - what English might take 20 words to explain, one could express in perhaps 6~8 characters, for example. At least, to the level we were learning, anyway :flower: I took a photo of the inside of a book cover, with the English being a line and a half long, and the Chinese literally a handful of characters to say the exact same thing. I hope that makes some sense? Heh, one of our teachers used to say to us 'Chinese is easy!' and we all told him that no, it really isn't :lol: )

Any native German speakers here? If not, I might have a look at LHN to add to this thread.

Natalia_A00
December 5th, 2018, 04:25 PM
From Spanish: Coletero (elastics) - ponytailer (?) something like that haha

Pelo pajizo - "Strawed" hair
Puntas abiertas - Open ends (split ends)
Trenza de raíz - Root braid (French braid)
Corona de trenzas - Crown of braids (Milkmaid braid)
Trenza de espiga - Spike braid - like a wheat spike (I really don't know how to translate "espiga." But trenza de espiga = fishtail braid)
Trenza de carrusel - Carrousel braid (French braided ponytail)
I think Spanish is quite similar to English so the terms are not very different

TreesOfEternity
December 5th, 2018, 07:06 PM
Oh, also in Spanish:

scalp = “cuero cabelludo” = hair leather
(Hair) ends = “puntas” = tips

MoonChildCurls
December 6th, 2018, 02:47 AM
I love this thread!
I'm such a word nerd. So many great translations, I can't choose a favorite.

Word nerd here too! I love learning different languages and this is such a fun thread.

Stray_mind
December 6th, 2018, 05:05 AM
Our words are pretty literal and i can't add anything interesting, but i like this thread and am going to be following it. :)

Xlena
December 6th, 2018, 05:45 AM
I love the “puntas florecidas” part haha :) I miss a term for “fairytale ends” in Spanish, any idea guys?? Also, a term for “classic length” because no one would know what you are talking about if you used the literal translation

Hmm... The only term that comes to my mind is "puntas finas" (fine ends) but that's not quite the same. I don't think we have a term for fairytale ends so we could make up one, what about "puntas translúcidas", "puntas suaves", "puntas pobres", "puntas de cuento", "puntas élficas", "puntas de rata", Idk


Pelo pajizo - "Strawed" hair

Here in the south that's called "pelo paja" (straw hair)

Elizabeth E
December 6th, 2018, 10:01 AM
Ooh, I like this thread!
Some funny direct translations from Afrikaans: hair clip = 'haarknippie' = little hair cut, could also mean little hear pinch
hair elastic = 'haarrek' = hair stretch
split ends = 'gesplete punte' = split points
conditioner = 'haaropknapper' = hair refresher
ponytail = 'bokstert' = goat tail
parting = 'paadjie' = little path/trail
tangled = 'gekoek' = this roughly translates to 'caked'
thick hair = 'dik hare' = wide/fat hair
That's all I can think of right now, ha ha.

amiraaah
December 6th, 2018, 10:27 AM
I like this thread so much but i don’t know if i can translate using arabic letters only because no one will understand anything.so i will use arabic letters and english letters to know how it’s pronounced.
Bobby pin=بنسه bensa
Hair elastic=توكه toka
Scalp=فروه farwa
Braid=ضفيره dfera
Conditioner= بلسم balsam
Ends=اطراف atraf
Haha this is really so funny and i’m sure nobody will understand anything :laugh:.

Joules
December 6th, 2018, 10:39 AM
Goat tail is hilarious :bluebiggr

In Russian scalp is just "skin of the head" (or even "the hairy part of the head", believe it or not). The word "scalp" itself in Russian means a trophy, a cut off piece of skin taken from an enemy.

Add a blowdryer is "fen" (like fan, and the actual fan - a machine that produces air flow to cool you off in the summer - is called "ventilator". I sometimes feel like Russians just took random English words and assigned random meanings to them :rollin:).

lapushka
December 6th, 2018, 10:42 AM
Ooh, I like this thread!
Some funny direct translations from Afrikaans: hair clip = 'haarknippie' = little hair cut, could also mean little hear pinch
hair elastic = 'haarrek' = hair stretch
split ends = 'gesplete punte' = split points
conditioner = 'haaropknapper' = hair refresher
ponytail = 'bokstert' = goat tail
parting = 'paadjie' = little path/trail
tangled = 'gekoek' = this roughly translates to 'caked'
thick hair = 'dik hare' = wide/fat hair
That's all I can think of right now, ha ha.

It always surprises me how many words I can recognize just from knowing Dutch. :)

amiraaah
December 6th, 2018, 10:42 AM
I like this thread so much but i don’t know if i can translate using arabic letters only because no one will understand anything.so i will use arabic letters and english letters to know how it’s pronounced.
Bobby pin=بنسه bensa
Hair elastic=توكه toka
Scalp=فروه farwa
Braid=ضفيره dfera
Conditioner= بلسم balsam
Ends=اطراف atraf
Haha this is really so funny and i’m sure nobody will understand anything :laugh:.

Edit:actually all the words don’t have any meaning.

TatsuOni
December 6th, 2018, 10:49 AM
One little thought. Hearing some words your whole life, you never really think about them, but when translating them now, they sound a bit funny :p

It's also very interesting to see the similarities and differences between different (or even within the same) languages!


Some more Swedish words:

Hair clip, hair slide and barrette - Hårspänne - Hair buckle

Fishtail braid - Fiskbensfläta - Fishbones braid

enting
December 6th, 2018, 10:54 AM
Goat tail is hilarious :bluebiggr

In Russian scalp is just "skin of the head" (or even "the hairy part of the head", believe it or not). The word "scalp" itself in Russian means a trophy, a cut off piece of skin taken from an enemy.

Add a blowdryer is "fen" (like fan, and the actual fan - a machine that produces air flow to cool you off in the summer - is called "ventilator". I sometimes feel like Russians just took random English words and assigned random meanings to them :rollin:).

The Hebrew word for blowdrying hair is "fen"! I am nearly positive that that is directly borrowed from the Russian, modern Hebrew has a lot of Russian loanwords. So it's a double loanword!

Natalia_A00
December 6th, 2018, 11:40 AM
Scalp - cuero cabelludo (hair leather) lmao

guska
December 6th, 2018, 11:47 AM
Swedish:
Flat iron - Plattång = Flat pliers
Curling iron - Locktång = Curl pliers


The words in brackets are literal translations of the individual characters. The translations after the equals sign are basically what the words in brackets mean when they aren't translated individually. Here we go!

Chinese:
Bun - 丸子头 = Meatball head
Fringe - 刘海 (Liu ocean) = Liu’s ocean
Hairstyle - 发型 (hair shape) = Shape of hair
Hair loss - 脱发 = To take off/shed hair
Scalp - 头皮 (head skin) = Skin of the head
Dandruff - 头皮屑 (head skin chip) = Scalp chip
Conditioner - 护发素 (protect hair essence) = Hair-protecting essence
Shampoo - 洗发水 (wash hair water) = Water that one uses to wash hair
Bunches - 双马尾 (double horse tail) = Double ponytail
English braid - 麻花辫 = Mahua braid
French braid- 蜈蚣辫 = Centipede braid
Dreadlock - 脏辫 = Dirty braid

Phew! Took some time googling and baiduing :lol:

MusicalSpoons
December 6th, 2018, 11:49 AM
One little thought. Hearing some words your whole life, you never really think about them, but when translating them now, they sound a bit funny :p

It's also very interesting to see the similarities and differences between different (or even within the same) languages!


Some more Swedish words:

Hair clip, hair slide and barrette - Hårspänne - Hair buckle

Fishtail braid - Fiskbensfläta - Fishbones braid

I learned it as 'herringbone plait (braid)' as a child! Herring being a specific type of fish. We also use herringbone to describe a weave of cloth and a type of pattern, e.g. used in wooden block flooring.

As for the part of your quote I underlined, there are many English words, usually compound words, which have specific meanings and are only used in a certain context which isn't implied by the word itself. As a very weak on-topic example, blowdryer - as far as I know it's only ever used in the context of hair, yet the word itself implies no such meaning. (The primary meaning of 'blow' to a native ear is a person blowing air from their mouth, such as blowing out a candle or blowing on food to cool it down. So actually 'I blowdry my hair', taken at surface value, is a bit odd!)
Or pigtails - ponytail is self-explanatory, but pigtails? Only on shorter, curly hair, otherwise they look nothing like pigs' tails! :confused: I grew up calling them 'bunches', incidentally.

Also hairbands - I grew up calling hairties/hair elastics hairbands, and the whole-head type a headband (also widely known as an Alice band, I assume from the Disney version of Alice in Wonderland (https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Alice+(Alice%27s+Adventures+in+Wonderland )&safe=strict&client=tablet-android-samsung&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAONgecToyy3w8sc9YSmXSWtOXmO04-IKzsgvd80rySypFFLhYoOypLh4pDj0c_UN0sst4jUYpLi44Dwl rqZ9Kw6xsXAwCjDwAABX4rDOUgAAAA&prmd=isvn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjyiPz64IvfAhXE3KQKHbEoBocQ_AUoAXoECA8QA Q&biw=800&bih=1280#imgrc=mKw8wON7DVhLTM:), who wore a headband).

Edit: oh yay guska, how interesting! Mahua braid - how would you translate 麻花? Is it to do with flax/hemp? Makes me wonder if it may have come from the hair colour :hmm:

lapushka
December 6th, 2018, 12:06 PM
More words in Dutch!

Hair loss, thinning, is "haar verlies" (meaning: the same)
Bangs, is "frou frou", this is Flemish dialect and a bit of a nonsense word.
Hairstyle, is "haar stijl", (meaning: the same)
Scalp, is "hoofdhuid", (meaning: skin of the head)
Dandruff, is "pellekes", this is Flemish dialect for flakes.

guska
December 6th, 2018, 12:20 PM
I learned it as 'herringbone plait (braid)' as a child! Herring being a specific type of fish. We also use herringbone to describe a weave of cloth and a type of pattern, e.g. used in wooden block flooring.

As for the part of your quote I underlined, there are many English words, usually compound words, which have specific meanings and are only used in a certain context which isn't implied by the word itself. As a very weak on-topic example, blowdryer - as far as I know it's only ever used in the context of hair, yet the word itself implies no such meaning. (The primary meaning of 'blow' to a native ear is a person blowing air from their mouth, such as blowing out a candle or blowing on food to cool it down. So actually 'I blowdry my hair', taken at surface value, is a bit odd!)
Or pigtails - ponytail is self-explanatory, but pigtails? Only on shorter, curly hair, otherwise they look nothing like pigs' tails! :confused: I grew up calling them 'bunches', incidentally.

Also hairbands - I grew up calling hairties/hair elastics hairbands, and the whole-head type a headband (also widely known as an Alice band, I assume from the Disney version of Alice in Wonderland (https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Alice+(Alice%27s+Adventures+in+Wonderland )&safe=strict&client=tablet-android-samsung&stick=H4sIAAAAAAAAAONgecToyy3w8sc9YSmXSWtOXmO04-IKzsgvd80rySypFFLhYoOypLh4pDj0c_UN0sst4jUYpLi44Dwl rqZ9Kw6xsXAwCjDwAABX4rDOUgAAAA&prmd=isvn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjyiPz64IvfAhXE3KQKHbEoBocQ_AUoAXoECA8QA Q&biw=800&bih=1280#imgrc=mKw8wON7DVhLTM:), who wore a headband).

Edit: oh yay guska, how interesting! Mahua braid - how would you translate 麻花? Is it to do with flax/hemp? Makes me wonder if it may have come from the hair colour :hmm:

Hmm, I think it's called 麻花辫 because of the resemblance to the snack 麻花/mahua :)

MusicalSpoons
December 6th, 2018, 12:36 PM
Hmm, I think it's called 麻花辫 because of the resemblance to the snack 麻花/mahua :)

Aha, gotcha. Thanks for patiently putting up with my curiosity! :flower:

Lapushka, I've heard frou frou used to mean frilly/fancy/fussy, a loanword from French (for us).

This thread has certainly sparked my inner etymology geek; I'm loving seeing all the responses! :inlove: thank you for starting it, TatsuOni!

guska
December 6th, 2018, 03:10 PM
Aha, gotcha. Thanks for patiently putting up with my curiosity! :flower:

Lapushka, I've heard frou frou used to mean frilly/fancy/fussy, a loanword from French (for us).

This thread has certainly sparked my inner etymology geek; I'm loving seeing all the responses! :inlove: thank you for starting it, TatsuOni!

You're welcome :) I'm glad that I can contribute with something, there doesn't seem to be many other Chinese members here.

lapushka
December 6th, 2018, 04:02 PM
Lapushka, I've heard frou frou used to mean frilly/fancy/fussy, a loanword from French (for us).

Gosh yes, I forgot about that! :) Seems appropriate. LOL! Now I imagine everyone with bangs coming after me with a pick axe for associating bangs with that meaning. :lol:

enting
December 6th, 2018, 04:50 PM
If I recall correctly, in French frou frou is an onomatopoeia for the sound silk makes when swished against itself. I think that's a lovely association for bangs/fringe, a silky swishiness.

lapushka
December 6th, 2018, 05:18 PM
If I recall correctly, in French frou frou is an onomatopoeia for the sound silk makes when swished against itself. I think that's a lovely association for bangs/fringe, a silky swishiness.

Really? I never knew that! :D Awesome. :)

enting
December 6th, 2018, 05:31 PM
Here's what Merriam-Webster's dictionary has to say about the term in English:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/froufrou

MusicalSpoons
December 6th, 2018, 05:49 PM
Here's what Merriam-Webster's dictionary has to say about the term in English:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/froufrou

Interesting! Here's a French link (your browser may automatically offer to translate into your preferred language) http://www.cnrtl.fr/definition/frou-frou

lapushka
December 6th, 2018, 05:49 PM
Here's what Merriam-Webster's dictionary has to say about the term in English:
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/froufrou

Awesome; had no idea the term existed in English, and here's me trying to explain it. LOL! :lol:

enting
December 7th, 2018, 04:28 AM
Interesting! Here's a French link (your browser may automatically offer to translate into your preferred language) http://www.cnrtl.fr/definition/frou-frou

Thanks! (and yes, it did so I did :) )

Elizabeth E
December 7th, 2018, 09:17 AM
More words in Dutch!

Hair loss, thinning, is "haar verlies" (meaning: the same)
Bangs, is "frou frou", this is Flemish dialect and a bit of a nonsense word.
Hairstyle, is "haar stijl", (meaning: the same)
Scalp, is "hoofdhuid", (meaning: skin of the head)
Dandruff, is "pellekes", this is Flemish dialect for flakes.

It's interesting to see the differences between Dutch and Afrikaans. Hair thinning is also called 'haar verlies' in Afrikaans, but is written as one word. And 'haar stijl' becomes 'haarstyl'. Here, bangs is called 'kuif', scalp is 'kopvel' and dandruff becomes 'skilfers'.

lapushka
December 7th, 2018, 11:03 AM
It's interesting to see the differences between Dutch and Afrikaans. Hair thinning is also called 'haar verlies' in Afrikaans, but is written as one word. And 'haar stijl' becomes 'haarstyl'. Here, bangs is called 'kuif', scalp is 'kopvel' and dandruff becomes 'skilfers'.

Schilfers is the "nice" Dutch word for flakes here too, but "pellekes" is our dialect (Flemish). I am Belgian, not Dutch so there is still a tiny bit of a difference here. :)

I think we sometimes write haarverlies as one word too.

TatsuOni
December 7th, 2018, 01:13 PM
Aha, gotcha. Thanks for patiently putting up with my curiosity! :flower:

Lapushka, I've heard frou frou used to mean frilly/fancy/fussy, a loanword from French (for us).

This thread has certainly sparked my inner etymology geek; I'm loving seeing all the responses! :inlove: thank you for starting it, TatsuOni!

You're welcome! :) I'm happy that others like the idea as much as I do :popcorn:

Keep the words coming!

dyna
December 17th, 2018, 08:05 PM
I can imagine someone walking and their long braid swinging back and forth in a similar movement as one would use with a scythe. I don't know if that's why, but I could see it.
Some long braids look sort of like scythe blades (assuming that Russian scythes look much like American ones). Wide at the base, long and curved, tapering to a point. And like you said, swinging. Makes visual sense to me.

TatsuOni
June 9th, 2019, 07:17 AM
Deep conditioner - hårinpackning - "hair in packing"/ "hair pack"

hollygolightly
June 9th, 2019, 11:41 AM
In Chile:

· curling iron: ondulador (i don't think there's a direct translation to that in english, the only one I can think is wave maker)
· claw clip: tiburón (literally means shark)
· conditioner: bálsamo (literally something like balm) (I noticed in here that the arabic term is very similar to the chilean one!)
· split ends: puntas partidas (literally split ends)
· french braid: trenza maría (literally mary braid)
· dutch braid: trenza maría invertida o al revés (literally inverted mary braid)
· bun: tomate (literally tomato) or moño
· ponytail: cola de caballo (horse tail)
· bowl cut: corte de pelela (pelelas are tiny bowls in which kids that don't know how to go to the bathroom pee so literally it would be urinal cut)
· bleached: decolorado (literally discolored)
· dirty/greasy/oily hair: pelo cochino (I know in some spanish variations cochino is equal to chancho or cerdo, and cerdo is also a word to describe something really nasty or disgusting so literally it means pig hair. If my friend hasn't washed her hair in days she will say: weon tengo el pelo cerdo! which literally would be "dude I have pig hair!")
someone here asked for classic length hair, in chilean spanish I would say "pelo hasta debajo del poto" (literally means hair below the butt)
· heat damaged hair: pelo quemado (literally burned hair)

most of this words are the casual ways to say things, other terms don't have any literally translation to english (bangs: chasquilla, bobby pins and other kind of pins: pinches, hair ties: colets), also i've heard some spanish or latin girls, can't remember, referring to their curly hair as pelo con chinos or achinado which literally means chinese hair or hair with chinese

TatsuOni
June 9th, 2019, 01:18 PM
In Chile:

· curling iron: ondulador (i don't think there's a direct translation to that in english, the only one I can think is wave maker)
· claw clip: tiburón (literally means shark)
· conditioner: bálsamo (literally something like balm) (I noticed in here that the arabic term is very similar to the chilean one!)
· split ends: puntas partidas (literally split ends)
· french braid: trenza maría (literally mary braid)
· dutch braid: trenza maría invertida o al revés (literally inverted mary braid)
· bun: tomate (literally tomato) or moño
· ponytail: cola de caballo (horse tail)
· bowl cut: corte de pelela (pelelas are tiny bowls in which kids that don't know how to go to the bathroom pee so literally it would be urinal cut)
· bleached: decolorado (literally discolored)
· dirty/greasy/oily hair: pelo cochino (I know in some spanish variations cochino is equal to chancho or cerdo, and cerdo is also a word to describe something really nasty or disgusting so literally it means pig hair. If my friend hasn't washed her hair in days she will say: weon tengo el pelo cerdo! which literally would be "dude I have pig hair!")
someone here asked for classic length hair, in chilean spanish I would say "pelo hasta debajo del poto" (literally means hair below the butt)
· heat damaged hair: pelo quemado (literally burned hair)

most of this words are the casual ways to say things, other terms don't have any literally translation to english (bangs: chasquilla, bobby pins and other kind of pins: pinches, hair ties: colets), also i've heard some spanish or latin girls, can't remember, referring to their curly hair as pelo con chinos or achinado which literally means chinese hair or hair with chinese

Interesting! I think that the tomato is my favorite!

lapushka
June 9th, 2019, 04:53 PM
In Chile:
· ponytail: cola de caballo (horse tail)

That's exactly what it means in Dutch too.

We say, "paardenstaart", literally, "horse's tail" (horse = paard; tail = staart).

Entangled
June 9th, 2019, 09:29 PM
Oh my, Pleco dictionary has a wealth of direct translation goodies (I really hope a hairdryer really is known as an electric wind tube!). I have no idea which are commonly used though; I'll be interested to see what you come up with :D


That is correct! 电吹风 - diàn chuīfēng - does mean "electric wind tube"! Or rather electric wind machine/engine. There's also the synonym 吹风机 - chuīfēng jī - which means "blow wind machine" :lol:
These translations are very, very clumsy. Every word (character) is translated literally by itself and I always cringe when I read them. That's not what Chinese sounds like to native Chinese speakers! I'd, e.g., rather translate 吹风机 - chuīfēng jī as "wind-blowing machine", because that gives foreigners a better insight in what the whole word means. "Wind-blowing machine" is what we native Chinese speakers actually hear, not "blow wind machine".

I love how clear Chinese is! So many words directly say what they mean.


I think that's part of the point of the thread, to be honest :flower: otherwise it would simply be 'translate your native hair words', not 'directly translate'. At least, that's how I understood the original post, anyway.

[As an aside, one of the things I love about Chinese is its directness and simplicity, which I find quite beautiful. There have genuinely been times when I've been reading a Bible study article in English and not been quite sure exactly which meaning an ambiguous English phrase intended, and looked it up in the Chinese article for clarity. I've never learned hair vocabulary though :lol: and I'm not around any native Chinese speakers any more due to various circumstances changing.]
I’ve done the exact same thing!


I know that :) "There are basically two ways of directly translating Chinese words", that's what I was trying to say. Wind-blowing machine and blow wind machine.Looking back at my sentence that you put in bold, I now understand how unclear my explanation was. I'm sorry :(

Chinese is indeed a very beautiful language. And complex as heck :P


Ah, 我明白 :) (my apologies, I didn't mean to imply anything negative by using the word 'simple' - as a written language and intertwined with culture it is certainly a very rich language. I think I meant that the grammar is a lot more straightforward, and that oftentimes it's a lot more direct and efficient - what English might take 20 words to explain, one could express in perhaps 6~8 characters, for example. At least, to the level we were learning, anyway :flower: I took a photo of the inside of a book cover, with the English being a line and a half long, and the Chinese literally a handful of characters to say the exact same thing. I hope that makes some sense? Heh, one of our teachers used to say to us 'Chinese is easy!' and we all told him that no, it really isn't :lol: )



The words in brackets are literal translations of the individual characters. The translations after the equals sign are basically what the words in brackets mean when they aren't translated individually. Here we go!

Chinese:
Bun - 丸子头 = Meatball head
Fringe - 刘海 (Liu ocean) = Liu’s ocean
Hairstyle - 发型 (hair shape) = Shape of hair
Hair loss - 脱发 = To take off/shed hair
Scalp - 头皮 (head skin) = Skin of the head
Dandruff - 头皮屑 (head skin chip) = Scalp chip
Conditioner - 护发素 (protect hair essence) = Hair-protecting essence
Shampoo - 洗发水 (wash hair water) = Water that one uses to wash hair
Bunches - 双马尾 (double horse tail) = Double ponytail
English braid - 麻花辫 = Mahua braid
French braid- 蜈蚣辫 = Centipede braid
Dreadlock - 脏辫 = Dirty braid

Phew! Took some time googling and baiduing :lol:

I was curious about the bolded one so I pleco-ed it and this is what I got:

(Liú Hǎir)
Liu Hair, a fairy boy wearing his hair in bangs, who sits on a toad and hold a string of gold coins
2 bang; fringe (of women or children)



These are all really interesting! I lived in Taiwan recently and we used some different vocab for some of those things.

Conditioner 潤髮乳rùn fǎ rǔ—smooth/sleek hair lotion/cream
Shampoo 洗髮精 xǐ fǎ jīng—washing hair extract or energy (精by itself has a lot of meanings, it seems)
Hairstick 髮簪 fǎzān —hairstick This one was weird because I always assumed it was 髮, the character for hair, and that’s what my traditional keyboard assumes I’m trying to say, but many online dictionaries (admittedly Mainland based) say 發/发 簪 (Lit. To spread, issue out, or send hair)
hair clip 髮夾 fǎjiā or 夾子 jiāzi—hair pinch(er)/pincher (夾 is to pinch or hold between two things, as if with tongs, chopsticks, or a file folder)

That’s the extend of my Chinese hair vocabulary! I tried to figure out the word for bun but the only words I got when I asked were 綁起來 bangqilai tie up or 包起來 baoqilai wrap up. So my vocab is not very specific!

guska
June 10th, 2019, 03:29 AM
More Swedish words :) Or they might actually be only Finnish-Swedish, I don't know if Swedish people use them :P

French braid - Inbakad fläta = Embedded braid
Dutch braid - Utstående fläta = Protruding braid
Pigtails - Råttsvans = Rattail

TatsuOni
June 10th, 2019, 06:05 AM
More Swedish words :) Or they might actually be only Finnish-Swedish, I don't know if Swedish people use them :P

French braid - Inbakad fläta = Embedded braid
Dutch braid - Utstående fläta = Protruding braid
Pigtails - Råttsvans = Rattail

We use "inbakad fläta". It can also be translated into "in baked braid"
Dutch braid is "utbakad fläta" - "out baked braid"
Pigtails are sometimes called "råttsvans". It depends on where in Sweden you are. Around here, I've only hear that reference, while talking about pigtails on little girls. More common around here is to call them "tofsar". Tofsar is also another word that we use for all types of elastics (including scrunchies) and for tassels. Although braid tassels are mostly called "the end of the braid" or "the end".

:)

iforgotmylogin
June 23rd, 2019, 10:06 AM
I am from an English speaking country, but we have quite the wild dialect

Ranga/bluey = Redhead

nondescript
June 25th, 2019, 07:45 AM
The word ‘kondé’ (pronounced cone day but said faster) is the Sinhalese word for a bun. It means hair. Yep that’s it. Hair 😆

enting
August 14th, 2019, 06:31 AM
Loc'd hair in Hebrew is "naOOL", or literally, locked. It's the same word as for a locked door. For some reason it seems funny to me when put into that literal context, whereas in English it doesn't give me that funny feeling.

FrayedFire
August 14th, 2019, 01:32 PM
In Chile:
· bowl cut: corte de pelela (pelelas are tiny bowls in which kids that don't know how to go to the bathroom pee so literally it would be urinal cut)

Bowl cuts are already considered bad, but that's so much worse.

MusicalSpoons
August 14th, 2019, 03:43 PM
In Chile:
· bowl cut: corte de pelela (pelelas are tiny bowls in which kids that don't know how to go to the bathroom pee so literally it would be urinal cut)

Bowl cuts are already considered bad, but that's so much worse.

:rollin:

The English equivalent that comes to mind is 'potty' - what an amusing mental image!! :laugh:

tekla
August 15th, 2019, 12:10 PM
Bowl cuts are already considered bad, but that's so much worse.

It's the same in Finnish, bowl cut=pottakampaus=potty cut.

TatsuOni
August 15th, 2019, 12:10 PM
:rollin:

The English equivalent that comes to mind is 'potty' - what an amusing mental image!! :laugh:

In Swedish bowl cut is Pottfrilla and that means "Potty style/potty hairstyle". I've heard people say it's because it looks as if you put a potty on the head and cut around it :lol:

MusicalSpoons
August 15th, 2019, 02:05 PM
In Swedish bowl cut is Pottfrilla and that means "Potty style/potty hairstyle". I've heard people say it's because it looks as if you put a potty on the head and cut around it :lol:

Yup, that's the same reason it's called a bowl cut here, but specifically a potty makes it so much worse/funnier!

lapushka
August 15th, 2019, 02:11 PM
I don't think there is even a specific word for "bowl cut" in Dutch. I have to think... but... No. No.