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r3d
November 14th, 2018, 07:54 AM
Hello everyone!

I have browsed the forums a lot, and notice that the once famous baking soda wash/vinegar rinse, is no longer a thing.
I understand it is highly NOT recommended anymore, and have taken the time to read all your posts and article links.

With that being said, I was a baking soda/vinegar user for...get ready...almost ten years on and off. the odd times I have had to use commercial shampoo/conditioner was when I was away on vacation or something and just got too much crap in my hair kind of thing.
I personally loved my hair on it. I stopped doing it a few months ago when I read all the stuff on here...but my hair isn't as nice as it used to be.
baking soda/vinegar made my hair alive, fluffy, lots of volume...I will include a picture of freshly washed hair (baking soda/vinegar) to show you what I mean.
I am not looking to start a war about this topic haha, but I just am very confused how my hair was so beautiful with doing it, yet everyone seems to strongly not recommend it.
the ONLY thing I could think of is perhaps my routine was different then most, and thus why it was a success for me?

I actually only would wash my hair with the mixture once every 4 to 8 weeks (yes that is right, only once a month or every other month)
I would only use the baking soda and water mixture on my scalp mainly.
I use a tiny bit of coconut oil every now and then.
I did not wash my hair in between at all (not even with water, nothing, I just left it)
I rarely brush my hair, maybe once a month.
I rarely use heat on my hair, maybe once a month.
I DO dye my hair, but also rarely, about once every 3 to 4 months.
So, is it possible that all those factors are why maybe it worked for me, or is it just an illusion?
Based on what I have read, a lot of people would use the mixture every few days, or every week, and still use heat etc, which I think is just all way too much for hair to handle maybe?

I want to go back to my baking soda and vinegar ways, but because of what I have read, I am scared, even though I think my hair picture speaks for itself...I don't know, please help? I would really love to also hear if anyone uses baking soda for hair at all still, one way or another?

Here is my picture: https://www.dropbox.com/s/l9owho2ojryack8/20180608_154938.jpg?dl=0

nycelle
November 14th, 2018, 08:02 AM
While this is anecdotal, I still think it's interesting- Baking soda/ACV wash (http://www.thenaturalhavenbloom.com/2014/11/caucasian-hair-cleansing-shikakai.html?fbclid=IwAR3jFyC6kmJyLGAEe8qVl7Y-OELKx64eZuntBX7hDZ56Rf2W7h3ZCE6PT8c)

Scroll down for pics of the baking soda wash.

blackgothicdoll
November 14th, 2018, 08:26 AM
While this is anecdotal, I still think it's interesting- Baking soda/ACV wash (http://www.thenaturalhavenbloom.com/2014/11/caucasian-hair-cleansing-shikakai.html?fbclid=IwAR3jFyC6kmJyLGAEe8qVl7Y-OELKx64eZuntBX7hDZ56Rf2W7h3ZCE6PT8c)

Scroll down for pics of the baking soda wash.

That was definitely interesting to see! Would you happen to know if she posted pictures of the experiment she did with her hair too? I would expect the results to be similar, though I'd like to see.

Thank you for posting.

ETA: She did here http://www.thenaturalhavenbloom.com/2015/05/hair-science-how-well-do-mild-cleansers.html. Yes, the results were similar, though ACV worked even less for her hair than it did for her husband's.

nycelle
November 14th, 2018, 08:31 AM
That was definitely interesting to see! Would you happen to know if she posted pictures of the experiment she did with her hair too? I would expect the results to be similar, though I'd like to see.

Thank you for posting.

edited: nevermind, you found the link. i was late posting..lol..

r3d
November 14th, 2018, 08:34 AM
@nycelle very interesting link, thank you!
but now, i am just more confused as to what to do haha :p

lithostoic
November 14th, 2018, 08:36 AM
I used a baking soda wash to strip permanent black dye from my hair. I tried it as a normal shampoo on my virgin hair before and it was disastrous.

Joules
November 14th, 2018, 08:36 AM
I've read that washing with baking soda compares to bleaching your hair (baking soda is very alkaline, and bleach contains alkaline compounds to help lift the cuticle and penetrate the hair to, well, discolor it). You washed only roots every 4-8 weeks, that compares to an average bleach user touching up their regrowth. Can people grow long hair with bleaching? Yes, absolutely. Will their hair be healthy though?

Your hair on that photo looks dry. No offence. I have a similar wave pattern to yours, and my hair looks like that when it's been through things (sea water, pools, etc.) and needs a deep treatment asap. When it feels great I still have quite a bit of volume, but it just doesn't stand up like this, only ruffled damaged cuticles can make type 2 waves look that big at the roots. I can't take your example as a positive baking soda experience, sorry. Your hair is lovely, but I wouldn't approach you on the streets to ask you what you're using.

nycelle
November 14th, 2018, 08:38 AM
@nycelle very interesting link, thank you!
but now, i am just more confused as to what to do haha :p

Up to you. But like you said, the general consensus here is not to do it.
If you don't believe it's caused damage, and it's been working for you for years, then you do you regardless of what others say. I probably would throw in a real wash with sulfates or a gentler surfactant now and then though..lol..

nycelle
November 14th, 2018, 08:40 AM
I've read that washing with baking soda compares to bleaching your hair (baking soda is very alkaline, and bleach contains alkaline compounds to help lift the cuticle and penetrate the hair to, well, discolor it). You washed only roots every 4-8 weeks, that compares to an average bleach user touching up their regrowth. Can people grow long hair with bleaching? Yes, absolutely. Will their hair be healthy though?

Your hair on that photo looks dry. No offence. I have a similar wave pattern to yours, and my hair looks like that when it's been through things (sea water, pools, etc.) and needs a deep treatment asap. When it feels great I still have quite a bit of volume, but it just doesn't stand up like this, only ruffled damaged cuticles can make type 2 waves look that big at the roots. I can't take your example as a positive baking soda experience, sorry. Your hair is lovely, but I wouldn't approach you on the streets to ask you what you're using.

hmm.. I thought she had type 3 that was styled using heat tools? At least that's what the roots look like to me? But now I don't know.

r3d
November 14th, 2018, 08:42 AM
I used a baking soda wash to strip permanent black dye from my hair. I tried it as a normal shampoo on my virgin hair before and it was disastrous.

ouch, sorry to hear >.<


I've read that washing with baking soda compares to bleaching your hair (baking soda is very alkaline, and bleach contains alkaline compounds to help lift the cuticle and penetrate the hair to, well, discolor it). You washed only roots every 4-8 weeks, that compares to an average bleach user touching up their regrowth. Can people grow long hair with bleaching? Yes, absolutely. Will their hair be healthy though?

Your hair on that photo looks dry. No offence. I have a similar wave pattern to yours, and my hair looks like that when it's been through things (sea water, pools, etc.) and needs a deep treatment asap. When it feels great I still have quite a bit of volume, but it just doesn't stand up like this, only ruffled damaged cuticles can make type 2 waves look that big at the roots. I can't take your example as a positive baking soda experience, sorry. Your hair is lovely, but I wouldn't approach you on the streets to ask you what you're using.

no offense taken, I appreciate your honesty and this is exactly what I wanted out of this thread, no bashing or hate, just everyone being honest with one another and their own input =) thank you!
I do not have many good pictures of my hair straightened, I will try to find one to get your opinion. my hair didn't feel dry at all from what I remember, but I think you make a good point. i also find when I leave my hair natural (curly) it just looks drier then when I straighten it.
the ruffled/damaged cuticles is also a good point...I do like my hair super big and poufy haha, so maybe although it was damage, because it was so big it made me like it and disregard any negative. I dono.
all this is very interesting and I appreciate your input so much!

r3d
November 14th, 2018, 08:44 AM
hmm.. I thought she had type 3 that was styled using heat tools? At least that's what the roots look like to me? But now I don't know.

https://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=147804
most say type 3 as well lol

lapushka
November 14th, 2018, 09:01 AM
No, not for me either. Much too alkaline a substance for human hair. I am surprised you don't have a roughened cuticle after all that time (you feel that by rubbing up a strand end to root).

I believe in regular clarifying washes (drugstore, meant for hair), and do it that way.

Sulfate washes are much more "gentle" than BS ever will be and that's a fact. Shampoos are pH balanced; usually.

r3d
November 14th, 2018, 09:17 AM
I am surprised you don't have a roughened cuticle after all that time (you feel that by rubbing up a strand end to root).

can you please explain this more to me? I tried to look it up on Google, but don't really understand :(

and thank you for your wonderful input as always :heart:

The-Young-Maid
November 14th, 2018, 09:38 AM
Baking soda is to hair what soap is to skin. They may feel nice and cleansing but in the long run they will *likely* do damage. I believe someone linked an article in a previous thread that explained how the different pH levels raise and close the hair cuticle. Over time it weakens the whole strand. In a pinch I will use BS for clarifying if I don't have a shampoo but thats it. If you like it and don't plan on growing your hair very long(LHC long lol) then feel free to keep using it. Maybe a harsh/clarifying shampoo can give you similar volume tho?

olivetime
November 14th, 2018, 09:59 AM
I've also used baking soda on and off for over a decade and haven't had any issues. For clarity, I use it maybe once a month, either on its own or I addition to my shampoo. I don't have dry hair. My hairdresser friend got really upset when I told her I use it and insisted I will regret it one day.

r3d
November 14th, 2018, 10:00 AM
Baking soda is to hair what soap is to skin. They may feel nice and cleansing but in the long run they will *likely* do damage. I believe someone linked an article in a previous thread that explained how the different pH levels raise and close the hair cuticle. Over time it weakens the whole strand. In a pinch I will use BS for clarifying if I don't have a shampoo but thats it. If you like it and don't plan on growing your hair very long(LHC long lol) then feel free to keep using it. Maybe a harsh/clarifying shampoo can give you similar volume tho?

thank you for this. I feel like maybe because I use it so little (every 4 to 8 weeks) maybe in a way for me it is acting like a clarifier, rather then using it as shampoo (ie everyday or weekly cleaning) so to speak, if that makes sense.
as for length, I keep my hair around waist/hip length i think is the term :) so I would not consider that LHC long hehe, but that is the length i personally like.

blackgothicdoll
November 14th, 2018, 10:00 AM
No, not for me either. Much too alkaline a substance for human hair. I am surprised you don't have a roughened cuticle after all that time (you feel that by rubbing up a strand end to root).

I believe in regular clarifying washes (drugstore, meant for hair), and do it that way.

Sulfate washes are much more "gentle" than BS ever will be and that's a fact. Shampoos are pH balanced; usually.

Yep. PH of shampoo should be between 5-7. PH of baking soda is about 9.

And here are some pics of my last biology lab, just so I don't feel like I wasted money on this class.

https://i.imgur.com/j9Yki4E.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/zYq7Ok4.jpg


Scale for reference:

https://image.shutterstock.com/image-vector/colorful-ph-scale-260nw-630394505.jpg

The PH of the shampoo I used here was 5, a bit on the acidic side. It was V05 Kiwi Clarifying. The baking soda was a 9, as expected. Dish liquid was an 8. Vinegar was a 1, this is regular vinegar not ACV. And we're not talking about astringent or OJ here, so no need to describe those lol.

Sorry my pics are big.

*Wednesday*
November 14th, 2018, 10:01 AM
I rather like your hair. I like poofy sultry styles. Just watch the ends to keep them moisturized.
I agree with Lapushka that drugstore S/C are enough than using baking soda which may cause damage.

r3d
November 14th, 2018, 10:04 AM
The PH of the shampoo I used here was 5, a bit on the acidic side. It was V05 Kiwi Clarifying. The baking soda was a 9, as expected. Dish liquid was an 8. Vinegar was a 1, this is regular vinegar not ACV. And we're not talking about astringent or OJ here, so no need to describe those lol.

Very interesting, thanks for this.


I've also used baking soda on and off for over a decade and haven't had any issues. For clarity, I use it maybe once a month, either on its own or I addition to my shampoo. I don't have dry hair. My hairdresser friend got really upset when I told her I use it and insisted I will regret it one day.
#twinning lol
I'm wondering if it's because we don't use it so often, that we have not had crazy damage or breakage.
Most of the horror stories I have read, are people who have essentially substituted it for their shampoo.
but again, as with anything we also all react differently to different things.
glad to see someone with similar experience as me though, thank you for sharing.

r3d
November 14th, 2018, 10:06 AM
I rather like your hair. I like poofy sultry styles. Just watch the ends to keep them moisturized.
I agree with Lapushka that drugstore S/C are enough than using baking soda which may cause damage.

thanks haha :D and I agree with you I need to pay a bit more attention to the ends :) lately I have been and I have seen a HUGE difference in softness/texture :)

Nightshade
November 14th, 2018, 10:11 AM
Very interesting, thanks for this.


#twinning lol
I'm wondering if it's because we don't use it so often, that we have not had crazy damage or breakage.
Most of the horror stories I have read, are people who have essentially substituted it for their shampoo.
but again, as with anything we also all react differently to different things.
glad to see someone with similar experience as me though, thank you for sharing.

I think the operative phrase here is YET.

I wrote a big long article about healing hair from baking soda washes, and break down how and why it's so damaging (https://nightbloominggarden.com/2018/01/healing-hair-damaging-no-poo-baking-soda-washes/). I'm not trying to be critical of your statement, I believe you when you say you're not getting these adverse effects, but they remind me of things other people have said here, how their hair can withstand dying or occasional flat ironing, or whatever... until it can't.

Damage on hair is cumulative because the strands cannot heal. Using baking soda washes is similar (from a PH perspective) of putting your hair through the process of chemically dying your hair. Of course doing it less often (once a month or so) will mean that the damage takes longer to compound than someone doing the same thing twice a week, but with continued exposure to these things, even with spans of time in between (baking soda washes, dying, flat ironing, etc.) hair still gets to the point where its very structure is damaged.

AshtangiPNW
November 14th, 2018, 10:33 AM
Does anyone know where shampoo bars tend to fall on the pH scale? Comparable to baking soda? Or less? I've been using CV bars periodically and want to make sure that I'm not causing a similar type of damage :)

blackgothicdoll
November 14th, 2018, 10:37 AM
Does anyone know where shampoo bars tend to fall on the pH scale? Comparable to baking soda? Or less? I've been using CV bars periodically and want to make sure that I'm not causing a similar type of damage :)

I would do a test on this since I still have some PH strips, but I don't think all shampoo bars are made equally. I have a few LUSH bars, I've got some I've ordered from different vendors on Etsy, and I don't know if they would all be the same. I would check what the active ingredient in them is. I notice the bars I buy from Etsy use a "coconut derived cleanser" while LUSH bars use SLS. Even some use shikakai or black soap. As long as they don't contain "sodium bicarbonate", I don't think any of those active ingredients would fall into the more alkaline side of the PH scale.

AshtangiPNW
November 14th, 2018, 10:44 AM
I would do a test on this since I still have some PH strips, but I don't think all shampoo bars are made equally. I have a few LUSH bars, I've got some I've ordered from different vendors on Etsy, and I don't know if they would all be the same. I would check what the active ingredient in them is. I notice the bars I buy from Etsy use a "coconut derived cleanser" while LUSH bars use SLS. Even some use shikakai or black soap. As long as they don't contain "sodium bicarbonate", I don't think any of those active ingredients would fall into the more alkaline side of the PH scale.

The CV ones contain saponified oils so sodium hydroxide is used in that process, I think :)

MusicalSpoons
November 14th, 2018, 10:56 AM
The CV ones contain saponified oils so sodium hydroxide is used in that process, I think :)

As far as I know, the sodium hydroxide is all reacted in the process so there is none left in the shampoo bar. Used in the process, yes, but is not in the end result.

r3d
November 14th, 2018, 11:16 AM
I think the operative phrase here is YET.

I wrote a big long article about healing hair from baking soda washes, and break down how and why it's so damaging (https://nightbloominggarden.com/2018/01/healing-hair-damaging-no-poo-baking-soda-washes/). I'm not trying to be critical of your statement, I believe you when you say you're not getting these adverse effects, but they remind me of things other people have said here, how their hair can withstand dying or occasional flat ironing, or whatever... until it can't.

Damage on hair is cumulative because the strands cannot heal. Using baking soda washes is similar (from a PH perspective) of putting your hair through the process of chemically dying your hair. Of course doing it less often (once a month or so) will mean that the damage takes longer to compound than someone doing the same thing twice a week, but with continued exposure to these things, even with spans of time in between (baking soda washes, dying, flat ironing, etc.) hair still gets to the point where its very structure is damaged.

thanks for your link, amazing read!

lapushka
November 14th, 2018, 11:52 AM
can you please explain this more to me? I tried to look it up on Google, but don't really understand :(

and thank you for your wonderful input as always :heart:

Your cuticle is like shingles on a roof, it lays down from root to tip and is pretty solidly "fixed". If the shingles are "loose" due to being roughed up by say bleach or other chemical processes, you can feel the roughness by going with two fingers around a strand up end to root. If it feels rough and not smooth, something is up!

lapushka
November 14th, 2018, 11:53 AM
I think 22nd century natural woman sells soap bars and shampoo bars and just recently had a demo video out saying there is no lye in her soaps - at all. I'm not sure if she's talking end result (because there's never lye in the end result even though lye is used in the process).

Caraid♫
November 14th, 2018, 12:57 PM
Me! but never straight up baking soda- I very often add just a small pinch of baking soda to my shampoo and mix it in, I had no clue that baking soda was considered so damaging!
I've never had extremely long hair but it used to be TBL length and even then I never noticed any damage, my hair feels healthy and is smooth. But if people have researched it's damaging effect, I definitely believe them, I guess the micro damage I'm doing hasn't compounded itself to a noticeable extent yet?

I've been doing for so long and haven't had adverse effects, so even though it may be damaging I'm tempted to keep doing it because I love the way it makes my hair feel and dont plan to grow too long (I'll stop at TBL), but I'll definitely reconsider!

I really like the way your hair looks by the way fwiw! If you're wanting to reach extreme lengths though it's probably important to heed all the wise warnings and cut the baking soda and anything else damaging because the tips of your hair will be years old when your hair is super long and'll have the most compounded damage!

AshtangiPNW
November 14th, 2018, 02:36 PM
I think 22nd century natural woman sells soap bars and shampoo bars and just recently had a demo video out saying there is no lye in her soaps - at all. I'm not sure if she's talking end result (because there's never lye in the end result even though lye is used in the process).

Interesting! Thanks, Lapushka and MusicalSpoons :) :blossom: I wasn't sure if the pH of the shampoo bar might remain too high and cause this shingle on a roof sort of effect in a similar way to baking soda? Or are the two methods of washing simply not comparable?

MusicalSpoons
November 14th, 2018, 03:21 PM
Interesting! Thanks, Lapushka and MusicalSpoons :) :blossom: I wasn't sure if the pH of the shampoo bar might remain too high and cause this shingle on a roof sort of effect in a similar way to baking soda? Or are the two methods of washing simply not comparable?

Interesting question; I've wondered about this myself after having read that shampoo bars have a learning curve and often people use an acidic rinse. This article puts shampoo bars into 3 categories: http://www.jacalynbeales.com/journal/how-to-find-the-right-shampoo-bar


For shampoo bars, there are mainly 3 types: cold-pressed, glycerin based and solid surfactant. I'll briefly explain each below.

Cold-pressed: the process of mixing fixed oils (like coconut) with an alkali (such as Lye) to achieve saponification, where the composition of the fixed oils changes thanks to the alkali. These soaps are often rich in nourishing fats (like oils and butters) and are often SLS-free. However, because of the oils and butters, many users like to rinse their hair with a clarifying product (such as an apple cider vinegar rinse) to prevent build up on the scalp. Update: a good, cold-pressed soap won’t have any lye left over after the saponification process.

Glycerin-based: glycerin is a natural byproduct of the soap making process, and soaps containing natural glycerin tend to be kinder on the hair and scalp due to their lower pH levels, which help to keep the peace with your hair's own pH levels; this is said to help hair and skin maintain moisture. However, some soaps contain added types of glycerin, such as that derived from palm oil, to increase glycerin content. If you're looking to avoid palm oil in your shampoo, keep an eye out for palm oil in the ingredient list.

Surfactant: soap containing a surfactant will often provide the most lather, because surfactants are a compound of detergents which cause bubbling or foaming (aka lather). Common surfactant soaps are those found at LUSH, for example, and often contain SLS. The main purpose of a surfactant soap is to remove the dirt, oil, and bacteria from something, like your hair, and can be extremely drying/clarifying to the point where they can do more harm than good to the health of your hair. Surfactant shampoo bars thus work well in conjunction with a conditioner.

So in short, the pH of an ordinary bar is probably higher than ideal - unfortunately I've read elsewhere that a bar will only solidify within a certain pH range (I don't know what that range is) so it's not actually possible to lower the pH and keep the bar solid. Liquid shampoos are pH balanced so adding substances such as baking soda will affect that too.

lapushka
November 14th, 2018, 03:33 PM
Have you guys actually *seen* the demo I hinted at from 22nd? In that she tests the pH of the soap.

MusicalSpoons
November 14th, 2018, 03:38 PM
Have you guys actually *seen* the demo I hinted at from 22nd? In that she tests the pH of the soap.

No, but a quick search shows hers are glycerin-based and therefore lower pH than the usual saponified oil (soap) bars anyway :)

Edit: I actually did the search to see if I could find the demo, but haven't found it yet :eye: If anyone can post a link I'd be interested to watch it.

AshtangiPNW
November 14th, 2018, 03:57 PM
No, but a quick search shows hers are glycerin-based and therefore lower pH than the usual saponified oil (soap) bars anyway :)

Edit: I actually did the search to see if I could find the demo, but haven't found it yet :eye: If anyone can post a link I'd be interested to watch it.

I couldn't find it either! :) The shampoo bars that I have right now are made from saponified oils (not glycerin-based). I've only used them a few times because my usual method of washing is CO. I hadn't considered the glycerin-based ones....thanks for the details, MusicalSpoons :)

Edit: Found it after all :)
https://youtu.be/BEbYER57wXs

MusicalSpoons
November 14th, 2018, 04:07 PM
I couldn't find it either! :) The shampoo bars that I have right now are made from saponified oils (not glycerin-based). I've only used them a few times because my usual method of washing is CO. I hadn't considered the glycerin-based ones....thanks for the details, MusicalSpoons :)

You're welcome - I'm glad I can put my curiosity to something useful! ;)

lapushka
November 14th, 2018, 04:32 PM
Edit: Found it after all :)
https://youtu.be/BEbYER57wXs

Yep that was it; thanks for posting (I was busy, sorry). :o

Chromis
November 14th, 2018, 04:43 PM
Interesting! Thanks, Lapushka and MusicalSpoons :) :blossom: I wasn't sure if the pH of the shampoo bar might remain too high and cause this shingle on a roof sort of effect in a similar way to baking soda? Or are the two methods of washing simply not comparable?

As a shampoo bar user of over a decade, I do not personally think the two methods are comparable.

AshtangiPNW
November 14th, 2018, 08:05 PM
As a shampoo bar user of over a decade, I do not personally think the two methods are comparable.

Good to hear, Chromis. I had heard not-so-great things about baking soda and wasnt sure if the pH of a shampoo bar differs from that of baking soda. In any case, I've had good luck with the bar that I've tried! :) :)

Sorry to derail the baking soda thread, r3d!

AshtangiPNW
November 14th, 2018, 08:13 PM
Yep that was it; thanks for posting (I was busy, sorry). :o

Not a problem at all Lapushka :blossom: Thanks for mentioning it. Kind of want to test my soaps with pH strips now, just out of curiosity....:) :)

r3d
November 14th, 2018, 09:13 PM
it's okay haha, I think we have all learned a lot from this thread so far! =)

spidermom
November 15th, 2018, 07:58 AM
Baking soda was a disaster for my hair as well. It kind of matted together like felt. It took a couple of weeks of daily conditioner soaks to return to normal.

We all have different tastes and preferences, that's why there are so many options. If my hair had turned out like the picture in your first post, I would have considered that a failure in terms of baking soda use, but I like for my hair to be smooth and shiny. If it's a success for you, enjoy.

AshtangiPNW
November 15th, 2018, 10:18 AM
Interesting question; I've wondered about this myself after having read that shampoo bars have a learning curve and often people use an acidic rinse. This article puts shampoo bars into 3 categories: http://www.jacalynbeales.com/journal/how-to-find-the-right-shampoo-bar

So in short, the pH of an ordinary bar is probably higher than ideal - unfortunately I've read elsewhere that a bar will only solidify within a certain pH range (I don't know what that range is) so it's not actually possible to lower the pH and keep the bar solid. Liquid shampoos are pH balanced so adding substances such as baking soda will affect that too.

Hm, the bars do contain things like aloe vera, though....I'm tempted to think that the addition of ingredients like aloe (pH of 4.5-5.5) would affect the pH of the bar. I'm not a scientist (at least not a physical one....), so my assumptions should be taken with a grain of salt. :) :flower:

proo
November 15th, 2018, 10:56 AM
I use it occasionally, very diluted with good results-
About a teaspoon in a gallon of water
It’s like sulphate shampoo to me-
Way harsh if not highly diluted.

r3d
November 15th, 2018, 11:41 AM
We all have different tastes and preferences, that's why there are so many options. If my hair had turned out like the picture in your first post, I would have considered that a failure in terms of baking soda use, but I like for my hair to be smooth and shiny. If it's a success for you, enjoy.

I really like this, because you are so right. It's funny because I don't like my hair smooth/sleek at all, I do like it super poufy haha. I should have lived in the 80s or something :P
Thank you <3


I use it occasionally, very diluted with good results-
About a teaspoon in a gallon of water
It’s like sulphate shampoo to me-
Way harsh if not highly diluted.

I agree same for me; I like the results I get, and I also dilute it a lot + only use it once every 4 to 8 weeks.

elfynity
November 15th, 2018, 12:52 PM
i think the only reason you got away with usinng baking soda for so long were the other ways you were being kind to your hair - 'alive, fluffy, lots of volume' sounds like hair strands that have damaged cuticles that are not lying flat anymore but standing on end.

I love baking soda because when I started this process, I used it to clarify that once - and it is super useful for alot of things around the house.

If I was you, I would consider changing to a rye / cornstarch flour wash, and you can still use your acv rinse - you will still have a fair amount of volume without risking damage.

blackgothicdoll
November 16th, 2018, 08:33 AM
So r3d, I love your big fluffy hair. If you still decide you want to continue using baking soda, that's totally your choice, but I just have some ideas.

Have you heard of twistouts, braid outs, even flexi rods? These are all ways you can get a lot of volume and texture. I find twistouts will give you waves closer to what your texture looks like in the pics you posted, while braidouts will give you more crimpy/spiral results, flexi rods are more like perm curls. I think twistouts would look really good on your hair personally. You can do these by applying your favorite styling product and braiding hair while it is damp. I would expriment with braiding angles, like braid it with a deep side part so that your fringe area can really stand up. I would only do two or three loose braids for your hair - bigger braids /twists = bigger waves.

Just a little suggestion cuz I think it would look awesome. :)

ETA: I think her results were nice


https://youtu.be/xSjfcM3bLq0