PDA

View Full Version : Whey for topical hair use



SallySue
October 11th, 2018, 02:48 PM
I am getting ready to make paneer and am about to have a bunch of whey liquid left over. Has anyone tried or heard of applying whey as a hair treatment? What results does it give? Can the hair cuticle absorb the protein from straight whey?

Ylva
October 11th, 2018, 03:39 PM
I think most proteins require hydrolysis in order for the hair to be able to benefit from them.

Dark40
October 11th, 2018, 03:44 PM
Nope, I've never heard of whey before but I do like using products that have protein in it.

SallySue
October 11th, 2018, 04:08 PM
Me too, but I guess the ingredients labels on my products all say "hydrolyzed" in front of the protein. Ok, I'll save it for protein smoothies. Thanks!

Dark40
October 11th, 2018, 04:13 PM
Ok, I don't know what that ingredient, "hydrolyzed" means in front of the protein. You're welcome!

Ylva
October 11th, 2018, 04:27 PM
Ok, I don't know what that ingredient, "hydrolyzed" means in front of the protein. You're welcome!

It means it has undergone hydrolysis, the process which I talked about in the first comment in this thread.

Dark40
October 11th, 2018, 04:33 PM
It means it has undergone hydrolysis, the process which I talked about in the first comment in this thread.

Oh, ok yeah I do remember reading that, Thanks!

MusicalSpoons
October 11th, 2018, 04:38 PM
Ok, I don't know what that ingredient, "hydrolyzed" means in front of the protein. You're welcome!

Hydrolysis is the chemical breakdown of a molecule in a reaction with water (from the Greek, hydro = water, lysis = breakdown) so a hydrolysed protein has been broken down into molecules small enough to penetrate the hair shaft :) Most whole proteins are too large to penetrate so they have no strengthening effect.

nycelle
October 11th, 2018, 04:42 PM
@Dark40 Hydrolyzed proteins are just proteins that get broken down into amino acids - just the basics of what make up that protein. One of my dogs is on a hydrolyzed soy protein diet. He has issues digesting, so breaking the protein down reduces it to something his body doesn't react to.

The process of doing so is hydrolysis, like Ylva said.

I also thought that for hair to benefit it needs to be hydrolyzed, but I could of sworn I read somewhere that it depends on the protein? Or maybe I'm imagining it..

Dark40
October 11th, 2018, 04:53 PM
Hydrolysis is the chemical breakdown of a molecule in a reaction with water (from the Greek, hydro = water, lysis = breakdown) so a hydrolysed protein has been broken down into molecules small enough to penetrate the hair shaft :) Most whole proteins are too large to penetrate so they have no strengthening effect.

Ok, thank you for explaining that to me. Because, I didn't understand what hydrolysis meant at first.

nycelle
October 11th, 2018, 04:55 PM
Hydrolysis is the chemical breakdown of a molecule in a reaction with water (from the Greek, hydro = water, lysis = breakdown) so a hydrolysed protein has been broken down into molecules small enough to penetrate the hair shaft :) Most whole proteins are too large to penetrate so they have no strengthening effect.

I need to learn to stop quoting posts, walking away, and then posting later as I miss all the posts in-between.. :p

Dark40
October 11th, 2018, 04:57 PM
@nycelle Ok, now I understand. Thanks for explaining that to me. I'm so sorry to hear that about one of your dogs having a digesting problem. Yes, that's true that in order for the hair to benefit it needs to be hydrolyzed.

MusicalSpoons
October 11th, 2018, 04:57 PM
I also thought that for hair to benefit it needs to be hydrolyzed, but I could of sworn I read somewhere that it depends on the protein? Or maybe I'm imagining it..

Couple of science-y hair blog posts addressing this:

http://science-yhairblog.blogspot.com/2013/09/more-about-protein.html

Soy protein. Even though soy protein is a medium-size protein, it may not have the hydrating power of the other proteins. It's amino acid complement is more abundant in amino acids which are not as abundant in human hair. Soy protein is a small-medium size for conditioning.

Corn protein is often combined with other proteins. Corn protein has small-medium size for conditioning and hydrating.

Keratin Human hair-source keratin is even more similar to the protein in your own hair. Keratin is a small-to-medium protein so it has hydrating and conditioning potential and 6 amino acids naturally abundant in the cuticle of your hair.

Silk protein is a smaller protein and mostly hydrating and conditioning

Also http://science-yhairblog.blogspot.com/2011/08/mysteries-of-hydrolyzed-proteins.html

SallySue
October 11th, 2018, 05:58 PM
Great resource! Thank you @musicalspoons . Too bad it doesn't mention anything about whey protein. :(

AutobotsAttack
October 11th, 2018, 06:06 PM
I think most proteins require hydrolysis in order for the hair to be able to benefit from them.

I would agree. But most protein powders for consumption all come hydrolyzed from the manufacturer

Ylva
October 11th, 2018, 06:10 PM
I believe that’s why it’s called hydrolyzed whey protein.

Indeed, that is what it becomes after undergoing hydrolysis. But I don't know if it's in that form in an edible product. I don't see why it would be.

MusicalSpoons
October 11th, 2018, 06:11 PM
I need to learn to stop quoting posts, walking away, and then posting later as I miss all the posts in-between.. :p

I do the same! :laugh: still, everyone's explanations add a little extra so it's all good :D

AutobotsAttack
October 11th, 2018, 06:12 PM
So OP, you can use it on your hair if you want, considering most whey products that we eat come hydrolyzed already.

MusicalSpoons
October 11th, 2018, 06:15 PM
So OP, you can use it on your hair if you want, considering most whey products that we eat come hydrolyzed already.

Really? She said she's making paneer with whey as a by-product, which sounded to me like it would be the entire whey protein - I could be wrong though as I know nothing about the process.

littlestarface
October 11th, 2018, 06:20 PM
Really? She said she's making paneer with whey as a by-product, which sounded to me like it would be the entire whey protein - I could be wrong though as I know nothing about the process.

When you make paneer its just with milk and lemon and that left over liquid after you squeeze it out is what shes asking about, I always just dump it in the sink.

Hmm now that I think about it I think I misunderstood you... so just ignore me.

AutobotsAttack
October 11th, 2018, 07:48 PM
Indeed, that is what it becomes after undergoing hydrolysis. But I don't know if it's in that form in an edible product. I don't see why it would be.

I meant to add something else to that part I said, but typically the edible proteins or wheys that come in powders are hydrolyzed. Most people who are in sports, or lift/train regularly at the gym buy those kinds of whey proteins. They’re a HUGE market for hydrolyzed whey proteins, and at least in the US they’re at pretty much every grocery store.

But I now realize I misread the original post

AutobotsAttack
October 11th, 2018, 07:56 PM
Really? She said she's making paneer with whey as a by-product, which sounded to me like it would be the entire whey protein - I could be wrong though as I know nothing about the process.


I mean if you really want to get technical, hydrolysis occurs when water is able to dissolve pretty much anything with some sort of salt in it. Either the salt of a base or an acid. (In this case amino acids) I have no idea why I thought store bought whey was something that OP was referring to, so for the sake of reducing confusion, just ignore me on that lol. Case in point, The lemon has enough acid to break down the ingredients she’s using. All the OP would have to do is let some water do the rest of the process. From what I understand there’s no need for heating, or mixing, just pretty much letting the lemon do it’s job, since hydrolysis occurs naturally in nature anyways.

So the OP can still use it.

SallySue
October 16th, 2018, 10:50 AM
Fascinating! Thanks for the insight. This time I ended up using the leftover whey for enriching some soup stock. Next time I'll use it as a hair treatment and see if it does anything.

lapushka
October 17th, 2018, 07:47 AM
It's not "whey", but I know a girl here on YT, from the green beauty channel does a hydrolized wheat protein:
https://www.amazon.com/Wheat-Protein-Hydrolyzed-3-0floz-89ml/dp/B0103UPJDY

Kat-Rinnč Naido
October 21st, 2018, 07:00 AM
If you are planning to use it next time, make sure you rinse it out thoroughly to eliminate any lasting odour.
Good luck!

SallySue
December 3rd, 2018, 10:19 AM
For a follow-up on this topic, I just wanted to share that I experimented with this today. I made paneer for the second time yesterday and reserved the whey again. My method was, after rinsing out my deep conditioner in warm water, doing a final rinse on just the lengths with about 1/2 cup of refrigerator-cold liquid whey. Right away my hair felt coarser and stronger. This was a stark contrast to the over-conditioned feeling that I have been getting from using deep conditioner alone. Based on my initial impressions, this CAN be used as a DIY protein treatment. Therefore, this may be the only case in which the answer to a LHC hair question is literally"cheese." :p

MusicalSpoons
December 3rd, 2018, 10:27 AM
For a follow-up on this topic, I just wanted to share that I experimented with this today. I made paneer for the second time yesterday and reserved the whey again. My method was, after rinsing out my deep conditioner in warm water, doing a final rinse on just the lengths with about 1/2 cup of refrigerator-cold liquid whey. Right away my hair felt coarser and stronger. This was a stark contrast to the over-conditioned feeling that I have been getting from using deep conditioner alone. Based on my initial impressions, this CAN be used as a DIY protein treatment. Therefore, this may be the only case in which the answer to a LHC hair question is literally"cheese." :p

:rollin: :rollin: :rollin:

Glad to hear it's worked well for you :)