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View Full Version : Water as heat protectant?? (Youtube video)



lauren_alia
September 10th, 2018, 12:47 AM
https://youtu.be/5ZiK6X-kb8k

Soooo I just saw this video pop up on my youtube feed, and I wanted to share it here and get your thoughts.
I can appreciate her skepticism of heat protectants, and the spirit this was done in, but I gotta say I think the experiments are..... flawed. To her credit, she does have a disclaimer at the end that she's not recommending using water as a heat protectant. Unfortunately, I think a lot of people are going to take this to mean flat ironing their hair while it's wet is a good idea, even if she doesn't explicitly recommend that. shudder:

illicitlizard
September 10th, 2018, 04:59 AM
Hmmmm interesting... Honestly I couldn't stop thinking how horrible that burning hair would've smelled. I kind of get where she's coming from, but these 'experiments' don't really prove anything. I feel like it's definitely going to be misinterpreted by someone as 'water is a good heat protectant' rather than 'we should be skeptical of some heat protectants'.

Joules
September 10th, 2018, 05:10 AM
I can kinda see how this would work with blowdrying though. Water will protect hair in a similar way sweat cools our bodies down when it's hot outside. So this experiment is extremely flawed, it's stupid to assume anything after watching it. If you look through the comment section, you'll see that a ton of people are switching to heat styling their hair with just water, I thought more people could think with their brains without just mindlessly believing everything they see...

If anything, to me this video means that heat is extremely damaging no matter what you use and how you do it. Not that I needed to see this video to understand it, but it's still an interesting experiment to watch. If someone sees it and consideres it a good idea to flat iron wet hair, well, it's their problem after all.

Alex Lou
September 10th, 2018, 08:59 AM
Seems fair to me. But then it always seemed like a no brainer that heat protectants will not protect the hair from damage. At least if someone's spritzing their hair with water like a heat protectant then they are saving money, even if it's a placebo. And I was just reading that many heat protestants release formaldehyde when heated: https://www.womensvoices.org/2016/07/05/is-formaldehyde-free-really-formaldehyde-free/

"...if you choose to straighten your hair with a flat iron at home, cyclopentasiloxane is also a common ingredient found in flat iron sprays (also called thermal protection sprays) you can purchase at retail stores. That’s right, if you flat iron your hair after spraying these products, you may be releasing formaldehyde into the air of your very own home!"

nycelle
September 10th, 2018, 09:27 AM
Who actually holds any 440 degree heat tool, less than an inch away from their hair, for a full minute? No one with even 1/2 a brain. Not even when you're flat ironing. Nothing's going to protect from that. This video to me is just for shock, nothing informative about it.
But if someone now believes water is just as good as a heat protectant.. well.. I truly feel sorry for them.

nycelle
September 10th, 2018, 09:29 AM
I've used heat protectants in the past and I do believe they work. In fact I know they do. Most of my damage didn't come from blowouts, it came from coloring.

eta: Don't get me wrong, I do believe blow drying regularly will cause some damage, but nothing like what was shown in the video.

Ylva
September 10th, 2018, 09:31 AM
Who actually holds any 440 degree heat tool, less than an inch away from their hair, for a full minute?

Indeed. Heat protectants aren't meant to function under those circumstances. Whether they actually protect the hair all that much under the right circumstances either, I won't say anything about, because I haven't looked into that, nor do I use them myself as I blowdry my hair on low or medium heat maybe once or twice a year.

Alex Lou
September 10th, 2018, 09:32 AM
Who actually holds any 440 degree heat tool, less than an inch away from their hair, for a full minute? No one with even 1/2 a brain. Not even when you're flat ironing. Nothing's going to protect from that. This video to me is just for shock, nothing informative about it.
But if someone now believes water is just as good as a heat protectant.. well.. I truly feel sorry for them.

I think water is just as good as a heat protectant... better if you consider cost and fumes. And the product claimed to protect against 440 degree heat which is why she used 440.

nycelle
September 10th, 2018, 09:53 AM
I think water is just as good as a heat protectant... better if you consider cost and fumes. And the product claimed to protect against 440 degree heat which is why she used 440.

My hair disagrees. But whatever, YMMV.

I have a babybliss and conair dryer. Both manuals say to keep it moving as you dry and to not concentrate on any one piece of hair. She's using the dryer incorrectly.

Alex Lou
September 10th, 2018, 10:05 AM
My hair disagrees. But whatever, YMMV.

I have a babybliss and conair dryer. Both manuals say to keep it moving as you dry and to not concentrate on any one piece of hair. She's using the dryer incorrectly.

She wasn't emulating correct use. She was doing it like 1 trial of a scientific experiment. Clearly, you would need many more trials to be scientific. But if someone heats their hair to 440 degrees (something which the product suggests is correct use, yikes!) for 2 seconds, then after 30 uses they will have accumulated 1 minute of 440 degree heat damage. Plus it's a whole lot easier to use the hair burning through as an objective observation, vs feeling the hair for damage or looking at the color change which is more subjective.

Alex Lou
September 10th, 2018, 10:07 AM
I saw this video as this woman objecting to the extreme claims that are made in selling these products.

Hairkay
September 10th, 2018, 10:36 AM
We may drink water to help us cool down and rehydrate but that does not mean it will protect hair. Water conducts heat or cold faster than just air. When it's very cold and we are trying to warm up we use hot drinks to help. With wet hair and a flat iron the hair will be either boiled or steamed.

Alex Lou
September 10th, 2018, 10:52 AM
With wet hair and a flat iron the hair will be either boiled or steamed.
Most of the heat protectants have water as one of the first ingredients.

lapushka
September 10th, 2018, 12:52 PM
I used to heat style on damp hair (a chin length bob). My hair was riddled in white dots to about one inch from the root. Then I had it permed and grew it all out to hip. :o I know, the things you shouldn't do. Because half my hair was riddled in white dots, I *know* that's not the way to do things... unless you want the damage!

cathair
September 10th, 2018, 01:51 PM
I'm not really sure what this proves without looking at the structure of the hair close up. It's not like anyone much heat styles their hair to the point of burning it off. The idea would be for it to not lose condition in normal circumstances.

I except heat protectant does very little in normal use, but it's not a fair test for that.

queenbee1
September 11th, 2018, 04:10 AM
She wasn't emulating correct use. She was doing it like 1 trial of a scientific experiment. Clearly, you would need many more trials to be scientific. But if someone heats their hair to 440 degrees (something which the product suggests is correct use, yikes!) for 2 seconds, then after 30 uses they will have accumulated 1 minute of 440 degree heat damage. Plus it's a whole lot easier to use the hair burning through as an objective observation, vs feeling the hair for damage or looking at the color change which is more subjective.

This!!! Can we all please stop bashing the youtuber? I think her idea of this experiment was great. The water as a heat protectant part was purely a joke on her part.

queenbee1
September 11th, 2018, 04:11 AM
I saw this video as this woman objecting to the extreme claims that are made in selling these products.

Agreed lol.

nycelle
September 11th, 2018, 08:46 AM
Since when is a difference of opinion bashing? No one said anything "mean" about her. I know the only thing I said was she did it for shock value.

I'll give her that maybe she was just doing it to show that Tresemmes claims are BS, but she could of done a video emulating real life use to prove that point.
Unless of course real life use yields completely different results and wouldn't be as interesting.

littlestarface
September 11th, 2018, 10:50 AM
So moral of the story is don"t use heat on your hair.

nycelle
September 11th, 2018, 11:14 AM
So moral of the story is don"t use heat on your hair.

To the point haha.. :D

illicitlizard
September 13th, 2018, 03:41 AM
She wasn't emulating correct use. She was doing it like 1 trial of a scientific experiment. Clearly, you would need many more trials to be scientific. But if someone heats their hair to 440 degrees (something which the product suggests is correct use, yikes!) for 2 seconds, then after 30 uses they will have accumulated 1 minute of 440 degree heat damage. Plus it's a whole lot easier to use the hair burning through as an objective observation, vs feeling the hair for damage or looking at the color change which is more subjective.

I saw that not as the heat protectant suggesting extreme use, but more a guarantee of it working under normal, sub 440F temperatures. Like those watches that say waterproof to 5 metres... It's unlikely that under non-lab conditions they actually will be waterproof up to 5m, but it gives a layer of certainty that for e.g. dropping the watch into a pond won't destroy it.

For it to be a useful experiment I would've liked to see multiple test strands at multiple temperatures. That way it would actually test the efficacy of the product. Less click-worthy though...

Alex Lou
September 13th, 2018, 08:54 AM
I saw that not as the heat protectant suggesting extreme use, but more a guarantee of it working under normal, sub 440F temperatures. Like those watches that say waterproof to 5 metres... It's unlikely that under non-lab conditions they actually will be waterproof up to 5m, but it gives a layer of certainty that for e.g. dropping the watch into a pond won't destroy it.

For it to be a useful experiment I would've liked to see multiple test strands at multiple temperatures. That way it would actually test the efficacy of the product. Less click-worthy though...

The product actually says up to 450. Omg! But I'm one of those people who is shocked that so many women routinely use 400 degree heat tools on their head.

I think it would have been really difficult to show anything definitive with normal blowdrying or responsible use of heat tools. It basically would have been her feeling the hair and looking for visible damage. In one use, even if the product worked, there's unlikely to be any difference because using heat responsibly 1 time without heat protectant does not cause noticeable damage for most people.

Also my phone is water resistant up to 3 feet and 30 min. I regularly take it swimming...

Lazy Loop
September 16th, 2018, 06:18 PM
So my take on this experiment: Stop trusting heat protectant!! It's a myth and is not protecting hair.
And, Water is No Better. They will have to invent something better to protect hair from heat and heat tools.
Otherwise, avoid heat tools as much as possible.

Arciela
September 16th, 2018, 06:53 PM
I always said if it truly protects your hair then it should protect the skin as well..and let me tell you, there is no way I am putting water and then a flat iron on my skin lol I don't think anything really protects hair from heat damage.

LittleOgre
September 16th, 2018, 06:58 PM
Well I'm not saying water is a heat protectant but from what I saw in that video. It caused less damage than putting heat bare. So honestly I highly doubt it will hurt anyone who decides to do it. Although I wouldn't...

LittleOgre
October 12th, 2018, 04:26 PM
https://youtu.be/--D6P1Z3FGY
Came across this video and found it very fascinating... So basically its a waste of time and another money grabber? Not exactly surpised since my sister got heat damage even though she doused her hair in heat protectant. There should be studies on this... Ive been seatching and couldn't find one.

littlestarface
October 12th, 2018, 04:35 PM
Not really a scam, since everyone should know aint no magic spray gonna protect hair from a 300-400 degree device.

mira-chan
October 12th, 2018, 04:46 PM
From what I know of heat protectant ingredients is that they have a silicon or oil base. This will help brushes or irons glide easier on the hair. So it helps in that there is less friction so the heat doesn't stay on the hair as long as without. Otherwise, yea not really protecting, but more giving shine from coating to make hair look better.

Ylva
October 12th, 2018, 04:52 PM
I don't personally use heat nor am I an avid defender of heat protectants, but you certainly aren't supposed to keep the heat so close to your hair for such a long time. If it was tested under realistic conditions instead of overdone like that, I'm sure the heat protectant would protect to a degree, but I don't think anything is going to protect 100%.

*Wednesday*
October 12th, 2018, 04:53 PM
Not really a scam, since everyone should know aint no magic spray gonna protect hair from a 300-400 degree device.

Lol. My sentiments exactly. Magic spray like that, I'll find a fire breathing dragon as a pet.

littlestarface
October 12th, 2018, 05:11 PM
Lol. My sentiments exactly. Magic spray like that, I'll find a fire breathing dragon as a pet.

Haha people are nuts.

Ylva
October 12th, 2018, 07:05 PM
This video has actually been discussed here before. This is the old thread: https://forums.longhaircommunity.com/archive/index.php/t-147531.html

Perhaps you, OP, can find some satisfying answers there.

Dark40
October 12th, 2018, 08:53 PM
I agree with mira-chan. I believe that heat protects do work. They have worked for my hair. They have been keeping my hair from burning, breaking off, and getting damaged. The kind of lotion I use is a heat protectant.

LittleOgre
October 12th, 2018, 10:15 PM
True but the name itself is misleading

Joules
October 13th, 2018, 03:40 AM
That experiment is weird. Nothing can protect hair from essentially a blowtorch. I do believe heat protectants work, as long as you use your common sense.

LittleOgre
October 13th, 2018, 03:52 PM
But there isnt any evdience on that. Maybe it jsut leaves a nice sheen

Emma Rose
October 13th, 2018, 10:33 PM
Man that was hard to watch.
My hair's always been a bit more prone to damage than the average head of hair and I can vouch that heat protectants work for me. I imagine the level of effectiveness would vary from brand to brand