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proo
August 27th, 2017, 03:34 PM
58 year old Irish/American native mostly SO here; I've been greatly inspired by YouTube naturalistas in these ways:
-being "scared" into natural practices by failing hair
-cutting out heat and chemicals
-styling/cutting my own hair
-a matured perception of beauty
-frustration with not knowing what to do
-realizing the absolute uniqueness of my particular head of hair
-it's up to me to figure this out
-becoming a product junkie till I figure it out
-less is more
-what works is probably not mainstream
-YouTube as a source
-independence from stylists and opinions of others

Of course this isn't conclusive or unique to the natural hair community, but it's the way it came to me and I'm eternally grateful.

lapushka
August 27th, 2017, 04:03 PM
Do you mean "natural" in the sense of using natural products, or "natural" in the sense of no perms no relaxers?

proo
August 27th, 2017, 04:46 PM
I'm talking about those with Afro textured hair who are enjoying/exploiting the characteristics of it

esfand
August 27th, 2017, 05:56 PM
If you want to avoid being a "product junkie" I recommend using the old-school hair products. They held through the test of time and a lot of naturalistas are going back to the stuff that their grandmas used like Blue Magic, Pink Lotion, and Queen Helene's cholesterol. They're still around for a reason - because they work. Petrolatum is not your enemy.

H o n є y ❤
August 27th, 2017, 06:08 PM
If you want to avoid being a "product junkie" I recommend using the old-school hair products. They held through the test of time and a lot of naturalistas are going back to the stuff that their grandmas used like Blue Magic, Pink Lotion, and Queen Helene's cholesterol. They're still around for a reason - because they work. Petrolatum is not your enemy.
I agree, though I don't personally use these products anymore but I have.

The natural hair movement has really changed my life in a way. I would've NEVER grown to love and take care of my hair had it not been for the NHM. I truly am happy to be apart of it and I am grateful for all of the natural hair Youtubers who helped to start it all. Despite some of the negativity that occurs in the natural hair community and some of the negative things people say about us, I am happy that it exists! I'm also happy that a movement like this can inspire people of different backgrounds.

Blakizbeautyful and Natural85 are my favorite Youtubers and were also the first I discovered in the beginning of my natural hair journey. Who are some of your favorites?

Ophidian
August 27th, 2017, 07:14 PM
I've learned a lot from the natural hair movement too. There's a creativity and focus on self-care and -acceptance that I find very inspiring.

proo
August 28th, 2017, 05:01 AM
Favorite youtubers:
Naptural85 - like you, honey ❤️, she was my gateway guru
Efficiently natural
Moknowshair
Protective princess
Nappyheadedjojoba-
are some of my top favorites

And to add to my previous list:
- keeping hair stretched
- twists as a style
- washing/conditioning in twists
- strategic "recycled " parting

I've adopted these practices in my unique SO method;
Twisting my hair as I preen is gentle, effective and efficient

lapushka
August 28th, 2017, 05:55 AM
I might not have afro-textured hair, but it took me a few decades to get used to my natural wavy hair as well. I hope this thread is for us too. :flower:

Hairkay
August 28th, 2017, 06:13 AM
Favorite youtubers:
Naptural85 - like you, honey ❤️, she was my gateway guru
Efficiently natural
Moknowshair
Protective princess
Nappyheadedjojoba-
are some of my top favorites

And to add to my previous list:
- keeping hair stretched
- twists as a style
- washing/conditioning in twists
- strategic "recycled " parting

I've adopted these practices in my unique SO method;
Twisting my hair as I preen is gentle, effective and efficient

I do my preening as I plait/braid my hair. I find it relaxing.

Nymphe
August 28th, 2017, 06:31 AM
I am glad more black women around the world are embracing their natural texture and sharing the info! I went natural back in the late 90s due to being tired of getting my hair done; 2002 was the last time I had my hair straightened. Queen Helene's Cholesterol Conditioner, Johnson's Baby Shampoo, and a vent brush were my staples... and my hair stay 5-6" long doing that. I only wish that I had searched for the hair forums and blogs back then. Motowngirl (http://motowngirl.com/) was my first stop.

I have learned so much about hair and overall health. So many have taken risks in order to see if either this product, that supplement, or these hair tools actually work. Vendors started paying attention and finally made products catering to that niche market. It was so exciting watching regular people start their natural hair companies from the ground up and being a willing guinea pig to try their wares (Oyin, Njoy, Qhemet, and Anita Grant to name a few).

YouTube tutorials took things to the next level, especially when it became more mobile friendly. That "curl definition" craze was a dark period; I still see comments from type 4s who wished they had curly hair. Finally seeing supercoilies embrace and show off their quirks and kinks after 2014 did my heart good.

I confess. I would love to see relaxers, curly perms, wigs and weaves become a sometimes thing or a rarity. I just hope the next generation will keep things moving in a positive direction so that this hair will become so commonplace that no one bats an eye when they see it.

YvetteVarie
August 28th, 2017, 06:37 AM
I also love Naptural85. She's so awesome. I also follow Blackbeautykween, and I was a huge fan of Longhairdontcare2011.

What I do to take care of my hair is:
- Frequent washing and deep conditioning. My hair grows faster and retains better
- Using wigs to protective style. This way I can wash often
- My hair loves butters and heavy oils, so I use these frequently
- And keeping my hair in a stretched state helps to minimize knots and makes life easier

Thanks to the NHM, I have successfully lived without salons until I got pregnant. Now, I go when I don't have the energy to deal with my hair, but I go to the pricier natural hair salons where they practice hair care to the standards of LHC and the NHM

Cherriezzzzz
August 28th, 2017, 06:42 AM
While in hair school I discovered "natural" hair care. Even being a red head and Caucasian. I often thought the best hairdressers for my hair were natural haired ethnic women in general bc they understood how to smooth my hair without killing it, frizzing it, or making it a huge triangle shape! I loooooove Queen Helene! We used it in hair school too! Petroleum is very protective for skin... and hair! I'm also wearing my hair natural now :) it's very different for me to not try to "relax" my hair wether through chemicals or heat.

While in hair school I discovered the first ceramic flat irons, Chi's. They were for ethic hair originally, and the girls at the booth (we were at a hair show "field trip") grabbed me when they saw me to demonstrate their irons hahaha I had the straightest, silkiest, flattest hair of my entire life! Of course I bought one ;) ALL the girls were black though and their hair was smooth as silk! To this day I can't get hair like that without my original Chi!

H o n є y ❤
August 28th, 2017, 11:28 AM
I also love Naptural85. She's so awesome. I also follow Blackbeautykween, and I was a huge fan of Longhairdontcare2011.

What I do to take care of my hair is:
- Frequent washing and deep conditioning. My hair grows faster and retains better
- Using wigs to protective style. This way I can wash often
- My hair loves butters and heavy oils, so I use these frequently
- And keeping my hair in a stretched state helps to minimize knots and makes life easier

Thanks to the NHM, I have successfully lived without salons until I got pregnant. Now, I go when I don't have the energy to deal with my hair, but I go to the pricier natural hair salons where they practice hair care to the standards of LHC and the NHM
Absolutely! I used to go the salon about every 3 weeks to get a sew-in. I would she'll out almost $200 just to get my hair done. That's more than my car insurance! Lol. Since going natural I've only been to the salon twice and both have been for big chops. I do want to start going back occasionally though for rollersets. Sometimes it's just nice having someone else do your hair for a change. I am still so thankful that I'm able to take care of my own hair now and save $200+ every month doing it.

daywalker
August 29th, 2017, 01:44 PM
I'm not of African descent but I also am so grateful for the natural hair movement. I was so tired of being told to "do something" with my hair and to "just straighten it" and then wondering why it kept falling out due to heat damage. The natural hair care message boards helped me learn how to wrap my hair at night, which is a main contributor to me being able to wrangle my hair without heat so that I can grow it long.

proo
August 30th, 2017, 05:41 AM
I've also learned to wrap my hair, usually as a conditioning treatment on dry hair-
30 minutes in a wrap after a good preen really revitalizes my hair when it feels thirsty, no water or product needed.
I also fingercomb way more than I used to.

I live in a resort and see a lot of people of all ethnicities-
And yes, I'm seeing way more heads of beautiful natural hair on young people and children
Perhaps I'm just more sensitive to it now, but It sure seems like the new wave imho.

And greenbeautychannel is an excellent source of information

Nymphe
August 31st, 2017, 11:44 AM
Oil rinsing and castor oil literally saved my hair. Two ladies brought it in 2007. One did oil washing, which I do, and the other, oil rinsing between the shampoo and conditioner steps. We found out a bit later that it was an ancient custom in many parts of the world.

Hairkay
August 31st, 2017, 11:51 AM
The movement did enable me to see lots of hair styles on all sorts of curly hair types and finger detangling. It also made me feel less of an alien for not having conventional hair care methods. I also got my last nudge to try DIY hair masks to solve my hair conditioning problem.

Eastbound&Down
August 31st, 2017, 12:01 PM
I love the NHM! It has helped so many people, and I personally LOVE the natural curly heads that I see around so much more frequently. Although I only hover around 2b/c, I have been able to adopt some methods from the movement that have helped get my hair to a healthy, happy place.

proo
August 31st, 2017, 04:20 PM
An approximately 3" mohawk section of my hair from crown straight back to nape has a frizzy undefined curl pattern while the rest is fairly uniformly wavy-
It's been that way since puberty; my sisters, my mom, we all have it and have spent our lives wrestling it into submission with heat , etc
Through NHM wisdom I've learned how versatile this texture can be in a stretched state- it can be almost sculpted into some very lush updos that hold shape.
My favorite guru for that is moknowshair.
I've given up heat completely and am loving what used to drive me nutz-
Long live silky scrunchies and banana clips!

AutobotsAttack
August 31st, 2017, 04:45 PM
I absolutely love the core values of the natural hair movement. I like the acceptance part, the versatility of different textures, learning new tips, styles, and tricks.
Most products meant for natural hair, I use freely anyways as a relaxed head. Personally I've accepted my hair from a young age, and it didn't take me being natural or relaxed to learn how
to accept myself or my own head of hair. I was natural for around 5 years during my highschool days and some of middle school, and I loved the curls, the kinks, the fluff, and how I could
go from bone straight to curly overnight. I've learned to love my hair in its natural state without chemicals, and in its relaxed state. I find you can never have too much info on how to care
for hair in its many styles that it comes in. I also like the many variations of curls you can come across. Some are so finely curled the hair in and of itself just looks like tiny slinkies, some have
big flowing curls, some have smaller coiled-like curls, and some is soft, fluffy, and adorably kinky.


HOWEVER with the natural hair movement has come a slew of people who like to accuse other people of not "accepting themselves", and "denying their roots", or they're still being "oppressed" by people of lighter skin,
simply because they relax their hair. They argue, call folks names, and deem themselves holier than thou just because they decided to give up chemicals. The hair that grows out of your head will never dictate your sense of self-worth, your character
or your integrity. I accept people for who they are regardless of what they decide to do to themselves or their hair. And there's a lot of people that say these things, and ive come across plenty of Facebook, and YouTube
comments exhibiting this kind of behavior, and I would just like to see more acceptance of all hair types. Natural, relaxed, straight, curly, blonde, brown, bleached, etc. And that is actually the reason I retreated to this site
some years ago, here everyone is welcome.

meteor
August 31st, 2017, 06:26 PM
I think the movement is wonderful. :D I love the acceptance and the incredible richness of all sorts of hairstyles and textures it brings about - just great all around!
I was inspired to experiment with and/or incorporate a few things like LOC, oil rinses, pre-poo oil treatments, CO-washing, silk scarves/bonnets, fingercombing and wide-tooth combs. Even though they may not necessarily be exclusively from the natural hair movement, that's definitely the movement that drew my attention to these things and gave lots of exposure to these practices in the media, as well. The movement has also definitely contributed a lot of great product lines and lots of invaluable information to the hair segment of the internet, as well.


HOWEVER with the natural hair movement has come a slew of people who like to accuse other people of not "accepting themselves", and "denying their roots", or they're still being "oppressed" by people of lighter skin,
simply because they relax their hair. They argue, call folks names, and deem themselves holier than thou just because they decided to give up chemicals. The hair that grows out of your head will never dictate your sense of self-worth, your character
or your integrity. I accept people for who they are regardless of what they decide to do to themselves or their hair. And there's a lot of people that say these things, and ive come across plenty of Facebook, and YouTube
comments exhibiting this kind of behavior, and I would just like to see more acceptance of all hair types. Natural, relaxed, straight, curly, blonde, brown, bleached, etc. And that is actually the reason I retreated to this site
some years ago, here everyone is welcome.

Yes, I must admit, I have noticed a bit of that, too, at least in North America (I didn't really notice this in Europe and Asia)... this unnecessary divisiveness and too much politicizing/reading into personal hair choices in the 21st century. Ironically, the people who like to be a bit authoritarian about what other people "should" or "shouldn't" do with their hair seem to be a bit "oppressive" themselves. I mean, it's somebody else's hair and it's an expression of their individuality and their choice at that time, not some collectivist ideal/uniform for everyone to follow. I just think that telling others that they should or shouldn't wear whatever colors, textures, styles, etc is very limiting. And shaming people for expressing their personal aesthetic preferences can create problems, rather than solutions IMHO. :flower: I don't think it's an issue with the natural hair movement overall though (it seems very accepting), just a few people here and there with a bit of a chip on their shoulders at the time maybe?

*Wednesday*
August 31st, 2017, 06:27 PM
This day and age...hair has become an acessory for women. A "look" to change from time to time. I don't think because a woman decides to straighten her hair she denies her roots. Going natural for some may have a deeper meaning ethnically. Others just want non-processed healthy hair. For some different styles is just fun.

AutobotsAttack
August 31st, 2017, 07:01 PM
I think the movement is wonderful. :D I love the acceptance and the incredible richness of all sorts of hairstyles and textures it brings about - just great all around!
I was inspired to experiment with and/or incorporate a few things like LOC, oil rinses, pre-poo oil treatments, CO-washing, silk scarves/bonnets, fingercombing and wide-tooth combs. Even though they may not necessarily be exclusively from the natural hair movement, that's definitely the movement that drew my attention to these things and gave lots of exposure to these practices in the media, as well. The movement has also definitely contributed a lot of great product lines and lots of invaluable information to the hair segment of the internet, as well.



Yes, I must admit, I have noticed a bit of that, too, at least in North America (I didn't really notice this in Europe and Asia)... this unnecessary divisiveness and too much politicizing/reading into personal hair choices in the 21st century. Ironically, the people who like to be a bit authoritarian about what other people "should" or "shouldn't" do with their hair seem to be a bit "oppressive" themselves. I mean, it's somebody else's hair and it's an expression of their individuality and their choice at that time, not some collectivist ideal/uniform for everyone to follow. I just think that telling others that they should or shouldn't wear whatever colors, textures, styles, etc is very limiting. And shaming people for expressing their personal aesthetic preferences can create problems, rather than solutions IMHO. :flower: I don't think it's an issue with the natural hair movement overall though (it seems very accepting), just a few people here and there with a bit of a chip on their shoulders at the time maybe?

Oh yeah, more than likely. And I wish to believe the majority of the natural hair movement rises above such antics. I'm pretty sure most do. I have come across some super nice people online and in real life, especially on here. And as I mentioned before I absolutely love the core values of the natural hair movement including the unity amidst everything, and taking the time to find new ways to innovate and become creative in expressing yourself and taking care of yourself.

AutobotsAttack
August 31st, 2017, 07:05 PM
This day and age...hair has become an acessory for women. A "look" to change from time to time. I don't think because a woman decides to straighten her hair she denies her roots. Going natural for some may have a deeper meaning ethnically. Others just want non-processed healthy hair. For some different styles is just fun.

a good chunk of people do transition to natural for ethnical reasons, which is great if its having a positive impact on your life, I just find it wrong to belittle someone else if they decide to keep their hair in a different style or texture. I could very well find a deeper meaning ( ethnically speaking), through so many things or practices, not just my hair. I do agree with you though, all the way.

Nymphe
August 31st, 2017, 09:13 PM
In any paradigm shift, there will always, always, always going to be those on the extreme of what should or should not be; that’s life. The negative or challenging mindsets will grab people’s attention, but we have a choice in how we respond. The one thing I have learned being natural when it was not the norm is that people are going to do and say whatever, but ultimately, it is my life, and I ain’t gotta swallow anyone verbal bile and make myself sick. Yeah, the comments irritated me, but I chose not to dwell on them. When I dwell on negative stuff, I seem to get more of it, and become more receptive (or sensitive) to it in return. No thanks…

Those militant naturalistas got that way for a reason – bad experiences, the “good hair” obsession, seeing negative perceptions too much, etc. At times, they have had information that I was not privy to; I listened and learned. I understand the root of their message: there is nothing wrong with your natural hair and here is why, so everybody else need to adapt. Most of those folks mellow out in time, and new ones will take their place. Although I hope more go natural so it becomes commonplace, I choose to stay in a neutral position because it ain’t my life.

Now, the tables have turned. I work with folks in their 60s and up, and some are absolutely fascinated with my coils. White women – the group that supposedly hates this “wild”hair the most – give me compliments. It is weirding me out to be honest because I never got that until my coils clumped. Nobody in the real wears their hair like mine, mainly TWAs, locs, stretched styles, or braids. I would love to see just one person in person with hair like mine. One day, I think I will… :)

spidermom
August 31st, 2017, 09:32 PM
Ah yes, what goes around comes around. I remember fondly the afros of the late 60s and into the 70s. The bigger and wilder, the better.

AutobotsAttack
August 31st, 2017, 09:35 PM
In any paradigm shift, there will always, always, always going to be those on the extreme of what should or should not be; that’s life. The negative or challenging mindsets will grab people’s attention, but we have a choice in how we respond. The one thing I have learned being natural when it was not the norm is that people are going to do and say whatever, but ultimately, it is my life, and I ain’t gotta swallow anyone verbal bile and make myself sick. Yeah, the comments irritated me, but I chose not to dwell on them. When I dwell on negative stuff, I seem to get more of it, and become more receptive (or sensitive) to it in return. No thanks…

Those militant naturalistas got that way for a reason – bad experiences, the “good hair” obsession, seeing negative perceptions too much, etc. At times, they have had information that I was not privy to; I listened and learned. I understand the root of their message: there is nothing wrong with your natural hair and here is why, so everybody else need to adapt. Most of those folks mellow out in time, and new ones will take their place. Although I hope more go natural so it becomes commonplace, I choose to stay in a neutral position because it ain’t my life.

Now, the tables have turned. I work with folks in their 60s and up, and some are absolutely fascinated with my coils. White women – the group that supposedly hates this “wild”hair the most – give me compliments. It is weirding me out to be honest because I never got that until my coils clumped. Nobody in the real wears their hair like mine, mainly TWAs, locs, stretched styles, or braids. I would love to see just one person in person with hair like mine. One day, I think I will… :)

I can understand whole heartedly, however bad experiences don't justify people choosing to act that way and say things of that nature. That's just being downright ugly, and justifying that because of bad experiences people have had isn't a very good excuse in my opinion.

I can understand the message of being natural. But no where is it written that everyone "needs" to adapt. Adapt to what? A change in hairstyle? Adapt to being comfy in our own skin? Being proud of where you come from? I wouldn't call that adaptation so much as acceptance. And in this day and age the word "acceptance" is such a touchy word. I'd prefer the term self acceptance, simply because you aren't dragging others into your intrapersonal skills or lack thereof.

And that's sort of the issue I have a problem with. The new militant naturalistas replacing the older ones. Let all that stuff die out. It serves no purpose but to keep narrow-minded thinking Alive and well.

Personally I don't even think people's attention should be focused on natural hair being more commonplace. Maybe it's just my thinking process, but what would even be commonplace? Every single woman of color rocking natural hair? A few thousand? A few hundred? Even then how commonplace is it really? The world is rather diverse. If it's commonplace to you, in your own world, then that's all that should really matter. If more pick up on it, let it be from their own choice. That's what I support about the natural hair movement. Peoples own personal decisions to change, not because they're doing it for the sake of societal pressures.

And I'm going to have disagree, with the upmost respect on white women supposedly being the ones that hate "wild" hair. Maybe some years ago. And maybe when business atmosphere called for everyone to look the same. But in this day and age, those numbers are few and far in between, of white women who "hate wild hair". I think they've come to like kinky hair because they now understand it. I don't think that needs to be coined with "supposed hate".

Nymphe
August 31st, 2017, 10:33 PM
I can understand whole heartedly, however bad experiences don't justify people choosing to act that way and say things of that nature. That's just being downright ugly, and justifying that because of bad experiences people have had isn't a very good excuse in my opinion.

I can understand the message of being natural. But no where is it written that everyone "needs" to adapt. Adapt to what? A change in hairstyle? Adapt to being comfy in our own skin? Being proud of where you come from? I wouldn't call that adaptation so much as acceptance. And in this day and age the word "acceptance" is such a touchy word. I'd prefer the term self acceptance, simply because you aren't dragging others into your intrapersonal skills or lack thereof.

And that's sort of the issue I have a problem with. The new militant naturalistas replacing the older ones. Let all that stuff die out. It serves no purpose but to keep narrow-minded thinking Alive and well.

Personally I don't even think people's attention should be focused on natural hair being more commonplace. Maybe it's just my thinking process, but what would even be commonplace? Every single woman of color rocking natural hair? A few thousand? A few hundred? Even then how commonplace is it really? The world is rather diverse. If it's commonplace to you, in your own world, then that's all that should really matter. If more pick up on it, let it be from their own choice. That's what I support about the natural hair movement. Peoples own personal decisions to change, not because they're doing it for the sake of societal pressures.

And I'm going to have disagree, with the upmost respect on white women supposedly being the ones that hate "wild" hair. Maybe some years ago. And maybe when business atmosphere called for everyone to look the same. But in this day and age, those numbers are few and far in between, of white women who "hate wild hair". I think they've come to like kinky hair because they now understand it. I don't think that needs to be coined with "supposed hate".

What I mean by adaptation and commonplace is having natural hair becoming a regular, normal thing. Exposure to natural hair and educating the young are the keys to that change. Also, there was a study centering on different groups' perception of natural hair; that is what I was referring to when I said "supposedly." I couldn't care less about being accepted as I am about not having someone's livelihood threatened over something minor, like what comes out of someone's scalp and the way it comes out.

lapushka
September 1st, 2017, 07:25 AM
HOWEVER with the natural hair movement has come a slew of people who like to accuse other people of not "accepting themselves", and "denying their roots", or they're still being "oppressed" by people of lighter skin,
simply because they relax their hair. They argue, call folks names, and deem themselves holier than thou just because they decided to give up chemicals. The hair that grows out of your head will never dictate your sense of self-worth, your character
or your integrity. I accept people for who they are regardless of what they decide to do to themselves or their hair. And there's a lot of people that say these things, and ive come across plenty of Facebook, and YouTube
comments exhibiting this kind of behavior, and I would just like to see more acceptance of all hair types. Natural, relaxed, straight, curly, blonde, brown, bleached, etc. And that is actually the reason I retreated to this site
some years ago, here everyone is welcome.

I know what you mean. I commented on YT once on a 4c hair channel (the YTer has a lighter skinned sister who is 2c), but apparently the other commenter didn't know that. Anyway, I got "told off" for even being there with my 2b/c hair. She felt I shouldn't be there on a "black channel", and proceeded to cause me all sorts of issues on YT. I ended up blocking her. There was just no other way.

Nymphe
September 1st, 2017, 09:00 AM
What y'all see as ugly, I see other things...

I see pain.
I see fear.
I see rejection.

We all know the fruits of those three items: anger, frustration, isolationism, confusion, etc. The only things that help are time, patience, and understanding. I feel sorry for them; they won't earn my acceptance or derision. The best thing to do is leave them alone; trying to correct them just makes them dig in deeper.

The children... Our focus should be on the future, on them learning their hair as-is is perfectly fine, that you do not have to change it to please society, ignore the hatred and ignorance.

AutobotsAttack
September 1st, 2017, 09:05 AM
What y'all see as ugly, I see other things...

I see pain.
I see fear.
I see rejection.

We all know the fruits of those three items: anger, frustration, isolationism, confusion, etc. The only things that help are time, patience, and understanding. I feel sorry for them; they won't earn my acceptance or derision. The best thing to do is leave them alone; trying to correct them just makes them dig in deeper.

The children... Our focus should be on the future, on them learning their hair as-is is perfectly fine, that you do not have to change it to please society, ignore the hatred and ignorance.

I don't think any of us said to try and correct them. I think most of do our part on leaving them alone and surrounding ourselves with more positive things.
Whether we use adjectives or nouns to describe negative feelings people create or have acquired in life, still do not change their ability to think before they speak, or even look at things
in a different angle.

And of course we should teach our children that, as well as encourage them to do whatever they please to their hair, when they become of age.

AutobotsAttack
September 1st, 2017, 09:07 AM
I know what you mean. I commented on YT once on a 4c hair channel (the YTer has a lighter skinned sister who is 2c), but apparently the other commenter didn't know that. Anyway, I got "told off" for even being there with my 2b/c hair. She felt I shouldn't be there on a "black channel", and proceeded to cause me all sorts of issues on YT. I ended up blocking her. There was just no other way.

Theres whole bunch of underlying reasons people do that, I really don't feel like bringing up, but I understand. all it does is create for divisions amongst the planet.

Nymphe
September 1st, 2017, 09:31 AM
I don't think any of us said to try and correct them. I think most of do our part on leaving them alone and surrounding ourselves with more positive things.
Whether we use adjectives or nouns to describe negative feelings people create or have acquired in life, still do not change their ability to think before they speak, or even look at things
in a different angle.
Easier said than done. The pain from rejection is a beast.

Hairkay
September 1st, 2017, 11:30 AM
Easier said than done. The pain from rejection is a beast.

Sadly you are right. For my part I'll add tiny bit of positivity with my comments. I may respectfully state my personal opinions on products or certain practices but I'll always praise someone's beautiful hair (any hair type) and creativity with their hair. Without the natural hair movement I'd have never got to see those gorgeous heart shaped afros.

proo
September 1st, 2017, 12:01 PM
Come to think of it, I learned hair wrapping from a youtuber with relaxed hair-
I explored relaxed hair methods, and still do, because of the extreme care that is necessary.
I tend to lump it all together as methods for achieving certain looks/levels of care with afro textured hair.
And yeah- as for telling others how they should or shouldn't be. . seems ridiculous to me.
My perspective is completely particular to me and I assume everyone's is.

AutobotsAttack
September 1st, 2017, 12:48 PM
Easier said than done. The pain from rejection is a beast.

I believe that's where character comes into play. You don't have to be perfect, but self control is as powerful as the feelings of rejections, when looked at and channeled in a positive way. Case in point, the natural hair movement, WITHOUT being a butt face. I will agree with you though. It causes some sort of social cycle of back and forth negative feelings. You've got the people you've described, and then there's the others who haven't done anything but also get crap too.

I'm at least glad I can talk to you guys about it.

AutobotsAttack
September 1st, 2017, 12:49 PM
Come to think of it, I learned hair wrapping from a youtuber with relaxed hair-
I explored relaxed hair methods, and still do, because of the extreme care that is necessary.
I tend to lump it all together as methods for achieving certain looks/levels of care with afro textured hair.
And yeah- as for telling others how they should or shouldn't be. . seems ridiculous to me.
My perspective is completely particular to me and I assume everyone's is.

I agree. Very much Agree.

proo
September 11th, 2017, 07:43 AM
More products and processes:
African black soap
Hawaiian silky activator gel
Whipped shea butter
Detangling with diluted vinegar
Invisible hairnet hairstyles

Cherriezzzzz
September 11th, 2017, 12:16 PM
I believe that's where character comes into play. You don't have to be perfect, but self control is as powerful as the feelings of rejections, when looked at and channeled in a positive way. Case in point, the natural hair movement, WITHOUT being a butt face. I will agree with you though. It causes some sort of social cycle of back and forth negative feelings. You've got the people you've described, and then there's the others who haven't done anything but also get crap too.

I'm at least glad I can talk to you guys about it.

You're so right. I loooooove this. It is about character!

I don't let my past control how I act. If I'm a jerk, I apologize. It's no one's fault but my own. Humbled hearts heal.

Not ALL rude, mean, people are "made" that way by negative experience. Most ppl know someone who had it all and are ungrateful, angry, and act so badly towards others. Some people suffer so much and wouldn't hurt a fly! Sometimes people are just vain and selfish! Don't project your past onto others if you've been hurt. No one can know some one else's heart and motivation. I frankly don't care why someone is rude or mean. The cycle has to stop somewhere... let it start with me!

Bitterness and victim hood are devils that ruin lives. Cause it's only gunna hurt you to hurt others. It is such a vicious cycle. And even then... sometimes it makes others feel good to put people in their place! We live in a world where people like to hurt others... It's not simple. You can't just say oh I feel bad for them. Why? Cause you can't always know why they do what they do!

But i know I can only control ME! And quite honestly, so can everyone else.

It's just hair LoL :slap::pins:shudder::soapbox:

15 years ago when I was in hair school this wasn't an issue. The ethic haired girls helped me tame my mane! And they braided cornrows into silky straight blonde hair. It was so much fun! I pray the next generation rejects the spirit of division that is do prevalent in everything now... even hair! :grouphug:

Cherriezzzzz
September 11th, 2017, 12:29 PM
Hahaha wow this thread got philosophical!

About natural hair though... in school growing up it would have been unheard of to let my poufy waves fly! I would be "expected" to straighten my hair and make it behave. I loooooove the freedom to let it be "who it is." So long as my maintenance is simple, my hair is healthy, and it is of course LONG! Hahaha I'm finally free to let my hair be frizzy if that's what it wants!

reilly0167
September 12th, 2017, 04:48 AM
I agree, though I don't personally use these products anymore but I have.

The natural hair movement has really changed my life in a way. I would've NEVER grown to love and take care of my hair had it not been for the NHM. I truly am happy to be apart of it and I am grateful for all of the natural hair Youtubers who helped to start it all. Despite some of the negativity that occurs in the natural hair community and some of the negative things people say about us, I am happy that it exists! I'm also happy that a movement like this can inspire people of different backgrounds.

Blakizbeautyful and Natural85 are my favorite Youtubers and were also the first I discovered in the beginning of my natural hair journey. Who are some of your favorites?
I love sun kissed alba, curly penny.:)

lapushka
September 12th, 2017, 05:15 AM
I have a whole list of tightly coiled ladies in my feed.

I have found I can use the same products, the same kind of stylers, I just have to use *way* less of them, like only a coinsize per layer in the LOC/LCO method - that is good enough for me. And it works!

proo
September 12th, 2017, 05:33 AM
As a mostly SO practitioner I've learned to use Jamaican black castor oil in my scritch-
I lightly oil my comb by rubbing it between lightly oiled palms
then I scritch away.
This method provides just enough oil for slip-
Plus it makes my eyes roll back in my head and my hind leg kick

YvetteVarie
September 12th, 2017, 07:22 AM
As a mostly SO practitioner I've learned to use Jamaican black castor oil in my scritch-
I lightly oil my comb by rubbing it between lightly oiled palms
then I scritch away.
This method provides just enough oil for slip-
Plus it makes my eyes roll back in my head and my hind leg kick

The bolded made me smile (couldn't laugh as I am at work). I am curious about how you transitioned to SO. How did you do it? What were your biggest challenges?

Nymphe
September 12th, 2017, 08:45 AM
Using heat (steam or hooded dryer) to get moisture from DCs to penetrate has been a game-changer for some. There are a few still having problems with hydration and I hope more solutions are discovered.

I am happy to see more supercoilies wearing wash and go, embracing their texture.

I love my Loc Soc (http://soclocsoc.com/).

Hairkay
September 12th, 2017, 11:04 AM
Using heat (steam or hooded dryer) to get moisture from DCs to penetrate has been a game-changer for some. There are a few still having problems with hydration and I hope more solutions are discovered.

I am happy to see more supercoilies wearing wash and go, embracing their texture.

I love my Loc Soc (http://soclocsoc.com/).

Ooh thanks, that's the first time I'm seeing that site, Nymphe, I wonder if sis has seen it. If not I'll enlighten her.

proo
September 12th, 2017, 02:05 PM
Hi Yvettevarie-
I came to SO by way of WO;
WO wasn't working since it seemed to require too much manipulation and produced helmet head. It did help me get used to my own sebum and not using products though. I realized that the longer I went between rinses, the less waxy and more manageable my hair became (relatively speaking). My SO routine evolved gradually, and is still evolving. It's been 3(?) years now that I've been completely product-free and I love it- productfree in the sense that I don't leave anything in or on my hair except sebum.
I do rinse about every 4-6 weeks, although lately it's been longer.
My rinse: a few drops of sls shampoo in a bucket of water, followed by a highly dilute vinegar rinse
followed by a distilled water rinse if I'm feeling luxurious.
I usually wrap it when 80% dry, stretching really works for me.
Thinking of getting a bonnet hair dryer for the winter for dry silk wrapping.

I'm 58, not much sebum compared to my younger days, but I'm now convinced that product was a big culprit.
As I've said many times on the SO thread, hair without product is a whole nother animal
I really never knew the true characteristics of my hair till now

proo
September 13th, 2017, 02:21 PM
Any bonnet dryer recommendations?
I've never had one, think I want the small portable kind with the blowup bonnet-
When I read reviews on amazon they're kind of all over the map. .
Not into a lot of heat, just want to shorten my drying time this winter so it doesn't take ALL DAY.
And for dry silk wrapping

Nymphe
September 13th, 2017, 03:46 PM
Any bonnet dryer recommendations?
I've never had one, think I want the small portable kind with the blowup bonnet-
When I read reviews on amazon they're kind of all over the map. .
Not into a lot of heat, just want to shorten my drying time this winter so it doesn't take ALL DAY.
And for dry silk wrapping

They still make them? The one I had wanted was discontinued before I decided to buy it. I see folks using hooded dryers of various price ranges and those bonnet attachments for handhelds.

Cherriezzzzz
September 13th, 2017, 04:18 PM
My grandmother was a hair dresser. She had a chair with a hood in her house! Heaven! I had great hair at her house haha

proo
September 14th, 2017, 05:29 AM
My mom had a large hard plastic hood style dryer,
perfect for her '60s roller sets.
I don't own even a blow dryer at this point, but I'm thinking maybe that's the way to go with the bonnet attachment.
Is 20 minutes use outside a blow dryer's capability?

meteor
September 14th, 2017, 09:07 AM
I went to a couple salons that used hooded dryers on me and I really disliked how they felt on head, on skin, on ears - just loud and hot and even a bit claustrophobia-inducing. Plus, with my thickness, they made me sit there for ages, so I always ended up getting out from under the uncomfortable dryer with my hair still wet. I guess the good thing about hooded dryers is that your arms don't get sore like with a standard blow-dryer. But I wonder if hooded dryers on high or medium heat could be more damaging to external (cuticle) layer than standard blow-dryers on equivalent settings, since the flow is uninterrupted and the distance to hair surface really short for anyone with a large head and lots of hair to cram in there? :hmm:

But I am as happy as I can be with air-drying, to be honest. Even though it takes ages, I can do other things and ignore the hair.

proo
September 14th, 2017, 10:35 AM
Yes, I'm definitely not up for heat damage, not even the tiniest bit!
It's been so long since I've used a dryer of any kind, I've sort of forgotten what it's like-
I'm hoping to use it only on medium heat, covering my hair with a silky scarf as protection
and either roll it or wrap it
to shorten dry time somewhat.

proo
January 17th, 2018, 06:46 PM
Hey kids
More observations:
Turbaning dry hair in a thin plastic bag is very moisturizing
I crocheted myself a tubi wrap cap!
Got a blow dryer and bonnet attachment; works great with the plastic bag turban
Experimenting with loc hairstyles on my unloc-ed hair; I’m intrigued with using my own hair to secure styles
Successful cedar tea hair rinse
Curious about clay washes
New youtuber: classyAshli

Hairkay
January 19th, 2018, 11:33 PM
Hey kids
More observations:
Turbaning dry hair in a thin plastic bag is very moisturizing
I crocheted myself a tubi wrap cap!
Got a blow dryer and bonnet attachment; works great with the plastic bag turban
Experimenting with loc hairstyles on my unloc-ed hair; I’m intrigued with using my own hair to secure styles
Successful cedar tea hair rinse
Curious about clay washes
New youtuber: classyAshli

I've been chatting with my sis about the joys and convenience of not having to look for hair accessories to tie up or secure hair. Sis has locs. I keep my hair braided/plaited. I do lwb, plaited or twisted and plaited ponytails by using one plait to wrap around the others. I also tuck my flatwists/cornrows/French braids back in so hair isn't hanging around.

proo
January 20th, 2018, 07:04 AM
Yes I imagine twists/braids behave much the same as locs in this way.
I really like the “basket weave “ effect-
Pretty, low manip, protective.

proo
January 22nd, 2018, 10:15 AM
Also curious about African threading as a protective style-
It seems if I threaded 6-8 sections around the perimeter I could rope braid them into a decent crown braid.

Lanalavallama
January 22nd, 2018, 10:16 AM
Also curious about African threading as a protective style-
It seems if I threaded 6-8 sections around the perimeter I could rope braid them into a decent crown braid.

If you do this, would you please share pictures?

proo
January 23rd, 2018, 06:59 AM
I don’t have the technology for that-
But it’s an intriguing idea, if I do it I’ll definitely report back.
In my meandering through the internet I haven’t come across much on actually wearing threading as a style, usually it’s covered up.
So that’s what I’m shooting for:
A threaded style that looks cute.

Lanalavallama
January 27th, 2018, 10:00 AM
I don’t have the technology for that-
But it’s an intriguing idea, if I do it I’ll definitely report back.
In my meandering through the internet I haven’t come across much on actually wearing threading as a style, usually it’s covered up.
So that’s what I’m shooting for:
A threaded style that looks cute.

Looking forward to your feedback.

Hairkay
January 27th, 2018, 01:31 PM
Also curious about African threading as a protective style-
It seems if I threaded 6-8 sections around the perimeter I could rope braid them into a decent crown braid.


If you do this, would you please share pictures?

I have seen a thread crown braid style on Youtube. Here it is.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTzakOyFB0Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NU6zPFtmCQo

Here's a spiral

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rg7HfRj8fTk

I'm likely to go for the quick easy styles like this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zqqu8pfnYss

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQaJi52UNYs

proo
January 27th, 2018, 03:17 PM
These are great, Hairkay-
And of course the mommas already got this!
It cracks me up when I’m reinventing some ancient wheel. .
Interested in elastic thread, found some clear at the $ store, going to start with 5-6 sections
Will report back ��
Also interested in using yarn paranda style; 1-2 strands so it will be more “threaded “.

lapushka
January 27th, 2018, 04:16 PM
If you do this, would you please share pictures?

If you watch the channel 22 century natural woman, she has *very* long hair and does threading quite a lot!
https://www.youtube.com/user/Moorevolve

ThrowNormanAway
January 27th, 2018, 11:03 PM
I absolutely love the core values of the natural hair movement. I like the acceptance part, the versatility of different textures, learning new tips, styles, and tricks.
Most products meant for natural hair, I use freely anyways as a relaxed head. Personally I've accepted my hair from a young age, and it didn't take me being natural or relaxed to learn how
to accept myself or my own head of hair. I was natural for around 5 years during my highschool days and some of middle school, and I loved the curls, the kinks, the fluff, and how I could
go from bone straight to curly overnight. I've learned to love my hair in its natural state without chemicals, and in its relaxed state. I find you can never have too much info on how to care
for hair in its many styles that it comes in. I also like the many variations of curls you can come across. Some are so finely curled the hair in and of itself just looks like tiny slinkies, some have
big flowing curls, some have smaller coiled-like curls, and some is soft, fluffy, and adorably kinky.


HOWEVER with the natural hair movement has come a slew of people who like to accuse other people of not "accepting themselves", and "denying their roots", or they're still being "oppressed" by people of lighter skin,
simply because they relax their hair. They argue, call folks names, and deem themselves holier than thou just because they decided to give up chemicals. The hair that grows out of your head will never dictate your sense of self-worth, your character
or your integrity. I accept people for who they are regardless of what they decide to do to themselves or their hair. And there's a lot of people that say these things, and ive come across plenty of Facebook, and YouTube
comments exhibiting this kind of behavior, and I would just like to see more acceptance of all hair types. Natural, relaxed, straight, curly, blonde, brown, bleached, etc. And that is actually the reason I retreated to this site
some years ago, here everyone is welcome.

your last paragraph there... I've witnessed youtube comments, tumblr is especially toxic for that stuff.. all kinds of people out there saying even that it's appropriation to even have curly hair, even naturally, if you're not black. You know, like the millions and millions of people of other races who naturally have curly hair of all types. like, what? How on earth is that conclusion drawn? Very upsetting. I love that so many more people are embracing natural waves, curls, straight, all colors, etc. people of all races manage to have textures and hair types of all types. I don't want to go too down this very upsetting rabbit hole or go on a rant, but it is very disturbing that there's ever a holier-than-thou attitude to be had when we're all just out here trying to do our best and live our lives.

chomsky
January 28th, 2018, 02:07 AM
your last paragraph there... I've witnessed youtube comments, tumblr is especially toxic for that stuff.. all kinds of people out there saying even that it's appropriation to even have curly hair, even naturally, if you're not black. You know, like the millions and millions of people of other races who naturally have curly hair of all types. like, what? How on earth is that conclusion drawn? Very upsetting. I love that so many more people are embracing natural waves, curls, straight, all colors, etc. people of all races manage to have textures and hair types of all types. I don't want to go too down this very upsetting rabbit hole or go on a rant, but it is very disturbing that there's ever a holier-than-thou attitude to be had when we're all just out here trying to do our best and live our lives.

You and AutobotAttack have summed up my feelings about the movement perfectly. I love it as a source of knowledge (even if the products are too pricey for me haha), and the idea of loving your hair as is, but that's it. I've seen too many people saying that certain people "don't belong" or that mixed race girls, like myself, are "hijacking the movement" (literally saw a video like that the other day). Curly hair isn't exclusive, neither is wavy hair, straight hair isn't exclusive either. Why do we get hung up about the superficial when we're here for the same cause? It just doesn't feel inclusive at all, and I don't tend to linger where I'm not wanted, so.

I binge on the hair straightening videos though. I don't know why but when I watch others do it, it gives me the satisfaction that I feel when I do it to my own head. :lol:

Lanalavallama
January 28th, 2018, 02:58 AM
Thank you for the suggestions Hairkay and Lapushka. Will have a look at those.

Interesting comments regarding the potentially divisive nature of some that is displayed all over the interwebs. It's why I stopped reading a few websites; people started making haircare a very political topic. All I want is to grow my own hair in the healthiest way possible, and for me that means no chemical straightening. But others are free to make their own choices.
And yes, that is why I love this site. We are all here for the hair.

Also, a number of these divisive "purists" who feel others are appropriating curly culture, have ZERO issues when a kinky/curly/coily social media personality they identify with straightens or flat irons their hair. Hypocritical much?

proo
January 28th, 2018, 07:10 AM
Interesting about the hair straightening videos, chomsky-
I have a hard time watching those since that’s the way I destroyed my poor hair backintheday.
My rabbit hole is watching big chops and deva cuts-
I find it very relaxing and. . satisfying.

I think today’s the day I’ll try that crown braid experiment-
Will report back!

Hairkay
January 28th, 2018, 07:41 AM
Thank you for the suggestions Hairkay and Lapushka. Will have a look at those.

Interesting comments regarding the potentially divisive nature of some that is displayed all over the interwebs. It's why I stopped reading a few websites; people started making haircare a very political topic. All I want is to grow my own hair in the healthiest way possible, and for me that means no chemical straightening. But others are free to make their own choices.
And yes, that is why I love this site. We are all here for the hair.

Also, a number of these divisive "purists" who feel others are appropriating curly culture, have ZERO issues when a kinky/curly/coily social media personality they identify with straightens or flat irons their hair. Hypocritical much?

I just take what I want out of social media and ignore the rest. I'd be too irritable trying to go through everyone's ideas of which identity is what and who fits where and what hair characteristics for certain people "should" be.


Interesting about the hair straightening videos, chomsky-
I have a hard time watching those since that’s the way I destroyed my poor hair backintheday.
My rabbit hole is watching big chops and deva cuts-
I find it very relaxing and. . satisfying.

I think today’s the day I’ll try that crown braid experiment-
Will report back!
Have fun.
I'm not too fond of the straightening videos simply because it's not something I'd do myself. The only interesting thing about them to me is seeing the difference between fully stretched out hair and shrinkage. I like seeing the different creative hair styles. It's an extra treat when they manage to use what hair they've already got.

proo
January 29th, 2018, 04:31 AM
WELL I tried the crown braid idea with banding-
6 sections banded with tiny black rubber bands, no twisting or doubling over of the bands, just put on down the lengths.
Then beginning at the frontmost piece, I rope braided them,
Continuing to work the tail around with my trusty topsytail till completely incorporated.
Result: okay. . Didn’t feel rock solid or look too great in the back.
Analysis: not enough sections
What I’m shooting for is a cute protective style that I can wear for a few days ; I’m quite sure threading would be more secure, so onward.
My recent YouTube investigation on the subject reminded me of one of my absolute favs- frotastic.
I love her 1 + 1 method of threading.

YvetteVarie
January 29th, 2018, 07:53 AM
I donít have the technology for that-
But itís an intriguing idea, if I do it Iíll definitely report back.
In my meandering through the internet I havenít come across much on actually wearing threading as a style, usually itís covered up.
So thatís what Iím shooting for:
A threaded style that looks cute.

I will ask for permission from a FB group I am on to post some of their threading pictures here. Its quite a trend in my country right now

proo
January 29th, 2018, 08:01 AM
Thank you so much!
Eagerly anticipating

lapushka
January 29th, 2018, 09:07 AM
your last paragraph there... I've witnessed youtube comments, tumblr is especially toxic for that stuff.. all kinds of people out there saying even that it's appropriation to even have curly hair, even naturally, if you're not black. You know, like the millions and millions of people of other races who naturally have curly hair of all types. like, what? How on earth is that conclusion drawn? Very upsetting. I love that so many more people are embracing natural waves, curls, straight, all colors, etc. people of all races manage to have textures and hair types of all types. I don't want to go too down this very upsetting rabbit hole or go on a rant, but it is very disturbing that there's ever a holier-than-thou attitude to be had when we're all just out here trying to do our best and live our lives.

This girl has gotten a lot of flack for not being black, and is even doubted on the "naturality" of her hair. I'll link her YT here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQc1gwjbIsPOU02zQ7zZWFg

We have a white girl, with straw-colored blonde hair living here around the corner, and she has afro curls, really tightly woven curls, like a 3b/3c pattern, I think. People look at her as if she's some kind of freak of nature. It's altogether sad, really. :(

Hairkay
January 29th, 2018, 11:19 AM
This girl has gotten a lot of flack for not being black, and is even doubted on the "naturality" of her hair. I'll link her YT here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQc1gwjbIsPOU02zQ7zZWFg

We have a white girl, with straw-colored blonde hair living here around the corner, and she has afro curls, really tightly woven curls, like a 3b/3c pattern, I think. People look at her as if she's some kind of freak of nature. It's altogether sad, really. :(

Where I grew up no one would bat an eyelid of someone looking like this though most will be darker. Her hair is curlier than some of my mixed race family who look white if you didn't know their parentage. If people are being abusive and attacking this woman she and others who see the attacks need to report it.

proo
January 30th, 2018, 10:32 AM
More about the topsy tail-
What an amazing tool for sewing hair, either with yarn/thread, or a piece of your own hair.
Hopefully you know what I’m talking about, it’s a large plastic needle generally used to flip a ponytail -
I can achieve that with my fingers
Brainstorming about using it to secure my crown braid by sewing it with a couple of thin rope braids. .

ThrowNormanAway
January 30th, 2018, 04:45 PM
More about the topsy tail-
What an amazing tool for sewing hair, either with yarn/thread, or a piece of your own hair.
Hopefully you know what I’m talking about, it’s a large plastic needle generally used to flip a ponytail -
I can achieve that with my fingers
Brainstorming about using it to secure my crown braid by sewing it with a couple of thin rope braids. .

thats a great idea! if you try it out please post pictures.

proo
January 31st, 2018, 04:09 PM
I love learning from young people

proo
February 8th, 2018, 06:27 AM
Did my monthly rinse with. . (drumroll)- snow!
Turns out, it takes ALOT of snow to make a decent amount of rinse,
A couple of large bucketfuls.
I melted it with some cedar fronds, added a bit of vinegar and rinsed away.
Scalp feels wonderful, hair very smooth, shine is off the charts!

proo
March 12th, 2019, 08:32 AM
Reviving my crusty thread-
Have any yíall experimented with the very popular rice water rinse?
I LOVE it- extremely strengthening

BerrySara
March 12th, 2019, 10:01 AM
Reviving my crusty thread-
Have any y’all experimented with the very popular rice water rinse?
I LOVE it- extremely strengthening

I have not but I have been really curious about it for a while. Only thing that has stopped me is not knowing the rice fermenting process/details. Also it requires some research, planning aka effort on my part lol. But I keep seeing it pop up a lot.

When you say its strengthening, it is like a protein treatment? Have you seen less breakage?

proo
March 12th, 2019, 10:23 AM
Apparently it’s a significant protein treatment-
I brew it overnight so it’s not stinky and use it as a conditioning rinse with a splash of vinegar.
Then I rinse, preferably with melted snow water, so it’s not in there very long.
I don’t use products so that’s probably why a mere rinse does it for me.
As to your question,berrysara, my individual strands feel denser and more resilient and my shed, which was not much to begin with, has reduced to almost nothing.

blackgothicdoll
March 12th, 2019, 09:58 PM
Interesting thread. I don't know my ethnicity more than I'm black American, that's about it. Most of us are 70-85% African, the rest depends on what other ethnicities were enslaved with our ancestors or where our ancestors sewed their roots following freedom (for those of us whose roots involved slavery, my dad's side did, my mom's is a mystery). Anyhow, my skin tone is enough to tell me or anyone else I am a black American, I can do what I please with my hair.

I had a white male tell me when I wore my hair straight it was cultural appropriation of Europeans... Clearly a troll but seriously, who cares? I don't think I've seen much of the militant natural thing going around recently (re: if you relax your hair you hate yourself) but I do remember when the NHM first exploded there was plenty of that.

I digress, I never knew going natural was an option at all until we got a high school student who transferred from Florida I think, with long natural hair she wore straight sometimes. This was 2009/2010. It wasn't a big movement then, so when I told my mom I wanted to stop gettng relaxers she thought I was crazy and said 'you NEED a relax, your hair is nappy'. I still big chopped in 2010, was made fun of until I went to college and a lot of people my age had started going natural as well.

Tangent aside, I think the movement is wonderful to show people that there are other options. It's not just black women, it's women with a texture of hair who have been trained in some way to change their texture. It's nice to show all of us that we can grow our hair from the roots, without heat or chemicals or what not and still be beautiful.

Today, it's more about product reviews, consumerism, fads, clickbait and page traffic. Could live without it and that's actually what brought me to this forum. I don't want to buy a million products or rub mud on my hair I just want to stop damaging it and treating it like crap. I tend to watch videos of most curly hair just because curly hair is natural hair and vice versa. I do understand the difference culturally, but I also hate divisiveness as well as the monetization of women struggling with their hair.

So in summary, I have mixed feelings about how it's started and where it's going.

proo
March 13th, 2019, 02:54 PM
Thanks for chiming in blackgothicdoll-
I find these circuitous stories of owning one’s uniqueness fascinating!
Could you share some bullet points of your current routine please?

blackgothicdoll
March 13th, 2019, 05:16 PM
Hi proo! I currently am still working on it, but have been consistently using pointers from 1ballerina (YouTube): https://fas.org/sgp/library/quist2/index.html and herlucidsky (fotki): https://public.fotki.com/Herlucidsky/my-natural-hair-/

What they both do is stretch their hair with braids and wear braid-outs as their texture. The only difference is I don't wear my hair out because I have a lot of straight hair from heat damage, so I bun it or dutch braids, or otherwise style the resulting braid waves. It helps avoid knots and tangles from shrinkage, and helps me efficiently apply product to my hair. I also use shea butter, which they both recommend. So my routine is:

Heavy oil/Hot oil Treatment: Warm oil and apply heavily to hair and scalp, leave on for 3 hours or overnight
Condition: (CWC), the first conditioner helps get the oil out because the shampoo alone won't.
Wash: Shampoo, sulfate or sulfate free alternating
Condition: Second condition, sometimes a deep conditioner

Then I style using LCO, usually Kinky Curly Knot Today, whipped shea butter, and any oil (I have so many). I put in my 10-12 braids, let those braids dry for an entire day, then I take them out and usually go right to dutch braids to stretch the curls out even more. As the week passes I can do buns and such.

proo
March 14th, 2019, 06:58 PM
Thanks for all that bgd-
How often do you shampoo?
Do you consider porosity?

blackgothicdoll
March 15th, 2019, 09:38 PM
Thanks for all that bgd-
How often do you shampoo?
Do you consider porosity?

I don't really have a routine, usually just when I feel the need to, which can be anywhere between 3-7 days, 5 being the most likely. I used to consider porosity, but honestly lately I've totally forgotten about it. My hair seems to fit the description of low porosity, but I've never done a porosity test as I read they can be inaccurate.

proo
March 16th, 2019, 06:43 AM
Are protein treatments in your rotation?

lapushka
March 16th, 2019, 10:05 AM
I have watched the hype evolve on YT. It probably will come and go like any other new fad. I have no intention of wasting rice for this. If it is at all a waste; nor am I prepared to put this on my head; I have plenty of "real" products to use up. ;) Even though, some companies have jumped on the bandwagon and are doing some form of rice water in their products - they are out there!

Hairkay
March 16th, 2019, 02:35 PM
I have watched the hype evolve on YT. It probably will come and go like any other new fad. I have no intention of wasting rice for this. If it is at all a waste; nor am I prepared to put this on my head; I have plenty of "real" products to use up. ;) Even though, some companies have jumped on the bandwagon and are doing some form of rice water in their products - they are out there!

Yes that trend will run it's course until the next one. I will happily use DIY stuff because that's most suitable for my situation. I knew about using oats long before someone mentioned it on youtube and I do use that. Rice would suit those who regularly cook with it so it's readily available to them. This would be those who have trouble getting hair products due to cost or lack of access or allergy problems.

blackgothicdoll
March 16th, 2019, 02:49 PM
Well, lately I do swear by flax seed gel, I add some shea butter and a tbsp of fenugreek seeds while cooking it and it's the best thing since sliced bread. Most gels dry out my hair or have protein, or smell too much, etc, so gel was the one product I just could not find a match for in almost 10 years (well, ecostyler olive was a hit until they changed their formula, now it does not work in my humid area). I tried rice water but wasn't really impressed enough to continue it... plus the sanitary concerns of putting anything fermented in my hair. :/

proo I do a protein treatment generally when I think to myself 'huh, when's the last time I did a protein treatment'? Lol. I think I don't actually need them, because months can pass and I will see no sign of moisture overload or of even desiring protein. It's usually an afterthought, to be safe, or because I've heard I'm supposed to do it so I really can't give any true experience regarding protein for my hair. :/

meteor
March 17th, 2019, 08:22 PM
I definitely learned a lot from the natural hair movement... mostly techniques, especially:

- oil rinses (they are sometimes called "ROO - rinse-out oil" on the LHC, for some reason),
- squish-to-condish,
- pre-poo and other forms of oiling,
- LOC,
- silky scarves for bed,
- protective styling in different ways that can actually can look interesting (including experimenting with synthetic hair instead of messing with your own natural hair),
- washing hair in sections (in braids) and other forms of tangle prevention and management... and the list goes on and on.

Even though I can use only a couple ideas at this point (silk scarves and sectioned washing), since my hair is too long now for anything other than benign neglect at this point, other ideas are still solid and can work for many heads of hair.

But I think the most important thing I learned was to take hair seriously and not chop it off just because it can take a bit of time sometimes. Natural hair movement turned around my hair philosophy completely, because I used to think that if hair is too massive to handle, then I should just cut it, but NHM promotes a lot of patience and acceptance, there is also no shaming for significant lengths. If anything, there is an actual appreciation/respect of length, including on men and kids.

I think overall it's pretty helpful. :)
Oh, and my favorite naturalistas are probably the Urban Bush Babes (https://cdn1.poz.com/27014_Urban-Bush-Babes-1.jpg_90a3a4cf-fd81-45be-a2e7-00a5a2b0be75.jpeg) (Cipriana and TK Quann), but I like many others that were mentioned here, too.

proo
March 18th, 2019, 09:44 AM
Oh yeah, the Quann sisters are inspiring!
As for rice rinsing, Iím not one to jump on YouTube hype given the minimalist nature of my routine.
Iím shooting for zero residue with anything applied so as not to upset natural ph/acid mantle.
Rice rinsing provides this as well as conditioning and strengthening;
I didnít expect the profound effect.
Iíve used it since November which for me is 6 rinses.
One womanís experience.

Also experimenting with silky scarf turbans/head coverings under hats and while at home in this harsh winter.

BerrySara
March 18th, 2019, 10:47 AM
I understand and admire the natural hair movement and the empowerment it enables. I know I am not included or invited to be part of it but I am totally okay with that. The political message it carries for black women to be accepted and embraced for their natural hair texture has had such a positive reach that it extends beyond the originally intended group. I think its educational, eye-opening and incredible empowering to see young girls receive the message that their natural texture growing out of their scalp is not only acceptable but it is beautiful!

I truly think a lot of people were blinded to the struggles and discrimination that black women (and men) have had to face with regards to their natural hair. The movement brought these issues to the forefront and questioned it which brought awareness and acceptance amongst those directly affected but it has also rippled through to many others who were oblivious to those struggles or lacked the awareness and understanding. It had an affect in many other forms as well; from product availability (growing up curly product were definitely not a thing), to media and fashion industry where its far more common to see natural textures than ever before (we still have a long way to go). We now see more and more black celebrities (Issa Rae, Lupita Nyang'O, Solange Knowles, Viola Davis etc) rocking their natural textures at award shows and events, which just wasn't something you would often see even 10 years ago.

Most importantly, I think it's incredibly beautiful to see the change in women who truly love and accept their natural texture and who feel beautiful and empowered regardless of what is considered "main stream beauty". As women we are constantly criticized for our looks; whether it's hair, body size or age. So to stand up against it in any form is a positive as it's truly no one's business to dictate how anyone should look. Our value as beings is not measured by how we look, yet that is the message that so many girls receive even today. So a movement that challenges that, I truly support and admire.

I understand that these days it has morphed into product sales, views and reviews. But despite this, in my opinion, the original message isn't lost. Having too many product options is better than none.

I owe my own journey to accepting my 3c hair to the natural hair movement. I may have been on the outside of the acceptable group for the movement, but it still taught me the messages no one else did. To accept, embrace and yes even love my own hair - That was 100% because of the natural hair movement and for that I am truly grateful.

H o n є y ❤
March 18th, 2019, 11:14 AM
BerrySara & meteor I love hearing your stories! And I really appreciate your respectful approach to the movement.