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Lavendersugar
August 7th, 2017, 05:31 PM
Living a semi desert climate my hair is thirsty.

The LOC method is too much. Aloe did not work.
Just started doing hair mask but it's not enough.
I was using John Masters and my hair started splitting. I did S&D to help remove as much of thevsplits as possible and did a 1inch trim. I only blow dry in the winter and use a cone based serum for protection.


My hair is at my hip and do wash often. Not always but washing has never been an issue for me in terms of hair condition. Only use products that not test on animals.

My thought was to do night treatments to help add moisture.

I'm at a lost of what else to do.








In all honesty if anything is complicated I'm probably not going to do it.

Cg
August 7th, 2017, 06:04 PM
Sometimes in winter I dampen the ends with water and a couple drops of argan oil before night bunning. Not sure it makes much difference, but I did buy the oil, so....

Lavendersugar
August 7th, 2017, 06:43 PM
Sometimes in winter I dampen the ends with water and a couple drops of argan oil before night bunning. Not sure it makes much difference, but I did buy the oil, so....

Hmm... I did buy some at Trader Joe's. I'll give it a go. I have amla oil too.

Anje
August 7th, 2017, 07:10 PM
Try an SMT, or at least warm conditioner and honey blended. 30-45 minutes under a plastic cap/bag, then rinse really thoroughly. (You don't want to leave humectants in your hair in desert climates, but bagged up it will help your hair get more moisture.) Maybe smooth a drop or three of baby oil or your favorite hair oil over your damp hair after rinsing when you take it from the towel, and let it air dry.

Corvana
August 7th, 2017, 07:11 PM
Make sure whatever you're using isn't a humectant. That will pull moisture out of whatever has more of it: the air or your hair. If the air is dry, then they'll be the opposite of what you want! Aloe and honey are two humectants I can think of. I believe if you used them as a rinsed off treatment they would do well, but less so in dry air as a leave in.

MoonRabbit
August 7th, 2017, 07:33 PM
I would also add that it may take up to a few months to really see results. It took my hair 3 months of weekly deep treatments to start feeling moisturized.

Lavendersugar
August 7th, 2017, 08:59 PM
Try an SMT, or at least warm conditioner and honey blended. 30-45 minutes under a plastic cap/bag, then rinse really thoroughly. (You don't want to leave humectants in your hair in desert climates, but bagged up it will help your hair get more moisture.) Maybe smooth a drop or three of baby oil or your favorite hair oil over your damp hair after rinsing when you take it from the towel, and let it air dry.

I have used SMT in the past. I'll give it another try.


Make sure whatever you're using isn't a humectant. That will pull moisture out of whatever has more of it: the air or your hair. If the air is dry, then they'll be the opposite of what you want! Aloe and honey are two humectants I can think of. I believe if you used them as a rinsed off treatment they would do well, but less so in dry air as a leave in.
Yes, aloe as a leave in really dried it out. I'll try SMT again. Not tried it in months.


I would also add that it may take up to a few months to really see results. It took my hair 3 months of weekly deep treatments to start feeling moisturized.

Oh wow. Good to know. Thank You

school of fish
August 7th, 2017, 09:50 PM
I can relate. I have a similar texture to yours and in my case I suspect my naturally smooth slicked down cuticle has been slammed shut after years of henna applications, making it hard to get and keep moisture in there.

My routine is based on daily washing (it really likes getting soaked, cleaned and conditioned that often - that moisturizes for me better than anything else), but I find that in the brittle dry winter months I need a little extra - so I add very light oil rinses pretty much the whole season we have the central heating on. I use maximum 5 drops of mineral oil (jojoba also works for me) in between my shampoo & conditioner steps. Keeps the static away and guards against snapping I get from dryness.

I can't use leave-ins - everything and anything builds up on me, even in single-drop quantities - but oil rinsing I can do! :)

Anje
August 7th, 2017, 10:17 PM
I can't do leave ins either. They just make my hair feel gunky. I could absorb a couple drops of oil, tops, on my fingertip length ii hair. Never liked how my hair or scalp feel after damp bunning or long treatments. But SMTs do it for me, and if your hair likes protein or seems lank/stretchy you can add some gelatin to it (just dissolve in a little hot water first). A lot of folks also swear by humidifiers. I'm in the Midwest where forced air heat in the winter is really drying, and having a whole-house humidifier on the furnace does seem to make a difference for my skin.

butterfly_dream
August 8th, 2017, 07:19 AM
Another vote for daily washing/wetting plus a couple drops of MO on damp hair.
This routine helps my hair to stay moisturized.

truepeacenik
August 8th, 2017, 08:56 AM
Try an SMT, or at least warm conditioner and honey blended. 30-45 minutes under a plastic cap/bag, then rinse really thoroughly. (You don't want to leave humectants in your hair in desert climates, but bagged up it will help your hair get more moisture.) Maybe smooth a drop or three of baby oil or your favorite hair oil over your damp hair after rinsing when you take it from the towel, and let it air dry.

I'd notuse honey in semi arid, unless the bathroom is steamy.
My town averages 35 percent humidity in summer. Far less in winter. Inside is drier yet.
I have gone to the simple side, a diluted non sulphate shampoo and a mid weight to heavy conditioner. Oil on ends while damp. Monthly pre shampoo oiling. Simple olive oil.

Lavendersugar
August 8th, 2017, 11:41 AM
I can relate. I have a similar texture to yours and in my case I suspect my naturally smooth slicked down cuticle has been slammed shut after years of henna applications, making it hard to get and keep moisture in there.

My routine is based on daily washing (it really likes getting soaked, cleaned and conditioned that often - that moisturizes for me better than anything else), but I find that in the brittle dry winter months I need a little extra - so I add very light oil rinses pretty much the whole season we have the central heating on. I use maximum 5 drops of mineral oil (jojoba also works for me) in between my shampoo & conditioner steps. Keeps the static away and guards against snapping I get from dryness.

I can't use leave-ins - everything and anything builds up on me, even in single-drop quantities - but oil rinsing I can do! :)


Hmm I never thought henna could be the issue. I typically only do my roots but once in a while I will do the length.

I'll try the oil rinse tomorrow.
Typically I will wash daily but there are times where if I'm lounging I won't wash it.


I can't do leave ins either. They just make my hair feel gunky. I could absorb a couple drops of oil, tops, on my fingertip length ii hair. Never liked how my hair or scalp feel after damp bunning or long treatments. But SMTs do it for me, and if your hair likes protein or seems lank/stretchy you can add some gelatin to it (just dissolve in a little hot water first). A lot of folks also swear by humidifiers. I'm in the Midwest where forced air heat in the winter is really drying, and having a whole-house humidifier on the furnace does seem to make a difference for my skin.

I'd done the humidifier but never noticed hair benefits. Then again I've never had this issue. My hair does not like protein in large amounts. Might be due to henna.



Another vote for daily washing/wetting plus a couple drops of MO on damp hair.
This routine helps my hair to stay moisturized.

MO is mineral oil?

Lavendersugar
August 8th, 2017, 11:50 AM
I'd notuse honey in semi arid, unless the bathroom is steamy.
My town averages 35 percent humidity in summer. Far less in winter. Inside is drier yet.
I have gone to the simple side, a diluted non sulphate shampoo and a mid weight to heavy conditioner. Oil on ends while damp. Monthly pre shampoo oiling. Simple olive oil.

Yes, humidity here stays low in the 20's to 30's. We have been in triple digits this summer more than ever before. Sometimes we get a break of high 90's. Lol!
Once in a while we will peak at humidity in the 50's.

Sulfate free and my scalp rarely agree. It depends on the product and ingredients. I did do well scalp wise with JM but clearly my length did not like it.

lapushka
August 8th, 2017, 03:04 PM
Is LOC too much even when you use a pea size or coin size per layer? The first mistake people make is to use too much product. I only use a coinsize on TBL and classic length hair, and I'm a iii, so if you're a ii and BSL, you need *far* less product.

MsPharaohMoan
August 8th, 2017, 11:18 PM
Unless your hair has damage, in which case moar product! As some have suggested, use products according to weather. Watch humectant use.

butterfly_dream
August 9th, 2017, 05:12 AM
MO is mineral oil?
Yes, it is! :)

Lavendersugar
August 10th, 2017, 11:00 AM
Is LOC too much even when you use a pea size or coin size per layer? The first mistake people make is to use too much product. I only use a coinsize on TBL and classic length hair, and I'm a iii, so if you're a ii and BSL, you need *far* less product.

I'm hip length. I tried doing it by layers pinning up the hair and pulling down even amounts. It's just too much for my hair. Ends up looking greasy and knots easily. Using about a pea size of each product