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timeschild
May 20th, 2017, 11:04 PM
So April 8 I got put on thyroid meds. Levothyroxon and it is causing my hair to fall out even more. Do y'all have any tips on how to help hair growth when a meds cause it to fall out. I can't stop taking it I could die I could try a new one but I can only afford what I am on it is 4 US dollars. I am very sad. Please help

Siv
May 21st, 2017, 04:51 AM
I'm so sorry this is happening to you! There may very well be people more qualified to answer this question than I, but in the meantime, I'll give it a go.

The basics of hair growth seems to be to make sure you get all your vitamins and nutrients. If you're lacking in any, you'll see less hair growth. You can get your blood tested to see if there is anything obvious missing, and supplement with vitamins as needed. I my experience, my bloodworks didn't show anything, but later I still did notice a difference when I started eating healthier, working out, sleeping better, and cutting down on stress factors (i.e. dumping that ex lol!). So basically, just looking after yourself, especially as you're already going through a rough time. However, just taking supplements even if your blood test shows you're not lacking anything probably won't help.

Another thing, is Rogaine (or any other brand). I don't have any experience with it, but I've heard its great for stimulating "inactive hair follicles" in people who experience hair loss, whether it is due to age, hair pulling, medication, or the like. It can be sort of pricey, however, and it stops working when you quit using it.

Then there are the less scientific methods such as the inversion method and other scalp massage methods - I won't write much about that because it's not my cup of tea, and I'm very dubious about it, but you can use the search bar to find more information about it if you're interested! If anything, I doubt it hurts trying it out, and a scalp massage is pretty nice :)

Another thing I've heard, that I don't know much about myself, is castor oil. I've a friend who thickened up her eyebrows using castor oil, actually. Perhaps someone else can provide more info on castor oil for hair growth, or you can make a search.

Oh, I don't know what shampoo you use, but you could try going off harsh sulfates if you're using sulfate shampoos. I actually experience a lot more shedding when I shampoo with sulfates, and I've heard others report the same experience. It's pretty individual, however.

Finally, if your hair is thin at this point and it's bothering you, you could try "disguising" by adding a bit of curl to your hair. Styling with heat tools can be damaging, but you could try heatless methods like braiding or other methods. Google "heatless curls" or use the forum search bar!

lapushka
May 21st, 2017, 05:35 AM
Just concentrate on taking what your doctor is prescribing. If you have concerns, then go back to your doctor and discuss this. He or she might have a solution we can't possibly think of (like adjusting your medication). You need to watch your body and report the signs and symptoms to your doctor or else he or she won't be able to help you. :flower:

Obsidian
May 21st, 2017, 06:09 AM
I've been on Levothyroxon for a number of years now, it never caused me any hair fall. I suspect since you've only been on the meds a short while, you are still experiencing hair fall from low thyroid levels.
When are you due for another blood test? When I first went on meds, they checked me every three months for a year, then twice a year for a few years and now I only get tested once a year.
My dr said you need to be on the meds 6-8 weeks for your thyroid levels to stabilize, might not be a bad idea to get more blood tests after you've been on them for 8 weeks, even if its sooner then your doctor wanted to make sure you are on the right dose.

enting
May 21st, 2017, 07:10 AM
I second the opinion that if you're having concerns, go back to your doctor.

You can make sure to get enough protein, calories, vitamins, and minerals, but underneath it all, keep checking in with your doctor. None of the other things will matter to your body if your body can't process them properly.

Lots of luck! Thyroid issues suck. I do hope you'll get to a happier, healthier place with the medication brand you're on and can afford. I remember once needing to get Synthroid without insurance and I was completely shocked by how expensive it was/is. There's really no call for some of these prices, especially when the generics are so very much cheaper.

embee
May 21st, 2017, 07:46 AM
Keep on with your meds. I've been on that stuff for years and things are better when the thyroid levels get stabilized. It takes a while. I am grateful for the low cost of the meds!

Remember longer hair makes the shed hair in the brush look worse than it really is. Short hair can shed without being noticed, but long hair that's in a bun or braid will shed all at once into the comb or brush or shower.

Ondine11
May 21st, 2017, 07:51 AM
I'm sorry this is happening to you! Having been through it myself, I know how traumatic it is. Mine fell out from hormonal issues, forcing me into a big chop I didn't want. IF you recently began taking the meds, it can take a couple of months or so for the shedding to slow & reverse itself. As Obsidian said above.

I attacked the problem in every way possible & the hair shedding stopped & has reversed itself. It went from a chin length Bob with bangs last Oct, to APL now, & there's a bunch of new 3" long hair where the shedding occurred.

Since you DO have a medical issue, please clear supplement usage with your doctor first, just to be safe.

I began taking the Nature's Bounty hair growth vitamin gummies (2 per day as directed) & 300 mg iron supplement every other day. Within two weeks of doing this alone, the shedding dramatically slowed.

I invested in a Hair Max Laser (Prima 7) hair comb. This model is one you use for 15mins, 3x per week.They have other more expensive models you use for much less time.

Only use sulfite free products, & blow dry only when 75% air dry & use dryer on lowest heat setting. IF you flat iron, no higher than 350. ALWAYS use a heat protectant.

I do the inversion massages, usually with no oil, sometimes with 15 drops of rosemary essential oil & 15 of lavender essential oil in 1 tsp of coconut oil. Flip head down between your knees, dip fingertips into the oil (or just use your fingers) & gently massage your scalp for 4-5 mins. You don't need to use all the oil in one session. You can also lie on your stomach on your bed with your head dangling off the end.

During my inversion massages, I also listen to hair growth subliminals (You Tube) Ignore silly claims that your hair will grow 5" overnight!


These last two methods have not been scientifically proven, BUT, since they cannot possibly do harm & massage IS beneficial, what the heck! Might as well.

Fia
May 21st, 2017, 08:04 AM
If the US is anything like Sweden you're started out on a quite low dosage of thyroid meds. Checked what levels you have in your blood after about a month and then dose adjusted (up/down) with respect to what your levels are. Then another check a month later, dosage adjusted again. Until you find the right level of the medication for you. The reason the doctors go slow and gradually is that they don't want to push you in the other direction where you become hyperthyroid, which brings about a whole new set of issues and symptoms.

This means that for most people they will still be slightly hypothyroid in the beginning of adjusting the level medication, and still have some of the symptoms, including hair loss. Once you're adjusted to your correct dosage this should disappear.

lapushka
May 21st, 2017, 09:28 AM
I've been on Levothyroxon for a number of years now, it never caused me any hair fall. I suspect since you've only been on the meds a short while, you are still experiencing hair fall from low thyroid levels.
When are you due for another blood test? When I first went on meds, they checked me every three months for a year, then twice a year for a few years and now I only get tested once a year.
My dr said you need to be on the meds 6-8 weeks for your thyroid levels to stabilize, might not be a bad idea to get more blood tests after you've been on them for 8 weeks, even if its sooner then your doctor wanted to make sure you are on the right dose.


If the US is anything like Sweden you're started out on a quite low dosage of thyroid meds. Checked what levels you have in your blood after about a month and then dose adjusted (up/down) with respect to what your levels are. Then another check a month later, dosage adjusted again. Until you find the right level of the medication for you. The reason the doctors go slow and gradually is that they don't want to push you in the other direction where you become hyperthyroid, which brings about a whole new set of issues and symptoms.

This means that for most people they will still be slightly hypothyroid in the beginning of adjusting the level medication, and still have some of the symptoms, including hair loss. Once you're adjusted to your correct dosage this should disappear.

I think that could well be it right now!

Which is why constant feedback between doctor & patient is so important. What does your doctor say? I urge you to take it up with her or him. And then please get back to us whether or not it's better or not. :flower:

You can't expect things like this to be better and "all well" with the snap of the fingers. It takes it's *bloody* time. Not that it compares. My aunt had a thyroid issue and underwent radioactive iodine treatment when she was a teen.

dansyl
May 21st, 2017, 09:36 AM
In my experience it will fall out more at first and then slow down. Mine still falls out a little more than i would think normal... but i still have plenty of hair.

Prism
May 21st, 2017, 10:37 AM
Hypothyroidism can cause hair loss. You may be experiencing hair loss still because you haven't been taking levothyroxine long enough to make a difference. It can cause hair loss, but it's much more likely that your thyroid isn't balanced yet. Hang in there and try to minimize tugging on your hair on your hair in the meantime. If you still have this as a concern, a trip back to your doctor is probably the best thing you can do. He/she will be able to tell you whether you're still adjusting to your meds or if a change needs to be made. I'm sorry you're going through this.

esfand
May 21st, 2017, 11:11 AM
The hair fall can be temporary, could be just you getting used to meds. If Levothyroxon doesn't work out for you in the long run, you can ask the doctor about Armour, which is dessicated pig thyroid. It's the one Hillary Clinton uses.

Lady Stardust
May 21st, 2017, 11:18 AM
I'm sorry to hear about your problems. I'm afraid I don't have any hair advice to add to the great advice you've received above. I just wanted to say that my mum had thyroid issues and it took a while to get the medication levels right, but once they were sorted she was able to get back to normal. It took a bit of to-ing and fro-ing with the doctor but the levels were sorted out in the end and mum had a new lease of life. Hang on in there and it will improve.

Eastbound&Down
June 1st, 2018, 03:17 PM
I have an appointment to schedule a blood test for my thyroid on 18 June. I've been having symptoms for a couple of years and I think its time to do something about it.

lapushka
June 1st, 2018, 03:59 PM
I have an appointment to schedule a blood test for my thyroid on 18 June. I've been having symptoms for a couple of years and I think its time to do something about it.

Good on you for finally taking action. :thumbsup: Hope your appointment goes well. Fingers crossed.

Eastbound&Down
June 1st, 2018, 07:10 PM
Good on you for finally taking action. :thumbsup: Hope your appointment goes well. Fingers crossed.

Thank you! I am beyond frustrated with the way I feel lately.

Blondieee
June 1st, 2018, 11:39 PM
I'm so sorry! I've heard of Levothyroxine causing major hair loss more than once. It's a known side effect of the drug. That's why I don't take thyroid medication. I chose the natural route of a gluten free diet.

I've been through many similar health problems as you and I know this well. What was your most recent TSH level? Your doctor may have told you that you could die from it to scare you, but unless your TSH is crazy high that's not true. I have hypothyroidism and don't take thyroid medication.

First off, most likely you have an autoimmune thyroid disease called Hashimoto's. Most doctors don't test for it cause they figure the treatment is the same of thyroid medication. But the treatment is not the same. Have you been tested for Hashimoto's? If not, demand that your doctor test your TPO antibodies and Thyroglobulin antibodies. Don't take no for an answer.

If you have Hashimoto's which you more than likely do cause it's responsible for more than 90% of cases of hypothyroidism, I HIGHLY suggest a gluten free diet. I was diagnosed with Hashimoto's back in 2013 and I suffered with horrible symptoms for years. I knew gluten is bad when you have Hashimoto's, but I was stubborn and refused to give up pasta and bread and pizza so I suffered for 5 years unnecessarily. Going gluten free brought my antibodies down significantly, reduced my 6 month stomach bloat, reduced my leg swelling, leveled out my moods (I don't get irritated very much anymore), got rid of my brain fog, and increased my energy level a lot. Don't make the same mistake I did. Don't wait and suffer with awful symptoms when it's as simple as a diet change.

Also, have you had your ferritin levels tested? If not, this is something you need to ask your doctor to test you for. Low ferritin levels are common in people who have Hashimoto's because of poor iron absorption. If the result comes back in range, your doctor might tell you it's normal. Ferritin levels that are below 50 are NEVER normal and cause fatigue and hair loss. Ferritin levels in women should be 70 and that's right from WebMD. You can show that to your doctor if he/she doesn't believe you. Low ferritin levels are actually the #1 cause of hair loss in premenopausal women.

In the meantime for your hair, what's your TSH? If it's not that high, I would suggest going off the medication, obtaining more lab work, and starting a gluten free diet if you have Hashimoto's. Hope this helps! 🙂

Blondieee
June 1st, 2018, 11:43 PM
Also, I respectfully disagree with the posters who said the hair loss is probably temporary and due to your thyroid being off and not the medication. I have heard about this over and over. I'm a member of a couple different Hashimoto's support groups and about once a week, someone posts about all the hair loss they're having from Levothyroxine and it doesn't get any better. Hair loss is a well-known side effect of it.

embee
June 2nd, 2018, 05:24 AM
Hair loss is not always a massive issue. I've been on levothyroxine for some 20+ years, my hair is ok. To tell the truth, when this thyroid rollercoaster started I would have only noticed hairloss if I'd gone flat *bald*, there was so much else going on with my body and my life.

Thyroid troubles are not perfectly understood, the endocrine system is amazingly complex, some symptoms show up before others, sometimes bloodwork can look fine when other symptoms point to troubles. Good luck to you and hope all goes smoothly for you.

If levothyroxine is for you, be happy that it is an old inexpensive med. :) And there's a generic.

lapushka
June 2nd, 2018, 08:08 AM
I'm so sorry! I've heard of Levothyroxine causing major hair loss more than once. It's a known side effect of the drug. That's why I don't take thyroid medication. I chose the natural route of a gluten free diet.

Yes, but you aren't taking desperately needed medication due to the "fear" you "might" get hair loss. I don't want to sway your decision or even meddle in this, but how do you know you would have had hair loss if you never even tried? Who knows your hair might thrive more than it is now on the medications. The thing is... you don't know.

Also, I would hesitate to post that gluten free is a possible solution to hypothyroidism, because it's not. But maybe that's just me. :o

My aunt had a problem and got radiation and is fine now, but she had quite the issues with it. Her hair was a mess, but now she has even thicker hair than mine!

Blondieee
June 2nd, 2018, 12:08 PM
I appreciate your opinion, but I respectfully disagree. Gluten free is a treatment for hypothyroidism IF the hypothyroidism is caused by Hashimoto's. There will be people who disagree with me, but it is proven as far as functional medicine goes (it's not yet known in the regular medicine world) that everyone who has an autoimmune disease has a leaky gut AKA increased intestinal permeability. There are 3 things needed to get an autoimmune disease:
-Genetic predisposition
-Environmental trigger (toxins, food, infections, pregnancy, birth control)
-Leaky gut (increased intestinal permeability)

Gluten temporarily increases intestinal permeability in everyone, even a healthy person. So it should be avoided in anyone with any autoimmune disease. But in the case of Hashimoto's, gluten is especially the enemy. Here's why. When you have a leaky gut (if you look up leaky gut, it will make more sense) the foods you eat are leaking through into your bloodstream. That includes gluten. Your body sees all these foods in the bloodstream where they don't belong and flags them. Your body starts attacking these foods cause to your body, these foods don't belong there. They belong in the gut. But when it attacks gluten, here's when the trouble happens. The molecular structure of gluten is IDENTICAL to that of your thyroid. I saw a diagram and they're literally identical. So when your body attacks the gluten and it's looking around for anything that looks like it, your thyroid gets attacked in the process. It's a case of mistaken identity. There are many sources I can site that will back up everything I'm saying, if necessary. But I know some people will disagree. Some people will disagree about anything. But instead of arguing, a gluten free diet has made me calm and relaxed. So I don't sweat the small stuff anymore 🙂

But I'm proof that a gluten free diet significantly helps Hashimoto's. My TPO antibodies dropped from 1,000 that they were steadily at for years to 630 (lower than when I was first diagnosed) on just 3 weeks of a gluten free diet and that included a cheat day. I've had no more cheat days since then. I like having energy, not looking like I'm about to give birth to triplets, and all the other benefits that gluten free brings. So yes, if someone has hypothyroidism caused by Hashimoto's a gluten free diet will help. There are people who have even went into complete remission from Hashimoto's with a gluten free diet.

As far as medication, that is nobody's choice but mine. Certainly if someone's TSH is extremely high and they are in danger and need the medication, they need to take it. My last TSH since going gluten free was 3.8 (had been as high as the 4's, 5's, and even 6's one time). Even though 3.8 is still hypothyroid, that was only after being gluten free for 3 weeks with a cheat day. Now I've been strict gluten free (no cheat days) for an additional month. I'm waiting for my endocrinologist (who did recommend a gluten free diet to me actually) to send lab work so I can get my numbers checked again. But I'm not bedridden anymore. I have energy to put on makeup which I haven't had energy to do in years. Sure I don't want to go run a marathon, but I'm happy with how far I've come.

You're right that I don't know if thyroid medication would have helped or not. I can tell you that the vast majority of people I hear on Synthroid or Levothyroxine are not doing well. Again, that's not everyone. I know someone is going to post and say how well they're doing. There are some people who do well on it. But the vast majority of people I hear about have significant hair loss and no improvement in hypothyroid symptoms. I've had enough hair loss that I don't even want to try it. And I might not even need it now that I'm gluten free. I could have had an improvement in hair and energy on the medication, but I also could have had major hair loss and still have the same other symptoms. Not worth it to me. Plus thyroid medication doesn't address the leaky gut that caused the problem to begin with. Thyroid medication would not have helped my 6 month bloat. Only gluten free helped that. Many symptoms in many people it will not help with (as far as Synthroid or Levothyroxine, I have heard good things about Cytomel but I've never tried it). But if someone needs it and their numbers are really bad, they should take it. That's why I was asking the poster her TSH number.

Blondieee
June 2nd, 2018, 12:18 PM
This site shows a diagram of the molecular structure of gluten and your thyroid and how they literally look identical. I did not know this, but Dr. Amy Myers says in her article that gluten affects thyroid function even in someone without Hashimoto's so she still recommends a gluten free diet. But the poster really needs to know if she has Hashimoto's. She needs to have TPO antibodies and Thyroglobulin antibodies checked.

https://www.amymyersmd.com/2015/07/the-gluten-gut-and-thyroid-connection/

Wendyp
June 2nd, 2018, 06:23 PM
I’m hypothyroid, I take naturethroid currently but took armour for many years, Levo made me gain a huge amount of weight quickly. So I fired my dr and found a functional medicine expert. Armour and naturethryoid are both natural versions and are very effective and made a huge difference in my life. Thyroid is a very complicated thing. I have since learned all about hormones and the effect on the thyroid. so I really suggest a functional medicine expert.

lapushka
June 3rd, 2018, 06:14 AM
You're right that I don't know if thyroid medication would have helped or not. I can tell you that the vast majority of people I hear on Synthroid or Levothyroxine are not doing well. Again, that's not everyone. I know someone is going to post and say how well they're doing. There are some people who do well on it. But the vast majority of people I hear about have significant hair loss and no improvement in hypothyroid symptoms. I've had enough hair loss that I don't even want to try it. And I might not even need it now that I'm gluten free. I could have had an improvement in hair and energy on the medication, but I also could have had major hair loss and still have the same other symptoms. Not worth it to me. Plus thyroid medication doesn't address the leaky gut that caused the problem to begin with. Thyroid medication would not have helped my 6 month bloat. Only gluten free helped that. Many symptoms in many people it will not help with (as far as Synthroid or Levothyroxine, I have heard good things about Cytomel but I've never tried it). But if someone needs it and their numbers are really bad, they should take it. That's why I was asking the poster her TSH number.

Well I can only speak for my aunt and she went the regular medicine route. She was a teen when she had issues, and has been fine since undergoing regular treatment (radioactive iodine). Never ever had to take medication again. And her hair is now thicker than mine.

The thing is... you don't know. So you can't speak against these medications, I feel. Just my 2cts. :flower:

maborosi
June 3rd, 2018, 10:13 AM
So April 8 I got put on thyroid meds. Levothyroxon and it is causing my hair to fall out even more. Do y'all have any tips on how to help hair growth when a meds cause it to fall out. I can't stop taking it I could die I could try a new one but I can only afford what I am on it is 4 US dollars. I am very sad. Please help

Hey, just know that you could need some time to adjust to your medication, and your thyroid levels may still not be where they need to be, so you could still be having hair loss from that.
I would talk with your doc about this if you are concerned, though!

Hugs for you, timeschild! :flower:

enting
June 3rd, 2018, 11:55 AM
Is there any way your insurance could cover a different medication?
I'll agree that it could just still be an adjustment period. It could be increasing the speed of hair turnover (castor oil does this to me - it increases shedding but also increases new growth.) The last time I got my dosage changed I had a lot more shedding for a while, but it seems to have balanced out. At least, my circumference hasn't changed. (I'm on eltroxin which is yet another formulation.)

I will agree that sometimes changes in diet can help. I'm not a fan of movements for specific eating habits, but sometimes things are worth trying out if they seem safe for you otherwise. Make sure you're not deficient in anything else at the moment, as that can also affect your hair. When you were untreated that could have masked some deficiencies because everything was slow. Now that you're getting treated, nutrients are getting used at a faster pace and a different deficiency that could cause hair shed might show up more now. I'm seconding the opinion to talk to your doctor about it.

MusicalSpoons
June 3rd, 2018, 12:16 PM
Is there any way your insurance could cover a different medication?
I'll agree that it could just still be an adjustment period. It could be increasing the speed of hair turnover (castor oil does this to me - it increases shedding but also increases new growth.) The last time I got my dosage changed I had a lot more shedding for a while, but it seems to have balanced out. At least, my circumference hasn't changed. (I'm on eltroxin which is yet another formulation.)

I will agree that sometimes changes in diet can help. I'm not a fan of movements for specific eating habits, but sometimes things are worth trying out if they seem safe for you otherwise. Make sure you're not deficient in anything else at the moment, as that can also affect your hair. When you were untreated that could have masked some deficiencies because everything was slow. Now that you're getting treated, nutrients are getting used at a faster pace and a different deficiency that could cause hair shed might show up more now. I'm seconding the opinion to talk to your doctor about it.

That's an excellent point. timeschild in your post you said your hair is falling out even more since taking the medication, so this would make sense. Definitely go back to the dr, explain what's happening and push for more bloodwork (don't let them fob you off! I know how difficult it can be) because you need to know if it is a deficiency or if it could be from the medication, or if it could just be due to your body adjusting.

As to diet, there may be some benefit to investigating certain things for yourself, but there is no universal magical cure - and for some people, not taking medication may be an option, but if your thyroid is wonky enough to prompt them to put you on medication, chances are you probably do need it. Knowing your TSH value is useful though, either way; that way you can keep track of the results when they do follow-up tests, and see how it correlates to how you're feeling.

Wishing you all the best with this - I hope once your body has adjusted and stabilised that you do feel much better overall :flower:

Blondieee
June 3rd, 2018, 01:53 PM
I’m hypothyroid, I take naturethroid currently but took armour for many years, Levo made me gain a huge amount of weight quickly. So I fired my dr and found a functional medicine expert. Armour and naturethryoid are both natural versions and are very effective and made a huge difference in my life. Thyroid is a very complicated thing. I have since learned all about hormones and the effect on the thyroid. so I really suggest a functional medicine expert.

I second seeing a functional medicine doctor. I've been to a couple terrible ones, but I've also went to one who was really good. She thought gluten might be causing my antibodies to be so high and she was right! They will hopefully help you get to the root cause of your Hashimoto's.

Be careful though, some of them can be money hungry. If you feel they are trying to charge you for ridiculous tests and supplements, find a new one.

Blondieee
June 3rd, 2018, 01:54 PM
Well I can only speak for my aunt and she went the regular medicine route. She was a teen when she had issues, and has been fine since undergoing regular treatment (radioactive iodine). Never ever had to take medication again. And her hair is now thicker than mine.

The thing is... you don't know. So you can't speak against these medications, I feel. Just my 2cts. :flower:

Did your aunt have Graves/hyperthyroidism? I've only heard of radioactive iodine being used for Graves, not Hashimoto's/hypothyroidism. I'm glad your aunt is doing well and that it helped her. That being said, I would never personally choose that route. Radioactive iodine destroys the thyroid, it ablates it to where you have no thyroid. I'm not sure why anyone would want to go through with that so called "treatment." Not meaning to offend, it's just shocking to me that some doctors think destroying your thyroid is a treatment. Your thyroid is innocent in this. It's your immune system that's attacking your thyroid because it's confused (molecular mimicry, gluten looks like your thyroid). I'm guessing your aunt is older and probably at the time, that was the only treatment known. But now in functional medicine, they are aware of the connection between autoimmune disease and the gut. Many people have reversed Hashimoto's naturally through diet. And if you can do that, why wouldn't you want to try it?

Even though I've never tried thyroid medication myself, I have family members and friends who have. My grandfather had Graves and they gave him too much of a medication that made him go hypo. So then they put him on Synthroid. He's now bald and lost all his hair shortly after starting the Synthroid. My old doctor that I used to go to had hypothyroidism (whether Hashi's or not I don't know) but he took Synthroid and he's bald. And shortly after he started taking it, that's when all the hair loss started. Synthroid and Levothyroxine even have a warning on the insert that says it causes hair loss. I also have friends that have taken it with the same result (lost a ton of hair). It may work great for some people and I'm not doubting that for some people, it probably does work really well and they don't experience hair loss. Plus some people's TSH is so high that they need it. But other people can choose diet as an option instead. And after everything I've seen and heard I'm not choosing the medication option. I'd rather give up gluten for the rest of my life (looks like I'll have to anyway cause of the severe stomach bloating it causes) than take thyroid medication. But that's just me.

One thing to keep in mind too, is that no medication works as well as your body's natural thyroid function. Some people really need the medication, but if you can get your body's natural thyroid function back through diet, then why not do that? Just something important to think about 😊

Blondieee
June 3rd, 2018, 01:57 PM
Hey, just know that you could need some time to adjust to your medication, and your thyroid levels may still not be where they need to be, so you could still be having hair loss from that.
I would talk with your doc about this if you are concerned, though!

Hugs for you, timeschild! :flower:

That's what the doctors told my grandfather and my friends that have taken it, that they needed some time to adjust to the medication and that it was the hypothyroidism causing hair loss. It wasn't. It was the medication.

Think about it. The person was hypothyroid before taking the Synthroid/Levo. So if the hair loss started after taking it, it's the medication, not the hypothyroidism.

Blondieee
June 3rd, 2018, 02:07 PM
That's an excellent point. timeschild in your post you said your hair is falling out even more since taking the medication, so this would make sense. Definitely go back to the dr, explain what's happening and push for more bloodwork (don't let them fob you off! I know how difficult it can be) because you need to know if it is a deficiency or if it could be from the medication, or if it could just be due to your body adjusting.

As to diet, there may be some benefit to investigating certain things for yourself, but there is no universal magical cure - and for some people, not taking medication may be an option, but if your thyroid is wonky enough to prompt them to put you on medication, chances are you probably do need it. Knowing your TSH value is useful though, either way; that way you can keep track of the results when they do follow-up tests, and see how it correlates to how you're feeling.

Wishing you all the best with this - I hope once your body has adjusted and stabilised that you do feel much better overall :flower:

I would be hesitant to say there's not a cure. Numerous people have reversed Hashimoto's through either a gluten free diet, a gluten and dairy free diet, or a Paleo diet. Some people will disagree with me but when you've reversed Hashimoto's and are in remission and have no antibodies, that's a cure. As far as there not being a universal cure, that could be true since everyone is different. Some people's cure is a gluten free diet while other people's cure is a Paleo diet. Everyone is different so it just depends. But gluten free is always a good starting place when you have Hashimoto's. 😊

I agree that she does need to know her TSH and not just take the doctor's word for it that she needs medication. Doctors told me I needed medication with a TSH of 5. I refused it. A TSH of 5 is not life threatening and if she has a similar TSH and they told her that, they lied to her.

People's TSH can come down (depending on how much damage there is to the thyroid) once antibodies go down. People's TSH levels have went from 8 to 1.5, 12 to 2, major significant drops without medication after doing diet change. So unless her TSH is super high like 100, I fully believe that she shouldn't take the medication and try diet changes to see if it improves her numbers. The most important thing is she needs her TPO and Thyroglobulin antibodies checked to see if she has Hashimoto's.

lapushka
June 3rd, 2018, 03:54 PM
Did your aunt have Graves/hyperthyroidism? I've only heard of radioactive iodine being used for Graves, not Hashimoto's/hypothyroidism. I'm glad your aunt is doing well and that it helped her. That being said, I would never personally choose that route. Radioactive iodine destroys the thyroid, it ablates it to where you have no thyroid. I'm not sure why anyone would want to go through with that so called "treatment." Not meaning to offend, it's just shocking to me that some doctors think destroying your thyroid is a treatment. Your thyroid is innocent in this. It's your immune system that's attacking your thyroid because it's confused (molecular mimicry, gluten looks like your thyroid). I'm guessing your aunt is older and probably at the time, that was the only treatment known. But now in functional medicine, they are aware of the connection between autoimmune disease and the gut. Many people have reversed Hashimoto's naturally through diet. And if you can do that, why wouldn't you want to try it?

Even though I've never tried thyroid medication myself, I have family members and friends who have. My grandfather had Graves and they gave him too much of a medication that made him go hypo. So then they put him on Synthroid. He's now bald and lost all his hair shortly after starting the Synthroid. My old doctor that I used to go to had hypothyroidism (whether Hashi's or not I don't know) but he took Synthroid and he's bald. And shortly after he started taking it, that's when all the hair loss started. Synthroid and Levothyroxine even have a warning on the insert that says it causes hair loss. I also have friends that have taken it with the same result (lost a ton of hair). It may work great for some people and I'm not doubting that for some people, it probably does work really well and they don't experience hair loss. Plus some people's TSH is so high that they need it. But other people can choose diet as an option instead. And after everything I've seen and heard I'm not choosing the medication option. I'd rather give up gluten for the rest of my life (looks like I'll have to anyway cause of the severe stomach bloating it causes) than take thyroid medication. But that's just me.

One thing to keep in mind too, is that no medication works as well as your body's natural thyroid function. Some people really need the medication, but if you can get your body's natural thyroid function back through diet, then why not do that? Just something important to think about ��

To be clear, I am not trying to fault you for not taking the medication route. It's ultimately your choice. :flower: But I feel like it's dangerous to "promote" that it can very easily be solved through diet (just give up gluten) when it is such a difficult problem to treat and get the treatment well adjusted for especially when there are some side-effects to the medication. Just my 2cts.

I had someone say to go on this or that diet and that would "solve" my handicap (rare disease). Of course, I didn't believe them! There is no such thing (for my issue).

But if your blood panel comes back perfect and you can do it with a diet, then by all means...

enting
June 3rd, 2018, 05:34 PM
I started medication with a tsh of 5. The doctor didn't want to put me on meds, he thought I could just eat less and stop the insane weight gain. We fought the doctor because it wasn't about diet for me. The medication was life changing and in a good way. True, I still feel like crap half the time, but I a) have other issues going on b) have a stable weight whereas before I very much did not, and c) it does help me.

Thyroid is not gluten, but Hashimoto's does often come along with celiac. I've been tested and have no sensitivity to gluten, and did not have any thyroid antibodies until quite recently. I also know for my own body that anything I try to go off of for a while and then reintroduce, I will get sick from for a little while. It doesn't matter what that thing is, I've done it with sugars, with fats. I'm not really willing to try another thing that isn't really based on anything that science can discover in my own body.

It's important to go into things eyes open, but to advise someone who is clinically hypothyroid, even a little bit, explicitly not to take medication for it is, well, dangerous.

It doesn't matter as much what the tsh is as what the t4 is. My t4 still struggles to stay in range, even when my tsh seems to be fine. Even more than the numbers, the symptoms matter, even if one is entirely in normal range. In the end, one has to decide for oneself what to do and what's best for their body, but laypeople cannot judge that for someone else. Heck, even professionals cannot always judge that for someone else. Some patients do come in with a tsh of 100 with fewer symptoms than someone with only a 5. Hormones and their levels and effects on the body are really really individual.

I do very much agree it's important information to know whether this is hashimotos or non hashimotos. The former is autoimmune, which raises the possibility of finding other autoimmune issues and increases the chances of diet helping reduce autoimmune reactions. The latter is not and may not respond at all the same way.

Blondieee
June 4th, 2018, 05:21 AM
To be clear, I am not trying to fault you for not taking the medication route. It's ultimately your choice. :flower: But I feel like it's dangerous to "promote" that it can very easily be solved through diet (just give up gluten) when it is such a difficult problem to treat and get the treatment well adjusted for especially when there are some side-effects to the medication. Just my 2cts.

I had someone say to go on this or that diet and that would "solve" my handicap (rare disease). Of course, I didn't believe them! There is no such thing (for my issue).

But if your blood panel comes back perfect and you can do it with a diet, then by all means...


There may not be a diet change that works for your condition, but there is for Hashimoto's. So if someone told you to try a certain diet and it wasn't known to work and it didn't work, that's different. It is well documented from tons of sources and people that a gluten free diet reduces Hashimoto's antibodies. I think it's very important for the poster to know if it's Hashimoto's or not. And if it is, I strongly recommend a gluten free diet.

She also needs to know her TSH level because it could very well not be dangerous like the doctor claimed. Doctors claim a lot of things. They claimed my 6 month bloat was stress, "skinny fat", fatty tissue, I'm at the same weight (actually a couple pounds more) than I was before going gluten free. It was never "skinny fat", fatty tissue, or anything of the sort. Nor was it stress. I was also told that my ferritin level of 5, 10, 12, etc was normal. Apparently doctors don't receive ferritin training. Ferritin levels should NEVER be that low and it is well documented. It's even on WebMD that levels should be 70 in women so it's quite honestly pathetic that doctors don't know that. We give doctors more credit than they deserve. Doctors don't know everything.

Blondieee
June 4th, 2018, 05:23 AM
I started medication with a tsh of 5. The doctor didn't want to put me on meds, he thought I could just eat less and stop the insane weight gain. We fought the doctor because it wasn't about diet for me. The medication was life changing and in a good way. True, I still feel like crap half the time, but I a) have other issues going on b) have a stable weight whereas before I very much did not, and c) it does help me.

Thyroid is not gluten, but Hashimoto's does often come along with celiac. I've been tested and have no sensitivity to gluten, and did not have any thyroid antibodies until quite recently. I also know for my own body that anything I try to go off of for a while and then reintroduce, I will get sick from for a little while. It doesn't matter what that thing is, I've done it with sugars, with fats. I'm not really willing to try another thing that isn't really based on anything that science can discover in my own body.

It's important to go into things eyes open, but to advise someone who is clinically hypothyroid, even a little bit, explicitly not to take medication for it is, well, dangerous.

It doesn't matter as much what the tsh is as what the t4 is. My t4 still struggles to stay in range, even when my tsh seems to be fine. Even more than the numbers, the symptoms matter, even if one is entirely in normal range. In the end, one has to decide for oneself what to do and what's best for their body, but laypeople cannot judge that for someone else. Heck, even professionals cannot always judge that for someone else. Some patients do come in with a tsh of 100 with fewer symptoms than someone with only a 5. Hormones and their levels and effects on the body are really really individual.

I do very much agree it's important information to know whether this is hashimotos or non hashimotos. The former is autoimmune, which raises the possibility of finding other autoimmune issues and increases the chances of diet helping reduce autoimmune reactions. The latter is not and may not respond at all the same way.

Sorry to hear your doctor thought you could just eat less and lose weight. That's just another example of how doctors don't know everything. I'm happy to hear the medication worked for you and helped a lot. Like I said, the medication does help some people a lot. It's not bad for everyone. It just depends on the person. Some people react well to it and some do not.

I don't have Celiac either. I was tested twice, negative both times before going gluten free. These are the following symptoms gluten caused for me:
-6 month pregnant bloat - I'm not kidding. Do you want to see a before/after picture?
-Severely puffy face. I didn't even look like myself
-Swelling all over including my legs and back
-Brain fog
-Feeling drugged after eating, would have to go nap
-Extreme fatigue. I was practically bedridden. Now I am functional and can wear makeup again cause I actually have the energy to put it on
-High TPO antibodies. My TPO went from 1,000 to 630 after just 3 weeks gluten free.
-It was affecting my vision because my vision is much sharper and clearer on a gluten free diet

I look like myself again. I'm starting to feel like myself again. I would never go back to eating that crap. And no I don't have Celiac. Majority of people who have Hashimoto's have an issue with gluten, Celiac or not. Either way, it causes a major issue because your thyroid tissue looks identical to the gluten protein and for you to say your thyroid is not gluten really just shows you want to remain sick. I obviously can't convince you. The research is out there. I waited 5 years after I was diagnosed to go gluten free. It's my biggest regret. I wish I would have gone gluten free sooner! I could've saved myself years of being sick and missing out on life.

It's not dangerous for someone not to take thyroid medication unless their TSH is severely elevated. Some people might feel like crap with a TSH of 5 but it's not dangerous. TSH, Free T3, and Free T4 all matter. TSH should be between 0.5-2. All numbers have to be optimal, not just T4.

I'm confused as to why you said diet helps reduce autoimmune reactions yet in another sentence you said thyroid is not gluten and refused to try diet changes cause that make you sick? Could you clarify this please? Also, gluten should never be reintroduced anyway when you have Hashimoto's so just don't reintroduce it. You can either choose to be sick or you can choose to be healthy. I choose to be healthy because to me, nothing tastes as good as healthy feels!

There is a Facebook group - Hashimoto's 411 with over 73,000 members and the basis of the group is that you must be on a gluten free diet. Why? Because they don't want anyone with Hashimoto's to suffer like I did for years. Even if your medication is helping a lot, it doesn't solve everything. It doesn't solve the autoimmune process behind the hypothyroidism that can be reversed through diet.

lapushka
June 4th, 2018, 06:31 AM
There may not be a diet change that works for your condition, but there is for Hashimoto's. So if someone told you to try a certain diet and it wasn't known to work and it didn't work, that's different. It is well documented from tons of sources and people that a gluten free diet reduces Hashimoto's antibodies. I think it's very important for the poster to know if it's Hashimoto's or not. And if it is, I strongly recommend a gluten free diet.

She also needs to know her TSH level because it could very well not be dangerous like the doctor claimed. Doctors claim a lot of things. They claimed my 6 month bloat was stress, "skinny fat", fatty tissue, I'm at the same weight (actually a couple pounds more) than I was before going gluten free. It was never "skinny fat", fatty tissue, or anything of the sort. Nor was it stress. I was also told that my ferritin level of 5, 10, 12, etc was normal. Apparently doctors don't receive ferritin training. Ferritin levels should NEVER be that low and it is well documented. It's even on WebMD that levels should be 70 in women so it's quite honestly pathetic that doctors don't know that. We give doctors more credit than they deserve. Doctors don't know everything.

It all depends on other values as well. You can't base it all off of WebMD, I would strongly advise against that. Doctors have received *years* of training. No they may not know all there is to know (they didn't in my case, but I have a rare disease), but they probably know more than WebMD does. :)

lapushka
June 4th, 2018, 06:35 AM
Sorry to hear your doctor thought you could just eat less and lose weight. That's just another example of how doctors don't know everything. I'm happy to hear the medication worked for you and helped a lot. Like I said, the medication does help some people a lot. It's not bad for everyone. It just depends on the person. Some people react well to it and some do not.

I don't have Celiac either. I was tested twice, negative both times before going gluten free. These are the following symptoms gluten caused for me:
-6 month pregnant bloat - I'm not kidding. Do you want to see a before/after picture?
-Severely puffy face. I didn't even look like myself
-Swelling all over including my legs and back
-Brain fog
-Feeling drugged after eating, would have to go nap
-Extreme fatigue. I was practically bedridden. Now I am functional and can wear makeup again cause I actually have the energy to put it on
-High TPO antibodies. My TPO went from 1,000 to 630 after just 3 weeks gluten free.
-It was affecting my vision because my vision is much sharper and clearer on a gluten free diet

I look like myself again. I'm starting to feel like myself again. I would never go back to eating that crap. And no I don't have Celiac. Majority of people who have Hashimoto's have an issue with gluten, Celiac or not. Either way, it causes a major issue because your thyroid tissue looks identical to the gluten protein and for you to say your thyroid is not gluten really just shows you want to remain sick. I obviously can't convince you. The research is out there. I waited 5 years after I was diagnosed to go gluten free. It's my biggest regret. I wish I would have gone gluten free sooner! I could've saved myself years of being sick and missing out on life.

It's not dangerous for someone not to take thyroid medication unless their TSH is severely elevated. Some people might feel like crap with a TSH of 5 but it's not dangerous. TSH, Free T3, and Free T4 all matter. TSH should be between 0.5-2. All numbers have to be optimal, not just T4.

I'm confused as to why you said diet helps reduce autoimmune reactions yet in another sentence you said thyroid is not gluten and refused to try diet changes cause that make you sick? Could you clarify this please? Also, gluten should never be reintroduced anyway when you have Hashimoto's so just don't reintroduce it. You can either choose to be sick or you can choose to be healthy. I choose to be healthy because to me, nothing tastes as good as healthy feels!

There is a Facebook group - Hashimoto's 411 with over 73,000 members and the basis of the group is that you must be on a gluten free diet. Why? Because they don't want anyone with Hashimoto's to suffer like I did for years. Even if your medication is helping a lot, it doesn't solve everything. It doesn't solve the autoimmune process behind the hypothyroidism that can be reversed through diet.

I think that is over the top not nice to say to someone. Obviously her doctor knows what's best for her.

Blondieee, you're not a doctor, so going around saying and spreading all of this as if it is a once size fit all, is a bit much, IMMHO.

Don't misunderstand, you do you, and all the more power to you. But going around spreading this as gospel is too much for me to hear. :(

Blondieee
June 4th, 2018, 07:17 AM
It all depends on other values as well. You can't base it all off of WebMD, I would strongly advise against that. Doctors have received *years* of training. No they may not know all there is to know (they didn't in my case, but I have a rare disease), but they probably know more than WebMD does. :)

When you're sick, you learn quickly that doctors do not have all the answers nor are they informed about much. You have to be the advocate of your own health. I was told I "could not" get my antibodies down. Well guess what? I did it. I was told a ferritin of 5, 10, 12 was normal and was not causing hair loss. It was causing *MAJOR* hair loss despite normal hemoglobin and hematocrit numbers. The information on optimal ferritin levels and what low ferritin levels do to the body is not just on WebMD. It's on many sites. But my endocrinologist did tell me to look at WebMD for information. When my ferritin was 5, 10, 12 I was told it was normal and I was having a difficult time breathing. I would go to the bathroom, wash my hands, and collapse on the bed for 30 minutes before I could get up. I had bald spots all over my scalp. Doctors told me this was not related to my low ferritin levels. It was!! Doctors don't learn everything during their years of training. As far as the health issues I've been through, they haven't learned a thing. Most doctors don't know what optimal B12 levels are, optimal ferritin levels, optimal TSH levels, what Free T3 even is, causes of bloating, there's so much that they don't know and aren't trained on. You are in charge of your own health. Not a doctor. You have to be your own advocate.

lapushka
June 4th, 2018, 07:24 AM
When you're sick, you learn quickly that doctors do not have all the answers nor are they informed about much. You have to be the advocate of your own health. I was told I "could not" get my antibodies down. Well guess what? I did it. I was told a ferritin of 5, 10, 12 was normal and was not causing hair loss. It was causing *MAJOR* hair loss despite normal hemoglobin and hematocrit numbers. The information on optimal ferritin levels and what low ferritin levels do to the body is not just on WebMD. It's on many sites. But my endocrinologist did tell me to look at WebMD for information. When my ferritin was 5, 10, 12 I was told it was normal and I was having a difficult time breathing. I would go to the bathroom, wash my hands, and collapse on the bed for 30 minutes before I could get up. I had bald spots all over my scalp. Doctors told me this was not related to my low ferritin levels. It was!! Doctors don't learn everything during their years of training. As far as the health issues I've been through, they haven't learned a thing. Most doctors don't know what optimal B12 levels are, optimal ferritin levels, optimal TSH levels, what Free T3 even is, causes of bloating, there's so much that they don't know and aren't trained on. You are in charge of your own health. Not a doctor. You have to be your own advocate.

I don't dispute that, but you can take it too far. In the end, the doctors decide. :flower: If that doctor doesn't listen or doesn't "vibe" with you, then you go to another doctor. But the doctors are still ultimately in control! Let's not forget that. ;)

Blondieee
June 4th, 2018, 07:24 AM
I think that is over the top not nice to say to someone. Obviously her doctor knows what's best for her.

Blondieee, you're not a doctor, so going around saying and spreading all of this as if it is a once size fit all, is a bit much, IMMHO.

Don't misunderstand, you do you, and all the more power to you. But going around spreading this as gospel is too much for me to hear. :(

Well there's not any doctor that knows what's best for me. I trust my body. My body knows what's best for me and will tell me what it likes and doesn't like. And it doesn't like gluten.

No I'm not a doctor but I've had Hashimoto's since 2013 and I've studied it extensively. Gluten is a main trigger for it. The part that you bolded about gluten looking like your thyroid isn't gospel. It's the truth. Some people may not want to hear it, but that doesn't make it any less true.

I didn't mean it in a mean way. I'm being honest. People told me the same thing. People told me since I wasn't willing to go gluten free, that meant I wasn't sick enough. This comment angered me cause I was dealing with debilitating symptoms at the time. But now I realize, that person was right. When you get sick enough, you go gluten free. You don't question it. You just do it.

enting
June 4th, 2018, 07:25 AM
I didn't want to get into a major technical discussion on someone else's thread, but no, I'm sorry, gluten and thyroid are not identical. If you're basing that information off the link you posted earlier, that is not a molecular image, not even a computer generated molecular image. It is a simplified image of what an antibody and antigens work like, generally speaking. I was expecting when I clicked on it that they wanted to show some molecular model that showed an identical binding surface, but that is not what was demonstrated.

Understanding that gluten and thyroid are not the same molecule is entirely unrelated to believing that foods can help or hurt a person.

Diet *may* help autoimmune conditions. It's not a given. Gluten free *may* help with thyroid function, if that person is sensitive to gluten.
I refuse diet changes that are only a maybe. I have had my period of life where I experimented with foods and diet, and I'm kind of done. I can only tell that anything I tried made me worse off, and then I had a bad transition period back to normal eating habits, at which point things leveled out again. I do have flares, but I cannot correlate foods with them. I do not believe that I am one of those that will be helped by going gluten free. I would never tell someone else not to try a safe diet for improved health if they'd like to try it, I think that's sensible. On the flip side, I would never discourage someone from trying medication unless I knew that the particular one in question often does more harm than good.

Phrases like choosing to be healthy or choosing to be sick may feel empowering. For others, it is a very very fine line away from victim blaming, if viewed as different at all. You may not have been aware of how that can come off.

Either way, I think we're in agreement that we hope everyone finds their way to the best health they can, however that may come about.

Blondieee
June 4th, 2018, 07:28 AM
I don't dispute that, but you can take it too far. In the end, the doctors decide. :flower: If that doctor doesn't listen or doesn't "vibe" with you, then you go to another doctor. But the doctors are still ultimately in control! Let's not forget that. ;)

Not always. There wasn't one doctor who told me my 6 month bloat was caused by gluten. I took my health into my own hands and cut out gluten (knowing it's an issue for Hashimoto's) just to see. I figured out an issue that went on for YEARS and doctors didn't have a clue. Doctors have knowledge when it comes to common things that you go in for like when you have a cold or a sinus infection. Not for chronic stuff like autoimmune diseases. They don't have the slightest clue what's going on. I'm referring to regular doctors here. Not functional medicine doctors.

Blondieee
June 4th, 2018, 07:35 AM
I didn't want to get into a major technical discussion on someone else's thread, but no, I'm sorry, gluten and thyroid are not identical. If you're basing that information off the link you posted earlier, that is not a molecular image, not even a computer generated molecular image. It is a simplified image of what an antibody and antigens work like, generally speaking. I was expecting when I clicked on it that they wanted to show some molecular model that showed an identical binding surface, but that is not what was demonstrated.

Understanding that gluten and thyroid are not the same molecule is entirely unrelated to believing that foods can help or hurt a person.

Diet *may* help autoimmune conditions. It's not a given. Gluten free *may* help with thyroid function, if that person is sensitive to gluten.
I refuse diet changes that are only a maybe. I have had my period of life where I experimented with foods and diet, and I'm kind of done. I can only tell that anything I tried made me worse off, and then I had a bad transition period back to normal eating habits, at which point things leveled out again. I do have flares, but I cannot correlate foods with them. I do not believe that I am one of those that will be helped by going gluten free. I would never tell someone else not to try a safe diet for improved health if they'd like to try it, I think that's sensible. On the flip side, I would never discourage someone from trying medication unless I knew that the particular one in question often does more harm than good.

Phrases like choosing to be healthy or choosing to be sick may feel empowering. For others, it is a very very fine line away from victim blaming, if viewed as different at all. You may not have been aware of how that can come off.

Either way, I think we're in agreement that we hope everyone finds their way to the best health they can, however that may come about.

Gluten does look identical to your thyroid. Your thyroid gets attacked in the process of molecular mimicry/mistaken identity when your body is trying to attack the gluten. This is everywhere online. You can google it and read more about it. I didn't think gluten free would help me either. I was wrong. I waited too long to try it. I definitely didn't mean for that statement to come off in a bad way. It was meant to be empowering so I apologize. There's no harm in giving gluten free a try though. It might surprise you. I recently recommended it to a friend of mine and she couldn't stop thanking me cause she feels so much better now.

Diet does help autoimmune conditions. I would disagree. I believe it's not a maybe, but a given but to each her own 😊

But I agree that the poster should do what she feels is best for herself and her body. And I think we both also agree that she should get her TPO and Thyroglobulin antibodies checked to see if she has Hashimoto's.

lapushka
June 4th, 2018, 07:43 AM
Gluten does look identical to your thyroid. Your thyroid gets attacked in the process of molecular mimicry/mistaken identity when your body is trying to attack the gluten. This is everywhere online. You can google it and read more about it. I didn't think gluten free would help me either. I was wrong. I waited too long to try it. I definitely didn't mean for that statement to come off in a bad way. It was meant to be empowering so I apologize. There's no harm in giving gluten free a try though. It might surprise you. I recently recommended it to a friend of mine and she couldn't stop thanking me cause she feels so much better now.

Diet does help autoimmune conditions. I would disagree. I believe it's not a maybe, but a given but to each her own ��

But I agree that the poster should do what she feels is best for herself and her body. And I think we both also agree that she should get her TPO and Thyroglobulin antibodies checked to see if she has Hashimoto's.

I think enting explained that she tried it, she tried loads of things, and that it didn't work for her. :flower: Everyone is different, Blondieee. You always have to consider that.

Chiquita Banana
June 4th, 2018, 07:47 AM
Some interesting dialogue here! I felt the need to quickly chime in before heading off to work. I have several rare auto-inflammatory diseases, some of which have kicked my butt since I was a teenager. Doctors have missed things and tried to over-medicate, not even considering that I look at my diet at all. I have never had a doctor that is ultimately in control of my health. I am in charge of my health. Doctor's have training in certain areas and can offer me help and suggestions... but I am in charge. If a medication works for me, great - I'll take it. If eliminating gluten works for me, great - I'll do it. My goal is to feel better, heal what can be healed and enjoy my life as much as I'm able. No one knows my body better than I do. And what works for me, might not work for you. One size does not fit all. That being said, major diet changes and certain supplements have helped me the most and I am happy with that. Certain diseases are in remission and certain ones are not... but I am better, so that works for me! Best of luck to all of you as you navigate through the best options for your health.

Blondieee
June 4th, 2018, 07:48 AM
I think enting explained that she tried it, she tried loads of things, and that it didn't work for her. :flower: Everyone is different, Blondieee. You always have to consider that.

I don't think she tried gluten free. She said she experimented with other diets at one time and wasn't going to try gluten free because it's only a "maybe." Yes everyone is different, I agree. But if you Google "gluten thyroid molecular mimicry" it comes up with a million hits. It is very likely to help. It may not help her or the original poster, but what if it does? Isn't it at least worth a try?

I would have never correlated my severe bloating or other symptoms with gluten, but it was still causing them. I just didn't know. When you're really sick, you can't tell what foods are causing what symptoms until you take it out. You don't know how bad you've been feeling until you feel good again.

Blondieee
June 4th, 2018, 07:52 AM
Some interesting dialogue here! I felt the need to quickly chime in before heading off to work. I have several rare auto-inflammatory diseases, some of which have kicked my butt since I was a teenager. Doctors have missed things and tried to over-medicate, not even considering that I look at my diet at all. I have never had a doctor that is ultimately in control of my health. I am in charge of my health. Doctor's have training in certain areas and can offer me help and suggestions... but I am in charge. If a medication works for me, great - I'll take it. If eliminating gluten works for me, great - I'll do it. My goal is to feel better, heal what can be healed and enjoy my life as much as I'm able. No one knows my body better than I do. And what works for me, might not work for you. One size does not fit all. That being said, major diet changes and certain supplements have helped me the most and I am happy with that. Certain diseases are in remission and certain ones are not... but I am better, so that works for me! Best of luck to all of you as you navigate through the best options for your health.

THIS! Thank you! 😊
Couldn't agree more with the whole thing but loved the "No one knows my body better than I do" statement. So true! I don't trust doctors to get me better. I take it into my own hands and get myself better. Glad you did the same.

What major diet changes and supplements did you take, if you don't mind me asking?

MusicalSpoons
June 4th, 2018, 08:07 AM
Blondieee, nobody is doubting you know best for your own body. That's great, truly it is, and it is good to share your experiences in case something there might help someone else. But ultimately, being an expert patient (and I'm using that phrase genuinely - it's well-known in various rare disease communities) is about being an expert in your individual condition. It doesn't mean being an expert in everybody else's variant of the condition, simply because every condition affects individuals differently. So share and encourage by all means, but please don't make judgemental statements about what other people choose for their health (even unintentionally). I'm sure you know how exhausting it is to repeatedly explain oneself, so for somebody to then feel one has to defend one's own choices against a frankly evangelical mass of information and opinion actually isn't helpful. Each person is responsible for their own health and although we all wish to be helpful, it's important to recognise that and be supportive.

(Incidentally, I personally know several people who manage their conditions primarily through diet - and I mean diets supervised by a dietician, strictly followed, the majority as a result of seeing functional medicine specialists - but they all still feel ill, and most still need some medication. Three at least have definite autoimmune conditions, and yes they do feel better than they did but they're still unwell. Diet has helped, quite dramatically so in some cases, but not one has it cured. Your case appears to have had a simple solution, but not everybody is in that position. And not everybody is in a position to seek care outside of conventional medicine, let's not forget that.)

OP, I hope you're able to find a good balance in working with your doctor(s) and educating yourself about your own health. You only came here for hair advice! But hopefully there's some useful info in here that you can work with in your own circumstances :flower:

lapushka
June 4th, 2018, 08:13 AM
Blondieee, nobody is doubting you know best for your own body. That's great, truly it is, and it is good to share your experiences in case something there might help someone else. But ultimately, being an expert patient (and I'm using that phrase genuinely - it's well-known in various rare disease communities) is about being an expert in your individual condition. It doesn't mean being an expert in everybody else's variant of the condition, simply because every condition affects individuals differently. So share and encourage by all means, but please don't make judgemental statements about what other people choose for their health (even unintentionally). I'm sure you know how exhausting it is to repeatedly explain oneself, so for somebody to then feel one has to defend one's own choices against a frankly evangelical mass of information and opinion actually isn't helpful. Each person is responsible for their own health and although we all wish to be helpful, it's important to recognise that and be supportive.

(Incidentally, I personally know several people who manage their conditions primarily through diet - and I mean diets supervised by a dietician, strictly followed, the majority as a result of seeing functional medicine specialists - but they all still feel ill, and most still need some medication. Three at least have definite autoimmune conditions, and yes they do feel better than they did but they're still unwell. Diet has helped, quite dramatically so in some cases, but not one has it cured. Your case appears to have had a simple solution, but not everybody is in that position. And not everybody is in a position to seek care outside of conventional medicine, let's not forget that.)

OP, I hope you're able to find a good balance in working with your doctor(s) and educating yourself about your own health. You only came here for hair advice! But hopefully there's some useful info in here that you can work with in your own circumstances :flower:

^^ I so very much agree with this, which is what I tried to say mildly by "everyone is different". There is no one-size fits all (don't we wish). It would all be so simple then.

And yes, advocating for your own health is fine, but in the end the doctor does decide, whether you like it or not. If you don't like what that doctor says, find a different one, but we still can't prescribe our own medications. ;)

Chiquita Banana
June 4th, 2018, 05:44 PM
THIS! Thank you! ��
Couldn't agree more with the whole thing but loved the "No one knows my body better than I do" statement. So true! I don't trust doctors to get me better. I take it into my own hands and get myself better. Glad you did the same.

What major diet changes and supplements did you take, if you don't mind me asking?

I went gluten free around 14 years ago which helped a lot. Then I went hard core Paleo for 3 years but lost so much weight that my doctor had me slowly add back things like rice and cheese, which my body has handled just fine. I was scared to death that one of my conditions in particular would come back, but so far I've been fine! Now, I am gluten and corn free. The only dairy I have is cheese. And I eat lots of veggies, some fruit and grass fed meats. For supplements, I take a good multi-vitamin. For the first two weeks of my cycle I take cod liver oil and for the second 2 weeks, I take evening primrose oil. And I take a Thyroid Support supplement. I drink lots of water, herbal teas and my one cup of coffee in the morning.