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View Full Version : Warnings; What to watch for; What to avoid



Mrstran
November 12th, 2016, 12:42 PM
Hopefully there aren't many on here that have suffered. Even if this thread stays empty. So be it.

After my most recent nightmare; with my hair sticking together and all, I figured why not start a thread specifically dedicated to prevention. Lol

If you have had bad experiences, tips, or know of anything that people out there could benefit from (that could save them from a huge mess later) Please feel free to add.

products; tools; mixture; sticky; drying; breakage.

Arctic
November 12th, 2016, 12:57 PM
Great idea of a thread!

Mine is: if you have a sensitive scalp/skin, and it starts to show displeasure from any new experiment you might be trying out, listen to it.

Vanille_
November 12th, 2016, 01:02 PM
I really think the satin pillow case helps with not only hair damage but also skin irritation.

Flipgirl24
November 12th, 2016, 01:31 PM
If your hair is over processed and irreparably damaged, cut it. No oil, conditioner, or magic potion will fix it. I used to work at a shop that sold semi natural bath products and a lady came in with super long (well, to her waist) but severely over processed hair. She asked for a recommendation for a deep conditioner. I recommended cutting it but she protested. So o recommended the most moisturizing conditioner we had. The next day she yelled at me because it didn't work. I reiterated suggestion of cutting it then taking care of it as it grows and she vehemently refused and was angry at me for suggesting it. While I understand not wanting to cut it because of the time invested, I feel like you are going to go through much more disappointment when products don't work. Cut your losses and start from scratch. And get a good hairdresser who knows hair. Which will cost money but it's worth it.

littlestarface
November 12th, 2016, 01:53 PM
If you have hair like mine thats like spiderwebs don't try an unknown complicated braid style or else RIP hair.

Annalouise
November 12th, 2016, 01:58 PM
I really think the satin pillow case helps with not only hair damage but also skin irritation.

Do you mind if I ask a question about silk pillowcases? I bought one and it was 20$. I got it on ebay, but when I run my fingers over it, it doesn't feel any softer than my cotton pillow case. In contrast, I have a silk scarf I bought at Talbots and its silky smooth. So therefore, does it matter what type of silk pillowcase you buy? I wonder if I shouldn't be wrapping my head in my Talbots scarf but its literally so silky it slips right off my head. :bigeyes:

Annalouise
November 12th, 2016, 02:01 PM
If you have hair like mine thats like spiderwebs don't try an unknown complicated braid style or else RIP hair.

:bigeyes: Oh my goodness that does sound like a nightmare.

lapushka
November 12th, 2016, 02:09 PM
If your hair is over processed and irreparably damaged, cut it. No oil, conditioner, or magic potion will fix it. I used to work at a shop that sold semi natural bath products and a lady came in with super long (well, to her waist) but severely over processed hair. She asked for a recommendation for a deep conditioner. I recommended cutting it but she protested. So o recommended the most moisturizing conditioner we had. The next day she yelled at me because it didn't work. I reiterated suggestion of cutting it then taking care of it as it grows and she vehemently refused and was angry at me for suggesting it. While I understand not wanting to cut it because of the time invested, I feel like you are going to go through much more disappointment when products don't work. Cut your losses and start from scratch. And get a good hairdresser who knows hair. Which will cost money but it's worth it.

I disagree here. Mine was like that, and I did cut it back, but only to chin length. The rest of the damage (it was damaged to the root, both times) I dealt with, because I didn't want to have a bald head.

You have to gauge for yourself what you can and can't deal with, but just point blank saying cut it all off is a bit much, IMMHO. :flower:

littlestarface
November 12th, 2016, 02:15 PM
Do you mind if I ask a question about silk pillowcases? I bought one and it was 20$. I got it on ebay, but when I run my fingers over it, it doesn't feel any softer than my cotton pillow case. In contrast, I have a silk scarf I bought at Talbots and its silky smooth. So therefore, does it matter what type of silk pillowcase you buy? I wonder if I shouldn't be wrapping my head in my Talbots scarf but its literally so silky it slips right off my head. :bigeyes:

Sounds like you got a fake silk one. If it was real it would cost like 40bucks+ Cuz I seen on adorabellababy her mulberry pillowcase cost 44 bucks and it would be so silky smooth too like never catch anything.

missmelaniem
November 12th, 2016, 02:26 PM
If your hair is over processed and irreparably damaged, cut it. No oil, conditioner, or magic potion will fix it. I used to work at a shop that sold semi natural bath products and a lady came in with super long (well, to her waist) but severely over processed hair. She asked for a recommendation for a deep conditioner. I recommended cutting it but she protested. So o recommended the most moisturizing conditioner we had. The next day she yelled at me because it didn't work. I reiterated suggestion of cutting it then taking care of it as it grows and she vehemently refused and was angry at me for suggesting it. While I understand not wanting to cut it because of the time invested, I feel like you are going to go through much more disappointment when products don't work. Cut your losses and start from scratch. And get a good hairdresser who knows hair. Which will cost money but it's worth it.


I disagree here. Mine was like that, and I did cut it back, but only to chin length. The rest of the damage (it was damaged to the root, both times) I dealt with, because I didn't want to have a bald head.

You have to gauge for yourself what you can and can't deal with, but just point blank saying cut it all off is a bit much, IMMHO. :flower:

I disagree as well. You cant gauge all from an experience with one client.

For damaged hair unless its literally falling apart when wet (then of course you have no choice) or breaking off when touched, you can help your hair to at least recover somewhat, coddle it and do microtrims.

I used to want to specialize in long hair. I let my license lapse in 2003 because I had long since moved on from hairdressing, but I'm thinking about getting it back and freelancing doing long hair only. Small market, but then again I work more than FT so that would work for me. I would work with a longer haired client to try to get their hair back in condition, and give them instructions to follow at home... thats just me tho. I think virtually any hair can be saved.

embee
November 12th, 2016, 02:27 PM
There are many different weaves of silk, some are rough and some are smooth. Maybe you need to touch the fabric before buying, just to be sure it's what you're looking for.

About watching out for things: if the ad sounds too good to be true, pay attention... Let someone else try it out first. ;)

meteor
November 12th, 2016, 02:37 PM
Great idea for a thread! :D

I haven't had time to think about it in detail, but here are a couple quick ideas, that are relevant for *my* hairtype (it's all YMMV, of course ;) ):

- avoid/limit stuff that's dusty/linty or anything super-fibery and hard to wash out (at least, without blending and straining it extremely well first) due to tangling risk, e.g. bananas, avocados, etc;

- avoid/limit exposure to high pH stuff, like baking soda;

- avoid/limit really drying stuff, like salts, clays and quite a few herbs;

- avoid/limit some really dense brushes and brushes with plastic balls with seams on long and thick hair (I don't brush at all);

- avoid forcing a product/hairstyle/routine if it doesn't work for you - leave it alone, but it might work for you later, e.g. when your hair's needs change over time;

- avoid/limit really complex tangle-inducing, high-manipulation hairstyles (risk of mechanical damage) and if your hair is super-thick and short, don't even worry about standard buns yet, focus on easy braids and sectioned, braided updos instead. (I finally managed to do an unbraided LWB recently, and I'm past fingertip. I wish I hadn't attacked my hair with all those attempted and failed complex buns for years.)

- with my hairtype, if the hair is badly tangled, avoid washing it right away (to avoid wet-setting it with those tangles), instead take the time to detangle it thoroughly first;

- avoid/limit permanent and demi-permanent dyes if you are trying to go darker, try *true* semi-permanent and temporary dyes instead, to save hair from some developer (peroxide) damage;

- avoid or be extra vigilant around velcro rollers (or velcro anything) and round brushes, if your hair is long (serious tangling risk).

Obviously, this is all YMMV. ;)

lapushka
November 12th, 2016, 02:54 PM
I used to want to specialize in long hair. I let my license lapse in 2003 because I had long since moved on from hairdressing, but I'm thinking about getting it back and freelancing doing long hair only. Small market, but then again I work more than FT so that would work for me. I would work with a longer haired client to try to get their hair back in condition, and give them instructions to follow at home... thats just me tho. I think virtually any hair can be saved.

Or specialize in long hair and also curly hair (there's a fast growing market for that).

Mrstran
November 12th, 2016, 03:09 PM
If your hair is over processed and irreparably damaged, cut it. No oil, conditioner, or magic potion will fix it. I used to work at a shop that sold semi natural bath products and a lady came in with super long (well, to her waist) but severely over processed hair. She asked for a recommendation for a deep conditioner. I recommended cutting it but she protested. So o recommended the most moisturizing conditioner we had. The next day she yelled at me because it didn't work. I reiterated suggestion of cutting it then taking care of it as it grows and she vehemently refused and was angry at me for suggesting it. While I understand not wanting to cut it because of the time invested, I feel like you are going to go through much more disappointment when products don't work. Cut your losses and start from scratch. And get a good hairdresser who knows hair. Which will cost money but it's worth it.

I had to do that. My hair was getting shorter and shorter and wouldn't stop breaking. I couldn't even comb it without hair flying everywhere. Scary huh? I cut my hair up to CBL and it's now doing great aside from the sticky mess I made the other night.

I'm Never touching castle soap again. My hair hates it.

Annalouise
November 12th, 2016, 03:10 PM
Sounds like you got a fake silk one. If it was real it would cost like 40bucks+ Cuz I seen on adorabellababy her mulberry pillowcase cost 44 bucks and it would be so silky smooth too like never catch anything.

Oooo, well, the scarf retailed for about 45$ and I got it on clearance. And the pillowcase was not that price so yes, we get what we pay for don't we. :)


There are many different weaves of silk, some are rough and some are smooth. Maybe you need to touch the fabric before buying, just to be sure it's what you're looking for.


I got the bad weave....:)

jfg1987
November 12th, 2016, 04:30 PM
Oooo, well, the scarf retailed for about 45$ and I got it on clearance. And the pillowcase was not that price so yes, we get what we pay for don't we. :)

I purchased this (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FWZVIWW/ref=psdc_3732831_t1_B00FW49P0U) one almost two years ago, it's great! I never wake up with wrinkles on my face and my hair doesn't get dried out.

Avoid those stupid overpriced hair growth vitamins/pills! There's nothing special in them and they might actually be dangerous.

LaísB
November 12th, 2016, 04:40 PM
I think that an ultimate no-no (at least for me) is braiding wet hair, because it always breaks off and gets damaged so for me it is a huge No sign. Also mixing up too many products at once.

sumidha
November 12th, 2016, 05:40 PM
So, silk versus satin pillowcases...

Silk is a fiber, which can vary from raw silk, which is soft but textured and nubby to silk satin which is shiny and incredibly slippy. Satin is a weave, and most of the cheap satin you see out there is made of polyester fibers. If you are in the market for an 'LHC approved' silk pillowcase (or scarf or sleeping cap or whatever) you are looking for a fabric called charmeuse which is a satin weave, made with silk fiber. Alternatively, if it's just labeled 'satin' you want to look for a 100% silk fiber content.

Which is not to say you wont get some benefit from polyester satin, or silk fabric that isn't charmeuse, after all the point is to reduce friction with something smooth, whatever it is, I just see the same confusion pop up on here a lot. :)

As for what to watch out for, for me personally it's DIY masks involving food. Avocados, eggs, bananas, yogurt, these are food, put them in your body, not on it! (And of course YMMV, I know there's people who quite enjoy food based hair masks, they've just never worked for me, resulting in food particles stuck in my hair and on my scalp with rinsing and washing over and over again trying to get it all out... Ugh)

meteor
November 12th, 2016, 05:46 PM
Another thing I'd add to my list is some heat-free curling methods aren't always all that safe for my hair, probably due to length, thickness and multiple textures going on. Especially everything that loops hair through, like the headband curls, or things that are just really tight, like bantu knots (e.g. torrin's bad experience - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7XXlh9QfXw).

As for the pillowcases/scarves/bonnets question, to be honest, I actually prefer some super-silky types of polyester (e.g. satin weave) to 100% silk, because they just feel more slippery. Silk with satin weave can be great, but some synthetics can be even smoother to touch and they are vegan-friendly, much cheaper, easier to find, etc... The downside is that they are normally less breathable and might cause static for some, but it all depends... I'd try a few different materials and just go with what feels smoother to touch but also feels more comfortable to sleep on. :)

missrandie
November 12th, 2016, 05:47 PM
Castile soap. Terrible stuff.

Narrow toothed seamed combs.

Sharp edged barettes.

Tangly danglies.

HeartofHaleth
November 12th, 2016, 07:03 PM
Don't leave hair to the last minute (if you're like me, anyways)! The other night I was in a terrible hurry to get it washed and up in a braid. A Dutch braid.Why on earth I thought that would be a good idea, I have no clue. Anyways my hair was wet, it was dark, I was sitting in a pickup truck that was going down the road, and I had a couple of minutes to get my hair braided. I got impatient and the hairs started to snap. Moral of the story: don't be like me! :p

lora410
November 12th, 2016, 07:52 PM
I found less is more. If your routine is working and your hair likes it LEAVE IT ALONE. I used to constantly always try new scalp treatments and new oils,horn combs,bamboo combs etc and ended up doing damage to it. Esp the disaster garlic treatment where I mistook cooked garlic for raw. Yeah stank for a few days on that one...lol..anywho.. Since having to chop and regrow, 2yrs now, I do sulfate free shampoos, coney condish, and my leave in from dollar tree and my hair is happy, so I leave it be. Also no split ends or breakage either :)

Entangled
November 12th, 2016, 09:17 PM
The one thing I've learned that I believe is helpful to longhairs except for maybe the hyper curly is this: don't pile your hair in top of your head while shampooing. There is no benefit at all to doing so. It just tangles hair.

Flipgirl24
November 12th, 2016, 09:40 PM
I had to do that. My hair was getting shorter and shorter and wouldn't stop breaking. I couldn't even comb it without hair flying everywhere. Scary huh? I cut my hair up to CBL and it's now doing great aside from the sticky mess I made the other night.

I'm Never touching castle soap again. My hair hates it.

I'm glad you have restored your hair's health!

Flipgirl24
November 12th, 2016, 09:47 PM
I disagree here. Mine was like that, and I did cut it back, but only to chin length. The rest of the damage (it was damaged to the root, both times) I dealt with, because I didn't want to have a bald head.

You have to gauge for yourself what you can and can't deal with, but just point blank saying cut it all off is a bit much, IMMHO. :flower:

Of course. But when one is beating a dead horse, then one is setting oneself up for major disappointment. It's great that you were able to get your hair back to health. I'm not saying it isn't possible but if most of your hair is irreparably damaged, it needs drastic measures. I mean cutting several inches not millimeters at a time. I guess it's isn't for everyone but you have to adjust your expectations depending on how much damage you cut off.

LadyCelestina
November 12th, 2016, 11:14 PM
great idea for a thread :thumbsup:
Mine is : If your hair is tangled and you need to wash it but cannot for some reason detangle it either before or after wash (time, don't have conditioner etc), then don't wash it at all.
You'll maybe feel fresher but when you finally get to detangle the hair, it's likely you are going to have a bad time.

Guess who once had to reach for the scissors after unexpectedly staying in a hospital for a couple days?

anou
November 12th, 2016, 11:16 PM
Protective hairstyles! They are so good for keeping hair tangle-free.

Not that I don't leave my hair down sometimes, but that's usually on wash day/day 2 (in a half up, usually). Then I start braids. XD And yes it's braided/bunned for sleep too. Upside : if you lightly oil before sleeping and braid/bun, you're going to wake up to glorious tangle free hair.

animetor7
November 13th, 2016, 12:35 AM
Don't chemically process your hair!!! Bleach, perms, chemical straightening, etc. will all come back to bite you even if you don't notice damage immediately. These might not be a problem if your goal is something like BSL or waist, but will definitely be problematic if trying to grow hair longer than that. In a similar vein, avoid heat as much as possible. I'd recommend air drying if you possibly can against a blow dryer, even on warm, as you may still be doing more damage than by just leaving it alone and this will show up eventually. Scalp washes can help with this once hair gets long by reducing drying time because not all of the hair is wet.

I'll also second protective styles and just generally techniques for avoiding damage in the first place rather than trying to repair it.

hopefulred
November 13th, 2016, 03:02 AM
Of course. But when one is beating a dead horse, then one is setting oneself up for major disappointment. It's great that you were able to get your hair back to health. I'm not saying it isn't possible but if most of your hair is irreparably damaged, it needs drastic measures. I mean cutting several inches not millimeters at a time. I guess it's isn't for everyone but you have to adjust your expectations depending on how much damage you cut off.

I also have to disagree. Mine is damaged beyond repair (due to the last hairdresser!!) from over processing and then over lapping bleach and it's only staying intact with olive oil and really babying it. If I cut it all off I would have 3.5cms of hair (virgin hair) and for me that would make me feel really bad so growing out my natural colour, being able to tie it back and get it trimmed every month is going to work better for me, Iv been to see a tricologist so I know for a fact the hair is beyond repair but it's not effecting my healthy regrowth and won't and by doing it this way it's the least traumatic way for me! It's not always so easy as to say cut it all off when you would have hardly any hair left!

Anyhow mine are simple and what I will be living by for the rest of my life.... No bleach or colour and embrace what God gave me......role on to when my hair is all virgin healthy ginger (strawberry blonde) long hair!

Johannah
November 13th, 2016, 04:01 AM
Just don't put banana in your hair.

That's all I got to say. :lol:

Wildcat Diva
November 13th, 2016, 09:43 AM
Sounds like you got a fake silk one. If it was real it would cost like 40bucks+ Cuz I seen on adorabellababy her mulberry pillowcase cost 44 bucks and it would be so silky smooth too like never catch anything.

I've been real happy with this one.

TexereSilk Solid Silk Pillowcase (Single Pack, Gold, King) Soft and Comfortable Silk Pillowcases https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006ITYJ3Q/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_-CjkybQY5AN6V

Annalouise
November 13th, 2016, 09:44 AM
So, silk versus satin pillowcases...

Silk is a fiber, which can vary from raw silk, which is soft but textured and nubby to silk satin which is shiny and incredibly slippy. Satin is a weave, and most of the cheap satin you see out there is made of polyester fibers. If you are in the market for an 'LHC approved' silk pillowcase (or scarf or sleeping cap or whatever) you are looking for a fabric called charmeuse which is a satin weave, made with silk fiber. Alternatively, if it's just labeled 'satin' you want to look for a 100% silk fiber content.

Which is not to say you wont get some benefit from polyester satin, or silk fabric that isn't charmeuse, after all the point is to reduce friction with something smooth, whatever it is, I just see the same confusion pop up on here a lot. :)


Thank you. Added to Christmas wish list. :)

sumidha
November 13th, 2016, 10:20 AM
Glad I could help. :)

LadyCelestina
November 13th, 2016, 10:35 AM
just don't put banana in your hair.

That's all i got to say. :lol:

!!!! This !!!!!
:D

littlestarface
November 13th, 2016, 12:44 PM
I've been real happy with this one.

TexereSilk Solid Silk Pillowcase (Single Pack, Gold, King) Soft and Comfortable Silk Pillowcases https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006ITYJ3Q/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_-CjkybQY5AN6V

Very nice and the reviews are great, they even say both sides are silk too. Thank you, now I'm a go get one.

Pixiebella
November 13th, 2016, 02:24 PM
I agree with the poster about about chemically processing your hair: it may look okay for awhile, but the structure has been irreversibly compromised and just isn't the same as virgin/hennaed hair. One step further: don't trust olaplex!! It will promise you that bleach will not turn your hair into a squishy, swampy mess, but that you will be a silky haired and radiant blonde. LIES!! Your hair will look great for a couple months, but even olaplex can't keep the splits and breaks away. Trust me -- I just cut all my hair off, up to my chin because of it.

Flipgirl24
November 13th, 2016, 10:35 PM
[QUOTE=hopefulred;3324091]I also have to disagree. Mine is damaged beyond repair (due to the last hairdresser!!) from over processing and then over lapping bleach and it's only staying intact with olive oil and really babying it. If I cut it all off I would have 3.5cms of hair (virgin hair) and for me that would make me feel really bad so growing out my natural colour, being able to tie it back and get it trimmed every month is going to work better for me, Iv been to see a tricologist so I know for a fact the hair is beyond repair but it's not effecting my healthy regrowth and won't and by doing it this way it's the least traumatic way for me! It's not always so easy as to say cut it all off when you would have hardly any hair. [\QUOTE]

You have more patience than me!

Apolli
November 14th, 2016, 04:29 AM
Don't try to fight your hair texture. Changing it up a bit is a-okay but denying that you're one type and forcing your hair into submission doesn't work well at all.

Don't force aa routine onto your hair or scalp. If any of them protests to a regime then change it and listen closely to how your hair/scalp reacts. My hair suffered a lot because I tried to force it to be cone free and using an sls free shampoo. I also thought that I absolutely MUST brush my curly hair (how little did I know :p ).

Also, don't put too much pressure on your edges. Traction alopecia is real and more people should know about it, unfortunately >_>

Adelain
November 14th, 2016, 07:39 AM
Annalouise, have you considered to wrap the pillow in your scarf? I usually sleep with a large silk scarf on my pillow because I only have cotton pillowcases

Annalouise
November 14th, 2016, 07:48 AM
Adelain ~ Yes, I've been doing that but it doesn't stay on the pillow. I was thinking about pinning it to my pillowcase so it stays on. :)

Flipgirl24
November 14th, 2016, 10:28 PM
Also, don't put too much pressure on your edges. Traction alopecia is real and more people should know about it, unfortunately >_>

What do you mean by edges?

littlestarface
November 15th, 2016, 12:56 AM
What do you mean by edges?

Hair line.

Cryptlesbian
November 15th, 2016, 02:11 AM
Just don't put banana in your hair.

That's all I got to say. :lol:

Lol! I have to agree. I'd been given this deep conditioner recipe that had coconut water and banana as ingredients. It took forever to get the banana bits out... :mad:

Cryptlesbian
November 15th, 2016, 02:13 AM
As far as silk pillowcases go, honestly I prefer a bonnet. I don't like pillows, and scarves come right off.

Annalouise
November 15th, 2016, 12:24 PM
Cryptlesbian ~ what do you mean by a bonnet? Is it silk?

Hay_jules
November 15th, 2016, 01:41 PM
Food in hair...it really doesn't work for me. I did egg and banana and it really ruined my hair (temporarily).

Beware hinges in barrettes and things. I've broken way too many hairs in simple barrettes. Also those cheap foam rollers with wire inside that you just twist, they broke my hair. So much for less damage than heat.

The velcro roller warning reminded me of when I first started losing my hair during chemo. It was Christmas eve and I knew it would start falling out soon so I was already babying it. I used velcro rollers (because I didn't want to pull the straightener through anymore) and when I carefully pulled out the rollers hunk of hair came out with them. One of the more traumatic things I've experienced.

Strands
November 15th, 2016, 02:26 PM
I disagree as well. You cant gauge all from an experience with one client.

For damaged hair unless its literally falling apart when wet (then of course you have no choice) or breaking off when touched, you can help your hair to at least recover somewhat, coddle it and do microtrims.

I used to want to specialize in long hair. I let my license lapse in 2003 because I had long since moved on from hairdressing, but I'm thinking about getting it back and freelancing doing long hair only. Small market, but then again I work more than FT so that would work for me. I would work with a longer haired client to try to get their hair back in condition, and give them instructions to follow at home... thats just me tho. I think virtually any hair can be saved.


I concur. I had terrible hair compared to just a month ago when I stumbled upon this forum. I have changed my methods in the last couple weeks, and seen dramatic improvement. Knowledge is power, and although over time the bad probably will have to go, just cutting it off might not have to happen. Sometimes just good conditioning and S&D can do wonders... it did for me anyway.

Flipgirl24
November 15th, 2016, 10:16 PM
Hair line.

Oh ok. Thank you!

Tassledown
November 17th, 2016, 09:32 PM
Advice for what to watch for, gleaned from some recent posts and my own experience:

Be prepared, if you go to a salon, to fight for proper treatment of your hair. Practice saying "No, I don't want that. Don't do it." and be prepared to walk out of the appointment if you need to.

Hair stylists are not God and don't get to do whatever they want, but some sure seem to think they are. Be ready to deal with them; better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it. (If you don't wind up needing it, get a business card.)

Dessi
November 20th, 2016, 10:23 PM
Lol! I have to agree. I'd been given this deep conditioner recipe that had coconut water and banana as ingredients. It took forever to get the banana bits out... :mad:

That's what I did yesterday too.. :D Definitely hard to get out.

Silverbrumby
November 20th, 2016, 11:04 PM
Just because it's natural doesn't mean it's better. Oils, routines, no poo, condition only, scalp oilings. All these things sometimes don't work and can cause irritating scalp conditions.

stachelbeere
November 21st, 2016, 04:45 AM
DON'T blow dry your sick boyfriend's hair when your own hair is loose and he is lying down - some of your hairs at the front will get sucked into the back of the blow dryer and you'll have to cut it off... true story :/

HairPlease
November 21st, 2016, 05:50 AM
Just because it's natural doesn't mean it's better. Oils, routines, no poo, condition only, scalp oilings. All these things sometimes don't work and can cause irritating scalp conditions.

Very true. Oils do horrible things to my scalp and hair. Yes, all oils that I've ever tried, and I've tried a lot. Listening to your body is extremely important to finding the routine that is right for YOU.

A thing to watch out for, for me I've found, is unusual amounts of scalp grease. If it gets greasy for more than a couple months, the routine/product simply must be changed.


DON'T blow dry your sick boyfriend's hair when your own hair is loose and he is lying down - some of your hairs at the front will get sucked into the back of the blow dryer and you'll have to cut it off... true story :/

That's scary. :eek:

mizukitty
November 21st, 2016, 09:32 AM
Mine is simple, but I try not to stray from it. Don't try to force things that don't work for you, especially if they cause uncomfortable symptoms.

For example, my scalp becomes horrendously itchy if I even *think* about stretching washes, because it is naturally quite oily. And no, not "dry and overproducing oil" like everyone on earth usually says. It is a good indicator that if your face/forehead is oily, your scalp is as well. All of my experiences trying not to wash my scalp every other day have resulted in the need to use really, really drying antifungal shampoos to curb the condition, which stripped my hair into oblivion. So for me it's: wash more frequently (with sulfate free shampoos alternating with CO washes), avoid fungal scalp issues, no need for active ingredient shampoo, scalp + hair is happy.

Another example is giving up oils that weigh my hair down. Even though I love the idea of olive oil because it makes my hair so incredibly soft, it's far too heavy for daily use. I reserve it for pre poo only, and stick to a lighter camellia for daily smoothing.

Annalouise
November 21st, 2016, 12:53 PM
I agree, with the above sentiments. The worst thing in the world for me was water only. I lost a significant amount of hair. :brickwall
I've also noticed that the longer I go between washes the more hair fall I experience. To be honest, the best thing for my scalp is daily washing with a sulphate free shampoo on the scalp. A clean scalp is a happy scalp for me. :blossom:

Strands
November 21st, 2016, 07:53 PM
Just because it's natural doesn't mean it's better. Oils, routines, no poo, condition only, scalp oilings. All these things sometimes don't work and can cause irritating scalp conditions.

Indeed, and I for one welcome and worship the cone overlords. ALL HAIL THE CONES.

OhSuzi
November 22nd, 2016, 08:59 AM
'If it ay broke dow fix it.' UK - If you're happy with how your hair e.g. it's already curly neat n shiny don't start messing up & forcing on the newest fad routine on it when what you're doing already gets great results.
Conversely those quickest to adapt are more likely to survive - If your hair is not behaving how you'd like it, but you've always used the same routine, the same shampoo and it always used to work for you get over it, perhaps your older & your hormones are different, perhaps you've gotton used to the same hair products - don't stick to something rigidly because it used to work - then you should be trying something new to find a better result for your hair.