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meteor
July 27th, 2016, 02:56 PM
Has anyone tried any metal wide-tooth combs for detangling? If so, what were your impressions?

Of course, I was always scared of metal (thinking it must be more prone to breaking hair and adding static), but when I tried it, just for curiosity, I was shocked at how much smoother and easier it was than similar designs in wood and plastic. :bigeyes:

This is super counter-intuitive to me, since I always thought of metal is inappropriate (too harsh) for detangling, but I decided to try it just because the teeth were super long and I got that "hot knife through butter" ease of combing, no snagging or breakage. And when I ran my fingers along the teeth it did make sense to me, because the metal teeth (stainless steel) were super thin and absolutely slick and perfectly rounded, *much* more so than polished wood or plastic or hard rubber I've tried.
Also, I hear that smooth metal hair sticks/forks slide out of updos much more easily than wood/horn/acrylic... but maybe that excessive slip of the material is helpful for detangling purposes? :hmm:




I'm just curious if anybody else has tried metal wide-tooth combs or had similar or different experiences? I'm kind of afraid to continue using metal, but at the same time it just glides so easily. Or am I crazy and should just stick to wood, because it should be safer/gentler?





And another question specifically about materials... aren't all combs that don't have much give (be it rubber or plastic or wood or horn, etc etc), assuming the same design, still equally liable to break hairs (if one pushes through tangles instead of stopping to take knots apart)? Or is the idea that the harder, less bendy materials must be automatically worse for hair (though those materials may be more durable and take longer to develop snags)? Is there a "hierarchy" of materials for safest hair detangling?





Also, slightly unrelated question: why is stainless steel so widely used for pet grooming tools for long-haired cats and dogs, especially for professional combs? And not so much plastic or wood? Is it just a durability issue? And is wood or plastic still better for detangling our long-haired pets?


Thank you in advance! :flowers:

lapushka
July 27th, 2016, 03:11 PM
My grandma on mom's side used to have a metal WT comb for detangling her hair. She had short hair but was super careful with it. She always used to comb it as if she was afraid to touch it, that careful. And she never ripped through her hair. Tried it once, very smooth!

I think it's more how you handle the WT comb that is important, more than the material it's made from.

meteor
July 27th, 2016, 03:19 PM
^ Thanks a lot, lapushka! :D That's great to know.


I think it's more how you handle the WT comb that is important, more than the material it's made from.

Oh I definitely agree! :agree: Handling is everything. :) And I think fingers-only detangling is so great from that perspective (they provide perfect control and feel for tangles), I just don't get that super-thin and perfectly smooth surface on fingers compared to good combs/rakes, otherwise I'd always stick to fingers only. :)

mermaid lullaby
July 27th, 2016, 03:56 PM
I never seen a metal comb before

Chromis
July 27th, 2016, 07:22 PM
I don't see why it would be an issue myself, I just haven't seen them around casually. I have had my current comb for many years now off the swap board here and it is plastic however it is thick and does not really have any flex. I think more an issue might be tine spacing and good machining. Most of the pet rakes I have seen are spaced too close for me. When I have used them on animals I used a curry comb first and didn't rip through the tangles. I have a closer tined wooden comb that I sometimes use for smoothing, but only after having used the wide one first just like a BBB.

I think the reason pet combs are usually metal is for durability and ease of cleaning. A puppy is more likely to try chewing on a comb and critters are washed less, the grime doesn't seem to stick to the metal as much, but it makes a layer on plastic and wooden combs that is a pain to get off.

lapushka
July 28th, 2016, 07:02 AM
I think my grandma's comb was a stainless steel one, I don't remember - it got lost. I don't know if she got it wet; don't think so. But it not rusting is important because that can damage hair no kidding.

miss_donya
July 28th, 2016, 07:19 AM
I think my grandma's comb was a stainless steel one, I don't remember - it got lost. I don't know if she got it wet; don't think so. But it not rusting is important because that can damage hair no kidding.

I'm curious, how would the rust damage the hair? Is the the texture or the chemical structure?(depositing hash materials into hair,for example)

pailin
July 28th, 2016, 07:24 AM
Rust would make it rough so it would tend to damage hair for that reason.

missmelaniem
July 28th, 2016, 08:25 AM
In this context I would associate the metal with slicing, which would make me scared to use it

lapushka
July 28th, 2016, 08:29 AM
I'm curious, how would the rust damage the hair? Is the the texture or the chemical structure?(depositing hash materials into hair,for example)

It's rough in texture and it crumbles, so it's only normal, IMMHO. Besides it would be a deteriorating comb, you wouldn't want to put that near your hair. Yikes.

meteor
July 28th, 2016, 10:43 AM
Chromis, that's great to know about pets! Thanks a lot! :flowers: I definitely remember frequently cutting out my Persian's mattes back in the day when I knew nothing about good detangling and avoided metal tools. :oops: :doh:

Mermaid lullaby, depending on where you live, ethnic hair salons/stores might carry some rakes / combs / picks in metal, though I agree, they can be really hard to find. Mine is an Afro pick, it looks a bit like this (http://images.etsy.com/all_images/c/cbb/e71/il_fullxfull.19506695.jpg), only the teeth on mine are *much* longer than on that picture, 4'' long, which is awesome for my thick hair. Afro picks are meant for fluffing out roots, but frankly, they work *amazingly* well for detangling my thickness and length... not sure why, maybe because the teeth are much longer and thinner than on typical WT combs, which makes it easier to get through dense hair, and also maybe the way the handle is positioned parallel to the teeth makes is a lot more ergonomic for the way I detangle length. Afro picks are usually made out of plastic (with seams!) that's just way too weak and bendy and develops snags within just a few months of use! :( So I'm happy I checked out the metal option now, because the teeth are like completely smooth cylindrical thin rods with a bit of give and they glide like a breeze.

About the rust issue, I thought of that, too, but I don't think it's a risk, since it's stainless steel. But I'll definitely come back and report if I notice any rusting. :)

I detangle over white surface and I quickly check to see if there is breakage (bulbs vs. no bulbs), and so far I haven't seen any breakage, but it could be just my gentle detangling technique rather than the quality of the tool itself, I don't know... though I must say, I'm impressed by how easily it glides, wood and plastic seem almost a bit "sticky" by comparison. I'm still kind of scared that I might be inadvertently causing damage without noticing it... I'll try to be vigilant. ;)

calmyogi
July 28th, 2016, 10:48 AM
Stainless steel shouldn't rust. I have always assumed it would be more gentle, but I have never seen them mentioned on the boards before. The reason I figured they would be gentle on the hair is because they make them for ethnic hair and a lot of the time that type of hair is more delicate.

Anje
July 28th, 2016, 11:23 AM
Sounds interesting, and I would imagine a comb with wire teeth would be quite smooth and gentle. (One that was, say, cut out from a metal blank would probably need extensive polishing to not have any sharp edges, though.) Where did you find this thing?

lapushka
July 28th, 2016, 11:27 AM
meteor, do you have a picture of the comb, or a site/place where you got it? I'm curious. Might possibly be interested in getting me one.

Johannah
July 28th, 2016, 12:37 PM
I've never seen such a comb, but tbh it sounds like good material for a comb now I think about it... If I would find it, I'd definitely try it.

Hinza
July 28th, 2016, 01:58 PM
I have this kind whole stainless steel comb and it is very smooth and round without any edges but its not wide tooth working for human hair. Its great for my dogs and antistatic and easy to keep clean. I got it from pet shop few years ago. It cannot also break.

Hairkay
July 28th, 2016, 02:24 PM
Chromis, that's great to know about pets! Thanks a lot! :flowers: I definitely remember frequently cutting out my Persian's mattes back in the day when I knew nothing about good detangling and avoided metal tools. :oops: :doh:

Mermaid lullaby, depending on where you live, ethnic hair salons/stores might carry some rakes / combs / picks in metal, though I agree, they can be really hard to find. Mine is an Afro pick, it looks a bit like this (http://images.etsy.com/all_images/c/cbb/e71/il_fullxfull.19506695.jpg), only the teeth on mine are *much* longer than on that picture, 4'' long, which is awesome for my thick hair. Afro picks are meant for fluffing out roots, but frankly, they work *amazingly* well for detangling my thickness and length... not sure why, maybe because the teeth are much longer and thinner than on typical WT combs, which makes it easier to get through dense hair, and also maybe the way the handle is positioned parallel to the teeth makes is a lot more ergonomic for the way I detangle length. Afro picks are usually made out of plastic (with seams!) that's just way too weak and bendy and develops snags within just a few months of use! :( So I'm happy I checked out the metal option now, because the teeth are like completely smooth cylindrical thin rods with a bit of give and they glide like a breeze.

About the rust issue, I thought of that, too, but I don't think it's a risk, since it's stainless steel. But I'll definitely come back and report if I notice any rusting. :)

I detangle over white surface and I quickly check to see if there is breakage (bulbs vs. no bulbs), and so far I haven't seen any breakage, but it could be just my gentle detangling technique rather than the quality of the tool itself, I don't know... though I must say, I'm impressed by how easily it glides, wood and plastic seem almost a bit "sticky" by comparison. I'm still kind of scared that I might be inadvertently causing damage without noticing it... I'll try to be vigilant. ;)

I've seen those metal afro picks before. They do indeed work. I just have a plastic one that I occasionally use to gently rub my scalp under plaits/braids when I think I need a better reach than my fingers for WO washing.

lithostoic
July 28th, 2016, 03:01 PM
The thought of detangling with metal terrifies me. I keep picturing it slicing through knots and snapping my hair, and giving me static frizz. A metal comb is probably more likely to be seamless than plastic though, right?

meteor
July 28th, 2016, 04:49 PM
meteor, do you have a picture of the comb, or a site/place where you got it? I'm curious. Might possibly be interested in getting me one.


Sounds interesting, and I would imagine a comb with wire teeth would be quite smooth and gentle. (One that was, say, cut out from a metal blank would probably need extensive polishing to not have any sharp edges, though.) Where did you find this thing?

Anje, lapushka, I got it at a local ethnic haircare store, next to a small curly salon. It looks like this (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/416OLoLQ66L.jpg), only mine has 4''-long teeth and 1/4'' spacing between teeth. They are super-affordable and I think they are pretty common in ethnic haircare sections/shops, actually, especially the ones that are smaller and in plastic. For some reason, I could never find Afro picks locally in wood - that would be awesome to try! (Wooden picks are available online, but the prices I've seen are much higher than for similar WT combs.) I see picks all over places like ebay, just google "stainless steel" or "metal" "Afro picks" or "Afro piks". ;)
Oh yes, Anje, the structure of each tooth is like perfectly round wire / rod :agree: - I'm pretty sure they weren't cut from anything, just wires/rods sealed in the base/handle.


I've seen those metal afro picks before. They do indeed work. I just have a plastic one that I occasionally use to gently rub my scalp under plaits/braids when I think I need a better reach than my fingers for WO washing.

Very cool, Hairkay! :D
Have you tried the Afro "fan" picks, like this (http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTYwMFgxMjAw/z/xF8AAMXQrhdTXEg3/$_12.JPG?set_id=880000500F)? I wonder how they compare to the straight ones? :hmm:


By the way, I like the plastic too, but for some reason, I can't find any without seams and whenever I tried to sand them down, I caused more micro-snags in the material. Plastic seems to develop tiny snaggy areas after some use, but maybe I'm not gentle enough. Of course, if I find out that metal is more damaging, I'll go back to plastic.
Also, I know there are some great quality plastic ones, like seamless Hercules Sagemann's Matador (http://cdn2.bigcommerce.com/server300/7cdd4/products/277/images/15445/Matador_2676__53190.1396292031.1280.1280.png?c=2)o r double-row Afro picks, like this (http://i59.tinypic.com/eis93r.jpg)or this (https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41RS2MQFcDL._AC_UL320_SR278,320_.jpg), but I've never tried them and haven't seen them locally, unfortunately.

lapushka
July 28th, 2016, 05:06 PM
Anje, lapushka, I got it at a local ethnic haircare store, next to a small curly salon. It looks like this (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/416OLoLQ66L.jpg), only mine has 4''-long teeth and 1/4'' spacing between teeth. They are super-affordable and I think they are pretty common in ethnic haircare sections/shops, actually, especially the ones that are smaller and in plastic. For some reason, I could never find Afro picks locally in wood - that would be awesome to try! (Wooden picks are available online, but the prices I've seen are much higher than for similar WT combs.) I see picks all over places like ebay, just google "stainless steel" or "metal" "Afro picks" or "Afro piks". ;)
Oh yes, Anje, the structure of each tooth is like perfectly round wire / rod :agree: - I'm pretty sure they weren't cut from anything, just wires/rods sealed in the base/handle.

Afro picks aren't what I'm looking for, unfortunately. :) They are a bit too clumsy for me to detangle with. I need shorter teeth and a longer comb to be comfy in my hands.

meteor
July 28th, 2016, 05:15 PM
Afro picks aren't what I'm looking for, unfortunately. :) They are a bit too clumsy for me to detangle with. I need shorter teeth and a longer comb to be comfy in my hands.

I've seen them in comb shape a while ago in a haircare shop, too, like this (http://moncoiffeurafro.fr/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/metall_kamm_8cbd2f7e88.jpg)or this (http://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/320597908150-0-1/s-l1000.jpg), but I don't think they are common, more in specialty shops or online.

miss_donya
August 9th, 2016, 11:24 AM
Hmm, my cats also have a metal comb. I'm not brave enough to use it yet but I think I might...

truepeacenik
August 9th, 2016, 11:28 AM
Why am I picturing a metal cake slicer?

https://www.amazon.com/Angel-Food-Cake-Cutter-732/dp/B00MHSTCQ6

missrandie
August 9th, 2016, 12:13 PM
Why am I picturing a metal cake slicer?

https://www.amazon.com/Angel-Food-Cake-Cutter-732/dp/B00MHSTCQ6

Hey, a hair rake! Lol

meteor
August 9th, 2016, 01:08 PM
^ He-he, I *bet* my hair would love that cake cutter "comb", actually :lol: (as long as the teeth are perfectly smooth, of course).

I guess I should give a quick update: the metal pick is the only tool I'm using on my hair now. It's hands-down the best thing I've ever tried detangling with - just glides through my hair. :cloud9: Also, my detangling sessions take only half the time they used to, even though I try to be very gentle and slow. Another cool thing: my texture remains intact after using it: it doesn't straighten out my waves or any curls I set at all. It's likely not due to the metal though, but maybe due to the fact that the teeth are thin and extra-long (4''), so the straight spine doesn't get to glide against the canopy, avoiding the inadvertent straightening effect that could happen with shorter teeth?

(I should add that it could be a very YMMV thing. Just to give an idea of how my hair behaves: for example, while I like using fingers, I tried a "fingers-only detangling for a month" challenge and failed miserably while many other people are doing extremely well there. Also, my hair rebels against brushes with a great poof and spider-webby interlocking.)

meteor
August 19th, 2016, 11:31 AM
Argh, the teeth on my metal pick started developing a bit of rust? :wail: I'm not sure, it's just some tiny black-ish dots in the middle of some teeth but the teeth are supposed to be made of stainless steel, so I don't understand this. I've never even tried it on wet or damp hair (I only detangle dry), so maybe the chemistry of my sebum is causing all this? :hmm: Needless to say, I switched back to wood, but I really miss the glide from metal. :(

Jadestorm
August 21st, 2016, 08:18 AM
Ooops, clicked too quickly. I do actually have this very pretty set of a small decorated metal comb and matching mirror and I have combed my hair with it a few times for fun. Kind of forgot about that. But haven't tried it consistently, so I can't really comment on how it would be for the hair. It's also really more decorative than meant for actual use.

Jadestorm
August 21st, 2016, 08:19 AM
Argh, the teeth on my metal pick started developing a bit of rust? You might be able to sand it back to its smooth self?

Groovy Granny
August 21st, 2016, 11:08 AM
I have one for my shih tzu...that I never use....and have never seen them sold for people here.

For rust/tarnish spots...just use a bit of steel wool then apply clear nail polish....or spray paint lacquer.

I had that happen to a few Ficcare seconds and a couple of metal hair forks and it worked well!

sumidha
August 21st, 2016, 11:19 AM
Yes, and I really liked it!

I used a brush with metal bristles... It was meant for pet grooming, and because of that it was poorly made and fell apart pretty quickly, but it worked well while it lasted. Like using a wide tooth comb, I had to be careful not to break hairs when detangling, but it left my hair very smooth. I would totally buy a stainless steel wide tooth comb. I like the cake rake, but the tines look a little sharp for me.

It was also kind of embarrassing if someone asked about it and I had to admit it was a pet brush...

Arctic
August 21st, 2016, 11:53 AM
Stainless steel can corrode in right circumstances. My sink and the the table around it got rust after my overzelous cleaning with baking soda. I got it back to how it had been by scrubbing with soapy steel wool.

meteor
August 21st, 2016, 12:25 PM
Oh, thank you so very much, guys, for all this great info about corrosion! :flowers: :love:

So soap and water are safe to rub on metal with steel wool? :) And then nail polish on top of dried surface is actually safe on metal, too?

And is there any special material/product I should be wiping the comb with after use to prevent rust from reappearing so quickly?

(Thanks a lot for the tips :flowers: , and sorry about my questions - I just don't know much about caring for metal. :oops: )

Arctic
August 21st, 2016, 12:38 PM
I don't know answers to other questions, but soap, water and fine steel wool are safe. The better lather you have going the less there is scratches. I have already forgot a lot, but I recall stainless steel has some sort of metal coating (chromium) that renews itself all the time as protects the stailess steel.

Wikipedia:


Stainless steel does not readily corrode, rust or stain with water as ordinary steel does. However, it is not fully stain-proof in low-oxygen, high-salinity, or poor air-circulation environments.

Stainless steel differs from carbon steel by the amount of chromium present. - - Stainless steels contain sufficient chromium to form a passive film of chromium oxide, which prevents further surface corrosion by blocking oxygen diffusion to the steel surface and blocks corrosion from spreading into the metal's internal structure.

The chromium forms a passivation layer of chromium oxide (Cr2O3) when exposed to oxygen. The layer is too thin to be visible, and the metal remains lustrous and smooth. The layer is impervious to water and air, protecting the metal beneath, and this layer quickly reforms when the surface is scratched. This phenomenon is called passivation - -

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel)


From BRITISH STAINLESS STEEL ASSOCIATION:

Does stainless steel corrode?

Although stainless steel is much more resistant to corrosion than ordinary carbon or alloy steels, in some circumstances it can corrode. It is 'stain-less' not 'stain-impossible'. In normal atmospheric or water based environments, stainless steel will not corrode as demonstrated by domestic sink units, cutlery, saucepans and work-surfaces.

What forms of corrosion can occur in stainless steels?

The most common forms of corrosion in stainless steel are:

* Pitting corrosion - The passive layer on stainless steel can be attacked by certain chemical species. The chloride ion Cl- is the most common of these and is found in everyday materials such as salt and bleach. Pitting corrosion is avoided by making sure that stainless steel does not come into prolonged contact with harmful chemicals or by choosing a grade of steel which is more resistant to attack. The pitting corrosion resistance can be assessed using the Pitting Resistance Equivalent Number calculated from the alloy content.
* Crevice corrosion - Stainless steel requires a supply of oxygen to make sure that the passive layer can form on the surface. In very tight crevices, it is not always possible for the oxygen to gain access to the stainless steel surface thereby causing it to be vulnerable to attack. Crevice corrosion is avoided by sealing crevices with a flexible sealant or by using a more corrosion resistant grade.
* General corrosion - Normally, stainless steel does not corrode uniformly as do ordinary carbon and alloy steels. However, with some chemicals, notably acids, the passive layer may be attacked uniformly depending on concentration and temperature and the metal loss is distributed over the entire surface of the steel. Hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid at some concentrations are particular aggressive towards stainless steel.
* Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) - This is a relatively rare form of corrosion which requires a very specific combination of tensile stress, temperature and corrosive species, often the chloride ion, for it to occur. Typical applications where SCC can occur are hot water tanks and swimming pools. Another form known as sulphide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) is associated with hydrogen sulphide in oil and gas exploration and production.
* Intergranular corrosion - This is now quite a rare form of corrosion. If the Carbon level in the steel is too high, Chromium can combine with Carbon to form Chromium Carbide. This occurs at temperatures between about 450-850 deg C. This process is also called sensitisation and typically occurs during welding. The Chromium available to form the passive layer is effectively reduced and corrosion can occur. It is avoided by choosing a low carbon grade the so-called 'L' grades or by using a steel with Titanium or Niobium which preferentially combines with Carbon.
* Galvanic corrosion - If two dissimilar metals are in contact with each other and with an electrolyte e.g. water or other solution, it is possible for a galvanic cell to be set up. This is rather like a battery and can accelerate corrosion of the less 'noble' metal. It can avoided by separating the metals with a non-metallic insulator such as rubber.

(http://www.bssa.org.uk/faq.php)

meteor
August 21st, 2016, 12:49 PM
^ Thanks so much, Arctic! :flowers: That's really great stuff! :D

I didn't know about the oxygen supply - I kept it in plastic, I should probably just let it sit in open air instead. :doh:
And it could have been my own sweat (the high-salinity environment mentioned in that source) that was responsible for the corrosion in that section of the teeth...

I wonder if clear nail polish is a safe enough sealant? Or if it will block off the oxygen supply that seems to be good for stainless steel? :hmm:

Arctic
August 21st, 2016, 01:00 PM
My sink and the table around it corroded with a contact with lot of baking soda, so that's probably also high salinity environment. I recall having seen people using oil to polish kitchen sinks (stainless steel) but I don't know about nailpolish. A quick googling showed some people saying it wouldn't stick, and some people said it works like a charm.

AutobotsAttack
March 9th, 2018, 12:31 AM
Ive used a metal comb to detangle all last year.

I personally like it. The teeth are very very long so they can get down to my new growth and detangle so I donít have to go in such small sections sometimes.

It is a bit on the heavy side so firmly bracing it helps it from pulling if Iím being light handed.