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Pamberpestana
July 15th, 2016, 11:02 AM
Well maybe this is a dumb question but I'm curious so here goes:
I've read in multiple places that it's better for your hair to dry your hair with a T-shirt rather than a towel. Well do you ladies go and buy t shirts specifically to dry your hair with and then keep them in your bathroom as towels? Or do you just grab a shirt out of the closet on your way to the shower? For me I have a handful of older shirts that I wouldn't really wear in public anymore that I'll use if I remember to use it (I'm a stay at home mom at the moment so I wear my 'non-public' clothes quite a bit) Otherwise I'll just pat my hair with my towel.

What do you do? If you don't use a towel or a shirt, what do you use?

Spring
July 15th, 2016, 11:11 AM
I've always been curious to how absorbent t-shirts are. Anywho, I use a turbie towel and I love it, but I'm curious about t-shirt drying as well.

Nadine <3
July 15th, 2016, 11:16 AM
I used a tshirt before I got turbie twists and I had a few tshirts that I treated as towels.I used them, and hung them up to dry and they got washed with the towels. I never wore them anyways,although now one of those tshirts is now my hair dying shirt so now it's covered in red and purple blotches lol

browneyedsusan
July 15th, 2016, 11:27 AM
I use a t-shirt, but start with a towel to get the drippiest drips out. 2 towels live in the bathroom, one for my body and the other for my hair. I keep my hair in the towel for a few minutes, while I dry my body, put on deodorant, moisturize my face, whatever. Then I take the towel off my head, shake out my hair, and put a t-shirt over my hair. -- Pull the t-shirt over my head, flip my hair out from under the collar, bend from the waist, invert the shirt and pull the thing up so the collar is at my hairline, give a few twists, stand up and tuck in the end. (kind of like this : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnSkraTN5W0 [starts around 1:00 mark] ) --

I use a non-public t-shirt from the closet. Whatever leaps into my hand is fair game!

lapis_lazuli
July 15th, 2016, 11:38 AM
I just grab a t-shirt typically worn to bed. Nothing special, but I can say it has helped the condition of my hair lots :)

Cg
July 15th, 2016, 11:47 AM
I use a Turbie Twist and then a microfiber turban. I cannot imagine how a T-shirt could absorb all that water, but clearly it does for those who swear by it.

littlestarface
July 15th, 2016, 11:49 AM
I use a t-shirt thats pure cotton and that I wear around the house as it's just going on my hair to dry it. So I just take one out of the closet and set it on the bed and wrap my hair in it. It doesn't suck out all the water so after, I let my hair loose over my pillow and wake up to fully dried hair.

Frankenstein
July 15th, 2016, 11:50 AM
I don't like to use a t-shirt or towel. I usually squeeze the excess water out of my hair with an old satin pillowcase and then leave it to dry.

MlleMC
July 15th, 2016, 12:12 PM
I use an old oversized t-shirt that I don't wear (the kind that are given away at events). I've tried a few different ones, and found that 100% cotton works best.

I usually pat my hair with a towel first to get the worst of the water out. I put the t-shirt around my neck, pull my hair out and pull the t-shirt around my hairline. I don't invert my head as it tends to create tangles, I just leave my hair down my back. Then I twist it in the main part of the shirt (leaving the sleeves free) and do a kind of cinnabun with it. My hair is much longer than the t-shirt, so I wrap the uncovered ends under the "bun". I finally secure it by tying the sleeves together over it, just tight enough that it will hold without pulling the collar away from the hairline.

ETA: I keep it on about an hour, and then let it air dry. If I'm going to bed, I spread a second (dry) t-shirt on the pillow.

Lucy Elizabeth
July 15th, 2016, 12:37 PM
Can confirm, have been doing this for the last year and the state of my ends have drastically changed.

I squeeze all the excess water out of my hair with my hands before I get out of the shower, then I put my length through the collar of the shirt and just wrap it up like I would with a regular towel. I just use old work shirts and tees that I don't wear anymore.

Mirabele
July 15th, 2016, 01:34 PM
I use a t shirt because i think it is gentler to hair than a towel. I have fine hair that is prone to mechanical damage so i think t shirt is a better choice for me. I think it absorbs better than a towel. I use one some of my old t shirts for that.

Hairkay
July 15th, 2016, 02:20 PM
I put aside 3 used old T-shirts (100% cotton since I only get cotton t-shirts) for towel duty. I no longer wear those. Before switching to the t-shirts drying hair would sometimes be painful because my little curls would latch on to those little towel loops like velcro and if I didn't notice in time and pulled away the towel, I'd be yanking hair out by the roots. That hurts. T-shirts on hair has been a pleasant experience. I do own a microfibre towel but I reserve that for taking on trips away from home.

lapushka
July 15th, 2016, 02:39 PM
Well maybe this is a dumb question but I'm curious so here goes:
I've read in multiple places that it's better for your hair to dry your hair with a T-shirt rather than a towel. Well do you ladies go and buy t shirts specifically to dry your hair with and then keep them in your bathroom as towels? Or do you just grab a shirt out of the closet on your way to the shower? For me I have a handful of older shirts that I wouldn't really wear in public anymore that I'll use if I remember to use it (I'm a stay at home mom at the moment so I wear my 'non-public' clothes quite a bit) Otherwise I'll just pat my hair with my towel.

What do you do? If you don't use a towel or a shirt, what do you use?

There's the "curly tee towel": http://www.curlytee.com/ - I have 2 of those. But you can just as easily make one. Just take a man's T, and sew it shut at the bottom. Then put the neck hole over your head, and let your hair drape into the shirt. The cool thing is, it doesn't matter how long your hair is, it will catch it all, and you'll have something very light on your head!!!

You drape the end ("bag") over your head, then shut the two arm holes over it to hold it all there. Easy peasy.

It takes about 10-15 min. longer to dry as far as absorbency goes, IMO. Yeah, about that. I'm in my T for 30-45 min. and it's not heavy on my head at all. I sometimes even forget to take it off! :lol:

Deborah
July 15th, 2016, 03:34 PM
No. I don't get it. I use a homemade turbie type towel, and it works great. I don't rub my hair with it or anything. I just put it on, leave it there for a few minutes, then take it off and let my hair air dry. I can't imagine that a t-shirt would absorb enough water to be very helpful.

Whatever works for each of us I guess. :)

lapushka
July 15th, 2016, 03:53 PM
No. I don't get it. I use a homemade turbie type towel, and it works great. I don't rub my hair with it or anything. I just put it on, leave it there for a few minutes, then take it off and let my hair air dry. I can't imagine that a t-shirt would absorb enough water to be very helpful.

Whatever works for each of us I guess. :)

I didn't think that either... until I started using one. You do need to find a good thick quality t-shirt though, none of that new fashion flimsy stuff.

MINAKO
July 15th, 2016, 04:08 PM
I just use a regular towel for squezing it down the length in one single section when its wet. Don't think for that kind of technique a tshirt would make any difference, especially as i bun my hair before it's anywhere near completely dry.

littlestarface
July 15th, 2016, 04:38 PM
I just use a regular towel for squezing it down the length in one single section when its wet. Don't think for that kind of technique a tshirt would make any difference, especially as i bun my hair before it's anywhere near completely dry.

Ya it's mainly for plopping hair as you can make hair go even more wurly with using this tshirt method with how one lays the hair in the shirt. If one is straight hair or whatever this technique wouldn.t be to useful.

lapushka
July 16th, 2016, 04:17 AM
Yes, texture plays a pretty big role in it. Straight hair can use whatever towel they like, IMO. :) But once you're wavy, I've now found that it matters. I can't see the difference between terry cloth & microfiber that much, but a t-shirt is a world on its own. I understand why curlies and esp. tightly curlies want to only use a shirt!

Sunshine&Opals
July 16th, 2016, 04:32 AM
I use an old fitted sheet from when my babies were young, the type that goes in a Moses basket. It is made from that same sort of soft jersey t shirt fabric, but because it has elasticised sides, it holds on my head pretty well. Thought it's worth a mention in case any of you have this sort of sheet knocking about around the house and want to give it a try. My hair is only APL , though, and fits in pretty well. If you have longer hair you might find it doesn't work as well.

diddiedaisy
July 16th, 2016, 05:26 AM
I'm going to try this tomorrow. I'll see if one of my older boys has has got a thicker tshirt going spare lol.

lapushka
July 16th, 2016, 06:23 AM
About it not being as absorbent as a regular towel. You actually sort of want that, because after it comes out of the "towel", it's time for my styling products, and you do still want your hair to be *moist* enough to distribute product well. I think that's its whole appeal.

ephemeri
July 16th, 2016, 07:08 AM
About it not being as absorbent as a regular towel. You actually sort of want that, because after it comes out of the "towel", it's time for my styling products, and you do still want your hair to be *moist* enough to distribute product well. I think that's its whole appeal.

I agree. It's really a method that works well for people that don't have straight hair. You can still put styling products in because it's still damp. But I also like it because drying my hair this way seriously cuts down on frizz.

I have a really big (XXL?), thick cotton tshirt that I don't wear, and use that only to scrunch excess water out of my hair. Then I use a smaller sized, thinner tshirt to plop in. I just lay them out to dry and treat them kind of like towels. I feel like my hair screams at me if I use a towel to dry it now!

lapushka
July 16th, 2016, 07:47 AM
I agree. It's really a method that works well for people that don't have straight hair. You can still put styling products in because it's still damp. But I also like it because drying my hair this way seriously cuts down on frizz.

I have a really big (XXL?), thick cotton tshirt that I don't wear, and use that only to scrunch excess water out of my hair. Then I use a smaller sized, thinner tshirt to plop in. I just lay them out to dry and treat them kind of like towels. I feel like my hair screams at me if I use a towel to dry it now!

Yeah, the difference for me in turbies (terrycloth vs. microfiber) wasn't that much, so I kept using the towels. Then I tried a t-shirt and boy... it *is* different! You do need the thick jersey knit kind though, not the women's Ts as they are fashionably thin! :lol:

I do have the 2 curly tee towels but I think I'm going to let my mom make me a few white cotton Ts (sewn shut at the bottom, just like with the curly tees, so my hair can be caught into some sort of "bag" (it's too long otherwise). It's remarkably light on the head vs. a regular towel (bathtowel turbie needed for classic length here), another bonus!

calmyogi
July 16th, 2016, 08:55 AM
I just use my husbands old t shirts. I plop or plunk by putting the t shirt flat on the toilet seat and then bending over the shirt and wrapping it up around my head. It's taken time to figure out how to make it stay but I twist up the sides and tuck them under it in the back. It's made a huge difference in my hair health and keeps it out of the way while I dress. I keep it up long enough so it doesn't drip when I take my hair down.

ephemeri
July 16th, 2016, 08:59 AM
I do have the 2 curly tee towels but I think I'm going to let my mom make me a few white cotton Ts (sewn shut at the bottom, just like with the curly tees, so my hair can be caught into some sort of "bag" (it's too long otherwise). It's remarkably light on the head vs. a regular towel (bathtowel turbie needed for classic length here), another bonus!

I really want to get one of these when my hair gets longer. I think it's a genius idea, makes so much sense. And once I'm past a certain length a plain old T ain't gonna cut it, I think!

mermaiden_hair
July 16th, 2016, 09:01 AM
I just use a microfiber hair turban. Works great!

lithostoic
July 16th, 2016, 09:06 AM
I use a cotton long sleeved shirt to scrunch out excess water before putting product in. Then I use an identical shirt to plop. I don't do this a lot but it works great for when I want to wear my hair wavy.

lapushka
July 16th, 2016, 09:13 AM
I just use a microfiber hair turban. Works great!

My hair doesn't fit into a turbie anymore. Comes with gaining length. At some point you can turn a bath towel into a turbie (which is great), but a shirt is so much lighter on your head. Esp. if you sew it shut and stick your head through the neckhole, it's awesome for losing all that length.

Cg
July 16th, 2016, 10:23 AM
My hair doesn't fit into a turbie anymore. Comes with gaining length. At some point you can turn a bath towel into a turbie (which is great), but a shirt is so much lighter on your head. Esp. if you sew it shut and stick your head through the neckhole, it's awesome for losing all that length.

I made a turbie from a microfiber towel and it's really light weight.

czech it out
July 16th, 2016, 10:51 AM
I use a t-shirt, but start with a towel to get the drippiest drips out. 2 towels live in the bathroom, one for my body and the other for my hair. I keep my hair in the towel for a few minutes, while I dry my body, put on deodorant, moisturize my face, whatever. Then I take the towel off my head, shake out my hair, and put a t-shirt over my hair. -- Pull the t-shirt over my head, flip my hair out from under the collar, bend from the waist, invert the shirt and pull the thing up so the collar is at my hairline, give a few twists, stand up and tuck in the end. (kind of like this : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnSkraTN5W0 [starts around 1:00 mark] ) --

I use a non-public t-shirt from the closet. Whatever leaps into my hand is fair game!

I use a "double shirt" like the one in this video. I got the idea from a similar video, also on Torrin Paige's channel. I had been using a normal t shirt, but I always had a few soggy inches sticking out of the ends. Props to my amazing boyfrind for sewing me this mutant t shirt!

http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=23928&d=1468687772

littlestarface
July 16th, 2016, 10:57 AM
So do you straight hairs put your hair in a towel a different way? With us wavys and curlies your supposed to make sure all the hair is put in the middle of the shirt and scrunched all together at the top of the head, that way we get clumped wurls. I never have any problem with my hair sticking out of my tshirts or turbie towels and I got longish hair.

ladyshep
July 16th, 2016, 11:01 AM
Oh yes, I've used a t-shirt before...I've also used high absorbent paper towels when I had extremely long hair to shorten dry time, but then stopped and went back to t-shirts in regards to the environment. Now, I just use a towel, but I really like the effect t-shirts had on my hair and the style it came out as.

Shepherdess
July 16th, 2016, 11:06 AM
I just use an old 100% cotton t-shirt, or a thin white dish towel (the ones that are similar in texture to a t-shirt). My hair tends to be a lint magnet, but when I use a t-shirt or cloth with similar texture I don't find as much lint in my hair when combing, which helps. :) I don't think I will ever use a regular bath towel on my hair again if I can help it. :)

czech it out
July 16th, 2016, 11:22 AM
So do you straight hairs put your hair in a towel a different way? With us wavys and curlies your supposed to make sure all the hair is put in the middle of the shirt and scrunched all together at the top of the head, that way we get clumped wurls. I never have any problem with my hair sticking out of my tshirts or turbie towels and I got longish hair.

Can't speak for all straighties, but I just plop my hair in and let it slither all the way down. I can't think of any benefits for clumping my straight hair, and I feel like the more surface area the better for drying purposes!

Temme
July 16th, 2016, 12:00 PM
I don't use anything. I just wash it in the morning, and it's dry in about 3 hours. My hair is still kind of wet when I get to school, but I don't care.

nekosan
July 16th, 2016, 12:19 PM
I just let my hair lie straight along the towel and bun it up while I get dressed. I take it down and let it hang dry until it's damp, then bun it to get some wave.

"Plopping" does nothing for my stick straight hair. It just bends in random directions and then likes to tangle when dry. When I had a perm, yes, I could encourage the curls. There absolutely no curl or wave at all in my natural hair, however. Bunning or braiding damp hair is the only way I can get any sort of body.

lithostoic
July 16th, 2016, 04:13 PM
littlestarface It never occurred to me to plop a different way. However I'm 1c so I already have waves just not as tight or uniform as a true wavy.

curly girl fla
July 16th, 2016, 04:30 PM
I use flour sack dish towels that I purchased years ago at WalMart. Target has a 4-pk, 30"x30", for $3.99 and Amazon has them cheaper as well. Not very glamorous, but...Cheap. Gentle. Absorbs. Keeps my curl. I also alternate with a microfiber Turbie Twist which I use when I don't have too much time so my hair dries a bit quicker. I recently stopped diffusing and find this helps define and reduce frizz.

Thraven
July 16th, 2016, 07:10 PM
I'm going to say that 99% of the time I use a shirt for getting as much moisture out of my hair as possible. And it is a specific shirt, mostly because I do use a lot of leave-ins, and whatnot, in my hair, and I don't want one of my nicer shirts to get stained. And, for me, there has been a vast improvement in the condition of my hair with using a shirt for this purpose. So much so that I've been doing it for more than 5 years now, and I don't have any plans on ever changing. Even thoug I do get lightly mocked on occasion for having a shirt on my head! :D

DoomKitty
July 16th, 2016, 09:00 PM
I thought I'd give the t shirt a try this morning...not plopping exactly as I put it up in a turbie twist for over half an hour (only meant to leave it for 15 minutes but got sidetracked by DD). It was still pretty damp when I LOCd and plopped it so we'll see but I'm not worried about boosting my waves. But it's light, out of the way and not making me cold so it's a win so far lol

Decoy24601
July 16th, 2016, 09:04 PM
Hmmm, I normally use my SO's old T-shirts to wear around the house and overnight, but I'll have to sacrifice one of them and try this out.

Garnetgem
July 16th, 2016, 09:16 PM
I use a baby towel its softer than a usual towel but need two as have thick hair..but i have tried t-shirts in the past but not really absorbent and hair was soaked and there was no improvements in the amount of splits...i didn't buy any i just used old t-shirts that were no good for wearing out anymore.

Beborani
July 16th, 2016, 11:04 PM
Even though I am a curlie I use t-shirt (men's undershirts are perfect) or thin cotton towels made for hair (in India) to blot and squeeze out the water by twisting the length lightly. I don't bother to plop though I do this step after applying all the products. I change towels and tees two or three times to make sure most of the water is wicked away. My hair curls at the ends even if I don't make the effort-- this way my hair dries faster. On rare occasion when I feel like plopping I like to use long-sleeved T so I can tie it around my head easily.

Hairkay
July 17th, 2016, 12:26 AM
So do you straight hairs put your hair in a towel a different way? With us wavys and curlies your supposed to make sure all the hair is put in the middle of the shirt and scrunched all together at the top of the head, that way we get clumped wurls. I never have any problem with my hair sticking out of my tshirts or turbie towels and I got longish hair.

My hair will clump no matter how I put it in the t-shirt so I don't have a special method for using a t-shirt.

diddiedaisy
July 17th, 2016, 03:39 AM
I washed my hair hair this morning and tried this method. I found a couple of medium thickness long sleeve tees, after I got out the shower I put one on and was able to turban style it. I left that that one on for about 4-5 minutes, took it off, put my leave-in on and serum than put the dry tee on. That was then left for about 20 minutes. The absorbancy wasn't as bad as I thought it would be actually and I'm going to stick with this method. It didn't seem to do much for my waves/curls, they pretty much look the same apart from starting a tad higher.

So all in all, I like the tee method rather than a towel, but I'm just going to use it as I would a towel. As I very rarely wear my hair down in it's natural state it's not worth me attempting the curly girl method.

lapushka
July 17th, 2016, 04:13 AM
I'm going to say that 99% of the time I use a shirt for getting as much moisture out of my hair as possible. And it is a specific shirt, mostly because I do use a lot of leave-ins, and whatnot, in my hair, and I don't want one of my nicer shirts to get stained. And, for me, there has been a vast improvement in the condition of my hair with using a shirt for this purpose. So much so that I've been doing it for more than 5 years now, and I don't have any plans on ever changing. Even thoug I do get lightly mocked on occasion for having a shirt on my head! :D

Yeah, there's that. My dad finds it funny every time. :lol: :rolleyes:

brickworld13
July 18th, 2016, 11:52 AM
Any shirt that is clean and has minimal printing on it is fair game for hair drying. Most of my shirts don't have any printing on them, but some of the larger size ones are better for hair than the ones that actually fit my body nicely.

althara
July 18th, 2016, 04:12 PM
I just found two ladies XL 100% cotton t-shirts at Dollar Tree yesterday, so I'm going to be giving this drying method a try the next time I wash. I'm hopeful this will help lessen the mchanical damage I tend to get on my ends over time.

restless
August 6th, 2016, 02:59 AM
Thank you for starting this thread :) I tried this method years ago when I was new here, but I wasnt too impressed. However I cant remember if it was actually cotton t-shirts I used back then (I suspect thats not the case...) and decided to give it anothet go when I saw this thread. Ive been doing it for a week now and its actually not bad. I guess itīll take a long time to see the results, but thats okay. Iīll definitley keep doing it for a while. I need to get a bigger t-shirt though :p

lapushka
August 6th, 2016, 03:03 AM
Thank you for starting this thread :) I tried this method years ago when I was new here, but I wasnt too impressed. However I cant remember if it was actually cotton t-shirts I used back then (I suspect thats not the case...) and decided to give it anothet go when I saw this thread. Ive been doing it for a week now and its actually not bad. I guess itīll take a long time to see the results, but thats okay. Iīll definitley keep doing it for a while. I need to get a bigger t-shirt though :p

If you sew the bottom shut, then stick your head through the neckhole and let your hair fall into the bag (scrunch), it will solve that issue for you. I have let my mom sew a few regular Ts shut, and it's great for longer hair that way. If the neckhole is too big and moves off your head, you can always poke a drawstring through. It's the method of a curly tee towel (the real deal), but they are amazingly expensive. So I "hacked" a few. ;)

restless
August 6th, 2016, 03:15 AM
Oh thats brilliant :D Thank you so much for the tips lapushka!

lapushka
August 6th, 2016, 03:35 AM
Oh thats brilliant :D Thank you so much for the tips lapushka!

You're welcome! :)

PixieP
August 6th, 2016, 03:47 AM
Has anyone tried this with an athletic t-shirt? I wonder if that would absorb more moisture or less :hmm:

Sunshine&Opals
August 6th, 2016, 04:31 AM
That's a great idea for the tshirt, Lapushka. I'm going to try that next time, although I won't bother sewing the bottom shut just yet, since my hair is still way too short. But the idea of using the neckline - genius! ��

Hairkay
August 6th, 2016, 04:41 AM
I use the neck hole too. One of my t-shirts is long sleeved so I put it on my head and use the arms to tie it to my head securely.

lapushka
August 6th, 2016, 04:45 AM
I use the neck hole too. One of my t-shirts is long sleeved so I put it on my head and use the arms to tie it to my head securely.

Yes, the arms criss-cross over the head for me too, that's how the curly tee towel was made - but it's easy to replicate on just a T you have. I spent *way* too much on the real deal. But well, early b-day present for me. ;)

diddiedaisy
August 6th, 2016, 10:58 AM
I've adopted this method too since this thread was started. I know it sounds a stupid question but what results can you expect to see and how long does it take to see them? Apologies for being dumb :)

meteor
August 6th, 2016, 01:26 PM
I used 2 XXL T-shirts sewn together by the bottom for a long while. I think torrinpaige mentioned this tip on her YouTube channel a while ago.

However, my hair is way too long and heavy for this to work for my neck/scalp now, even if I don't move at all, and after I painfully pulled my neck under a "turban", I decided to switch to a completely different set-up:
- I squeeze out as much water as I can by hand,
- then I blot the length and especially scalp area with a couple towels,
- then I leave my scalp area open and wrap an extra-long cotton T-shirt (held vertically) around my length only, kind of like a snake/tube. I think it's the same approach as what beautyklove showed in her recent videos, actually (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rZLfZqLV70 or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZZOWWxE2cA)
- then I air-dry my hair hanging loose over a towel and I place a fan nearby to help aerate the hair a bit.


If you sew the bottom shut, then stick your head through the neckhole and let your hair fall into the bag (scrunch), it will solve that issue for you. I have let my mom sew a few regular Ts shut, and it's great for longer hair that way. If the neckhole is too big and moves off your head, you can always poke a drawstring through. It's the method of a curly tee towel (the real deal), but they are amazingly expensive. So I "hacked" a few. ;)


I use the neck hole too. One of my t-shirts is long sleeved so I put it on my head and use the arms to tie it to my head securely.

How do you guys fit all your wet hair through that small neckhole? :hmm: Do you have to ponytail or braid the hair first or something?

Personally, I used the 2-T-shirts-sewn-together method in the past, but I had to cut the neck opening and stitched up the seams. Also, I didn't sew the bottom neck opening shut because it didn't affect the wrapping and towel-drying action at all for me. :) Less work! ;)


Has anyone tried this with an athletic t-shirt? I wonder if that would absorb more moisture or less :hmm:

I tried a couple of those and for me, they weren't absorbent enough somehow. Those shirts were very thin (like athletic undershirts). But I think it depends a lot on the specific type of athletic T-shirt material you get. Some wick more moisture, i.e. draw water to themselves and to the surface to evaporate more easily (e.g. some polyester blends), some absorb more moisture, i.e. draw water to themselves quickly but hold onto it for a while (often higher cotton % content). :)

lapushka
August 6th, 2016, 02:10 PM
How do you guys fit all your wet hair through that small neckhole? :hmm: Do you have to ponytail or braid the hair first or something?

Personally, I used the 2-T-shirts-sewn-together method in the past, but I had to cut the neck opening and stitched up the seams. Also, I didn't sew the bottom neck opening shut because it didn't affect the wrapping and towel-drying action at all for me. :) Less work! ;)

Well, it's all stuck together in my case anyway when the water is squeezed out (I wash upside down), so I just have to stick it in.

littlestarface
August 6th, 2016, 03:54 PM
I've adopted this method too since this thread was started. I know it sounds a stupid question but what results can you expect to see and how long does it take to see them? Apologies for being dumb :)

It's mostly for less frizz and keeping the scrunched curls nice and keeping their shape.

Hairkay
August 6th, 2016, 03:58 PM
I used 2 XXL T-shirts sewn together by the bottom for a long while. I think torrinpaige mentioned this tip on her YouTube channel a while ago.

However, my hair is way too long and heavy for this to work for my neck/scalp now, even if I don't move at all, and after I painfully pulled my neck under a "turban", I decided to switch to a completely different set-up:
- I squeeze out as much water as I can by hand,
- then I blot the length and especially scalp area with a couple towels,
- then I leave my scalp area open and wrap an extra-long cotton T-shirt (held vertically) around my length only, kind of like a snake/tube. I think it's the same approach as what beautyklove showed in her recent videos, actually (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rZLfZqLV70 or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZZOWWxE2cA)
- then I air-dry my hair hanging loose over a towel and I place a fan nearby to help aerate the hair a bit.





How do you guys fit all your wet hair through that small neckhole? :hmm: Do you have to ponytail or braid the hair first or something?

Personally, I used the 2-T-shirts-sewn-together method in the past, but I had to cut the neck opening and stitched up the seams. Also, I didn't sew the bottom neck opening shut because it didn't affect the wrapping and towel-drying action at all for me. :) Less work! ;)



I tried a couple of those and for me, they weren't absorbent enough somehow. Those shirts were very thin (like athletic undershirts). But I think it depends a lot on the specific type of athletic T-shirt material you get. Some wick more moisture, i.e. draw water to themselves and to the surface to evaporate more easily (e.g. some polyester blends), some absorb more moisture, i.e. draw water to themselves quickly but hold onto it for a while (often higher cotton % content). :)

I wash my hair in plaits/braids plus my t-shirts have v necklines which are bigger than small crew cut necklines.

Arctic
August 6th, 2016, 04:37 PM
I've been using t-shirt probably at least 7 years now for hair drying, and the main thing I have gotten from is it's lightness and lack of clumsiness like a big, thick towel has. These two have been so big advantages for me that I never like to go back to towels. I use big, old, cotton men's ts that are soft and very absorbent. Also while traveling it takes very little room.

rmani
August 6th, 2016, 05:41 PM
I have 2 hair-drying designated t-shirts. My hair is between SL and APL so I don't have the length to wrap it but it's super thick so if I don't deal with the extra moisture I get bacne (yuck!).
After shower, use towel to blot roots and remove excess moisture from ends. Detangle, apply product, then put other t-shirt over shoulders and let hair air dry.
I find if I invert or put it up in a turbie it gets too tangled and keeps my hair moist.

meteor
August 6th, 2016, 06:00 PM
Thanks, lapushka and Hairkay! :D


I find if I invert or put it up in a turbie it gets too tangled and keeps my hair moist.

^ That's exactly my experience, too! :hifive: Which is why I wrap only the length with a T-shirt and place the resulting long "tube" around my neck on my shoulders. :) This distributes the weight but also dries significantly faster and prevents tangles, because the length is spread out properly inside the towel-tube instead of being all bunched up inside a "turban". :)

PixieP
August 6th, 2016, 06:10 PM
I
I tried a couple of those and for me, they weren't absorbent enough somehow. Those shirts were very thin (like athletic undershirts). But I think it depends a lot on the specific type of athletic T-shirt material you get. Some wick more moisture, i.e. draw water to themselves and to the surface to evaporate more easily (e.g. some polyester blends), some absorb more moisture, i.e. draw water to themselves quickly but hold onto it for a while (often higher cotton % content). :)

I have one I don't use to work out in (don't like the fit), it's a thick polyester material from Nike, in a mens size XL (I usually buy mens workout tops since in my experience women's t-shirts are too short, I have a lot of stomach and it takes extra long tops to cover it up). I'm gonna try out both that and an old cotton t-shirt I have and see if I see a difference between the two.

rmani
August 6th, 2016, 06:30 PM
Thanks, lapushka and Hairkay! :D



^ That's exactly my experience, too! :hifive: Which is why I wrap only the length with a T-shirt and place the resulting long "tube" around my neck on my shoulders. :) This distributes the weight but also dries significantly faster and prevents tangles, because the length is spread out properly inside the towel-tube instead of being all bunched up inside a "turban". :)

Nice! Mine's not long enough for that but I will remember that when that day comes :hifive: